Brown University shieldBrown University

Courses in Modern Greek and of Interest to Modern Greek

Modern Greek Studies offers a variety of courses each semester. There are seven semesters of language teaching, as well as courses in comparative literature, Byzantine Literature and history. Courses taught in anthropology or other departments will be cross-listed with Modern Greek when they are taught. 

Fall 2019

Professor Elsa Amanatidou

Introduction to Modern Greek 

Designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Modern Greek. The aim is to introduce students to basic linguistic structures and develop the ability to comprehend and produce text, as well as to speak and understand speech, in a variety of contexts and registers. The course objectives are to enable students to perform a range of tasks, master a minimum core vocabulary and acquire knowledge and understanding of various forms of Greek culture.

MGRK 0100

M,Tu,W,Th 12-12:50 pm

 

Intermediate Modern Greek

Develops linguistic and cultural competence and may be taken by anyone who has completed MGRK 0200 or after consultation with the instructor and/or a placement exam. It focuses on further development of the four language skills as well as knowledge and understanding of various aspects of Greek society. It employs a variety of materials, including film, digital stories, internet based sources, music, art, and literature.

MGRK 0300

Tu, Th       1-1:20 pm

 

Advanced Modern Greek

May be taken by students who have completed the previous sequences or by anyone who places successfully into the course. The course places emphasis on the improvement of writing and oral skills, via presentations, collaborative projects, conversations and assignments based on topics and texts, drawn from a variety of sources and cultural forms of expression.

MGRK 0500

Time: TBD

 

 

Special Topics in Modern Greek

MGRK 1910 

Modern Greek for Classicists and Archaeologists

May be taken by students who have completed the previous sequences or by anyone who places successfully into the course. The course places emphasis on the improvement of writing and oral skills, via presentations, collaborative projects, conversations and assignments based on topics and texts, drawn from a variety of sources and cultural forms of expression.

MGRK 2200

Time: TBD

 

Professor Vangelis Calotychos

Poets, Poetry, and Politics

The award of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature to Bob Dylan ignited a lively debate about who is, and who is not, a poet. Historically, who were deemed poets, what was their function? What do their poems do and how do they work? Do they foment revolution or “make nothing happen,” as Auden once wrote? How does the poet aspire to a unique, individual voice even as he or she may (be seen to) best represent a constituency? This course relates the poetic act to political action and interrogates the commonly aired contention that politics makes for bad poetry.

COLT 1431C

M, W, F  2-2:50 pm

 

Travel, Tourism, Trafficking through the Ages

Why go away to find ourselves? How does the self constitute itself “elsewhere”? This course considers the genre of travel writing and its theory: how are roots, routes, and rootlessness treated in diverse racial, spiritual, sexual, national, and imperial encounters. Today, when cosmopolitan tourists, intellectuals, or exotic and erotic adventurers share the same beach as downtrodden, abject refugees and their traffickers, what are the cultural, ethical and political implications of leisurely seeking out (self-) discovery, disappearing authenticity, and commodified otherness? Readings include Herodotus, Equiano, Chatwin, Kingsley, Montagu, Darwin, Twain, Miller, Durrell, Baldwin, Phillips, Iyer, Houellebecq, Woolf, Thompson, Theroux, Baudrillard

COLT 1811L

MWF 12-12:50 pm

 

 

Professor Yannis Hamilakis

Archaeology of Eating and Drinking

Everybody eats -- but patterns of eating and drinking vary dramatically from culture to culture. This course will examine the social roles and meanings of eating and drinking from prehistory to the present, using case studies from the Mediterranean and other parts of the world. How are identity, gender, and power negotiated through food and drink? What are the roles of the body, the senses, and memory? What does a history of humanity look like from the point of view of the consuming body?

ARCH 0770

T, Th  9-10:20 am

Decolonizing Classical Antiquity: White Nationalism, Colonialism, and Ancient Material Heritage

Why do the material remnants of classical antiquity still attract public attention and exercise symbolic power? Why have such monuments been "used" by authorities and diverse social groups in the service of often totalitarian agendas? What are the cases where these monuments operate as weapons for resistance? How has colonial, racial, and national modernity shaped the way we understand and experience the materiality of the classical? Finally, how can we decolonize classical antiquity? We will use a diversity of global case studies, including modern Greece and Europe, and a variety of sources, from ethnographically derived performances to digital culture.

MGRK 1220

Tu,Th  2:30-3:50 pm