Events

Public and community programs are an important part of the Center for Public Humanities’ DNA.  Our lunch talk series, Public Humanities Now: New Voices, New Directions, invites a range of innovators in the Public Humanities to share their work each semester over lunch in the Lecture Room.  In the fall of 2021, we are launching a new series Conversations at JNBC with (mostly) local writers, thinkers, architects, composers, and artists. Conversations will be held weekly on Thursday evenings.  Our conferences, workshops, and exhibitions chart new directions in the field.  It goes without saying that so much of the value of these events is tied to togetherness. 

Please scroll down to see the lunch talk and conversations schedule for this semester.  In addition, you will find many resources throughout our website that may be enjoyed digitally.   

  • Our digital projects  page has links to a digital tour of our departmental home (the Nightingale-Brown House), to Public Work: A Public Humanities Podcast, and to Rhode Tour, a mobile and web app on historic and cultural sites in Rhode Island. 
  • We record all of our conferences! Our Conferences page has information about past events with links to the Center for Public Humanities' YouTube channel, where we post video of all of the presentations. 
  • Black Labor in the Making of the Nightingale-Brown House, by Joanne Melish, traces the history of black labor in the Center's departmental home on Benefit Street.  
  • The Public Humanities Blog has it all: it’s informative and fun, and features posts from many of our students, alumni, faculty, and fellows. 

 

Upcoming Events

  • Jul
    5
    All Day

    Exhibition: Not Never More

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Les Vues d’Amérique du Nord: Artists Respond (2021-2023) is an artist residency inviting two Rhode Island-based artists, Jazzmen Lee-Johnson and Deborah Spears Moorehead, to create site-specific artworks that respond to the Center for Public Humanities’ historic wallpaper, Les Vues d’Amérique du Nord.

    Jazzmen Lee-Johnson’s residency culminates in Not Never More, a series of prints installed in the Center for Public Humanities from April 28 – September 30, 2022.

    Artist’s Statement: We inhabit our histories. We feel the pains of the past, we clang in its echoes, feel its residue caked up on our skin. History’s traumas have been perpetually erected in monuments, embedded in street names, stone walled in woodlands, hung, stacked, and plastered in architecture. Not Never More is my gut reaction and visual response to confronting such an architecture—the problematic 19th century French wallpaper Les Vues d’Amérique du Nord (The Views of North America), created in 1834 by Jean-Julien Deltil. This wallpaper adorns the foyer and staircase of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage which is situated in the historic Nightingale-Brown House. Deltil’s wallpaper obfuscates colonialism, genocide, capitalism, and slavery, in its romanticized idyllic nostalgic imagery. My response, Not Never More, is a textile print/quilt installation that remixes, conceals, reveals, and warps this historically fraught and imperialist imagery into layers of possibility, braggadocio, pessimism, blunt historical moments of shame/ contradiction, dance, and critical optimism.

    Deborah Spears Moorehead’s artwork will be installed at the Center for Public Humanities in October 2022.

    Gallery Hours:

    May and September: Monday – Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    June – August by appointment. To schedule: call 401-863-1177 or email [email protected].

    Opening Reception: Thursday, April 28, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

    Open for Gallery Night Providence: Thursdays, May 19, June 16, and July 21 from 5-8 p.m.

    Closing Reception: Thursday, September 15, 5-8 p.m.

    JNBC Exhibitions

Past Events

  • Apr
    30
    9:30am - 1:00pm

    Inheritance Unconference

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Following two days of presentations and breakout conversations on Zoom, the in-person Unconference offers participants to continue conversations, collaborative thinking and project planning in an open-ended format. The Unconference takes place at the Center for Public Humanities. There will be three sessions, with opportunities for participants to submit session ideas twice throughout the morning.

    An unconference is a participant-led day of conversations, collaborative thinking and collaborative doing. Session ideas all come directly from participants — you. Never been to an unconference before? Read about how it works here.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    JNBC Conferences
  • Please join us for a celebration of Jazzmen Lee-Johnson’s Not Never More (2022), a site-specific art installation on the ground floor of the Center for Public Humanities. Read more about the exhibition here.

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    JNBC Conferences, JNBC Exhibitions, JNBC Performances
  • Apr
    28
    All Day

    Exhibition: Not Never More

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Les Vues d’Amérique du Nord: Artists Respond (2021-2023) is an artist residency inviting two Rhode Island-based artists, Jazzmen Lee-Johnson and Deborah Spears Moorehead, to create site-specific artworks that respond to the Center for Public Humanities’ historic wallpaper, Les Vues d’Amérique du Nord.

    Jazzmen Lee-Johnson’s residency culminates in Not Never More, a series of prints installed in the Center for Public Humanities from April 28 – September 30, 2022.

    Artist’s Statement: We inhabit our histories. We feel the pains of the past, we clang in its echoes, feel its residue caked up on our skin. History’s traumas have been perpetually erected in monuments, embedded in street names, stone walled in woodlands, hung, stacked, and plastered in architecture. Not Never More is my gut reaction and visual response to confronting such an architecture—the problematic 19th century French wallpaper Les Vues d’Amérique du Nord (The Views of North America), created in 1834 by Jean-Julien Deltil. This wallpaper adorns the foyer and staircase of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage which is situated in the historic Nightingale-Brown House. Deltil’s wallpaper obfuscates colonialism, genocide, capitalism, and slavery, in its romanticized idyllic nostalgic imagery. My response, Not Never More, is a textile print/quilt installation that remixes, conceals, reveals, and warps this historically fraught and imperialist imagery into layers of possibility, braggadocio, pessimism, blunt historical moments of shame/ contradiction, dance, and critical optimism.

    Deborah Spears Moorehead’s artwork will be installed at the Center for Public Humanities in October 2022.

    Gallery Hours:

    May and September: Monday – Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    June – August by appointment. To schedule: call 401-863-1177 or email [email protected].

    Opening Reception: Thursday, April 28, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

    Open for Gallery Night Providence: Thursdays, May 19, June 16, and July 21 from 5-8 p.m.

    Closing Reception: Thursday, September 15, 5-8 p.m.

    JNBC Exhibitions
  • Apr
    28

    Recordings of all sessions from the Inheritance Symposium are available on  YouTube (Inheritance Symposium Playlist)

    Inheritance brings together activists, curators, educators, tribal leaders, artists, historians, heritage workers, and policy makers to explore the range of strategies that institutions and communities are using to respond to contentious representations of race, Indigenous lifeways and history in public art and architecture. Over two days on Zoom, speakers from the US, UK and Canada will offer first-hand accounts of initiatives and actions that resulted in the removal, reinterpretation, or recontextualization of public and commemorative artworks, heritage sites and museum collections, while others will present on efforts to protect and preserve sites that have been ignored or under-resourced. We are in the midst of a reckoning, as communities seek to reshape how (and whose) history is told and commemorated in public space. This may entail radical changes to the art that hangs on our walls, the monuments in our public squares, and the stories that are told at historic sites as the public landscape that we have inherited continues to evolve.

    This symposium, organized by the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, includes a mix of online and in-person events and opportunities over four days. In-person events at the Public Humanities Center include an artist’s talk and participatory performance with Haus of Glitter on Wednesday, April 27; an exhibition opening for Jazzmen Lee-Johnson’s Not Never More on Thursday, April 28; and an Unconference on Saturday, April 30. The symposium takes place on Zoom on Thursday, April 28 and Friday, April 29, with opportunities for audience conversation during breakout sessions at the end of each day. Please check the Program page for a detailed schedule of events.

    The symposium and all associated events are free and open to the public, but registration is required. Inheritance is made possible through a grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

    REGISTER HERE

    JNBC Conferences
  • Apr
    27
    5:30pm - 7:00pm

    QTPOC Liberation Lawn Party!

    Nightingale-Brown House

    The Haus of Glitter Dance Company has spent the last 2 years living + healing + creating in the former home of Esek Hopkins, commander of the slavery ship “Sally”, hired by the Brown brothers of Brown University. Join The Haus of Glitter for a Artist Talk + Lawn Party + Protest Demonstration that celebrates Queer Feminist BIPOC led historic intervention and our beloved intersectional cultures of dance, music and creative community. Come strut the runway with us! Music by DJ Sita (Haus of Glitter) + Food and Beverages provided!

    This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

    JNBC Performances
  • Apr
    21
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Barnaby Evans

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: Barnaby Evans, artist, urban consultant, and creator of WaterFire, will talk about his work creating artworks involving large scale, urban interventions and site-specific installations that serve to catalyze broad citizen involvement in transformational change for their communities.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    21
    1:00pm - 2:30pm

    J. Carter Brown Lecture: Doreen Adengo

    List Art Building

    Doreen Adengo, AIA, is Principal of Adengo Architecture, LLC in Kampala.

    Adengo is an architect and the founder of Adengo Architecture in Kampala, Uganda. She has taught studio courses at The New School for Social Research and Pratt Institute, and worked previously for Adjaye Associates. Her firm’s recent work in Uganda includes the design of affordable housing, schools, and a mobile medical clinic that incorporate ecologically sensitive elements such as solar panels and water harvesting capabilities. Adengo is the Conservation Architect on the Uganda Museum, a 1940s modernist building selected for a Getty conservation grant in 2020, and is an expert on modernist architecture in Africa. Adengo’s presentation will discuss architecture in post-colonial Kampala.

    Adengo will present on Zoom. Link will be posted soon. Limited seating will be available in List 120.

    This event is sponsored by The Pritzker Foundation’s J. Carter Brown Memorial Lecture Fund at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Speaker: Rebecca Hernandez, PhD, Community Archivist, and Teresa Mora, Head of Special Collections & Archives, University of California at Santa Cruz Libraries

    Talk description: coming soon.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    18

    Digital media have afforded artists and archivists the ability to document and record at previously unimaginable levels. Yet despite its purportedly infinite storage capacity, the virtual world is also a precarious site for storage and documentation, one where users face the paradox of permanence and impermanence simultaneously. Domains are sold. Links rot. Servers crash. Sharks eat undersea cables. In many ways, the constraints and affordances of physical forms of documentation have been reproduced through the advent of digital record keeping.

    This event offers a set of questions about the role of documentation in the digital age, from practices of accountability to community building and the intersections thereof. The capacities and constraints of virtual and physical documentation will be interrogated, from audio-visual archiving to 3D printing to publishing and printing as an archival process. Join us for a panel featuring the work and insights of artists and archivists Regina Longo, Paul Soulellis, and Rosalie Yu, who have actively engaged these challenging questions.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    14
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Gina Borromeo and Jan Howard

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: RISD Museum curators, Jan Howard and Gina Borromeo, will share the RISD Museum’s process for deaccessioning a bronze head of an oba from Benin in preparation for its return to Nigeria.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and headquartered at the University of Michigan’s Center for Social Solutions, the Crafting Democratic Futures project brings together nine university partners, each tasked with leading a local effort to devise a racial reparations plan for their area. This talk will lay out the project in Newark, New Jersey, where Rutgers faculty, staff, and students have engaged multiple community organizations in an effort to imagine a reparations plan that both aligns with national and state-level efforts and is uniquely meaningful to the specific place from which it grows.

    Mark Krasovic is an associate professor of history and American studies at Rutgers University-Newark, where he is currently the lead PI on a Mellon-funded project devising a racial reparations plan for Newark. He also works on two local archives projects and is writing a book on community arts and cultural programs funded by Great Society-era initiatives like the War on Poverty and Model Cities.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    7
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Camilo Viveiros

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: Camilo Viveiros, Executive Director at The George Wiley Center, the longest running community organizing group in Rhode Island, will talk about the organization’s work and its focus on challenging systems of oppression and making policy changes around many of today’s social issues.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Embodied Archiving: Oral History as a Social Practice

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Amy Starecheski, Director, Oral History MA Program, Columbia University.

    Oral histories are social. They must be used, discussed, and remembered in order to stay alive; they can easily die in institutional archives. How can we curate oral histories in ways that connect them to places and people, creating embodied archives and social networks of oral history caretakers?

    Introduction and moderator: Caroline Cunfer

    JNBC Lectures
  • Students: Come learn about the Columbia University’s Oral History MA program with the program’s director Amy Starecheski. Columbia University’s Oral History Master of Arts Program is the first program of its kind in the United States: a one-year interdisciplinary MA degree training students in oral history method and theory. Through the creation, archiving and analysis of individual, community and institutional histories, they amplify the critical first-person narratives that constitute memory for generations to come. Light refreshments will be provided.

    JNBC Workshops
  • Apr
    5

    Philip Jodidio, born in New Jersey, graduated from Harvard in 1976 and moved the same year to Paris, where in 1980 he became the Editor-in-Chief of the art monthly Connaissance des Arts, at the time the largest circulation monthly art magazine in France. He began to write books about contemporary architecture in 1993 and left the magazine to pursue writing and editing as a full-time occupation in 2002. He is the author and/or editor of over 150 books for publishers such as Taschen, Rizzoli, Thames & Hudson and others, mostly about contemporary architecture. He has also been the editor of several scholarly books on historic Muslim cities published by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture. He is currently a resident of Lausanne, Switzerland.

    In his talk, Philip Jodidio will discuss the new architecture of Qatar.

    This lecture is sponsored by the Pritzker Foundation’s J. Carter Brown Memorial Lecture Fund.

    Free and open to the public.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    24
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Annu Palakunnathu Matthew

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: Annu Palakunnathu Matthew, visual artist and Professor of Photography at the University of Rhode Island, will present her visual work on the politically complicated role of the 2.5 million South Asians who “volunteered” for their British colonial power during World War II.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    24

    Primary sources—the materials of which archives and special collections are made—are the building blocks of evidence and storytelling. In this talk, I’ll describe how the Public Knowledge program at the Mellon Foundation is supporting co-creator approaches to archives, helping to cultivate multivocal narratives, and rethinking aspects of technology and infrastructure development.

    Patricia Hswe is the Program Officer for Public Knowledge at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which she joined in 2016. As the Foundation’s program area that supports libraries, archives, and university presses, Public Knowledge makes grants that strive to increase equitable access to—and activation of—recorded knowledge that helps to build an informed, heterogeneous, and civically engaged society. Before joining The Mellon Foundation, Patricia worked at the Penn State University Libraries and at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    22
    7:00pm - 8:30pm

    Public Humanities Lab / Sonic-Scapes, Session 4

    Nightingale-Brown House

    A weekly series of listening sessions where participants will come to the session with one sonic recording that relates to that week’s theme. As a group, we will listen to the selected sounds and discuss. Registration is required and curator will communicate with registrants regarding the weekly theme. Curator: Ariel Lynch

    Register for Session 4: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/263131863487

    This series is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.  

    JNBC Exhibitions
  • Mar
    17
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Avery Willis Hoffman

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: Avery Willis Hoffman, Artistic Director of the Brown Arts Institute, will explore the challenges (and opportunities) of launching a new institute for the arts during a turbulent pandemic era.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    16
    6:30pm

    Public Humanities Lab / Oral History Crash Course

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Come learn the basics of how to run an oral history interview! Participants will have the opportunity to take their own oral histories after training and exchange ideas on incorporating oral history into future projects. Curators: Alyssa Trejo and Elizabeth Mathews, with Dr. Lauren Yapp. Register here if you plan to attend.

    This series is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.  

    JNBC Exhibitions, JNBC Workshops
  • Mar
    15
    7:00pm - 8:30pm

    Public Humanities Lab / Sonic-Scapes, Session 3

    Nightingale-Brown House

    A weekly series of listening sessions where participants will come to the session with one sonic recording that relates to that week’s theme. As a group, we will listen to the selected sounds and discuss. Registration is required and curator will communicate with registrants regarding the weekly theme. Curator: Ariel Lynch

    Register for Session 3: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/263131261687

    This series is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.  

    JNBC Exhibitions
  • Mar
    15
    12:30pm

    Public Humanities Lab / Oral History Crash Course

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Come learn the basics of how to run an oral history interview! Participants will have the opportunity to take their own oral histories after training and exchange ideas on incorporating oral history into future projects. Curators: Alyssa Trejo and Elizabeth Mathews, with Dr. Lauren Yapp. Register here if you plan to attend.

    This series is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.  

    JNBC Exhibitions, JNBC Workshops
  • Brown University alumna (Class of ’98) and BAI Professor of the Practice Ayana Evans will present a series of protest projections on Nightingale-Brown House at 357 Benefit St, Providence, RI. The projections address mass incarceration, education inequalities, and love. This event will feature a live performance by the campus acapella group Harmonic Motion and poet Adjua Greaves, who is currently earning an MFA in Poetry from the Literary Arts Program at Brown.

    JNBC Performances
  • Providence’s North Burial Ground holds so much history: we can walk through the neatly winding pathways, reading the headstones and remembering those gone before. But waaaayyy in the back lies another section, a place where many more lie buried without a name. This project seeks to honor the residents of Potter’s Field and Free Ground through art, research and collective action. Curators: Traci Picard and Bridget Hall.

    Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm.

    Opening Reception will take place on Friday, March 11, 6-8:30pm and will feature speakers Matt Garza from Haus of Glitter, Rev. Janet Cooper-Nelson, Chaplain of Brown University, and Donnell Williamson from Brown’s Religion and Critical Thought Department.

    Open for Gallery Night Providence: March 17, 5-8pm.

    This exhibition is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.

    JNBC Exhibitions
  • Mar
    10
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Kate Kraczon

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: Kate Kraczon, Director of Exhibitions and Chief Curator of the Brown Arts Institute / David Winton Bell Gallery, will discuss the many ways contemporary curators decide what exhibitions to develop within their programs using examples from her own curatorial history.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Kim Gallon, Associate Professor of History, Purdue University.

    This talk explores the relationship and place of Black digital humanities as an area of inquiry and praxis within and outside of public humanities. It troubles the notion of “public” and discusses the complexity and challenges of developing and sharing humanistic work that is situated in moments of crisis.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    10
    10:00am - 4:00pm

    Public Humanities Lab / Coffee: A Journey Through the Senses

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Coffee Tasting Event: Coffee isn’t just a warm drink. It’s heritage, culture, and a living tradition you hold in your hands. Join us for an exhibit on coffee’s journey from bean to cup and a demonstration of its preparation. Curators: Hilary Bergen and Susana Turbay Botero.

    Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm.

    Coffee Tasting Event: March 17, 5-8pm.

    This exhibition is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.  

    The Gallery is open Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm.

    JNBC Exhibitions
  • Mar
    8
    7:00pm - 8:30pm

    Public Humanities Lab / Sonic-Scapes, Session 2

    Nightingale-Brown House

    A weekly series of listening sessions where participants will come to the session with one sonic recording that relates to that week’s theme. As a group, we will listen to the selected sounds and discuss. Registration is required and curator will communicate with registrants regarding the weekly theme. Curator: Ariel Lynch

    Register for Session 2: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/263126908667

    This series is a part of the Public Humanities Lab at the Center for Public Humanities, where Public Humanities graduate students curate exhibitions and public programs that probe questions about art, memory, heritage, culture and sensation.  

    JNBC Exhibitions
  • Mar
    3
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Vanessa Flores-Maldonado

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. 

    Today: Vanessa Flores-Maldonado (she/her), now a Co-Executive Director of Providence Youth Student Movement (PrYSM), will talk about her personal experience as a queer Guatemalan woman growing up in a low-income immigrant community in Los Angeles, and her journey to PrYSM where, through the queer trans youth program, she learned how to use her experiences and power to help build a world without police, prisons, or borders.

    The Conversations Series is funded by the Marshall Woods Lectureship Foundation of the Fine Arts.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    3
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    In the Center, Looking Around: Learning at the Studio Museum

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Ilk Yasha, Studio Museum Institute Manager, at The Studio Museum in Harlem.

    How can museums be dynamic sites of learning and exploration? In this presentation we’ll explore the power of polyvocality in education, community-building through ideas, and the spirit of intellectual imagination at the Studio Museum Institute in Harlem.

    Moderator: Kennedy Jones (MA’23)
    JNBC Lectures