Faculty Fellows

  • Stephen Kidd

    FALL 2020 FACULTY FELLOW

    Stephen Kidd is Associate Professor of Classics. He is the author of Nonsense and Meaning in Ancient Greek Comedy (Cambridge University Press, 2014)—which asks why comedy, unlike other genres, gives rise to the perception that some part of it is not meaningful—and Play and Aesthetics in Ancient Greece (Cambridge University Press, 2019)—which explores the ancient Greek concept of play (paidia) and its relationship to literature, theater, visual arts, and music. His current book project at the Cogut Institute is “Living Life as Fiction: Lucian of Samosata and the Nature of Disbelief.” It asks: what is the relationship between philosophical suspension of belief and fiction’s suspension of disbelief?

  • Michael Satlow

    FALL 2020 FACULTY FELLOW

    Michael Satlow is Professor of Religious Studies and Judaic Studies. His research focuses on the history of Jews and Judaism, particularly in antiquity. His latest books are How the Bible Became Holy (Yale University Press, 2015), translated also into Italian and French, and Creating Judaism: History, Tradition, Practice Columbia University Press, 2006). He has also written and taught on the digital humanities, method and theory in religious studies, and Jewish approaches to the economy and directs the digital project, Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine. He has been a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow and a Fulbright Scholar. His project at the Cogut Institute is tentatively entitled “Seeking the Gods: The Spiritual Landscape of Late Antiquity.”

  • Esther Whitfield

    FALL 2020 FACULTY FELLOW

    Esther Whitfield is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Hispanic Studies. She teaches in the field of Latin American and Caribbean literature. She has published primarily on literary writing in the context of economic, social, and political change in post-Soviet Cuba; and on borders, visibility, and surveillance in writing and art about the Guantánamo naval base. At the Cogut Institute, she will be working on her current book project, “The New No-Man’s Land: Guantánamo’s Literary Life,” which proposes reading the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo and the surrounding areas of Eastern Cuba as a borderland region that shares a natural environment, a marking of human lives by isolation, and a body of literature and art privileging survival over political hostility. The project draws on an archive of poetry, art, and memoirs by detainees and military personnel at the base and by Cubans nearby, and scholarship in Comparative Literature, Caribbean Studies, History and Law, to trace relationships between literature and other forms of representation, and between this isolated corner of Cuba and the rest of the world.

  • Jennifer Johnson

    SPRING 2021 FACULTY FELLOW

    Jennifer Johnson is Associate Professor of History at Brown, where she is also affiliated with the Center for Middle East Studies, Africana Studies, and the Watson Institute. Her research focuses on 20th-century Africa, specifically the Maghrib, nationalism, decolonization, humanitarianism, and public health. She is the author of The Battle for Algeria: Sovereignty, Health Care, and Humanitarianism (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and other articles and essays that have appeared in the International Journal of Middle East Studies, Contemporary European History, the Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Humanity, and the forthcoming edited volume, Decolonization, Self-Determination, and the Birth of Global Human Rights Politics. At the Cogut Institute, she will be working on a book project that examines the relationship between public health and state-building. Specifically, it explores family planning programs in postcolonial Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia and shows how newly independent regimes partnered with international organizations on this particular initiative to develop their countries and expand their national health services in the wake of decolonization. She holds an A.B. in History from Brown and a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. Her work has...

  • Jennifer Lambe

    SPRING 2021 FACULTY FELLOW

    Jennifer Lambe is Associate Professor of Latin American and Caribbean History. Her work explores the intersection between political history, intellectual history, and popular culture in Cuba and the Americas more broadly. Her first book, Madhouse: Psychiatry and Politics in Cuban History (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), traces the history of mental illness and mental healing in Cuba through the Mazorra Mental Asylum, the only public psychiatric hospital in Cuba until the 1959 Revolution and a key site of political intervention and social reform. She is also the co-editor with Michael Bustamante (Florida International University) of The Revolution from Within: Cuba, 1959–1980, forthcoming with Duke University Press in 2019. At the Cogut Institute, she will be working on new projects related to the Cuban Revolution and the transnational history of psychiatric dehospitalization.