Events

Public and community programs are an important part of the Center for Public Humanities’ DNA.  Our lunch talk series, Public Humanities Now: New Voices, New Directions, invites a range of innovators in the Public Humanities to share their work each semester over lunch in the Lecture Room.  Our conferences, workshops, and exhibitions chart new directions in the field.  It goes without saying that so much of the value of these events is tied to togetherness. 

During this time of social distancing, many of our planned events have been rescheduled, but our lunch talks continue virtually.  Please scroll down to see the lunch talk schedule for this semester.  In addition, you will find many resources throughout our website that may be enjoyed digitally.   

  • Our digital projects  page has links to a digital tour of our departmental home (the Nightingale-Brown House), to Public Work: A Public Humanities Podcast, and to Rhode Tour, a mobile and web app on historic and cultural sites in Rhode Island. 
  • We record all of our conferences! Our Conferences page has information about past events with links to the Center for Public Humanities' YouTube channel, where we post video of all of the presentations. 
  • Black Labor in the Making of the Nightingale-Brown House, by Joanne Melish, traces the history of black labor in the Center's departmental home on Benefit Street.  
  • The Public Humanities Blog has it all: it’s informative and fun, and features posts from many of our students, alumni, faculty, and fellows. 

Please visit the Brown Arts Initiative’s new website, [email protected], for information on new grant and partnership opportunities that are being offered during this difficult time, and for their slate of digital public programs, including online exhibitions, concerts and lectures.

Upcoming

Past Events

“The Rural Black Lives Project and the Co-Creation of Knowledge.” Lunch talk by Gerard Laurence Aching

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Gerard Aching is Professor of Africana and Romance Studies, a Faculty Fellow at the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, and Co-Principal Investigator of the Rural Humanities Initiative at Cornell University.

“What are exhibitions for? In a university gallery? In Abu Dhabi?” Lunch Talk by Maya Allison

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Maya Allison is founding Executive Director of The NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery, the first academic gallery in the GCC. She was curator at the David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University, and before that, at The RISD Museum as Curatorial Assistant.

“When Walls Talk: Hidden and Forgotten Stories of Enslaved People”, Lunch Talk by Jobie Hill

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Jobie Hill is a licensed Preservation Architect and Slave House Expert engaged in interdisciplinary research examining the dwellings of American slavery, the influence these dwellings had on the lives of their inhabitants, and is committed to the preservation and education of the history of enslaved people.

Race, Justice and Health Disparities: Barriers to Equality and Citizenship

Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice and the Inman Page Black Alumni Council

Lectures

“More than Just Volunteers: the International Docents that Connect the Museum to the World.” Virtual lunch talk by Phaedra Hui-shih Fang (National Museum of Taiwan)

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

The National Taiwan Museum in Taipei, established in 1908, is the oldest museum in Taiwan, with collections and programming related to the history of Taiwan, as well as anthropology, the earth sciences, zoology and botany. The Museum has developed an innovative program that trains international undergraduate and graduate students to give guided walking tours of the Museum’s collections and its historic buildings. Fang’s presentation gives an overview of this program, the National Taiwan Museum, and the state of the field of museum education in Taiwan today.

Lectures

“The Museum We Closed is Not the Museum We Reopen” Virtual lunch talk by Scott Stulen (Director and President, Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, OK).

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Museums are currently facing challenges on multiple fronts, from an ongoing global pandemic, calls to address systematic racism, long-standing labor inequity and looming financial shortfalls. For leadership, it can be a time to hold on to the past or an opportunity for radical change. Scott Stulen will share how the Philbrook Museum of Art is responding to this moment by connecting to the needs of the community, building a more sustainable organization and redefining how we measure success.

Lectures

“Witness” Virtual lunch talk by Karyn Olivier

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Karyn Olivier creates sculptures, installations, and public art. Her work often intersects and collapses multiple histories and memories with present-day narratives. She will discuss several projects which engage existing monuments and her fabrication of contemporary monuments and memorials.

Lectures

Southern New England Native Baskets and the Narrative of “Disappearance.” Virtual Lunch talk by Denene De Quintal

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Lectures

Virtual lunch talk by Dan Yaeger (NEMA): “COVID and Chaos: How Museums are Navigating the Crisis”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

With 3,000 members throughout the region, the New England Museum Association has been a hub for keeping museums and museum people connected during the coronavirus crisis. Here’s your chance to speak with NEMA Executive Director Dan Yaeger about the latest from the front lines of museum leadership, how people are coping, and the short/long-term prospects for museum careers.

Lectures

Virtual Lunch Talk: “Adaptive Practices: Two Curators Redefine Gathering During a Pandemic.”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Having been closed for 18 months of renovation, Providence Public Library was scheduled to begin its grand reopening on March 30th, with events and activities designed to bring crowds into the Library’s beautiful new public spaces throughout the weeks and months ahead. Instead, the Library didn’t open, and all public gathering for the foreseeable future has ceased.