Lectures

Lectures

Art in the City: The Practices of Procedural Public Art

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Did you know there are over 400 contemporary artworks in the city of New York’s public art collection? Where and how are these pieces situated? What is the process for artist selection, and artwork development, approval, and installation? Reina Shibata will discuss NYC’s public art processes, and what it takes to realize projects in the public realm.

Reina Shibata, MA’10, Deputy Director, Percent for Art, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs.

Lectures

Black Labor at the Nightingale-Brown House

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Joanne Pope Melish will explore the role of enslaved and free people of color in the rise of Joseph Nightingale, the Providence merchant whose elegant Benefit Street mansion is now the home of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage.

Lectures

Radical Inclusion and Creativity: Working for Museum Innovation

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room
Like many creatives, Sage’s career has not followed a well-established, linear trajectory. Rather, she has had to make her way along the sometimes thorny path of her own design. Her last three jobs were created for and by her, and sparked innovations, spurred new partnerships and resulted in the inclusion of young people who are too often excluded from universities and museums. Sage’s presentation is a poetic interpretation of her public cultural humanity work through the creative lens of equity.
Lectures

Visualizing Precarious Lives in “Torn Apart / Separados”

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

How can digital humanities be used to respond rapidly to humanitarian crises? What are the considerations for undertaking this work with vulnerable communities? This talk examines these questions throughTorn Apart / Separados, a digital humanities project that used data storytelling to respond to the United States’ government’s “zero tolerance” and family separation immigration policies. 

Roopika Risam, Assistant Professor of English at Salem State University.

Lectures

Global Mass Incarceration: A Human Rights Crisis

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

Mass incarceration is not only a problem in the United States. The globalization of mass incarceration presents unique challenges and opportunities for those working to combat the discriminatory practice of locking up certain populations in mass. This talk explores incarceration, genocide, and the U.S. racial history of incarceration during the United Nations International Decade for People of African Descent.

Lectures

How to Make the Revolution Irresistible: Everyday Stories at the National Public Housing Museum

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room
Lectures

Young Visitors to Shanghai’s New Art Museum

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

Lectures

How To Make Art with People, Places, and Things: Guggenheim Social Practice

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

What do a Moluccan cockatoo, police officer, and Punjabi TV station have in common when thinking about contemporary art? Framing the social as an artistic medium, Christina Yang provides an overview of how the Guggenheim educators and curators, artists, and activists alike are working together to create new realities within the political imaginary.

Lectures

What We Learned: Curating Bears Ears and Drone Warriors

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room, 1st floor

Lectures

In the stacks of the livebrary

John Hay Library, second floor Lownes Room 20 Prospect Street

Digital Arts and Humanities Lecture Series, co-sponsored with the University Library, welcomes Professor Jeffrey Schnapp.

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