Lectures

Lectures

Curating Contemporary Art: Perspectives on Practice

February 8, 2009 to May 10, 2009
RISD Museum Michael P. Metcalf Auditorium, Chace Center 20 North Main Street

February 9, 6 p.m.; March 21, 2:30 p.m.; April 20, 6:30 p.m.; April 27, 6:30 p.m.; May 4, 6:30 p.m.; May 11, 6:30 p.m.

Lectures

Cross-Cultural Pigs: Myths, Meals, and Tastings

John Nicholas Brown Center 357 Benefit Street

John Eng-Wong, Brown University
event is part of “Eating Chinese...” Series

Lectures

Black and Green: Two Centuries of Sustainability, Green Programming at Weeksville Heritage Center

John Nicholas Brown Center 357 Benefit Street

As Executive Director of the Weeksville Heritage Center, Pamela Green is responsible for the management and expansion of this unique historic African American preservation and education organization. Ms. Green's current focus is on the construction a new multimillion dollar education and cultural arts building. Prior to the Weeksville Heritage Center, Ms.

Lectures

Art Goes Public: Memorials and Interventions

John Nicholas Brown Center 357 Benefit Street

with Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, conceptual artists

Lectures

Works on Memory: Memory-Works

Nightingale-Brown House

The architect practices an art of ethical and purposeful transformation, creating spaces that frame human experience and contribute to a better future. While we imagine projects that leave traces over the skin of the earth, our process often lies in unveiling, unearthing, uncovering as well as anchoring histories and memories in and onto territories, cities and sites. It is in the face of catastrophes, historic traumas, and human injustices that the architect’s (and the artist’s) roles become increasingly complex, problematic and, hopefully, necessary.

Lectures

Why Did It Take Me 27 Years to Conceptualize a Work about the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb?

Nightingale-Brown House

Alan Nakagawa discusses Peace Resonance; Hiroshima/ Wendover, a sound-based semi-autobiographical work that combines the interior ambiance of the Hiroshima Atomic Dome and the Wendover Hangar to explore ideas about peace, war, sound and the Japanese-American experience. This artwork, begun in October 2016, is supported by funding from the Art Matters Foundation, the City of Hiroshima, the City of Los Angeles and the Center for Land Use Interpretation.

When it comes to conservation, climate change is the elephant in the room. Cultural heritage experts acknowledge its minor implications, from wood rot to tilting lighthouses. They call for bandaid remedies in the form of “green” restoration exemplars. But few have measured the whole elephant. Yet as Naomi Klein says, climate change changes everything. It’s even redefined cultural heritage itself. Who could have guessed, when our heritage laws were written, that carbon would one day become an even more precious heritage value than beauty or history?

Lectures

Vital Little Plans: A Conversation about Jane Jacobs and Public Writing

Nightingale-Brown House

Many consider Jane Jacobs the most influential urban thinker of the twentieth century. In "Vital Little Plans", Zipp and Storring collect for the first time a career-spanning selection of her short writings on a wide range of topics, from urban design to economics to morality, feminism to environmentalism, protest to politics. In this talk, the editors will explore the difficult process of collecting, curating, and interpreting the anthology, the delicate balance of honoring and challenging Jacobs's legacy, and what we can learn from her dual life as a public intellectual and activist.

Lectures

Visual Documentation: Stories from the Lost Paradise

Nightingale-Brown House

Professor Ho will speak from an intimate perspective about Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement, including the little stories, trauma and conflicts, the brutality, the Utopian villa

Lectures

Views of North America: Black Freedom in the White House

Nightingale-Brown House

This talk examines the history surrounding Vues d’Amerique du Nord, a nineteenth century scenic wallpaper, in order to trace the routes through which the US state, in the form of the presidency, appropriated images and ideas about black freedom. It connects state efforts to suppress autonomous black freedom struggles to the various contexts for producing and reproducing for this significant element of material culture.

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