Events

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Past Events

Lunch Talk: Fostering Community-Driven Archives: Meeting Practitioners At Their Point of Need

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Angela DiVeglia, Curatorial Assistant at Providence Public Library; Dr. Taino J. Palermo, RWU Community Development Graduate Program; and Kate Wells, Curator of RI Collections at Providence Public Library.

CANCELLED: “Queering the College Campus Map”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Pegah Rahmanian, Director of the Unity Center at Rhode Island College.

Exhibitions

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Lunch Talk: Kīpuka Aloha ʻĀina: Spaces of Indigenous Hawaiian Resurgence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Mary Tuti Baker is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at Brown University, where she teaches courses in Indigenous Political Theory.

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays