Events 2016-2017

Dissertation Defense: Han Li

July 3rd, 2017 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106

Please join us on July 3rd at 1pm for the Dissertation Defense of PhD Candidate Han Li entitled The Demands of Epistemic Rationality: Permissivism and Supererogation.  The defense will be held in seminar room 106 in Corliss-Brackett, located at 45 Prospect St and a small reception will follow.

New Event: Ethical Inquiry presents Peter Boettke

June 20th, 2017 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center

Please join us on June 20th for What Money Can Buy: Entrepreneurship, Ethics and Human Flourishing presented by Peter Boettke, George Mason University's BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism at the Mercatus Center University Professor of Economics and Philosophy.  The lecture will be held from 5:30PM to 6:30PM and a reception will follow immediately afterwards in the Martinos Auditorium lobby.

Event Co-Sponsored by the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship and the Brown/IE Executive MBA program.

History of Philosophy Roundtable - Reed

April 26th, 2017 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106

Join us for A History of Philosophy Roundtable on Platonic Personal Immortality with Doug Reed, University of Rhode Island, on Wednesday, April 26th at 7PM.

This event is pre-read, so please emma_kirby@brown.edu for the paper.

Myth, Creation and Science: Plato's Timaeus

April 7th, 2017 9:30 am - April 9th, 2017 12:45 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106/Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106

Please join us for the conference Myth, Creation and Science: Plato's Timaeus hosted in collaboration with Providence College on Friday, April 7th in the room 106 of Corliss-Brackett; Saturday, April 8th and Sunday, April 9th in room 106 of Smith-Buonanno Hall.  This conference will feature lectures from:

  • Christopher Rowe, Durham
  • Christine Thomas, Dartmouth
  • Dimitri El Murr, Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
  •  Barbara Sattler, St. Andrews
  • Colin Guthrie King, Providence College
  • Hendrik Lorenz, Princeton
  • Keith McPartland, Williams College
  • Sarah Broadie, St. Andrews
  • Pierre-Marie Morel, Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
  • David Sedley, Cambridge*

*Professor Sedley will give a keynote presentation at The Center for Catholic and Dominican Studies at Providence College on Friday April 7th from 4:30PM to 6PM.

A program of the conference is available here.

If you are interested in attending, please email Emma Kirby at emma_kirby@brown.edu.

Pleasure, Reward and Value: Philosophy of the Mind Conference

March 17th, 2017 2:00 pm - March 19th, 2017 1:00 pm
Room 130, Buidling for Environmental Research and Technology (BERT)

Please join us for Pleasure, Reward and Value on Friday, March 17th, from 2PM to 6PM; Saturday, March 18th, from 9AM to 6PM and Sunday, March 19th, from 9Am to 1PM.  There will be receptions on Friday and Saturday from 6:00 to 7:30PM in the lobby outside of room 130, BERT.  All attendees are invited.  The conference will feature speakers from Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience and Physics, including:

  • Kent Berridge,
    Psychology, University of Michigan 
  • Fiery Cushman,
    Psychology, Harvard 
  • Richard Holton,
    Philosophy, Cambridge 
  • Sarah McGrath,
    Philosophy, Princeton 
  • Read Montague
    Physics, University College London,  Virginia Tech 
  • Graham Oddie
    Philosophy, University of Colorado 
  • Timothy Schroeder
    Philosophy, Rice University 
  • Wolfram Schultz
    Neuroscience, Cambridge

For a complete schedule of speakers, please see the conference program here.

Colloquium: Lucy Allais

March 10th, 2017 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Petteruti Lounge, 75 Waterman Street

Please join the Philosophy Department for the colloquium lecture, Evil and the (Dis)unity of the Subject in Kant, presented by Lucy Allais, University of California San Diego, on March 10th, 2017.  A reception will follow immediately after in the Philosophy Department lounge located at 45 Prospect Street.

History of Philosophy Roundtable - Kaag

March 8th, 2017 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106

A History of Philosophy Roundtable will take place on Wednesday, March 8th at 5:30PM.  The roundtable will feature John Kaag, UMASS Lowell.

Colloquium: Miranda Fricker

February 17th, 2017 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106**

Please join the Philosophy Department for the colloquium lecture "Powers and Corruptions of Forgiveness" presented by Miranda Fricker, CUNY, on February 17th, 2017 in room 106 of Smith-Buonanno Hall**.  A reception will follow immediately after in the Philosophy Department lounge located at 45 Prospect Street.

 

**Location may change.  Please check this site the day of the lecture to confirm.**

Colloquium: Sarah Moss

February 10th, 2017 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Petteruti Lounge, 75 Waterman Street

Please join the Philosophy Department for the colloquium lecture "Probabilistic Knowledge" presented by Sarah Moss, University of Michigan, on February 10th from 3:30PM to 5:30PM.  A reception will follow in the Philosophy Department lounge, 45 Prospect Street.

History of Philosophy Roundtable - Gasser-Wingate

February 8th, 2017 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106

A History of Philosophy Roundtable will take place on Wednesday, February 8th at 7PM.  The roundtable will feature Marc Gasser-Wingate, Boston University.

Martha Nussbaum Lecture

February 6th, 2017 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Room 130, Building for Environmental Research and Technology (BERT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listen to the lecture here.

Please join the Philosophy Department for "Free Speech and Civil Disobedience" presented by Martha Nussbaum, University of Chicago.

Martha Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago. She has taught at Harvard and Oxford Universities, and from 1984 to 1995 at Brown.

Winter Solstice Party

December 16th, 2016 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106

Winter Solstice PartyWinter Solstice Party

Colloquium: Stephen Darwall

December 9th, 2016 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Petteruti Lounge, 75 Waterman Street

Please join the Philosophy Department for the colloquium lecture "What Are Moral Reasons" presented by Stephen Darwall, Yale University on December 9th from 3:30PM to 5:30PM.  A reception will follow in the Philosophy Department lounge, 45 Prospect Street.

Colloquium: Dhananjay Jagannathan

November 11th, 2016 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106

Please join the Philosophy Department for the colloquium lecture, "Political Wisdom in Aristotle" presented by Dhananjay Jagannathan, doctoral candidate at the University of Chicago and lecturer at Dartmouth College.  A reception will follow in the Philosophy Department lounge, 45 Prospect Street.

The 11th Annual Mark L. Shapiro Graduate Conference

November 4th, 2016 1:00 pm - November 5th, 2016 6:30 pm
Petteruti Lounge, 75 Waterman Street

Brown Philosophy graduate students will host the 11th Annual Mark L. Shapiro Graduate Philosophy Conference November 4th from 1PM to 6:30PM and November 5th from 9AM to 6:30PM. Students from the U.S. and abroad will convene to discuss a variety of topics.   The keynote speakers will be Bernard Reginster, Brown University and Kieran Setiya, MIT.

Please download the Program and Schedule here

History of Philosophy Roundtable - Keota Fields

November 3rd, 2016 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corliss Bracket, Seminar Room 106

A History of Philosophy Roundtable will take place on Thursday, November 3rd at 7PM.  The roundtable will feature Keota Fields, an associate professor at UMass Dartmouth, who will present on The Role of Normativity in Berkeley's Master Argument.

Abstract: Berkeley's master argument is often criticized as fallacious on the grounds that he rejects a distinction between representations and their intentional objects. It is also criticized for implying solipsism. I argue that these objections overlook the normative structure of Berkeley's accounts of sensible objects and sensible qualities. Once this normative structure is revealed, I propose an interpretation of the master argument that accuses materialism of committing the naturalistic fallacy. I then show that on my interpretation the master argument overcomes the aforementioned objections. 

This event is pre-read, so please email Emma Kirby at emma_kirby@brown.edu for the paper.

Snacks and drink will be provided and all are welcome to attend.

History of Philosophy Roundtables are organized and hosted by graduate students.

Ethical Inquiry Lecture: Benjamin Radcliff

October 28th, 2016 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106

Ethical Inquiry Lecture:
Happiness is Not for Sale, But You Are:
How the Market Economy Structures the Pursuit of Happiness.

Benjamin Radcliff, Political Science,
University of Notre Dame

Abstract:  Our understanding of happiness must be grounded in our understanding of the market economy. A central aspect of capitalism is
the "commodification" of labor and thus the commodification of persons themselves. The material and psychological burden of being "reduced to commodities" compels citizens to attempt to introduce countervailing forces in society that limit the extent of commodification. Across countries, and across the American States, data suggest that the single most important determinant of well-being is indeed the level of decommodification (as expressed through the social safety net, labor unions, and pro-worker labor market protections, such as the minimum wage). The magnitude of the relationship between decommodification and happiness dwarfs conventional individual-level factors, such as marital status or unemployment.


Reception to follow in the lobby of Smith-Buonanno Hall.

Physics and Philosophy - Physics Colloquium: Craig Callender, UCSD

October 24th, 2016 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Barus & Holley, Room 166

Please join Physics and Philosophy for a Physcis colloquium lecture "A Tale of Two Times" presented by Craig Callender, University of California San Diego on October 24th from 4:00PM to 5:00PM in Barus & Holley, Room 166.  Reception to follow immediately afterwards in the Barus & Holley lobby.

Abstract:  Programs in quantum gravity differ, but they seem to agree on having profound consequences for time. What consequences? Some programs promise to “save” time from relativity by re-introducing a time that corresponds to our intuitive notion of time flowing. Others promise the opposite: to finish the job that relativity began by eliminating time altogether. I’ll focus on examples of the former and the latter, causal set theory and canonical quantum gravity, respectively. I’ll argue that time is both harder to get rid of and harder to destroy than is commonly thought.

Presented by the Department of Physics.

Physics and Philosophy: Jenann Ismael

October 14th, 2016 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Room 001, Salomon Hall

 

Please join the Philosophy Department for the Physics and Philosophy lecture Does Determinism Clash with Freedom: A Fresh Look at Human Action through the Lens of (Classical) Physics" presented by Jenann Ismael, University of Arizona.

A reception will be held afterwards in the Philosophy Department lounge at 45 Prospect Street.