Research Reports of the Circumpolar Laboratory

Arctic Studies was introduced to Brown University with the appointment of J.L. Giddings as Director of the Haffenreffer Museum and Professor of Anthropology in 1955.  The Laboratory for Circumpolar Studies, housed at the Haffenreffer Museum's Collections Research Center, contains laboratory facilities, a library devoted to Arctic and sub-Arctic topics, and is the repository for important ethnographic and archaeological collections primarily from northwestern Alaska.  Here is our list of recent reports published by Museum staff and research associates and links to their electronic copies.

No. 1  Gilsbakki in Hvítársí›a, Western Iceland Preliminary Report of Investigations

Kevin p. Smith

2008

The first season of excavation at Gilsbakki in Hvítársí›a, Borgarbygg›, western Iceland, was undertaken from July 10th through July 17th, 2008. Electromagnetic and coring surveys were used to characterize the extent, depth, and integrity of cultural deposits within the central area of the current farmstead, while two exploratory trenches were excavated to test the results of these surveys and to assess the complexity and content of these deposits.

No. 2  Preliminary Textile Report - Gá́sir, Iceland

Michèle Hayeur Smith

2011

This preliminary report is part of an NSF-funded project at the Haffenreffer Museumo of Anthropology, Brown University (Rags to Riches:  An Archaeological Study of Textiles and Gender in Iceland, AD874-1800 (Award no:1023167)), examining gender and textile production and research carried out by Fornleifastofnun Íslands (FSÍ, the Archaeological Institute of Iceland) in northern Iceland.  

No. 3 Preliminary Textile Report - Möðruvellir, Iceland

Michèle Hayeur Smith

2011

This preliminary report is part of an NSF-funded project at the Haffenreffer Museumo of Anthropology, Brown University (Rags to Riches:  An Archaeological Study of Textiles and Gender in Iceland, AD874-1800 (Award no:1023167)), examining gender and textile production and research carried out by Fornleifastofnun Íslands (FSÍ, the Archaeological Institute of Iceland) in northern Iceland. 

 

No. 4 Preliminary Textile Report from the 1988 Bessastaðir Excavations

Michèle Hayeur Smith

2012

The analysis of these textiles was carried out in May 2011 at the National Museum of Iceland  where they are curated. Each piece was analysed for fibre identification, object dimensions, thread count, warp and weft yarn dimensions (though not microscopically as these measurements were taken in situ with limited equipment), spin tension (when possible), construction details, colour (evidence for dyeing will be performed in subsequent months), weave pattern, evidence for incorporation within larger garments or objects, adhering or incorporated non-textile materials, and unique features. All objects were photographed using a digital DinoScope! microscope (with magnifications ranging from 70X-200X) and a Nikon digital camera.