Courses for Fall 2019

  • How To Read A Poem

    It is difficult to get the news from poems/ yet men die miserably every day/ for lack/ of what is found there. Poet William Carlos Williams captures this course’s focus on the special ways that poetic language represents and gives shape to human experience. Organized around concepts and practical skills, the readings cross historical and geographical boundaries.
    ENGL 0100A S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Devils, Demons, Do-Gooders

    Who hasn’t struggled with the problem of good and evil? We will investigate how various writers grapple with these fundamental questions of judgment. What constitutes good and evil in the first place, and who gets to make such judgments? Works may include John Milton, Mary Shelley, Jhumpa Lahiri, Frederick Douglass, Toni Morrison, and Herman Melville. Students should register for ENGL 0100F S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100F S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Love Stories

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? We will see how writers have addressed this question from Shakespeare's day to the present. Writers may include Shakespeare, Austen, Eliot, Flaubert, Graham Greene, Marilynne Robinson, and/or others. Students should register for ENGL 0100P S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100P S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • The Experiment: Poetry and Knowledge

    How does the notion of the experiment in both science and poetry offer an opportunity for close observation, manipulation and description of the material world? Is poetry a form of knowledge? This course will examine the role of experimentation in poetry and science as a way of generating heightened modes of sensation and focused modes of inquiry.
    ENGL 0100Z S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • The Medieval King Arthur

    Where did stories of King Arthur come from and how did they develop in the Middle Ages? We will read the earliest narratives of King Arthur and his companions, in histories and romances from Celtic, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English sources, to examine Arthur's varying personas of warrior, king, lover, thief. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Shakespeare's Present Tense

    Shakespeare in Love suggests how Shakespeare was clued in to elite and popular cultures. Current adaptations like O and 10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU demonstrate how Shakespeare provides anachronistic clues to issues of the present. This course will trace such clues by examining the cultural origins and ongoing adaptations of Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Henry V, and the sonnets. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • The Claims of Fiction

    This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of novels and shorter fiction, in English or in translation. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will include Baldwin, Brontë, Coetzee, Conrad, Faulkner, Ishiguro, Morrison, Naipaul, Rushdie, Salih, Shelley. Limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150X S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Brontës and Brontëism

    The novels of Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë alongside works (fiction and film) influenced by or continuing their powerful (and competing) authorial visions: Wide Sargasso Sea (Rhys), Rebecca (Hitchcock), The Piano (Campion), and Suspiria (Argento). Among other questions, we will discuss the role of Romanticism, feminism, the bodily imaginary, colonialism, and genre. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Hitchcock!

    An exploration of the work of one of the most famous directors of the twentieth century. We will watch many of Alfred Hitchcock’s best-loved films, including The Birds, North by Northwest, Vertigo, Psycho, Rear Window, and Rope. In addition, we will read some of the most important criticism of these films. No knowledge of film theory required. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0151A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Trans–: Transformation, Translation, Transgression in Literature

    From transgression to transformation to trans rights, why does the prefix “trans” appear inescapable whenever one is discussing radical change? Centering on this mercurial prefix, this course examines the possibilities and limits of change from ancient anxieties about transcendence to contemporary discussions of transnationalism and transgender identities. Authors include: Wordsworth, Woolf, Ginsberg, Plath, Morrison, Imogen Binnie, hooks, Dylan, Against Me!. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brooksher
  • Between Home and Haven: Contemporary Narratives of Revolt and Refuge

    What forces dictate our perception of “home?” Is it where we come from? Somewhere we must find? Or is home what persecutes us - a place from which we must escape or rebel? This course will contemplate sanctuary, family, authoritarianism, and resistance across fiction, graphic memoir, and film. Writers may include Marjane Satrapi, Julia Alvarez, and Viet Thanh Nguyen. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Dun
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • The Examined Self: Lives of the Soul

    This course examines a crucial tradition in American letters and culture: the literature of self-examination and the spiritual quest. Each work focuses in some way on questions of identity and identification: We will be reading a wide range of authors and genres-- spiritual autobiography, short fiction, the novel, conversion narratives, confessions, and lyric and epic poetry. Limited to 30 students.
    ENGL 0500P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Melville, Conrad, and the Sea

    Stories begin with the sea: Jason and the Argonauts, Sinbad and the Seven Seas, Odysseus trying to sail home. The sea is the place of ‘tall tales,’ of adventure, and of terror, but also of industrial labor and modern commerce. This class reads the sea narratives of Herman Melville and Joseph Conrad within this larger narrative and historical context.
    ENGL 0511E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Postcolonial Literature

    Examines fiction, drama, poetry, travel writing, and cultural criticism by contemporary writers from former colonies of the British Empire. We study works by Anglophone writers from African, Caribbean, and South Asian backgrounds. Issues that will concern us include: cultural-nationalism, diaspora, and globalization; histories, identities, and generational shifts; literary form and the idea of “postcolonial literature.” Authors will include Coetzee, Ghosh, Hartman, Naipaul, Ondaatje, Kincaid, Soyinka, Walcott, and Wicomb. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700E S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • African American Literature and the Legacy of Slavery

    Traces the relationship between the African American literary tradition and slavery from the antebellum slave narrative to the flowering of historical novels about slavery at the end of the twentieth century. Positions these texts within specific literary, historical, and political frameworks. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison.
    ENGL 0710B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Black Poetics

    This course will think about black poetics through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Our attention will focus on formal dynamics—including genre conventions and innovation—as well as thematic/conceptual idioms (including poetics as epistemology and ontology and phenomenology). We will balance the close-reading of eight full collections with a gathering of single poems as well as critical essays.
    ENGL 0710X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0900 S06
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0900 S07
    Fall 2019 sections 01, 02, 03, and 04 are reserved for first-year students.
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Fall 2019 section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall 2019 sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Fall 2019 section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall 2019 sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Fall 2019 section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall 2019 sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Fall 2019 section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall 2019 sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Fall 2019 section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall 2019 sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0930 S06
    Fall 2019 section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall 2019 sections 04 and 05 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Myth + Modern Essay

    A writing and research focused course, in which students read a small selection of ancient texts (including The Epic of Gilgamesh and Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and use the myths retold to illuminate the contemporary world and to inform the essays they write. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • The Artist in the Archives

    While artists can benefit greatly from archival work, they are not typically given the tools to make use of these institutions. This writing intensive course takes a two pronged approach to the problem: embedding students in archives both at Brown and RISD to produce creative, lyrical, and multi-media essays; and exploring how artists have used these institutions for information and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course, taught by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    Fall: 1050G section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    ENGL 1050G S02
    Fall: 1050G section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Reframing Race in Art Writing

    This seminar will consider how contemporary writers and critics respond to art that directly addresses race and challenges institutional power. We will discuss past and recent controversies involving race and representation in exhibitions and examine the relationships between artists, museums and other art institutions, and public audiences. We will consider how writing about arts and culture can advance public discourse about race, equity, and justice. Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. Instructor permission required.
  • Writing Medical Narrative

    This class will examine the recent turn toward the use of narrative in medicine and the recent trend of published medical narrative. We'll look at literary and cultural narratives of sickness and health and how they shape perceptions and treatments, while keeping the science and politics of health care—and its public discourse—in view. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0900, ENGL0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0930 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    This course prepares students for their work as Writing Fellows. Course readings, activities, and assignments introduce students to: post-process writing theory and pedagogy; data-based investigations of the revision habits of experienced and inexperienced writers; and effective methods for responding to student writing and conferencing with student writers. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Nature Writing

    This course seeks to develop your skills as a sensitive reader and writer of the natural world. You will build a portfolio of revised work through a process of workshops, tutorials, and conferences, and engage in discussion of a range of written and visual narratives with reference to their personal, political, and ecological contexts. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
  • Nonfiction Now

    Nonfiction Now introduces students to contemporary nonfiction writing through in-person exposure to professional writers, who will visit the course to deliver a craft lecture, read from their latest work and discuss the labor that goes into maintaining a professional writing life. Students will be expected to read the work of the visitor and produce creative work in response. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 30 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1200 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Middle English Literature

    In the age of Chaucer, literature in Middle English ranged from lyrics to romance narratives to mystery plays and medieval genres like dream visions and debate poems. This course will introduce students to reading texts like Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Owl and the Nightingale in their original Middle English. No prerequisites. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1360J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Women's Voices in Medieval Literature

    This course explores literary works from the early medieval period, both literature by women and literature that represents women’s voices and desires. Traditions examined will include the Old and Middle English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish. The course provides insight into the construction of premodern sexualities as well as into the cultural and social histories of multiple national traditions.
    ENGL 1361D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S58
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • American Literature and the Civil War

    An examination of the way the Civil War is represented in American literature from Reconstruction to the present. Authors to be considered include Grant, Twain, Dixon, Chesnutt, DuBois, Faulkner, Morrison, Ellison.
    ENGL 1511A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads

    An introduction to and close reading of the Lyrical Ballads, one of the most radical and innovative volumes in British Romantic literature. We will pay special attention to the aesthetic, historical, ethical, and political dimensions of the text, patiently working through the poems and prefaces, as well as reading antecedent texts, in order to understand why the book was an experiment for its authors, and what are its enduring effects on our contemporary moment.
    ENGL 1511F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Writing and the Ruins of Empire

    An exploration of literary representations of "empire" and "imperialism" from the 18th century to the present. Readings in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volney's Ruins of Empire, and a wide range of 19th- and 20th-century texts. Some consideration of theories of imperialism and of visual representations of cultures of empire. Enrollment limited to 20. Prior coursework in 18th- and 19th-century literature advised.
    ENGL 1561D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

    After almost two decades of closure, public theaters re-opened in 1660. This new beginning occasioned new plays, new kinds of performance and production, and new intersections between the stage and society. We will study works by Etherege, Wycherly, Congreve, Dryden, Behn, Gay, Lillo, Sheridan, and others. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1561K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • What is an Author?: Poe, Hawthorne, Dickinson

    What does it mean to be identified as an “author”? How did the practices of writing and reading change in 19th-century America? This course addresses such questions by reconsidering the literary careers of Hawthorn, Poe, and Emily Dickinson. Our work will investigate literary culture and book history, focusing on 19th-century. authors, readers, magazines, publishing, criticism, and popular media. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Bloomsbury and Modernism

    The contribution of the avant-garde “Bloomsbury Group” to the development of literary modernism. The focus will be on the central literary figures (Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, and T. S. Eliot), but attention will also be paid to the visual arts (Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell, and Post-Impressionism) and to social criticism (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, and John Maynard Keynes).
    ENGL 1710Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Lyric Concepts: The Question of Identity in Modern and Contemporary Poetry

    The lyric within contemporary poetry has often been associated with a desire to express a subjective relation to interior experience while experimental traditions have often imagined the poem as a site of formal or conceptual play devoid of specific concerns of identity. This course draws on poets such as Rankine, Moten, Robertson, Hejinian and the critical tools of affect theory to trouble these distinctions.
    ENGL 1711H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Monsters in our Midst: The Plantation and the Woods in Trans-American Literature

    This course focuses on how literary and visual culture grappled with land as a topographic entity in relation to race, gender, and time. Students read literature about the Caribbean and parts of the U.S., produced from the 19th century to the present. Readings include Marlon James's The Book of Night Women and Jean Rhys's Wide Saragasso Sea.
    ENGL 1711N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ramirez
  • Toni Morrison

    This course will consider Toni Morrison’s novels and essays through four prisms: her interest in the anxieties of Americanness; her attention to language, which includes a consideration of form and of literary theory; her study of love; and her figuring humanity through the experiences of people who are racially black and (often) gendered female. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1760Y S01
    Class list for ENGL1760Y will be finalized in the fall. Attendance the first day is required to be considered for the class.
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
  • Hollywood and American Modernism from FDR to JFK

    Study of the interactions among Hollywood and modernism from the beginning of the sound era through the early 1960s. Authors and directors to be considered include, Loos, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Ferber, Hawks, Wilder, Hitchcock, Mann, and Ford. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1761D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S64
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Reading Sex

    How do we interpret "sex," as a concept, as a thing, as a phenomenon? What kinds of ethical, political, historical, and aesthetic contexts are informed by--and, in turn, form--our sense of "sex" itself? This course will focus on intensive close readings of various queer theoretical texts, novels, and films that variously try to think through the multiple ways we try to represent and render sex legible, while at the same time calling into question our sense of what, ultimately, sex can be as something that both binds and unbinds the human. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1900K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Shakespeare's Comedies

    We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s comedies with attention to his European sources and analogues. Consideration of both formal and historical questions including genre, convention, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, status and degree, and nation. Written work to include two papers, one a close reading and a longer final paper on a topic of your choice. Limited to 20 senior English concentrators.
    ENGL 1950K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required. S/NC
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Proseminar

    This seminar, required for first-year graduate students in English, considers the state and stakes of literary studies today. The course aims to familiarize students with contemporary critical debates and stances in the wider discipline, and to engage with current methodologies, theories, and analytical tensions. We also address issues of professionalization as they relate to the first years of graduate work. Enrollment limited to 10. S/NC.
    ENGL 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Lyric and Ecstasy

    This seminar principally focuses on ecstatic states in the lyric verse of three extraordinary seventeenth-century English poets—John Donne, Richard Crashaw, and John Milton—who are rarely read together. We will consider lyric poetry—both erotic and religious—not only as an apposite medium for rendering ecstatic experience, but also how lyric poetry itself might function as a stimulus for ecstasy. We might also venture into some consideration of music along similar lines. Limited to 15 graduate students.
    ENGL 2360Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Rhetoric and Narrative Discourse, from Austen to James

    An introduction to narrative theory and problems of meaning in fiction, including Roland Barthe's "readerly text," Wayne Booth's "implied author," Kenneth Burke's "socially symbolic" narration, Mikhail Bakhtin's "polyphonic novel," and others. To be studied alongside novels by: Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Henry James, Anthony Trollope.) Attention especially paid to the contested zone between author, narrator, and character. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Temporalities

    Centered on modernism and the early 20th century, this course will investigate the varied models of time pulsing through literary and theoretical texts, and consider a range of issues, including memory and forgetting, historical progress and decay, utopian futurity, and queer temporalities. Readings include work by Freud, Bergson, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Joyce, Woolf, Barnes, Stein, Faulkner. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Identity and Agency

    Any consideration of identity is bound to run up against the concept of agency. Considering identity and agency as mutually constitutive, this course looks at identity's formation and reformation as a narrative experience and effect, examining its emergence on historical and affective terrains. Approaching identity from a range of vantages (psychoanalysis, gender, history, law), we trace the ways that identities might be consolidated into (or, alternatively, unravel) cultural, political, national, or social arrangements. Works by Woolf, Selvon, James Weldon Johnson, Christopher Isherwood, Proust, Fanon, Arendt, Freud, Winnicott, Butler. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S64
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Scholarly Writing for Journal Publication

    Writing and professionalization workshop intended for graduate students in literary studies. Topics covered include selection of journal; framing, structuring and composition of the article; the logistics of peer review; sharing and workshopping drafts; working with academic mentors and advisors. Every passing student will have a publishable article under consideration by the end of the semester. Enrollment limited to 12 English Ph.D. students. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Enrollment restricted to students in the English Ph.D. program.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    American Studies
    AMST 2220Q The Homo Sapiens at the End of the World; or, Readings in Race Theory
    Comparative Literature
    COLT 1431C Poets, Poetry, and Politics
    Judaic Studies
    JUDS 0820 The Language of Religious Faith
    Modern Culture and Media
    MCM 2110T The Contingency of Critique
    ENGL XLIST 0