Solitary Confinement: Inhumanity in Rhode Island

January 29, 2017 to March 10, 2017
Nightingale-Brown House

Solitary Confinement: Inhumanity in Rhode Island seeks to educate the public about the abuses of solitary confinement in Rhode Island and throughout the country in order to create political pressure to reduce the prevalence of this violent practice. Presented at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, the exhibition includes a full scale mock-up of a solitary cell, audio testimony from people presently incarcerated in solitary confinement in Rhode Island, writings and artwork from survivors of solitary, and opportunities for attendees to write letters of support to people presently in solitary and to contribute to efforts to limit the use of solitary confinement in Rhode Island’s prisons.  The exhibition is curated by three MA students at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities – Matthew Branch, Thaddeus Gibson and Cherise Morris – with assistance from the Center’s Assistant Director of Programs, Marisa Brown, and from Rhode Island State Representative J. Aaron Regunberg and the national organizations Black and Pink and Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility, which generously lent materials to the exhibition. 

Solitary Confinement: Inhumanity in Rhode Island will be on exhibit at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage until Friday, March 10, 2017.  The gallery is open Mon-Fri 9am-5pm and may be accessed from the Center’s main entrance at 50 Williams Street in Providence, Rhode Island.   

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 5pm

Please join us for the opening of Solitary Confinement: Inhumanity in Rhode Island.  Speakers will include the Founder and National Director of Black and Pink, Jason Lydon, and survivors of solitary confinement.   Light refreshments will be served.

Please stay tuned as we will be scheduling additional events related to the exhibition in February and early March. 

Event Image: Billy Sell, Corcoran Sate Prison, California