Events

Upcoming

  • Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

    Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

    Closed on Weekends and Holdays

  • Oct
    18
    10:00am - 4:00pm

    Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

    Map It Out has previously been exhibited in Berlin and Long Island City. Maps from these two cities as well as those created in Cardiff, Wales will be exhibited along with the maps made in Rhode Island. This project is part of an ongoing collaborative art practice that uses creative processes to challenge mapping conventions. The exhibition and all associated programs are free and open to the public.

    Gallery Hours
    Monday – Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
    Closed holidays

    Opening Reception
    Thursday, September 26, 5 – 7 p.m.

    Providence Gallery Night Reception
    Thursday, October 17, 5 – 9 p.m.

    Gallery Talks
    Friday, October 18, 2 - 3 p.m.
    Thursday, November 14, 2 – 3 p.m.

    This project has been made possible, in part, by the Brown Arts Initiative.

  • Oct
    18
    2:00pm - 4:00pm

    Public Humanities Gallery Talks

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Join us for two gallery talks!

    2-3pm: “Map It Out – Providence”: Gallery Talk by Marisa Brown, Assistant Director for Program at the Center for Public.  Map It Out – Providence is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

    3-4pm: “Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador” Gallery Talk by Edwin Rodriguez, AMST PhD Student. Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El
    Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial
    component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical
    frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

  • John Hay Library offers a new resource: The Brown Community Organizing Archive.  The archive includes newly-available series of 100 videotaped interviews with a diverse array of high-impact community organizers.

    A team of Brown graduates who have spent their lives in community organizing initiated this print and video archive (available online) with the help of the John Hay Library and the Swearer Center staff.

    Brown faculty and staff are invited to a luncheon workshop to meet the organizers and Don Elmer, the video documentarian, and learn more about the archive. 

    The print materials in the Community Organizing Archive have been used both as course assignments and by researchers, and our goal is to make their usefulness more widely known.

    Involving hundreds of thousands of people across the country, community organizing shares important traits with traditional (and better known) social movements, such as the civil rights, labor, and women’s rights movements.

    But it brings a unique emphasis on the development of, and accountability to, local grassroots leadership teams who build enduring organizations and brought about significant change on issues such as wage theft, mortgage discrimination, exposure to toxic pollutants in low-income communities, educational equity, and many more in their communities, states and nationally.

    A particularly intriguing and inspiring part of the collection is the set of 100 videotaped interviews of a diverse array of organizers conducted by Don Elmer in 2009-10 for the Center for Community Change’s Organizers Genealogy Project.

    The individual interviews are already available at the John Hay Library website: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/collections/id_783/ .

  • Oct
    24
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Lunch Talk: Edouard Duval-Carrié

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Edouard Duval-Carrié, Artist

    Internationally acclaimed Haitian American sculptor and painter Edouard Duval-Carrié’s work is inspired by the complex histories of the Caribbean, including slavery, migration, colonialism and Afro-religious practices. His lunch talk will explore the themes of his upcoming exhibitions at the Brown Art Initiative and gallery at the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice. Duval-Carrié’s work has been shown in Paris, New York, Madrid and Venice. In 2016, he was awarded the Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government and in 2018 he received the Michael Richards Award and a commission at The Bass contemporary art museum in Miami.

    Lunch served at 11:50am.

  • Oct
    31
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Heritage Advocacy and Democratic Practice in Indonesia

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Dr. Lauren Yapp is a Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities at Brown University whose research explores the politics of heritage preservation in urban Indonesia.

    Since the fall of dictatorship in 1998, Indonesia has emerged as the world’s third largest democracy, a political transformation made possible in no small part by a lively and diverse civil society. Recently, certain sectors of this civil society – including activists, artists, academics, and their organizations – have banded together in passionate campaigns to “save” their cities’ historic structures from the bulldozer. By examining the language and strategies deployed in their protests, I argue that heritage is emerging in post-dictatorship Indonesia a critical front on which civil society leaders now seek to expand democratic practice, re-negotiate their relationship and rights vis-à-vis state authorities, and claim new spaces for the voices of ordinary citizens in debates over the future of their cities.

    Lunch at 11:50am.

  • Nov
    14
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Kīpuka Aloha ʻĀina: Spaces of Indigenous Hawaiian Resurgence

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Mary Tuti Baker, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Science, Brown University.

    Description of the talk is coming soon.

  • Nov
    19
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Queering the College Campus Map

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Pegah Rahmanian, Director of the Unity Center at Rhode Island College.

    More details about the talk TBA.

    Lunch served at 11:50am.

  • Angela DiVeglia, Curatorial Assistant at Providence Public Library; Dr. Taino J. Palermo, RWU Community Development Graduate Program; and Kate Wells, Curator of RI Collections at Providence Public Library.

    More details about the talk TBA.

    Lunch at 11:50am.

Past Events

The Art of Embedded Histories

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Edouard Duval-Carrié, Artist

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.