Courses for Fall 2017

  • Cultures and Countercultures: The American Novel after World War II

    A study of the postwar American novel in the context of the intellectual history of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. We will read the postwar novel in relation to the affluent society, the vital center, the lonely crowd, the power elite, the one-dimensional man, the post-industrial society. Authors to be considered include Baldwin, Bellow, Ellison, Highsmith, McCarthy, O'Connor, Petry, Pynchon, and Roth. Two lectures and one discussion meeting weekly. Students should register for ENGL 0100J S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Love Stories

    What do we talk about when we talk about love? We will see how writers have addressed this question from Shakespeare's day to the present. Writers may include Shakespeare, Austen, Eliot, Flaubert, Graham Greene, Marilynne Robinson, and/or others. Students should register for ENGL 0100P S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. WRIT
    ENGL 0100P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • How Poems See

    What makes poems and pictures such powerful forms of life? Why do pictures have so much to tell us? How do we see things in words? How do graphic images, optical images, verbal images, and mental images together constitute ways of understanding the world? Looking at poems and images from Giotto and Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Dickinson and Turner through such modern poets and painters as Stevens, Ashberry, Warhol and Heijinian, we will study sensory and symbolic images, the uses and dangers of likeness, and the baffling confluence of concrete and abstract, literal and figurative, body and mind, matter and spirit.
    ENGL 0100Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Being Romantic

    "Romantic literature" and "Romantic art" are familiar concepts in the history of culture. But what does "Romantic" actually mean? Were Coleridge and Keats especially dedicated to writing about erotic love? Why would "Romantic" literature emerge during the period of the French Revolution and Industrial Revolution? What does early 19th-century "Romanticism" have to do with the meaning and status of the "Romantic" in our culture today? Readings in British and American writing from Blake and Mary Shelley to Ani DiFranco and Rage Against the Machine.
    ENGL 0100S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • The Medieval King Arthur

    Where did stories of King Arthur come from and how did they develop in the Middle Ages? We will read the earliest narratives of King Arthur and his companions, in histories and romances from Celtic, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English sources, to examine Arthur's varying personas of warrior, king, lover, thief. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS WRIT
    ENGL 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Realism and Modernism

    The novel as a genre has been closely identified with the act of representation. What it means to represent "reality," however, has varied widely. This seminar will explore how the representation of reality changes as modern fiction questions the assumptions about knowing, language, and society that defined the great tradition of realism. English and American novels will be the primary focus of our attention, but influential French, German, and Russian works will be studied as well. Limited to 20 first-year students. Banner registration after classes begin requires instructor approval. FYS
    ENGL 0150Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Tragic Variations: Classical, Early Modern, Contemporary

    The genre of tragedy has been one of the most hotly contested and theorized topics in the Western canon, yet today, commonplace events are routinely deemed tragic. This seminar examines the history of tragedy by considering representative and foundational literary and philosophical texts (Shakespeare, Aristotle, Sophocles, Milton, Marlowe, and Nietzsche) to understand the “tragic”: catharsis, revenge, fate, pity, etc. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT
    ENGL 0200W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Madani
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. WRIT
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Mark Twain's America

    A course for all kinds of readers of Twain and his contemporaries. Close readings of fiction and essays that focus on race, slavery, capitalism, and the development of "modern" literature. Works include Puddinhead Wilson, Huck Finn, and Connecticut Yankee.
    ENGL 0510D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Melville, Conrad, and the Sea

    Stories begin with the sea: Jason and the Argonauts, Sinbad and the Seven Seas, Odysseus trying to sail home. The sea is the place of ‘tall tales,’ of adventure, and of terror, but also of industrial labor and modern commerce. This class reads the sea narratives of Herman Melville and Joseph Conrad within this larger narrative and historical context.
    ENGL 0511E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Introduction to Native and Indigenous Literatures

    This course will familiarize students with the study of Native and Indigenous literatures in North America. Focusing on a range of genres, geographic locations, and historical moments, students can expect to acquire both a working knowledge of the history of Native literatures in English and a critical methodological approach to the study of American literature.
    ENGL 0511G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Warburton
  • African American Literature and the Legacy of Slavery

    Traces the relationship between the African American literary tradition and slavery from the antebellum slave narrative to the flowering of historical novels about slavery at the end of the twentieth century. Positions these texts within specific literary, historical, and political frameworks. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison. DPLL
    ENGL 0710B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Snow
    ENGL 0900 S06
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rowe
    ENGL 0900 S07
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Cunniff
    ENGL 0900 S08
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Ramamurthy
    ENGL 0900 S09
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Krowiak
    ENGL 0900 S10
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Grandy
    ENGL 0900 S11
    Fall sections 02, 03, 04, 06, and 11 are reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Fall sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Fall sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Fall sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Fall sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Fall sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    ENGL 0930 S06
    Fall sections 01 and 06 are reserved for first-year and sophomore students. Fall section 03 is reserved for first-year students.
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
  • Myth + Modern Essay

    A writing and research focused course, in which students read a small selection of ancient texts (including The Epic of Gilgamesh and Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and use the myths retold to illuminate the contemporary world and to inform the essays they write. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • The Artist in the Archives

    While artists can benefit greatly from archival work, they are not typically given the tools to make use of these institutions. This writing intensive course takes a two pronged approach to the problem: embedding students in archives both at Brown and RISD to produce creative, lyrical, and multi-media essays; and exploring how artists have used these institutions for information and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course, taught by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    1050G, Section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    ENGL 1050G S02
    1050G, Section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students only.
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Multimedia Nonfiction

    Through a series of short assignments, we will learn what audio, visual, and performative tools are available to us and how these different mediums can affect our stories. The course culminates in a final project where each student will pursue a long-form story of their choice of subject and medium. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Writing in Place: Travel, Ecology, Locality

    To explore the relationships among people, places and language, this course will incorporate science and nature writing, environmental / ecological writing, travel writing, psychogeography and architectural writing. Assignments and practices will include diaries, observational writing, reporting, criticism and more lyrical forms. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Writing Diversity: A Workshop

    This course explores various forms of writing that address the broad spectrum of human experience, including issues of race, gender, varying physical and mental ability, social class, and inequities resulting from colonization, among others. Students will attempt to understand the issues and each other through class readings and articulating personal responses in writing. Writing sample required. Pre-requisite: ENGL 0900, ENGL 0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. S/NC. DPLL
    ENGL 1140D S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0180 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • Testimony

    How does the creative nonfiction writer bear witness to profound political, social, and environmental change? In this course students engage with the world as writers. They will conduct extensive interviews within the Brown community and beyond and will turn those first hand testimonials into a suite of creative nonfiction pieces in various genres including the lyric, personal, “found,” and multi-media essay. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rush
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    This course prepares students for their work as Writing Fellows. Course readings, activities, and assignments introduce students to: post-process writing theory and pedagogy; data-based investigations of the revision habits of experienced and inexperienced writers; and effective methods for responding to student writing and conferencing with student writers. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kastner
  • Nature Writing

    This course seeks to develop your skills as a sensitive reader and writer of the natural world. You will build a portfolio of revised work through a process of workshops, tutorials, and conferences, and engage in discussion of a range of written and visual narratives with reference to their personal, political, and ecological contexts. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • The Fiction of Nonfiction

    Nonfiction texts are fictions in that they deploy the devices of fiction (pacing, voice, etc.), but even more so in that they are constructs (they’re in-formed and made up). In this seminar we will revel in the architectonic of good nonfiction writing. Upending the myth of “objectivity,” we will read as if writing mattered, and write as if reading did.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S61
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Chaucer

    Texts in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer including the romance Troilus and Criseyde; dream vision poems Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls; Chaucer's translation of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy; his shorter poems; and two Canterbury Tales. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1310T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Introduction to the Old English Language

    This course offers a thorough introduction to the earliest period of English language and literature. We begin with an extensive coverage of grammar and syntax before reading short texts and a few Old English poems, including The Battle of Brunanburh and Judith. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1360H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Tolkien and the Renaissance

    This course explores the work of J.R.R. Tolkien alongside Renaissance forbears such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Milton and others. Topics to include love and friendship, good and evil, violence and nonviolence, and how literature offers distinctive forms of life. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Shakespearean Comedy

    We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s comedies with attention to his European sources and analogues. Consideration of both formal and historical questions including genre, convention, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, status and degree, and nation. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Getting Emotional: Passionate Theories

    This course examines connections between emotion, feeling, and affect in several key texts from 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century literatures. We will ask how and why affect becomes a central concept for writers and thinkers in the Enlightenment, and chart the ways in which affect productively opens up onto contemporary theorizations of identity, gender, sexuality, and race. Possible authors include: Wordsworth, Austen, Blake, Equiano, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Wilde, Pater, Kant, Melville, Hofmansthal, Hume. Films by Todd Haynes, McQueen, Campion, Frampton. Theoretical readings by Berlant, Ellison, Terada, Deleuze, Stewart. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.
    ENGL 1560W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Writing and the Ruins of Empire

    An exploration of literary representations of "empire" and "imperialism" from the 18th century to the present. Readings in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volney's Ruins of Empire, and a wide range of 19th- and 20th-century texts. Some consideration of theories of imperialism and of visual representations of cultures of empire. Enrollment limited to 20. Prior coursework in 18th- and 19th-century literature advised. WRIT
    ENGL 1561D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Literature and the Problem of Poverty

    Explores poverty as a political and aesthetic problem for the American novelist. Examines the ways that writers have imagined the poor as dangerous others, agents of urban decay, bearers of folk culture, and engines of class revolt. Also considers these literary texts in relation to historical debates about economic inequality. Writers may include Crane, Faulkner, Wright, Steinbeck, and Hurston.
    ENGL 1710K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Image, Music, Text

    This course examines a number of novels and short stories alongside their various cinematic, theatrical, or musical adaptations in order to ask what a medium is and what distinctive formal features might define literature, cinema, theater, and music. Writers will include Melville, Conrad, Maupassant, Mann, and Cortazar; filmmakers will include Hitchcock, Antonioni, Godard, Visconti, and Coppola; critics will include Barthes, Deleuze, and Ranciere. Limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in English, Comparative Literature, MCM, Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies, French Studies, German Studies, Literary Arts.
    ENGL 1762C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Neuroaesthetics and Reading

    Analysis of the theories of art, reading, and aesthetic experience proposed by neuroscience and cognitive science in light of traditional aesthetics and contemporary literary theory. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: At least one course on neuroscience or cognitive science and one 1000-level literature course. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1900Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Reading Narrative Theory

    Narrative is a powerful category of analysis spanning genres, historical periods, media forms, and the distinction between the "fictional" and the "real." This course examines major narrative theorists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will focus on literary examples, such as theories of the folktale and novel, and scholarship that interrogates the work of narrative in historiography, in cinema and television, and in extra-literary contexts (in the struggle of political campaigners to “control the narrative” or debates on narrative in gaming, medical research, law, and theory itself). Limited to 20 senior English concentrators. Others admitted by instructor permission only.
    ENGL 1950G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Proseminar

    This seminar, required for first-year graduate students in English, considers the state and stakes of literary studies today. The course aims to familiarize students with contemporary critical debates and stances in the wider discipline, and to engage with current methodologies, theories, and analytical tensions. We also address issues of professionalization as they relate to the first years of graduate work. Enrollment limited to 10. S/NC.
    ENGL 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Satire and Irony

    Satire is not so much a genre as it is a mode of discourse, like irony, that resists formal constraints and can function in almost any kind of text. Satire’s dynamic contradictions (reform and frustration; laughter and anger; topicality and generality; purposefulness and pointlessness; public and private) enliven early modern texts, and complicate the relationship between language and meaning. Theories of satire provide a framework for the study of its history and practice. Emphasis falls on the great age of satire (especially the works of Jonathan Swift and his contemporaries) but some attention will be given to earlier and later examples.
    ENGL 2561J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • American Literature and Middle Class Labor

    A study of the representation of forms of middle class in labor in American Fiction from the 1830s through the 1970s. Authors to be considered include Melville, Douglass, Jacobs, Twain, James, DuBois, Cather, Hurston, Fitzgerald, and Ellison. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Postcoloniality and Globalism

    Seminar addresses intersections and disjunctions between two currents in contemporary literary and cultural criticism: “postcolonial theory” and “world literature theory.” We read "theory” alongside imaginative literature by writers and critics associated with concepts of postcoloniality, globalism, and diaspora. Themes include: race, identity and subject-position, and the problem of “literature” itself, understood as mode of thought and act of will. Readings will include: Césaire, Damrosch, Fanon, Hall, Jameson, Naipaul, Said, Soyinka, Spivak, Walcott, Wright, Wynter. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2760M S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Ultimate Dialogicality: Thinking With Bakhtin

    “In Dostoevsky’s polyphonic novel we are dealing not with ordinary dialogic form … [but] with an ultimate dialogicality, … a dialogicality of the ultimate whole ..." With this claim, Bakhtin’s writing on literature arguably leaves the realm of criticism and becomes philosophy. In so doing it also anticipates some of the most challenging and significant developments in contemporary literature. Besides Bakhtin's major works, readings include Deleuze, Rancière, Flusser, Woolf, Sebald, Kelman. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Scholarly Writing for Journal Publication

    Writing and professionalization workshop intended for graduate students in literary studies. Topics covered include selection of journal; framing, structuring and composition of the article; the logistics of peer review; sharing and workshopping drafts; working with academic mentors and advisors. Every passing student will have a publishable article under consideration by the end of the semester. Enrollment limited to 12 English Ph.D. students. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Enrollment restricted to students in the English Ph.D. program.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Cogut Center for Humanities
    HMAN 1972X Kubrick's Work
    HMAN 2400B Trans/Passing, In Theory
    HMAN 2971D Caring for the Truth
    Hispanic Studies
    HISP 1240O Theater of Renaissance England and Spain
    ENGL XLIST 0