Courses for Spring 2017

  • Matters of Romance

    Narratives (1100-1500) of men, women, and elves seeking identity on the road, in bed, and at court. Readings (in modern English) include Arthurian romances, Havelok, lais by Marie de France, and Chaucer's "Wife of Bath's Tale." Primarily for freshmen and sophomores. Students should register for ENGL 0100D S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • The Literature of Identity

    This course will explore various conceptions of personal identity, with an emphasis on Romanticism. We'll read Anglo-American philosophical and literary texts (mostly poetry) from the Renaissance through the 19th century, taking some excursions into contemporary theory (queer, feminist, post-structuralist). Writers may include Shakespeare, Montaigne, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Keats, Emerson, Browning, and Wilde. DPLL
    ENGL 0100G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • The Claims of Fiction

    This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of novels and shorter fiction, in English or in translation. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will likely include Baldwin, Brontë, Condé, Conrad, Faulkner, Greene, Ishiguro, Lessing, Morrison, Naipaul, Salih. Limited to 20 first-year students. DPLL FYS
    ENGL 0150X S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Brontës and Brontëism

    The novels of Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë alongside works (fiction and film) influenced by or continuing their powerful (and competing) authorial visions: Wide Sargasso Sea (Rhys), Rebecca (Hitchcock), The Piano (Campion), and Suspiria (Argento). Among other questions, we will discuss the role of Romanticism, feminism, the bodily imaginary, colonialism, and genre. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0150Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • A Brief History of Technophobia

    From the printing press to CGI, novels and films depend upon machines for their existence. So why do they often depict technology as something sinister? From Mary Shelley to Terminator, we’ll explore the anxiety aroused by technology: considered as machinery, a mode of thought, and a principle of social organization. Marx, Dickens, Melville, Orwell, Kafka, Coetzee, Chaplin, Kubrick, Kathryn Bigelow. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Byrne
  • Obscenity

    The term “obscene” describes the extreme, the offensive, but also gestures toward that which is “offstage.” How can something offend if it takes place out of sight? Courting potential discomfort, we will tarry with obscenity in various guises and try to cope with its effects. Texts by Catullus, Shakespeare, Sade, Baudelaire, Henry Miller, Beckett, Delany, Jelinek. Films by Fassbinder, Breillat. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Casey
  • Opting Out: Social Withdrawal and the Reclusive Life

    Why do some people pursue lives of seclusion? What is lost or gained by withdrawing from society? This course considers literary approaches to the question of asocial behavior. We will also discuss several related topics, such as solitude, social anxiety, hikikomori, social media, monasticism, and shyness. Authors may include: Hawthorne, Thoreau, Shirley Jackson, Robinson, Krakauer, Doctorow. 1-2 films. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gastiger
  • To Be Young, Gifted, and Black

    This course will consider various expressions of African-American childhood and adolescence across literature and film. We will contemplate notions of joy, sorrow, love, shame, and pride and strive to better understand the influence of these feelings on modes of representation, perception, and experience. Authors/filmmakers will include: Wright, Baldwin, Morrison, Spike Lee, and Antoine Fisher. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Morgan
  • Avengers, Vigilantes and Detectives: Revenge in Fiction

    From Hamlet to Batman, the figure of the “avenger” has gripped the public imagination. Why does the desire for revenge speak to us across time? What parallels can we see between vigilantes and detectives, and what is their role in state and society? Works by: William Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, Emily Brontë, Gaston Leroux, Agatha Christie, Alan Moore and Quentin Tarantino. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Yates
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s plays with attention to both formal and historical questions. Issues to be addressed may include genre, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, consciousness, status and degree, politics and nation. Written work may include a mid-term and two short papers. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. WRIT
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans

    What can the grotesque, monstrous, and even alien creatures found lurking in an extraordinary range of literature across many centuries reveal about the different ways humans have imagined what it means to be human in the first place? Is the human a unified, single category of being at all? Authors may include Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, and Poe. DPLL WRIT
    ENGL 0511C S01

    This course is offered fully online. Students do not need to be on Brown's campus to participate in this course. Learn what it is like to take an online course at Brown and view technical requirements at: http://brown.edu/go/whatisonlinelike
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Reading Practices: An Introduction to Literary Theory

    What is it to read? This course is an introduction to theories of reading that have shaped literary interpretation and definitions of literature from the early twentieth century to the present, with particular attention to the relation between “literary theory” as a discipline and the broader reading practices it engenders and from which it emerges. We will read the New Criticism, structuralism, post-structuralism, and new historicism, critical race theory and feminist critiques, and recent work in aesthetics. Topics include literariness and textuality, the reader and subjectivity, narrative, rhetoric, and the problem of representation, and "new formalism." Enrollment limited to thirty.
    ENGL 0700P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • American Literature and Political Radicalism

    This class examines American literature in relation to key radical social movements in the twentieth century. The interplay between American authors and Socialism, the New Left, and Black Power nationalism will be at the forefront of the course. The class will focus on works by both committed activists and writers less directly involved in these social movements. Authors include John Steinbeck, Richard Wright, E.L. Doctorow, and Huey Newton. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • American Literature and the Cold War

    A study of American literature in the decades following World War II, with a view toward specifying the role of culture in the United States' ongoing conflict with the Soviet Union from the 1940s through the 1980s. Authors to be considered include Hersey, Ellison, Wright, Morrison, Bellow, O'Connor, Reed, Pynchon, Updike, Roth, and Didion. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Reading New York

    How have people imagined New York City from the early 20th century to the present? We will discuss immigration, mobility, nightlife and the neighborhood, downtown, underground and gentrified spaces, 9/11. May include work by John Dos Passos, Nella Larsen, E.B. White, Frank O’Hara, Patti Smith, Nan Goldin, Ernesto Quinones, Jonathan Safran Foer.
    ENGL 0710T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Spring section 04 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Lee
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Spring section 04 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Heine
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Spring section 04 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Fung
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Spring section 04 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Spring sections 02 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Spring sections 02 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Spring sections 02 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Spring sections 02 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Spring section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Myth + Modern Essay

    A writing and research focused course, in which students read a small selection of ancient texts (including The Epic of Gilgamesh and Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and use the myths retold to illuminate the contemporary world and to inform the essays they write. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • Testaments of War

    Discovery is at the heart of research. In this course, we will discover how and why literary texts reflect and illuminate the intellectual and social worlds around them. We will use a variety of primary and theoretical sources and research tools, identify powerful research problems, and craft questions and sophisticated thesis statements. The course will also enable you to refine a critically sensitive, informed, and persuasive writing style that will be key to the success of your scholarly work. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Narrative

    This course offers a broad exploration of the many kinds of essays you can write in creative nonfiction. We will be looking at how authors structure their pieces and the range of narrative techniques they often use. You can expect workshops, in-class prompts and readings by Jamaica Kincaid, John McPhee, David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, David Sedaris and others. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • True Stories

    This class will allow confident writers to explore and develop their creative nonfiction writing. We'll focus on two structures--nonfiction narratives and essays--with occasional forays into other forms. Students will work simultaneously on several small assignments and two larger, self-directed pieces. Readings will include cultural reportage, lyric memoir, science and nature writing, standard and hybrid essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Creative Nonfiction: Practice and Criticism

    What is Creative Nonfiction? It has a long history and recently writers have flocked to it; scholars have questioned it: Academic enough? Harm the truth? Narrative with too much “I” and too little “Eye”? Literary? Significant? By reading historical and contemporary examples along with critics, we will explore persistent questions about form, method, ethics, and significance. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Sportswriting

    This course introduces students to the practice of sportswriting, including writing sports news, features, and columns. Readings will include works by Rick Reilly, Bill Simmons, Frank Deford, Karen Russell, Allison Glock, Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, W.C. Heinz, and others. Students will develop skills in analyzing, researching, writing, revising, and workshopping in the genre. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories for newspapers and online. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop interviewing techniques, and hone their writing skills – all while facing the deadlines of journalism. The first half of the semester focuses on “hard" news: issues, crime, government, and courts. The second half is devoted to features, profiles, and narrative story telling. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed in first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mooney
  • The Literary Scholar

    “Literary detective work” aptly describes English literature scholarship. We pick up clues and chase down leads to meet the demands of scholarly yet personally engaged interpretation. We will develop methods of reading sufficiently diverse to read, credibly and richly, a range of literary texts from Susan Howe to Beowulf. Theoretical interpretation will be informed by cognitive poetics. Writing centered. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • The Public Intellectual

    This course offers advanced writers an opportunity to practice sophisticated, engaged critical writing in academic, personal, and civic modes. Emphasis will be on writing "public" essays (general audience essays that do intellectual work or academic essays that address public topics), ideally in fluid, "hybrid," audience-appropriate forms. Areas of investigation will include (but are not limited to) the review essay, the cultural analysis essay, literary documentary, and the extended persuasive/analytic essay. It will include some brief "touchstone" investigations into rhetorical theory, with the aim of helping to broaden our concepts of audience, analyze the constitutive and imaginative effects of language, increase the real-world effectiveness of our own language practices, and situate our writing within current political, cultural, aesthetic and intellectual debates. Students must have sophomore standing or higher in order to be admitted to the class. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930, 1030, or 1050. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Advanced Feature Writing

    For the advanced writer. Nothing provides people with more pleasure than a “good read.” This journalism seminar helps students develop the skills to spin feature stories that newspaper and magazine readers will stay with from beginning to end, both for print and on-line publications. Students will spend substantial time off-campus conducting in-depth interviews and sharpening their investigative reporting skills. The art of narrative storytelling will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ENGL1050G or 1050H, or published clips submitted before the first week of classes. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1160A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Digital Nonfiction

    Digital Nonfiction is an opportunity to explore the fundamental differences between print and digital narratives. Focusing on three short assignments and one longer project, this class encourages students to learn by doing. Additionally, students develop their digital fluency by exploring a variety of platforms and readings. Digital Nonfiction is an advanced creative nonfiction class that requires ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Lyricism and Lucidity

    For the advanced writer. This course will explore two subsets of the personal essay that blur or cross boundary lines--the lyric essay and the photographic essay-- in both traditional and experimental formats. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Travel Writing: Personal and Cultural Narratives

    For the advanced writer. Helps students build skills in the growing genre of travel writing, including techniques for reading, composing, and revising travel pieces. Students will read the best contemporary travel writing in order to develop their own writing in areas like narrative, setting, characters, and voice. The course will feature interactive discussions, instructor conferences, and workshops. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Poetics of Narrative

    Narratives are everywhere, simply there, like life itself, Roland Barthes says; we structure our experiences with narratives that we either infer or create. We will read different literary genres to see how narratives work and what makes them poetic and read theoretical texts to understand narrative function and performance. We will write experimentally to experience how stories are constructed. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0900, 0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History of the English Language

    Provides an introduction to the study of the English language from a historical, linguistic, and philological perspective, and an overview of the study of the "Englishes" that populate our globe. While providing students with the ability to identify and explain language change through historical periods, also examines language as a social and political phenomenon.
    ENGL 1311E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Middle English Literature

    In the age of Chaucer, literature in Middle English ranged from lyrics to romance narratives to mystery plays and medieval genres like dream visions and debate poems. This course will introduce students to reading texts like Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Owl and the Nightingale in their original Middle English. No prerequisites. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1360J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Women's Voices in Medieval Literature

    This course explores literary works from the early medieval period, both literature by women and literature that represents women’s voices and desires. Traditions examined will include the Old and Middle English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish. The course provides insight into the construction of premodern sexualities as well as into the cultural and social histories of multiple national traditions.
    ENGL 1361D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Tolkien and the Renaissance

    This course explores the work of J.R.R. Tolkien alongside Renaissance forbears such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Milton and others. Topics to include love and friendship, good and evil, violence and nonviolence, and how literature offers distinctive forms of life. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S58
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Darwin and Other Crises of Faith: Victorian Prose, Poetry, and Fiction

    A survey of Victorian literature through the lens of religion, science, and the emerging faith in "culture." The basic question is, why did the Victorians take the emergence of secular consciousness so personally? We will be reading scientific texts, criticism, and autobiography alongside novels and poems. Authors will include: Darwin, Eliot, Arnold, Tennyson, Browning, Newman, Hardy, and Mill.
    ENGL 1511W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • On Being Bored

    This course will explore how and why certain texts and films represent states of non-productivity or non-desire. Beginning with writings from the Enlightenment and Romantic periods, we will move into contemporary theoretical and aesthetic reflections on the links between art and worklessness: narratives with neither progress nor plot, characters that resist characterization, as well as poems and films that resist emphatic assertion and revelation. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL
    ENGL 1561W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Dickens

    Charles Dickens is one of the greatest novelists of the nineteenth century and his writings provide a rich resource for understanding both Victorian society and the history of the novel. Novels to be read include Oliver Twist, Little Dorrit, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend. Topics to be explored include comedy, narrative, sexuality and gender roles, capitalism and modernity. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Modern African Literature

    This course considers themes, antecedents, and contexts of modern African literature and related forms. Our readings will include fiction in English or in translation, traditional oral forms like panegyric and festival poetry, and some films. We will examine how these diverse materials explore the interplay of ethnicity, nationality, and race. We will also address the issue of "tradition" in contexts where nationalisms of various stripes are becoming stronger, even as the world becomes more interconnected through trade, immigration, and digital technology. Authors include Achebe, Cole, Dangarembga, Farah, Gordimer, Ngugi, Salih, Soyinka, Wicomb. Films by Blomkamp, Loreau, Sembène. DPLL
    ENGL 1710J S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Recent Experiments in American Fiction

    The premise of this course is that 21st-century American literature is undergoing a renaissance, the unifying quality of which is its exploration of a conceptual space located "on the very edge of fiction," as one writer puts it. We will discuss how and way the ideological threads that once served to connect the practice of literature to the world seem to be fraying. Writers discussed include Ball, Cole, Kushner, Lerner, Lin, Nelson, Robinson. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1710R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Modernist Henry James

    How consciousness knows the world was a topic of endless fascination to Henry James. By dramatizing the workings of consciousness, James transformed the novel and led the way to modernism. In addition to the aesthetic significance of his experiments with point of view, the course will also analyze the ethical consequences of his insistence on life’s ambiguities.
    ENGL 1711C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • African American Literature After 1975

    This course examines major authors and currents in African American literary writing from 1975 through the present. The class positions these works in relation to historical developments such as the rise of black nationalism, the evolution of a distinctive black feminist tradition, and the growing social divisions within the African American community. Authors include Toni Morrison, Jamaica Kincaid, Colson Whitehead, and John Wideman. DPLL
    ENGL 1711E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Refiguring Expression: The Feeling of Voice in Modern and Contemporary Poetry

    This course will examine how various traditions within modern and contemporary poetry have figured the relationship between poetic voice, affect, and expression and how these considerations of subjectivity have been inflected by procedural or conceptual constraints. Readings will include Dickinson, Stein, Olson, Zukofsky, Niedecker, Hejinian, Carson, Howe, Mayer, Cage, Berssenbrugge, Lin, Rankine, Moten, Dworkin, Acconci, Sedgwick, Ngai and Deleuze. Not open to first-year or sophomore students.
    ENGL 1711G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • "Terrible Beauty": Literature and the Terrorist Imaginary

    Why does terrorism fascinate literary writers in the modern period? Is terrorism the figure of something that is unrepresentable in fiction, or is it a type of direct political action that fiction writers aspire to? Can literature's humanistic role of allaying terror survive an age of spectacular politics? How susceptible is terrorism to "aestheticization"? Texts will include works by Conrad, Flannery O'Connor, Naipaul, Dennis Cooper, Frantz Fanon, and Ngugiwa Thiong'o. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors, juniors, and sophomores. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.
    ENGL 1760I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Zoopoetics

    This course will explore the intersections between the depictions of plants and animals in twentieth and twenty-first century poetry and the theoretical conversations about non-human worlds unfolding in emerging fields, such as animal studies and the environmental humanities. Readings will range from poetic texts by Francis Ponge and Marianne Moore to theoretical texts by figures such as Donna Haraway. There will be periodic mandatory film screenings.
    ENGL 1900J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Art of Criticism

    This course explores the art of literary criticism through analysis of individual critics as well as larger schools of criticism. Focusing on the twentieth century, we will read works by those affiliated with high theory as well as those who stood outside that influential development. The goal will be to understand literary criticism as a form of thinking, and an art, in its own right, one with philosophical, social, and literary dimensions. Authors include: Oscar Wilde, Kenneth Burke, Mary McCarthy, Lionel Trilling, Raymond Williams, Paul de Man, Eve Sedgwick, D. A. Miller, John Guillory. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1901F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Alternative Miltons

    This seminar undertakes a close reading of Milton's monumentally significant epic "Paradise Lost." We will also consider the current state of Milton criticism. What's new in Milton criticism? What approaches have been holding fort? Has Milton criticism been slower to take to critical and theoretical innovation than Shakespeare criticism? If so, why, and what might we do about it? On that account, the seminar will engage a range of newer approaches—disability studies, queer theory, trauma theory, eco-criticism, animal studies, technoculture studies, and popular culture studies—to consider what they have to offer by way of new perspectives on Milton. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.
    ENGL 2360S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Secret History

    During the rise of print culture, an extraordinary number of texts presented themselves as secret histories. These texts, which promise disclosure and truth along with scandal and partisanship, establish a new relationship between literature, politics, and the knowing subject. They contribute significantly to the development of new kinds of writing, such as the novel. Recent scholarship (Aravamudan, Ballaster, McKeon, Bullard, Bowers) will accompany the study of representative texts including work by Behn, Manley, Defoe, Haywood, Steele, and Swift. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Temporalities

    Centered on modernism and the early 20th century, this course will investigate the varied models of time pulsing through literary and theoretical texts, and consider a range of issues, including memory and forgetting, historical progress and decay, utopian futurity, and queer temporalities. Readings include work by Freud, Bergson, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Joyce, Woolf, Barnes, Stein, Faulkner. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • The Post-Slavery Imagination

    This course excavates nineteenth-century literary and political discourses for their positive accounts of a post-slavery US, and it examines how the category of “post-slavery” shaped postwar efforts to articulate the grounds of racial equality in the US. Authors to be considered Brown, Wilson, Emerson, Stowe, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Twain, James, Wright, Hurston, Ellison, Baldwin, Williams. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Literary Phenomenology

    An exploration of phenomenology’s theories of consciousness, the body, language, and time and their implications for aesthetics, hermeneutics, and the theory of literature. In addition to major figures in the phenomenological tradition (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Gadamer, Ricoeur, Iser), the course will explore such recent developments as embodied cognition, affect theory, kinesthetics, and the new materialism. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Around 1948: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Transformations

    This seminar will look at the year 1948 across international locations and from an interdisciplinary perspective. An array of new nations states, institutions, political and cultural formations and styles emerged at this moment, with the movements of decolonization, the spread of global socialism, and aftermath of the Second World War. We will analyze these events through documents, images, philosophical texts, archives, literary texts from the era.
    ENGL 2901F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Comparative Literature
    COLT 1420O Proust, Joyce and Faulkner
    Ethnic Studies
    ETHN 1890U Extravagant Texts: Reading the World Through Asian American Literature
    Modern Culture and Media
    MCM 2100Q Lacan vs. Foucault
    MCM 2110O Reading Remains
    ENGL XLIST 0