Co-lab(oration)

May 25, 2017

From September 14, 2017 until the end of the semester, Ariella Azoulay, Professor of Comparative Literature and Modern Culture and Media, along with Wendy Ewald, Susan Meiselas, Leigh Raiford, Laura Wexler and others, will mount the exhibit Co-lab(oration) in Pembroke Hall.  Co-lab(oration) is a pedagogical and curatorial experiment based on an ongoing exploration of photography as a form of collaboration.

How We Should Respond to Photographs of Suffering

Renty, a man taken from the Congo, in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1850. Photograph by J. T. Zealy / Wikimedia CommonsRenty, a man taken from the Congo, in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1850. Photograph by J. T. Zealy / Wikimedia CommonsRead a recent New Yorker article by Sarah Sentilles about the Azoulay's research.

 

Co-lab(oration) – is a pedagogical and curatorial experiment led by Ariella Azoulay, Wendy Ewald, Susan Meiselas, Leigh Raiford, Laura Wexler and others, based on an ongoing exploration of photography as a form of collaboration. Assuming a degree zero of collaboration as always already being at the basis of the event of photography, we seek to write a potential history of photography, different from the dominant history of single photographers and their approach and techniques. During the Fall semester, the third edition of Co-lab(oration) will be shaped. It consists of nearly one hundred of photographic projects reconstructing the material, practical and political conditions of collaboration in and through photography. Throughout the semester, in collaboration with members of the Co-lab team and students of four universities (Brown, Yale, Ryerson and Berkeley), revisions and additional projects will be generated. Through the exhibition and the seminar, collaboration will be explored as a means of creating transformative potentialities in given political regimes of violence, as a framework for collecting, preserving and studying existing images –as a basis for establishing civil archives by different communities; as a vantage point to reflect on relations of co-laboring that are hidden, denied, compelled, imagined, violent or empowering; as a pedagogic tool; and as an intimate “face to face” encounter between photographer and photographed person, denied or acknowledged, sometimes over time.