Courses for Fall 2016

  • Love Stories

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? We will see how writers have addressed this question from Shakespeare's day to the present. Writers may include Shakespeare, Austen, Eliot, Flaubert, Graham Greene, Marilynne Robinson, and/or others. Students should register for ENGL 0100P S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0100P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Being Romantic

    "Romantic literature" and "Romantic art" are familiar concepts in the history of culture. But what does "Romantic" actually mean? Were Coleridge and Keats especially dedicated to writing about erotic love? Why would "Romantic" literature emerge during the period of the French Revolution and Industrial Revolution? What does early 19th-century "Romanticism" have to do with the meaning and status of the "Romantic" in our culture today? Readings in British and American writing from Blake and Mary Shelley to Ani DiFranco and Rage Against the Machine.
    ENGL 0100S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Serial Fictions

    A study of serial and serialized fictional narratives from the nineteenth century the present-- dime novels, serial genre fictions, literary novels comprised of chapters initially published as short stories, radio and film serials, television programs old (The Naked City, Hawaii-Five 0), newer (The Wire, Sex in the City), and new (Americans), podcasts, and video games (Legend of Zelda).
    ENGL 0100U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Inventing Asian American Literature

    What insights can literature provide into the complicated workings of race in America? What role can the invention of a literary tradition play in illuminating and rectifying past and present injustices? We explore these questions by examining how the idea of an Asian American literary tradition came into being and by reading influential works that have become part of its canon. Students should register for ENGL 0100V S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0100V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Shakespeare's Present Tense

    Shakespeare in Love suggests how Shakespeare was clued in to elite and popular cultures. Current adaptations like O and 10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU demonstrate how Shakespeare provides anachronistic clues to issues of the present. This course will trace such clues by examining the cultural origins and ongoing adaptations of Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Henry V, and the sonnets. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0150D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • The Terrible Century

    Although the term "terrorism" was coined in the 18th century, and although its contemporary resonance has reached an unprecedented pitch, the truly terrible century was arguably the 20th. This course introduces 20th century literature in English through a historical and philosophical examination of terror and terrorism. We will focus on several historical contexts, including: British colonialism in Ireland and Africa, South African apartheid, and the post 9/11 world. Readings include Conrad, Bowen, Farrell, Gordimer, Coetzee, Foulds, Walters, Hamid. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0150U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Literature and the Visual Arts

    How do words and images represent? Are the processes by which literature and the visual arts render the world similar or different? Is reading a novel or a poem more like or unlike viewing a painting, a sculpture, or a film? This seminar will analyze important theoretical statements about these questions as well as selected literary and visual examples. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0150W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Monsters in America

    Monsters reveal our deepest fears and our greatest insecurities, and every society creates the monsters that it needs. Probing the shifting terrains of sexual, racial, and cultural otherness that monsters represent, this course examines depictions of monstrosity in 19th- and 20th-century American literature and film. Possible authors/films include: Hawthorne, Lovecraft, Stephen Crane, Octavia Butler, Asimov, The Elephant Man, and Alien. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fung
  • Reading With Feeling

    How do we feel with our bodies? Starting from the Enlightenment and moving to romanticism this course examines various literary and philosophical accounts of sympathy and sentimentality as modes that complicate the self and its relation to society. Authors include: Adam Smith, Goldsmith, Sterne, Austen, Wordsworth, Joanna Baillie, Keats. Films include Bridget Jones’s Diary and Atonement. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heine
  • Fresh Off the Boat: Immigration and Border-Crossings in American Empire

    How do borders, migration, and naturalization figure into 20th century media? Through several waves of US immigration, this course explores themes of border-crossing in European, Asian and Latina/o migration. Authors: Kafka, Willa Cather, Junot Diaz, Jhumpa Lahiri, Tao Lin. Films/TV: Fresh Off the Boat, El Norte. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT
    ENGL 0200S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lee
  • Beowulf to Aphra Behn: The Earliest British Literatures

    Major texts and a few surprises from literatures composed in Old English, Old Irish, Anglo-Norman, Middle English, and Early Modern English. We will read texts in their historical and cultural contexts. Texts include anonymously authored narratives like Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, selected Canterbury Tales by Chaucer, and texts by Sir Thomas Malory, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Aphra Behn. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0300F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Shakespeare: The Screenplays

    It's been said that if Shakespeare were alive today he'd be working in Hollywood. We will read five or six plays (including at least one representative of each of Shakespeare's genres: comedy, history, tragedy, romance) and then study film adaptations of them. The course is especially concerned with various approaches to the Shakespeare film: not just the straightforward adaptation, but also the Shakespeare spin-off ("10 Things"; "My Own Private Idaho"), the Shakespeare film as a star-turn (Helen Mirren as "Prospera" in Taymor's "Tempest"), and the Shakespeare film as an auteur-turn (Orson Welles's "Chimes at Midnight"; Polanski's "Macbeth").
    ENGL 0310E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Gender and Genre in Medieval Celtic Literatures

    This course traces images of masculinity and femininity in Welsh, Cornish, Breton, and Irish narratives within and around early medieval Britain. You will be introduced to the genres of saga, romance, and the short poetic lai as you consider how the nature and gender of the hero changes in specific cultural and linguistic moments.
    ENGL 0310G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Austen, Eliot, James

    A survey of the three English novelists who turned the novel into a vehicle for analysis, representation of consciousness, social judgment, and ethical questioning. Major works to be read: Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Daniel Deronda, and The Portrait of a Lady. Particular attention to be paid to questions of voice and the self-reflective capacities of the novel form.
    ENGL 0511D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Poetic Cosmologies

    This course will examine how various traditions within modern and contemporary poetry have addressed the question of materiality. Readings will range from poetic explorations of the archaeologies of place by William Carlos Williams and Charles Olson, to the investigations of non-human materialities of crystals, clouds and bacteria by writers such as Clark Coolidge, Christian Bök and Lisa Robertson. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Modernist Cities

    In the early twentieth century, modernist writers headed for New York, Paris, London and other cities, and based their literary experiments on forms of metropolitan life. We will discuss chance encounters, cosmopolitan and underground nightlife, solitary wandering, and bohemian communities. Writers may include Barnes, Dos Passos, Eliot, Hemingway, Hughes, Larsen, Joyce, McKay, Rhys, Woolf. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • American Literature in the Era of Segregation

    This course examines how American literature intersects with the legal, ethical, and racial discourses that defined the system of racial segregation. The class will assess literary works in relation to the discourses employed historically to rationalize segregation. In addition the course will explore the ways that literary style and genre became inseparable from the culture of segregation. Authors include Mark Twain, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, and Ralph Ellison. DPLL
    ENGL 0710Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0900 S06
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0900 S08
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Morgan
    ENGL 0900 S09
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Yates
    ENGL 0900 S10
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Gastiger
    ENGL 0900 S11
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Byrne
    ENGL 0900 S12
    Fall sections 02, 04, 05, and 08 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Casey
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Fall section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Fall section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Fall section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Fall section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Adrian
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Fall section 01 is reserved for first-year students. Fall section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
  • The Thoughtful Generalist

    This *ONLINE* section of “ENGL1030: Critical Reading and Writing II: Research” will prepare you for academic and real-world discourse. In Canvas, you will discuss essays demonstrating deep research distilled into engaging intellectual journey. You will research and revise four explanatory, analytical, persuasive essays, using varied sources to explore subjects or issues of your choice. Mandatory peer reviews and conferences ONLINE and in person. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030A S01

    This course is offered fully online. Students do not need to be on Brown's campus to participate in this course. Please view the technical requirements for this online course below.

    Technical Requirements:
    -Computer with reliable, high-speed internet connection
    -Up-to-date Internet browser supported by Canvas, Brown's learning management system. https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-1284
    -Camera for still and video images (or smartphone)
    -Headphones, earbuds or speakers
    -Webcam and microphone
    -Adobe Flash Player browser plugin (Course elements may require Flash and will not work on an iPad.)
    -Word Processing application to save and open Microsoft Office formats (.doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .ppt, .pptx).
    -Courses can also be accessed on tablets and mobile devices. These devices can be used as supplemental access points in order to complete most coursework. https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-1542
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • The Artist in the Archives

    While artists can benefit greatly from archival work, they are not typically given the tools to make use of these institutions. This writing intensive course takes a two pronged approach to the problem: embedding students in archives both at Brown and RISD to produce creative, lyrical, and multi-media essays; and exploring how artists have used these institutions for information and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Lifewriting

    We explore writing's various forms—memoir, diary, essay, graphic narrative, film, and autobiography—while crafting personal narrative. Students read sample texts, view films, and keep an electronic diary. Projects include a memoir, personal critical essay, and final autobiography, as well as shorter assignments.This is a writing workshop, so students read & critique each others work. Individual conferences with the instructor also provide feedback. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050D S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course, taught by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    1050G Sec 01 is reserved for first-years and sophomores students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    ENGL 1050G S02
    1050G Sec 01 is reserved for first-years and sophomores students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Multimedia Nonfiction

    In this class students will write and explore essays that focus on the meaningful integration of images, videos, and web tools with traditional nonfiction subgenres. No previous digital experience is necessary. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Music Writing

    Music writing asks that we take readers across a space not entirely tangible. To listen—with care—and then articulate, with words written, what was heard and what was experienced. Music writing is a big genre, encompassing journalism (especially criticism), memoir (by listeners and by direct participants), long-form essay, and lyric forms. This course will touch upon these categories. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • Advanced Journalistic Nonfiction

    For experienced writers. We will study and emulate the works of journalists who write across genres. We will focus on observational skills, narrative arc, the capturing of critical detail, scene setting, character, anecdote, thematic development, precision with words, and voice. Because all such writing is dependent upon quality reporting, we will explore the relationship between fidelity to fact and creativity. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Prerequisites: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1160J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gup
  • Writing Medical Narrative

    This class will examine the recent turn toward the use of narrative in medicine and the recent trend of published medical narrative. We'll look at literary and cultural narratives of sickness and health and how they shape perceptions and treatments, while keeping the science and politics of health care—and its public discourse—in view. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0900, ENGL0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • The Art of Literary Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. Based on Roland Barthes' notion of the fragment, this workshop features an incremental, literary approach to writing nonfiction, in both traditional and experimental formats. In response to daily assignments, students will produce numerous short pieces and three extended "essays," to be gathered into a chapbook at the end of the course. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0180 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    For students accepted as Writing Fellows, this course offers the study of literary essays and composition theory to help develop their own writing with a critical awareness of the elements of an essay. Students will write essays throughout the semester and will confer with each other for every paper, thereby gaining experience in peer tutoring and becoming better writers through the help of an informed peer. They will also respond to the writing of a cohort of students in another designated Writing Fellows class. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Nature Writing

    This course seeks to develop your skills as a senstive reader and writer of the natural world. You will build a portfolio of revised work through a process of workshops, tutorials, and conferences, and engage in discussion of a range of written and visual narratives with reference to their personal, political, and ecological contexts. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Firing the Canon: Early Modern Women's Writing

    Rediscovery and reconsideration of works by early modern women have changed the literary canon; these once-neglected works are becoming mainstream, and they are changing the way we read 'traditional' texts. The reading in this course includes poetry, letters, drama, essays, fiction, and life-writing by authors including Lanyer, Wroth, Cavendish, Behn, Manley, Haywood, Scott, and Montagu.
    ENGL 1310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

    Middle English narratives by Geoffrey Chaucer's band of fictional pilgrims, read in their 14th-century historical and literary contexts. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1310V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Shakespeare and Embodiment

    Consideration of a number of Shakespearean texts including the erotic narrative poem “Venus and Adonis,” the early revenge drama Titus Andronicus, the history Henry IV, pt. 1, the tragedy of Othello, among others, and their various representations of the body: as subject to violence, gender and desire, sovereignty and history. Attention to Shakespeare’s rewriting of Ovid, novelle, and chronicle history. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students.
    ENGL 1360Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Seminar in Old Norse-Icelandic Language and Literature

    This course offers a thorough introduction to a language both closely related to Old English and in which survives one of the richest medieval literatures. We will start with an extensive coverage of grammar and syntax before reading short excerpts from sagas including Egil’s Saga and Grettir’s Saga. Enrollment limited to 20; knowledge of Old English, Latin, or German advised.
    ENGL 1361J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Jane Austen and George Eliot

    A survey of the major novels of Austen and Eliot. Readings will also include contemporary reviews and responses, letters, and Eliot's critical prose, as well as literary theory and criticism addressing questions such as novelistic form, realism and narrativity, the problem of the subject, the politics of aesthetics, and the changing status of the woman writer in the 19th century. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. Instructor permission required. LILE
    ENGL 1560A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • Literature of the American Renaissance

    A study of American literature in the decades surrounding the Civil War, with a view toward registering the ways in which formal literary innovations interacted with a climate of political upheaval and Constitutional crisis. Authors to be considered include: Douglass, Wilson, Lincoln, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Crafts, Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Alcott, Twain, Stowe, Delaney, and Dickinson. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Literature and Culture of Black Power Reconsidered

    This course reexamines the Black Power movement as a signal development in American literature and culture. We will read classics from the period with a view toward reassessing the nuances and complexities of their form and politics. At the same time, we will recover less familiar texts that complicate conventional understandings of what defines this movement. Authors include Malcolm X, Huey P. Newton, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver, John Edgar Wideman, Ernest Gaines, and Amiri Baraka. DPLL
    ENGL 1710P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Bloomsbury and Modernism

    The contribution of the avant-garde “Bloomsbury Group” to the development of literary modernism. The focus will be on the central literary figures (Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, and T. S. Eliot), but attention will also be paid to the visual arts (Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell, and Post-Impressionism) and to social criticism (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, and John Maynard Keynes).
    ENGL 1710Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • The Men's Film, c. 2011

    It’s been said that there’s no such thing as “the men’s film,” only cinema and the subgenre of “the women’s film” (or “weepy”). This seminar reopens that question by focusing on genres (gross-out, bromance, coming of age, war) addressed to male audiences and concerned with men in unusual, even extreme circumstances. Films: The Hangover (1-2); Bridesmaids (female gross-out); Far From Heaven; Magic Mike; The D-Train; Boyhood; American Sniper. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1760X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Yeats, Pound, Eliot

    Readings in the poetry and selected prose of Yeats, Pound, and Eliot. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE
    ENGL 1761P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
  • The Ekphrastic Mode in Contemporary Literature

    Ekphrasis – the extended description of a visual work of art in a work of literature – is as old as Homer and as modern as McEwan; however, in contemporary literary criticism the concept has been eclipsed by terms such as "self-reflexivity" and "metafiction." This course proposes a rediscovery of ekphrasis as a key feature of contemporary works of literature and film. Includes texts by Sebald, Alan Bennett, Godard, Starnone, Panahi, McEwan. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students.
    ENGL 1762B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Literature and Politics

    Literature as a changing historical formation that often represents and is always shaped by the practices of organizing, asserting, and controlling power in society. Sustained focus on writings by Raymond Williams, Leon Trotsky, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Terry Eagleton, and on literary texts read from the perspectives of these six theorists (possibly Shakespeare, Milton, Marvell, Swift, Dickens, Gaskell, the Brontës, Victor Serge, Anna Akhmatova). Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT
    ENGL 1900D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Queer Relations: Aesthetics and Sexuality

    A study of the relationship between aesthetic thought and sexuality in a variety of literary and cinematic works. We will supplement our readings with ventures into queer theory, emphasizing how art is related to identity, community, race, gender, and ethics. Authors include Wilde, Pater, James, Winterson, Cole, Guibert, Foucault, Bersani, Edelman. Films by Julien and Jarman. DPLL
    ENGL 1900R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Shakespeare: a Politics of Love

    This seminar will explore certain of Shakespeare’s plays—mainstays such as Romeo and Juliet and Othello but also more marginal texts, such as All’s Well and As You Like It—in order to discern a politics of love. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2360Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Studying American Literature in a Digital Age

    How might scholars navigate the digital technologies increasingly used by humanists to access, archive, and study literary (and related) material in the information age? We’ll consider how our understanding of literature and literary study changes—if it does—in light of the digital turn and investigate how literary studies might be reconceived in light of the digital revolution. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • The Romantic Detail

    This course reads texts from the Romantic archive that provide a staging ground for the ethics, aesthetics, and politics of the detail. We will explore how a detail can move from part to whole, inconsequentiality to consequence, revelation and reticence, as well as become a sign of gender difference, sexual dissidence, and racial ambiguity. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Poetics of Liveliness: Materiality and Change in Modern and Contemporary Poetry

    This seminar will draw on emerging conversations in “new materialisms,” animal studies, queer theory and environmental literature to consider the problem of describing the variegated rhythms of change occurring within material worlds. Placing emphasis on how poetic texts stage a set of lively entanglements between materiality and temporality we will consider writing by Stein, Olson, Smithson, Hejinian, Robertson, Grosz, Barad. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • War and the Politics of Cultural Memory

    Examines British, European, and American cultural texts and sites that engage in the work of remembering in relation to four conflicts: the Second World War, the Korean War, Vietnam, and the so-called War on Terror. Works by Woolf, Georges Perec, Chang-rae Lee, Phil Klay, and Mohamedou Ould Slah; Agamben, Arendt, Hirsch, Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy; films by Lanzmann and Coppola. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Priority given to students in the English Ph.D. program. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of instructor.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Comparative Literature
    COLT 2830I Histories of the Early Modern Body
    Cogut Center for Humanities
    HMAN 2970W Ethics/Politics
    Judaic Studies
    JUDS 0050A Believers, Agnostics, and Atheists in Contemporary Fiction
    JUDS 0830 The Bible as Literature
    ENGL XLIST 0