Courses for Fall 2021

  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1200 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S47
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S67
    Primary Instructor
    Hipchen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S68
    Primary Instructor
    Scozzaro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Abdur-Rahman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S64
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S65
    Primary Instructor
    Ramirez D'Oleo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S66
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S68
    Primary Instructor
    Scozzaro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Abdur-Rahman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S64
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S65
    Primary Instructor
    Ramirez D'Oleo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Brontës and Brontëism

    The novels of Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë alongside works (fiction and film) influenced by or continuing their powerful (and competing) authorial visions: Wide Sargasso Sea (Rhys), Rebecca (Hitchcock), The Piano (Campion), and Suspiria (Argento). Among other questions, we will discuss the role of Romanticism, feminism, the bodily imaginary, colonialism, and genre. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Hitchcock!

    An exploration of the work of one of the most famous directors of the twentieth century. We will watch many of Alfred Hitchcock’s best-loved films, including The Birds, North by Northwest, Vertigo, Psycho, Rear Window, and Rope. In addition, we will read some of the most important criticism of these films. No knowledge of film theory required. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0151A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary lecture Mon/Wed and select ONE Friday conference section.
    Primary Instructor
    Scozzaro
    ENGL 0310A C01
    Primary Instructor
    Scozzaro
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0310A C03
    Primary Instructor
    Madani
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Tolkien and the Renaissance

    This course explores the work of J.R.R. Tolkien alongside Renaissance forbears such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Milton and others. Topics to include love and friendship, good and evil, violence and nonviolence, and how literature offers distinctive forms of life. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • City Spaces, City Memories

    How do cities, whose built environment constantly changes, preserve and remember their pasts? We focus on 20th and 21st century New York City to investigate the way both personal and communal pasts are located in the city’s fabric. Course material includes novels, journalism, memoirs, and photography, along with memorials and tourist attractions. Prerequisite: one previous literature class. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1762L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Reading Literature in an Information Age

    Is there something distinctive about reading, studying, and/or producing literature in an information age? Is literature's status as a form of deep social engagement and a way to produce broad social changes in jeopardy given the way STEM and the social sciences are represented in U.S. culture at large? Has the literary become obsolete in a video-driven media environment? And what place does the literary occupy in an information world? Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1901M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Law and Literature

    This seminar explores the conceptual, psychological and rhetorical connections between literature and law, examining how both disciplines shape the imagination but also aim to elicit response and responsibility. We will consider how literary works, legal writings, and legal opinions inform each other, but also illuminate each other’s blind spots. Looking beyond trial scenes, the course invites students to think about how principles and notions in law structure, and are structured by, literature and language. Authors include Walter Benjamin, Joseph Conrad, Albert Camus, Rebecca West, and Chinua Achebe; legal texts by Holmes, Bentham, Cover and a number of judicial opinions. Limited to 20 senior English concentrators.
    ENGL 1950F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Nonfiction Now

    Nonfiction Now introduces students to contemporary nonfiction writing through in-person exposure to professional writers, who will visit the course to deliver a craft lecture, read from their latest work and discuss the labor that goes into maintaining a professional writing life. Students will be expected to read the work of the visitor and produce creative work in response. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 30 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required. S/NC
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    This course prepares students for their work as Writing Fellows. Course readings, activities, and assignments introduce students to: post-process writing theory and pedagogy; data-based investigations of the revision habits of experienced and inexperienced writers; and effective methods for responding to student writing and conferencing with student writers. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carroll
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Enrollment restricted to students in the English Ph.D. program.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • The Public Intellectual

    This course offers advanced writers an opportunity to practice sophisticated, engaged critical writing in academic, personal, and civic modes. Emphasis will be on writing "public" essays (general audience essays that do intellectual work or academic essays that address public topics), ideally in fluid, "hybrid," audience-appropriate forms. Areas of investigation will include (but are not limited to) the review essay, the cultural analysis essay, literary documentary, and the extended persuasive/analytic essay. It will include some brief "touchstone" investigations into rhetorical theory, with the aim of helping to broaden our concepts of audience, analyze the constitutive and imaginative effects of language, increase the real-world effectiveness of our own language practices, and situate our writing within current political, cultural, aesthetic and intellectual debates. Students must have sophomore standing or higher in order to be admitted to the class. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930, 1030, or 1050. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • Travel Writing: Personal and Cultural Narratives

    For the advanced writer. Helps students build skills in the growing genre of travel writing, including techniques for reading, composing, and revising travel pieces. Students will read the best contemporary travel writing in order to develop their own writing in areas like narrative, setting, characters, and voice. The course will feature interactive discussions, instructor conferences, and workshops. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0900 sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Quirk
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0900 sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Sobande
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0900 sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rosenberg
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0900 sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ciccone
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0900 sections 01 and 02 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Jackshaw
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hipchen
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0930 S06
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 03, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S07
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    ENGL 0930 S08
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0930 S09
    Fall 2021 ENGL 0930 sections 02, 04, and 07 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Reframing Race in Art Writing

    This seminar will consider how contemporary writers and critics respond to art that directly addresses race and challenges institutional power. We will discuss past and recent controversies involving race and representation in exhibitions and examine the relationships between artists, museums and other art institutions, and public audiences. We will consider how writing about arts and culture can advance public discourse about race, equity, and justice. Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1050P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0930 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • Contemporary Asian American Writers

    In this advanced writing workshop, we will explore the work of Asian American writers who are engaging with questions of race and ethnicity; self-invention and identity; visibility and representation. We'll consider how authors use writing to give voice to marginalized experiences, preserve cultural memory, and redress injustice. Guest writers will read from and discuss their own work. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writings samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arnold
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course, taught by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    Fall: 1050G section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    ENGL 1050G S02
    Fall: 1050G section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Milton

    A recent book provocatively asked: “Is Milton better than Shakespeare?” Whatever one makes of that question, Milton wrote extraordinary poems in the principal modes of Renaissance verse. This course studies in detail many of those works, including the culturally monumental Paradise Lost. We’ll also take into account the shape of Milton’s authorial career and his always interesting ways with genre. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.
    ENGL 1361L S01
    Instructor permission only.
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Devils, Demons, Do-Gooders

    Who hasn’t struggled with the problem of good and evil? We will investigate how various writers grapple with these fundamental questions of judgment. What constitutes good and evil in the first place, and who gets to make such judgments? Works may include John Milton, Mary Shelley, Jhumpa Lahiri, Frederick Douglass, Toni Morrison, and Herman Melville. Students should register for ENGL 0100F S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100F S01
    Primary lecture Wed/Fri and select ONE Monday conference section. All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    ENGL 0100F C01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100F C02
    Primary Instructor
    Ben-Meir
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100F C03
    Primary Instructor
    Brooksher
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100F C04
    Primary Instructor
    Cunniff
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100F C05
    Primary Instructor
    Rowe
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Love Stories

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? We will see how writers have addressed this question from Shakespeare's day to the present. Writers may include Shakespeare, Austen, Eliot, Flaubert, Graham Greene, Marilynne Robinson, and/or others. Students should register for ENGL 0100P S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100P S01
    Primary lecture Mon/Wed and select ONE Friday conference section. All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    ENGL 0100P C01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100P C02
    Primary Instructor
    Dun
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100P C03
    Primary Instructor
    Gallardo
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100P C04
    Primary Instructor
    Pisanelli
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 0100P C05
    Primary Instructor
    Ross
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Late Romantics

    An introduction to the varied work of canonical and non-canonical writers often described as British second-generation or late Romantics: Keats, the Shelleys, Byron, Clare, de Quincey, Hemans, Austen. We will explore what lateness constitutes for these authors as a political, aesthetic, and ethical category, and consider how it informs the kind of distinctly "Romantic" work that characterizes their writings. Particular emphasis on close readings of poetry and theoretical texts, as well as excursions into late nineteenth-century authors.
    ENGL 0511H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Postcolonial Literature

    Examines fiction, drama, poetry, travel writing, and cultural criticism by contemporary writers from former colonies of the British Empire. We study works by Anglophone writers from African, Caribbean, and South Asian backgrounds. Issues that will concern us include: cultural-nationalism, diaspora, and globalization; histories, identities, and generational shifts; literary form and the idea of “postcolonial literature.” Authors will include Coetzee, Ghosh, Hartman, Naipaul, Ondaatje, Kincaid, Soyinka, Walcott, and Wicomb. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700E S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Poetry and Science

    This course will explore the relationship between the observational procedures and modes of composition employed by twentieth and twenty-first century poets who have worked in more conceptual or avant-garde traditions and the practices of description and experimentation that have emerged out of history of science. Readings will range from Gertrude Stein’s poetic taxonomies to recent work in critical science studies.
    ENGL 0710R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • The Nineteenth-Century Novel

    This seminar examines how British and French nineteenth-century novels thematize history, memory, representation and desire. Authors to be studied include Austen, Stendhal, Balzac, Dickens, Flaubert, Eliot, and, if time allows, James and/or Proust. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
  • Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture

    The Harlem Renaissance was a remarkable flowering of culture in post-war New York as well as a social movement that advanced political agendas for the nation. This course takes up the relationship between literature and politics by exploring such matters as the urbanization of black America, the representation of the black poor, the influence of white patronage, and the rise of primitivism. Writers may include Hughes, Hurston, Larsen, Fisher, Locke, and McKay.
    ENGL 1710I S01
    Primary lecture Mon/Wed and select ONE Friday conference section.
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    ENGL 1710I C01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    ENGL 1710I C02
    Primary Instructor
    Marsh
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Contemporary Black Women's Literature

    Examination of black women’s literature in the post- Civil Rights period. Foregrounding complexities of black womanhood, course investigates how black women have used writing to revise history, assert agency, manufacture beauty, and redress personal and group injury. Emphasis on the intersections of precarity and power, race and rebellion, pastness and black feminist futurity within the context of Africana women’s literary legacies. Specific attention paid to the aesthetics of form and the interrelations of race, class, sexuality, generation and nation. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1711L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Abdur-Rahman
  • The Pursuit of Happiness: Transatlantic Literary Culture in the Long Eighteenth Century

    English and American literature of the long eighteenth century with a focus on emerging concepts of happiness. Reading includes poetry, novels, satire, travel, moral philosophy, and other genres. The right to pursue happiness placed in the context of new forms of social mobility such as education, class, and affectionate marriage, but also in the context of war, empire, slavery, and other metropolitan and colonial cultural formations and exchanges. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Caribbean Literature

    Focusing mostly on prose narrative from the nineteenth-century to the present day, this seminar is an overview of various important texts from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone or Kreyol Caribbean texts. As crucial themes in the literary culture of the Caribbean, class discussion will be framed around questions of colonialism, slavery, blackness, whiteness, indigeneity, class as well as literary and aesthetic innovations such as surrealism, realism, and other important formalist trends and interventions. Texts originally written in Spanish and French will be read in translation, but students have the option of reading them in the original if they prefer as long as they are able to engage the class through the translation as well. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1762M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ramirez D'Oleo
  • Genres of American Comedy

    A survey of a number of American comic traditions, with a special emphasis on the ways in which these traditions elaborate, challenge, and/or promulgate middle-class social norms in the US. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0151E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Nationalizing Narratives: Race, Nationalism, and the American Novel

    While American novels can imagine the nation as a multiracial unity, they also provide potent critiques of white supremacy, giving literary form to the cultural expressions of communities of color. We examine novelistic visions of the nation by writers like Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, and Viet Nguyen along with critical anatomies of nationalism by theorists like Benedict Anderson and Etienne Balibar. Not open to first year students.
    ENGL 1710M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Hollywood and American Modernism from FDR to JFK

    Study of the interactions among Hollywood and modernism from the beginning of the sound era through the early 1960s. Authors and directors to be considered include, Loos, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Ferber, Hawks, Wilder, Hitchcock, Mann, and Ford. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1761D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Do the Right Thing

    An examination of literary works as developing our modern framework of moral values, along the way taking up questions of temptation, corruption, punishment, redemption, and responsibility. We will start with Christian allegorical texts (Dr. Faustus and Pilgrim's Progress), complicate the picture with 19th century psychological fiction, and conclude with some masterpieces of art cinema.
    ENGL 0100Y S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Melville, Conrad, and the Sea

    This class reads a number of the major works of Melville and Conrad in order to ask a number of questions crucial to understanding modern narrative: the relationship between realism and the romance (the sea being both the setting for adventure and a place of work); how, why, and by whom stories are told and passed on (the sea being both the place where ‘tall tales’ are told and where they are set); the role of the eye-witness (how do you prove you saw what no else has seen). Texts include "Moby Dick," "Billy Budd," "Lord Jim," and "Heart of Darkness."
    ENGL 1511Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • African American Language, Literacy, and Culture

    In this course, we will explore the social, educational, and political implications of AAL in the 21st century. Our task is threefold: we will 1) examine AAL semantics, syntax, phonology, and morphology, 2) identify underlying historical and socio-economic forces responsible for shaping AAL, and 3) explore the impact of AAL within Black speech communities and U.S. and global popular culture. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Black Popular Culture and Social Movements

    As a site of critical inquiry, Black popular culture provides valuable insight into the ways oppressed people (and allies) identify and mobilize against unjust power structures in society. We will begin with immersion experiences with primary and secondary resources that reveal how “voices on the margins” assert agency, identity, and community. Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Cogut Institute for Humanities
    HMAN 2401E Retouch: The Imaginaries of Repair
    ENGL XLIST 0
  • Studying at the End of the World

    This course will consider the enduring power of study, as it has been conceptualized in Renaissance European thought as studia humanitatis, and more recently in calls for the end of the university as we know it. Through a range of texts, essays, and visual media, we will consider what studying otherwise might mean here at the end of the world. Authors include: William Shakespeare, George Jackson, Octavia Butler, Ia Paperson, Kamau Brathwaite, etc. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lasasso
  • Graphic Novels and the Politics of Memoir

    Are comics literature? Can images help us bear witness? How do text and illustration work with or against one another? Paying special attention to the memoir form, this course explores the contemporary graphic novel (together with film and other visual narratives) as a transformative medium for political and aesthetic expression. Works by Spiegelman, Bechdel, Satrapi, Sacco, Richard Linklater, and others. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Adhikari
  • Necromancy for Beginners

    Have you ever wanted to speak to the dead? Or bring something dead back to life? This course examines the fantasies, historical practices, and political forces shaping reanimation and otherworldly communication in literature from medieval grimoires to contemporary American film. Authors/directors include: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton, Cavendish, Shelley, Lovecraft, Rymer (AHS), Bayona (Penny Dreadful), Sackheim (Lovecraft Country), and Fell/Butler (ParaNorman). Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Darrow
  • Black (W)holes, Black Feminism(s), and Black Feeling

    The seminar takes-up black women’s “self-defined sexualities.” What is a black feminist arrangement of erotic feeling, pleasure, and sexuality? What are its coordinates? Conditions? How might they change? We ground our exploration in close study of black feminist poetics—the specific formal and creative choices that poets, fiction writers, visual artists, and others use to critically examine life in art. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Holman
  • Trans Cultural Production and Trans Studies

    What animates the fields of transgender studies and trans cultural criticism in a moment of assimilation, heightened visibility, and violence? By reflecting on contemporary examples of trans cultural production, including literature, film, and new media, this course explores a wide range of art-making and activism working against state violence. Readings and works by Kai Cheng Thom, Tourmaline, and Leslie Feinberg.
    ENGL 0711B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lee
  • Editing as Revision

    This fully gamified course, organized by historically-based writing guilds and their competitors in bookselling, introduces students to content, copy, and proofs editing as revision praxis. Students will edit publishable texts inside an imaginative game-world, learning editing strategies that help expert authors revise scholarly nonfiction—strategies students will find useful in working with their own writing as well. Class will be capped at 17. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. Open to juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hipchen
  • The Global Middle Ages

    This course offers students an introduction to the medieval period as a time of active cultural exchange, racial imaginaries, and decentralized globality. We will explore what it means to think about history on a global scale, how to broaden our understanding of the Middle Ages without replicating Eurocentric perspectives, and how literary texts work to mediate history.
    ENGL 0300L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Min
  • Bad Blood: Conflict and the Family in Literature and Cinema

    The family home, often thought of as a refuge from the outside world, can also be a site of tension, competition, violence and horror. Why does dysfunction in the domestic sphere shock and fascinate us, and why is the gothic so intimately tied to the domestic? Readings and viewings from: Shakespeare, Shelley, Brontë, Wilde, Nabokov, Salinger, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Park Chan-wook.
    ENGL 0711C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Yates