Events: Exhibitions

Exhibitions

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibitions

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibitions

Unfinished Business: The Long Civil Rights Movement Exhibition and Reception

Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice
, Carriage House Gallery

Unfinished Business: The Long Civil Rights Movement

September 24, 2018 to December 14, 2018
Nightingale-Brown House, 357 Benefit Street

Nuestros Orígenes Devotos/Our Devoted Origins

May 18, 2018 to June 1, 2018
Nightingale-Brown House

Nuestros Orígenes Devotos/Our Devoted Origins. Manuel Mosquera Garcés: between religion, language and blood, a curatorial experiment that questions the memories (myths) created around absent figures in our families. This exhibition is centered on the case of Manuel Mosquera Garcés (1907-1972), Afro-Colombian politician and journalist, and the resonances his figure still has in the Mosquera family.

Public Humanities Gallery Lab

February 19, 2018 to March 19, 2018
Nightingale-Brown House

During the month of February 20 thru March 20, the Nightingale-Brown House's Carriage House Gallery will transform into a Public Humanities LAB. During this time, Public Humanities graduate students will mount exhibitions, pop-up experiences, prototyping projects, performances, workshops and gatherings that probe questions about art, memory, storytelling, history, culture and identity. All programs are free and open to the public. The Public Humanities LAB is open M-F 10am-4pm. The exact schedule of events is being finalized. Please check below for scheduling updates.

EXHIBIT: Crossing Borders

October 26, 2017 to January 24, 2018
> Multiple locations: see description for details

Migration; incarceration; income inequality; environmental degradation and extinction: these are some of the most pressing problems of the 21st century. There are volumes of data that reveal the extent of the impact these events are having on human lives; increasingly, they are the focus of some of the most affecting contemporary art as well.

EXHIBIT: Welcome to Camp America: Beyond Gitmo

September 13, 2017 to October 16, 2017
Nightingale-Brown House

This exhibition of photographs by Debi Cornwall includes environmental portraits of 14 former Guantánamo captives now living in 9 countries, from Albania to Qatar. Each image replicates, in the free world, the military’s “no faces” rule, commenting on alienation of indefinite detention and how these men will remain forever marked by Guantánamo.  

Playing Innocent: A Solo Exhibition by Sarah Paulsen

February 27, 2017 to March 16, 2017
Nightingale-Brown House

Sarah Paulsen is a visual artist and filmmaker based in St. Louis, MO. Playing Innocent, a solo exhibition of Paulsen's work, features a mix of paintings, collage, textile works, and animated film that examine the social construction of whiteness as a racial formation in American society, and its intersection with other social identities, such as gender, class, and citizenship.

Closing reception: March 16, 4:00-6:00pm. Light refreshments will be served.

Solitary Confinement: Inhumanity in Rhode Island

January 29, 2017 to March 10, 2017
Nightingale-Brown House

Solitary Confinement: Inhumanity in Rhode Island seeks to educate the public about the abuses of solitary confinement in Rhode Island and throughout the country in order to create political pressure to reduce the prevalence of this violent practice.

Artists, Environmentalists, Activists: 10 Years of UPP Arts

November 27, 2016 to February 11, 2017
>> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details

November 28, 2016-February 12, 2017
Providence City Hall, 2nd Floor Gallery
25 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

Opening Reception on Friday, December 2, 2016, 5:00-7:00 PM

Santuario Project

November 1, 2016 to November 21, 2016
Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

Santuario (a project by Rica Maestas, MA'18) is a space and occasion to make peace with your past, honor your memories, and move forward feeling lighter and open to new experience. From November 2-22, search your life and find something you want to let go of – resentment, nostalgia, regret, loss, etc. – and excise that feeling in the form of a meaningful object. Once this object is identified, please bring it by living room 4N of the Granoff Center and lay it to rest. More info here.

Umbrella Movement: Youth & Activism

Nightingale-Brown House

 From New York to Cairo, from Taiwan to Baltimore, political protest movements reveal the complicated and emotional relationships between citizens and their government.

Exhibition: States of Incarceration

August 28, 2016 to September 23, 2016
>> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details

States of Incarceration is the first national traveling multi-media exhibition on the history and future of mass incarceration in the United States. It was developed by faculty and students at twenty different universities across the country, including Brown, working together through a national program called the Humanities Action Lab with funding from the National Endowment of the Humanities and the Institute for Museum and Library Sciences.

Artful Protest: Creative Expression and the Umbrella Movement

April 29, 2016 to May 14, 2016
Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

The 2014 Hong Kong demonstrations, now known as the Umbrella Movement inspired a community of makers. Using art as protest, participants worked across various media, including photography, installation, text, performance, film, and illustration. Artful Protest: Creative Expression and the Umbrella Movement brings together photography and mixed media to highlight the commonalities of social justice movements across generations and around the globe.

Banners and bombs. Photographic exhibit

March 5, 2016 to March 18, 2016
Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

“Banners and bombs” is a photographic exhibit that presents the work of three young photojournalists who have been documenting the Chilean student movement since 2011. This movement provides another perspective on the civil rights movement as a global phenomenon. Come to the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts and check it out from March 5th - March 18th.

Sponsored by Creative Arts Council and John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Thousands of Little Colored Windows: Brown University’s Stamp Collections

February 10, 2016 to April 15, 2016
> Multiple locations: see description for details

Public Humanities Gallery, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, 357 Benefit Street February 10 – April 15, 2016

John Hay Library, Main Gallery: February 10 - May 13, 2016

Opening Reception: An Old Tree Becomes a Sculpture: BitterSweet

Nightingale-Brown House

Opening Reception

Sculptor Gail Whitsitt-Lynch has created "BitterSweet" from the wood of a stately elm that stood in the garden at the Nightingale-Brown house from 1920 to 2014. Although the tree is gone, its life continues in this dynamic carving. The exhibit explores the evolution of material through the artist's process to the finished sculpture, BitterSweet, and includes a graphic history of the life cycle of this singular tree.

An Old Tree Becomes a Sculpture: BitterSweet

May 22, 2015 to October 2, 2015
Nightingale-Brown House

Sculptor Gail Whitsitt-Lynch has created "BitterSweet" from the wood of a stately elm that stood in the garden at the Nightingale-Brown house from 1920 to 2014. Although the tree is gone, its life continues in this dynamic carving. The exhibit explores the evolution of material through the artist's process to the finished sculpture, BitterSweet, and includes a graphic history of the life cycle of this singular tree.

Gallery Hours: Monday-Friday, 10 am - 4 pm

Gallery Night Providence: June 18, July 16 and August 20

Opening Reception: Thursday, May 28, 4-8 pm

The Mobile Museum of American Artifacts

May 10, 2015 to May 16, 2015
> Multiple locations: see description for details

The Mobile Museum of American Artifacts (MMoAA) is a touring museum of personal objects and their histories. Housed in a small vintage trailer, MMoAA travels from town to town, conducting an “archeology of the present” that uncovers objects of significant (and insignificant) connection to everyday American life. MMoAA will be making its debut visit to Providence May 11-16th. Mark your calendars and find your objects!

MMoAA Locations:

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