Courses for Spring 2016

  • How Poems See

    What makes poems and pictures such powerful forms of life? Why do pictures have so much to tell us? How do we see things in words? How do graphic images, optical images, verbal images, and mental images together constitute ways of understanding the world? Looking at poems and images from Giotto and Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Dickinson and Turner through such modern poets and painters as Stevens, Ashberry, Warhol and Heijinian, we will study sensory and symbolic images, the uses and dangers of likeness, and the baffling confluence of concrete and abstract, literal and figurative, body and mind, matter and spirit.
    ENGL 0100Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • American Histories, American Novels

    How do novels make readers experience such traumatic American historical events as war, slavery, and race riots? What kind of political or ethical perspective on such divisive and violent events do literary narratives encourage their readers to take? This course explores these questions by examining a number of influential post-1945 works that offer powerful examples of how novels make us think and feel in particularly resonant ways about the histories they depict. The reading list will include works by such authors as: William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, Jeffery Eugenides, Chang-rae Lee, Mohsin Hamid and Junot Diaz. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0100R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Love and Friendship

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? This course poses this question in various ways. How, for instance, can we tell the difference between love's various forms—between love that is friendly and love that is romantic? How do the different forms of love differently shape people? How does love work when it involves sex, or marriage, or children, or divinity? And what must love involve to be called “good”? Why? Materials will range from Plato and St. Augustine to Leo Bersani and Allen Bloom and will also include popular filmic representations of love. Limited to 20. FYS
    ENGL 0150E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • The Roaring Twenties

    The 1920s helped solidify much of what we consider modern in 20th-century U.S. culture. This course reads literature of the decade in the context of a broader culture, including film and advertising, to think about the period's important topics: the rise of mass culture and of public relations, changes in women's position, consumerism, nativism and race relations. Writers include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Larsen, Toomer, Parker. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. Instructor permission required. FYS
    ENGL 0150S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • James and Wharton

    Friends, rivals, fellow ex-pats, and close correspondents for 15 years, Henry James and Edith Wharton had much in common. Their names are often coupled together in much the manner as Hemingway and Fitzgerald, since their fiction has often thought to deal with the same set of concerns: the societal and emotional ups and downs of well-to-do people in London, Paris, and New York. This class will read James and Wharton side by side in order not only to see in what ways they shed light on each other, but in what ways they differ. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS.
    ENGL 0150V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • The Claims of Fiction

    This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of novels and shorter fiction, in English or in translation. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will likely include Baldwin, Brontë, Condé, Conrad, Faulkner, Greene, Ishiguro, Lessing, Morrison, Naipaul, Salih. Limited to 20 first-year students. DPLL FYS
    ENGL 0150X S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Intimate Horrors: Encountering the Uncanny in Literature and Film

    The horrifying is often times uncomfortably close, even familiar. Alongside theoretical discussions of Gothic literature, psychoanalysis, media, and genre, this course examines the unsettling effects and affects of what makes our skin crawl. We will discuss crazed limbs, possessed voices, evil mothers, creaking houses, ghostly doubles, and creepy children. Works by: Freud, Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Wilde, Lovecraft, Cronenberg, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Lynch. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rada
  • Fictional Brains: Reading Artificial Intelligence and Cognition

    Reading high and popular literature (e.g. detective fiction and science fiction), this course investigates how we think about and construct fictional characters. This course will introduce students to applying classical and recent philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific research to the study of literary texts. Possible authors/works: Poe, Melville, Kafka, Asimov, Blade Runner, and Sherlock. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • The Spectacle of War in 20th-Century American Literature and Film

    This course examines the mediated experience of war from Vietnam forward in light of traditional representations beginning with the Civil War. We will consider the ways in which war is made visible (or invisible), and the position of the reader/spectator as voyeur, consumer, and citizen. Authors: Crane, Herr, O’Brien, Huong, Iraq War veterans, Guantanamo detainees. Directors: Griffith, Kubrick, Coppola, Scott. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Snow
  • Writing the Black Diaspora: Speaking Truth to Power

    What can slave narratives tell us about speech, power, and truth? What are the relationships between self-expression, genre, and questions of truth under conditions of disempowerment? This course introduces contemporary thinking about race and colonial encounters alongside fiction and life-writing by African-American, Canadian, and Caribbean authors from a range of historical periods. Authors: Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Dionne Brand, Lawrence Hill. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Thomas
  • Violence and Secrecy in Victorian Fiction

    How is violence actually depicted in Victorian fiction? Often these novels are oriented around violence but are structured by the figure of the secret, a figure that invites and refuses knowledge. This course examines the relation between violence and secrecy in Victorian fiction and its afterlife. Authors: Brontë, Stevenson, Dickens, Collins, Wilde. Films: The Prestige, Psycho, A History of Violence. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Walker
  • Race, Dystopia, and Contemporary Fiction

    What happens to race after the end of the world as we know it? We will study dystopian literature written by black and Asian North American authors to investigate how they (re)imagine race in relation to questions of the human, citizenship, and state violence. Authors include Colson Whitehead, Chang-rae Lee, Octavia Butler, Karen Tei Yamashita, Nalo Hopkinson, and Larissa Lai. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wang
  • Trial and Error: Law in American Literature and Film

    What does our cultural fascination with law suggest about the limits of justice in America? From crime to capital punishment, this course investigates law's fragile relation to personhood and citizenship, examining tensions between the human body and the terms by which it is legislated and disciplined. Authors: Capote, Eggers, Faulkner, Lee, Morrison, Twain. Film/TV: Dead Man Walking, Milk, The Wire. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wasserman
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s plays with attention to both formal and historical questions. Issues to be addressed may include genre, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, consciousness, status and degree, politics and nation. Written work may include a mid-term and two short papers. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Prose Sagas of the Medieval North

    In this course, we will read long prose fiction from medieval Iceland, Ireland, and Wales, considering how it is similar to and different from the modern novel. We will consider plot, characterization, and style in each linguistic tradition. Texts may include The Cattle Raid of Cooley, The Mabinogi, Njal’s Saga, Egil’s Saga, Grettir’s Saga, and Gisli’s Saga.
    ENGL 0310F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Getting Emotional: Passionate Theories

    This course examines the connection between emotions, politics, and society through several key texts in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature. We will consider how thinking about emotions involves questions of intersubjectivity, art, race, and gender. Special emphasis on the link between violence and feeling. Readings will consist of novels, stories, poetry, and philosophical essays. Authors might include: Wordsworth, Austen, Blake, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Oscar Wilde, Pater, Kant, Melville, Hofmmansthal, Hume. Enrollment limited to 30. LILE
    ENGL 0500Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Unstable Subjects: Race and Meaning in Contemporary (African) American Literature

    What are the stakes involved in defining (African) American literature through a racialized authorial framework? Should we adhere to this prescribed and contentious categorization when considering writers who only incidentally identify as “black,” and whose works challenge any critical or aesthetic alignment based upon racial affiliation? More broadly, this course seeks to question the lingering persistence of race as an ontological marker within the literary arts. Writers include but are not limited to Fran Ross, Darryl Pinckney, Andrea Lee, David Henry Hwang, Maurice Manning, and Colson Whitehead. DPLL
    ENGL 0510Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
  • The Nineteenth-Century British Novel

    A study of major novelists of the period, through the question: How did the novel develop as a form of social understanding? We will be looking at novels as bearers of social values, especially around questions of property, class, marriage, work, bureaucracy and the state, and selfhood. Authors studied: Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and Thomas Hardy.
    ENGL 0511B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Contemporary British Fiction

    This course is an introduction to the study of 20th century literature in English. We consider central terms of and approaches to literary criticism by reading some of the most important British writers of the last fifty years. We will also take into account theories of culture, ideology and nationhood, and attempt to bring into focus a Britain defined as much by its ways of looking as by historical and geopolitical situation. Readings include Kingsley Amis, Greene, McEwan, Zadie Smith, Spark, Kelman, Banville, Naipaul and Sebald. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Postcolonial Tales of Transition

    This course focuses on postcolonial British, Caribbean, and Southern-African works that exemplify, complicate, or refashion the category of the bildungsroman, the "novel of education." Issues to be considered include the ways the texts rework archetypal tropes of initiation, rebellion, development, and the interplay of contradictory passions. We will also think about ways in which issues of race, gender, and sexuality emerge in the texts, and the connections or disjunctions between literature and "the real world." Writers will likely include Dangarembga, CLR James, Ghosh, Ishiguro, Joyce, Kincaid, Lamming, Naipaul, Rhys, Wicomb. DPLL
    ENGL 0710E S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Being There: Bearing Witness in Modern Times

    What is the significance of one who says, "I was there"? This course explores the ethical, literary and historical dimensions of witnessing in an era when traumatic events are increasingly relayed secondhand or recorded in sound and image. Texts include Forster, Woolf, Camus, Freud, Celan, Coetzee; films by Hitchcock and Kurosawa; and readings in law and psychology. WRIT
    ENGL 0710F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Impressionism, Consciousness, and Modernism

    This course explores the role of the "literary impressionists" (Crane, James, Conrad, and Ford) in the transformation of the novel from realism to modernism (especially the "post-impressionists" Stein, Joyce, and Woolf). "Impressionism" is defined by its focus on consciousness, the inner life, and the ambiguities of perception. What happens to the novel when writers worry about whether the way they tell their stories is an accurate reflection of how we know the world? Attention will also be paid to how the literary experiments of impressionist and post-impressionist writers relate to simultaneously occurring innovations in the visual arts.
    ENGL 0710M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Home Made: American Modernism

    Modernism was born in the cities of Europe: Paris, Berlin, London. But there was another modernism, one made in America. This class takes a tour through the various scenes of American writing between the wars, both urban and rural: from Harlem to Los Angeles to Chicago to Mississippi. We’ll read William Faulkner’s fractured narratives of the South, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s sardonic portrayal of Hollywood, Zora Neale Hurston’s celebration of backwater Florida, and Edith Wharton’s nostalgic evocation of Manhattan, as well as the work of a number of other poets and novelists from around the United States.
    ENGL 0710P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Poetry and Science

    This course will explore the relationship between the observational procedures and modes of composition employed by twentieth and twenty-first century poets who have worked in more conceptual or avant-garde traditions and the practices of description and experimentation that have emerged out of history of science. Readings will range from Gertrude Stein’s poetic taxonomies to recent work in critical science studies.
    ENGL 0710R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Gullander-Drolet
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Apps
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for ENGL 1180. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    ENGL 0930 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0930 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
  • Research Essay: Science

    This course explores how science, as an academic way of thinking and a method, affects our critical thinking and expression of culture. Readings examine the various dialects of scientific discourse. Students write three major research essays on self-selected scientific topics from both within and outside their fields of study. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030C S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Research Essay: Myth + Modern Essay

    A writing and research focused course, in which students read a small selection of ancient texts (including The Epic of Gilgamesh and Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and use the myths retold to illuminate the contemporary world and to inform the essays they write. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • Research Essay: Literature

    Discovery is at the heart of research. In this course, we will discover how and why literary texts reflect and illuminate the intellectual and social worlds around them. We will use a variety of primary and theoretical sources and research tools, identify powerful research problems, and craft questions and sophisticated thesis statements. The course will also enable you to refine a critically sensitive, informed, and persuasive writing style that will be key to the success of your scholarly work. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories for newspapers and online. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop interviewing techniques, and hone their writing skills – all while facing the deadlines of journalism. The first half of the semester focuses on “hard" news: issues, crime, government, and courts. The second half is devoted to features, profiles, and narrative story telling. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed in first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mooney
  • Writing in Place: Travels, Localities, Ecologies

    To explore the relationships among people, places and language, this course will incorporate science and nature writing, environmental / ecological writing, travel writing, psychogeography and architectural writing. Assignments and practices will include diaries, observational writing, reporting, criticism and more lyrical forms. We may read works by Bhanu Kapil, Amitava Kumar, Katherine Boo, Matsuo Basho, Joe Sacco, Elizabeth Kolbert, June Jordan. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • The Literary Scholar

    “Literary detective work” aptly describes English literature scholarship. We pick up clues and chase down leads to meet the demands of scholarly yet personally engaged interpretation. We will develop methods of reading sufficiently diverse to read, credibly and richly, a range of literary texts from Susan Howe to Beowulf. Theoretical interpretation will be informed by cognitive poetics. Writing centered. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • The Public Intellectual

    This course offers advanced writers an opportunity to practice sophisticated, engaged critical writing in academic, personal, and civic modes. Emphasis will be on writing "public" essays (general audience essays that do intellectual work or academic essays that address public topics), ideally in fluid, "hybrid," audience-appropriate forms. Areas of investigation will include (but are not limited to) the review essay, the cultural analysis essay, literary documentary, and the extended persuasive/analytic essay. It will include some brief "touchstone" investigations into rhetorical theory, with the aim of helping to broaden our concepts of audience, analyze the constitutive and imaginative effects of language, increase the real-world effectiveness of our own language practices, and situate our writing within current political, cultural, aesthetic and intellectual debates. Students must have sophomore standing or higher in order to be admitted to the class. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930, 1030, or 1050. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Reporting Crime and Justice

    Crime and justice stories are people stories. The drama of everyday life is played out every day in courtrooms. This advanced journalism course will get students into the courtrooms, case files and archives of Rhode Island's judicial system and into committee hearings at the State House where they will report on stories that incorporate drama, tension, and narrative storytelling. Prerequisite: ENGL1050G, ENGL1050H or ENGL1160A (Advanced Feature Writing). Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1160F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Digital Nonfiction

    Digital Nonfiction is an opportunity to explore the fundamental differences between print and digital narratives. Focusing on three short assignments and one longer project, this class encourages students to learn by doing. Additionally, students develop their digital fluency by exploring a variety of platforms and readings. Digital Nonfiction is an advanced creative nonfiction class that requires ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Lyricism and Lucidity

    For the advanced writer. This course will explore two subsets of the personal essay that blur or cross boundary lines--the lyric essay and the photographic essay-- in both traditional and experimental formats. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Satire and Humor Writing

    For the advanced writer. This course will introduce students to the practice of writing satire and humorous essays. Readings will include works by Jonathan Swift, Mark Twain, Garrison Keillor, Bill Bryson, David Foster Wallace, David Sedaris, and others, and students will develop skills in analyzing, writing, and workshopping in the genre. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Writing Medical Narrative

    This class will examine the recent turn toward the use of narrative in medicine and the recent trend of published medical narrative. We'll look at literary and cultural narratives of sickness and health and how they shape perceptions and treatments, while keeping the science and politics of health care—and its public discourse—in view. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0900, ENGL0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Narrating History

    For the advanced writer: the protocols of historical narrative and essay for a general audience. Using the archives of Brown, the Rhode Island Historical Society, and the student's family (if feasible), each writer will research primary and secondary sources, use interviews and oral histories, to help shape three engaging, instructive true stories of the past. Intensive library work, revisions, and peer editing.

    Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Biography

    Biography, one of the oldest forms of creative nonfiction, tells the life story of a person, idea, place, or thing. We consider old and new forms of biography, experiment with those forms, and practice them as a method of inquiry as well as presentation of self. We also explore biography’s connection to journalism, autobiography, memoir, and history. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190C S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Writing the Mythic Life: The Use of Traditional Narrative

    This course explores the theory and practice of traditional narrative structures such as fairy-tale, myth, and legend in creating stories about ourselves. We will read fiction and nonfiction by Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, A.S. Byatt, and others, engaging critically with the texts as well as creating new ones modeled on them. Writing assignments will include several short papers and a longer end-of-term project. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0900, 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes.Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Origins of American Literature

    Where does American literature begin? Can it be said to have a single point of origin? Can writings by people who did not consider themselves American be the source of our national literary tradition? Does such a tradition even exist and, if so, what are its main characteristics? How does one understand the various diverse traditions that constitute American literature, including African-American, Native American, and many others, into a single object of study--or does one even need to? Authors may include de Vaca, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, and Phillis Wheatley. WRIT
    ENGL 1310H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Chaucer

    Texts in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer including the romance Troilus and Criseyde; dream vision poems Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls; Chaucer's translation of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy; his shorter poems; and two Canterbury Tales. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1310T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Liberalism, Empire, and the American Novel

    An historical consideration of how the novel in the United States addresses the relations between American liberalism and the projection of US sovereign authority into international contexts. Topics to be considered include: Manifest Destiny and the frontier; Reconstruction and the rise of imperial America; World War II and the Cold War; and the United States at the end of History.
    ENGL 1511N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Nature and the Self in Victorian Poetry

    The major works of Victorian poetry, spanning from the end of the Romantic period to the beginnings of Modernist poetry: roughly 1840 to 1890. We will be reading Matthew Arnold, Robert Browning, Thomas Hardy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Alfred Tennyson in detail, as well as critical writing and political poetry from the period.
    ENGL 1511V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Melville

    A seminar looking closely at the relation between the life and literary work of Herman Melville, with an extended reading of his masterpiece, Moby-Dick. The course will look at the history of writing and publishing during Melville's era and consider some of his contemporaries like Hawthorne and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1560B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Swift, Pope, Johnson

    The course provides in-depth study of three major writers of the eighteenth century and will include cultural contexts. Readings include Gulliver's Travels, The Rape of the Lock, and Rasselas. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE
    ENGL 1561G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • American Literature and the Corporation

    A study of the development of the American novel from the Civil War to the present in light of the emergence of the corporation as the principal unit of economic enterprise in the United States. We will survey corporate theory from Lippmann to Collins, and use it to frame the novel's development from realism through modernism into postmodernism. Corporate theorists to be considered: Lippmann, Dewey, Berle, Drucker, Mayo, Demming, Friedman, Coase. Novelists to be considered: Twain, Dreiser, Wharton, Stein, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wright, Ellison, McCullers, Reed, Gaddis, Morrison. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S56
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture

    The Harlem Renaissance was a remarkable flowering of culture in post-war New York as well as a social movement that advanced political agendas for the nation. This course takes up the relationship between literature and politics by exploring such matters as the urbanization of black America, the representation of the black poor, the influence of white patronage, and the rise of primitivism. Writers may include Hughes, Hurston, Larsen, Fisher, Locke, and McKay. DPLL
    ENGL 1710I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Modernism and Everyday Life

    We will examine modernist literature in the context of contemporary art, psychology, and theories of everyday life to ask how this period understood ordinary objects and events. Could they be the proper subject matter of art? In the right circumstances, might they actually be art? Writers may include Woolf, Joyce, Williams, Eliot, Stein, James, Freud, deCerteau. One previous literature class required.
    ENGL 1710L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Zoopoetics

    This course will explore the intersections between the depictions of plants and animals in twentieth and twenty-first century poetry and the theoretical conversations about non-human worlds unfolding in emerging fields, such as animal studies and the environmental humanities. Readings will range from poetic texts by Francis Ponge and Marianne Moore to theoretical texts by figures such as Donna Haraway.
    ENGL 1710Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • The Korean War in Color

    We examine US and South Korean representations of the Korean War. We look at how this event was depicted in US films of the 1950s with a focus on how it occasioned a transformation of American understandings of race, both domestically and transnationally. We then look at how this event has been memorialized by contemporary American authors as well as in South Korean literature and film. Authors we read include: Susan Choi, Ha Jin, Chang-rae Lee, Toni Morrison, Jayne Anne Phillips and Hwang Sok-Yong. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ENGL 1761V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Medieval Manuscript Studies: Paleography, Codicology, and Interpretation

    How do you read a medieval manuscript? This course teaches hands-on methodologies for deciphering the material text, including palaeography (history of scripts) and codicology (archeology of the book); contemporary models of interpreting scribal texts, including editorial theory and analysis of readers' reception; and medieval concepts of textuality and interpretation, including medieval theories of authorship and the arts of memory. Prior course work in Middle English or Latin or other medieval language recommended. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1900Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Literature and the Digital Humanities

    We will explore the implications of using digital technologies to study literature. How does our understanding of literature and literary study change—if it does—in light of recently developed digital methods for studying such works? How do such methods compare with traditional ways of studying literature? How might literary studies be reconceived in relation to new media studies? Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1901E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Civil Wars, Restoration, and Early Georgian Literature

    The seminar will consider major works from the English Civil Wars to the first years of the eighteenth-century, with attention to cultural and theoretical contexts for understanding important developments such as print culture, war, nation-formation, the marketplace, and public/private spheres. Writers will include Milton, Rochester, Behn, Restoration playwrights, Dryden, Swift, and others. Additional readings will include selections from Adorno, Pocock, Anderson, Zizek, Brown, Johns, and others. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.
    ENGL 2360R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Lyric and Ecstasy

    A seminar on ecstatic souls and ecstatic bodies in the lyric poetry of three major English authors--Donne, Crashaw, and Milton--who are rarely read together. (The course may also open out to other historical periods depending on student interests.) We'll consider lyric poetry not only as an apposite medium for rendering ecstatic experience, but also how lyric can itself function as a stimulus for ecstasy. Theoretical readings may include Bataille, Deleuze, Hollywood, Scarry, Culler, and others. We'll also engage the new lyric studies and the revival of aesthetic criticism. Limited to 15 graduate students in English, Comparative Literature, Religion, Literary Arts.
    ENGL 2360Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Psyche and Ethos in the Nineteenth-Century Novel

    This seminar will explore the relation between psychological and moral frameworks in the nineteenth-century novel. We will also consider how this period of literary and cultural history set the stage for modern and contemporary debates -- in ethics, cognitive science, and social psychology -- about the nature of selfhood, action, and moral life. Authors to include Eliot, C. Bronte, Trollope, and Hardy. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • James Joyce and Literary Theory

    James Joyce has been a monumental figure in the history of modernism, but his work has also been the focus of major theoretical statements that have helped to define the history of literary criticism over the last half century. This seminar will frame analysis of James Joyce's major works (Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake) with theoretical readings that demonstrate how the debates about interpreting Joyce have shaped and been shaped by the debates about literary theory and modernism. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • After Blackness: Framing Contemporary African American Literature

    The remarkable aesthetic variety and volume of African American literary art produced since the 1980s seems to outpace intellectual labors to conceptualize this work. Nowhere is this dynamic more evident than in the proliferation of interpretive frames devised to articulate the defining currents of contemporary black expression—postnationalist, postmodern, postsegregation, and post-soul among them. By staging an interplay between these theories and literary works, the seminar provides a broad overview of thought about contemporary black culture and gestures towards the scholarship yet to be done. Literary and theoretical texts by Morrison, Whitehead, Wideman, Beatty, Gilroy, Dubey, and Warren. Enrollment Limited to 15
    ENGL 2761H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Identity and Agency

    Any consideration of identity is bound to run up against the concept of agency. Considering identity and agency as mutually constitutive, this course looks at identity's formation and reformation as a narrative experience and effect, examining its emergence on historical and affective terrains. Approaching identity from a range of vantages (psychoanalysis, gender, history, law), we trace the ways that identities might be consolidated into (or, alternatively, unravel) cultural, political, national, or social arrangements. Works by Plato, James, Woolf, Isherwood, Camus, Orwell, Duras, and Proust. Critical and theoretical texts by Arendt, Benjamin, Freud, Lacan, Winnicott, Goffman, Levinas, Butler. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Literary Theory II: Post-Structuralism and the Problem of the Subject

    Conceived as a companion course to COLT 2650M, this seminar will approach the “problem of the subject” as the basis of the 20th-century experiment in critical thinking known as “post-structuralism.” Our focus will be on implications for scholarship in the humanities with a special emphasis on literature and literary criticism. We begin with Marx and Freud, founders of the disciplines (Marxism and psychoanalysis) that most influentially put the subject into question, and go on to consider questions of language, perception, ideology, authorship, desire and sexuality. Readings include Saussure, Bergson, Althusser, Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, Butler, Malabou. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Pedestrian Theory: Walking, Working, Waking

    Some political and philosophical vocabularies conjure thinking as walking, working, and/or waking. How do these concepts enact practices of critical deliberation and habits of reading? How do these concepts variously position us in relation to dissent, negativity, and refusals of -- or demands for -- compensation? Possible texts by Plato, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Emerson, Benjamin, Freud, Winnicott, Derrida, de Certeau, de Man. Films by Cronenberg, Haynes.
    ENGL 2901C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    ENGL 2901C F01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    F: Filming/Screening
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep