Courses for Fall 2020

  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1200 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S67
    Primary Instructor
    Hipchen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S64
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S65
    Primary Instructor
    Ramirez D'Oleo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S63
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S60
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S62
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S64
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S65
    Primary Instructor
    Ramirez D'Oleo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Terrible Births: the Novel out of Romanticism

    A new world struggled to be born at the turn of the nineteenth century, as Europe was consumed in revolutionary wars, the Industrial Revolution spawned new powers and violence, and the age of Romanticism envisioned a Promethean spirit unbound in poetry. We will be reading the novels that defined this tumultuous age and those that came in its wake. We will read Shelley's "Frankenstein," Brontë's "Wuthering Heights," and books by Walter Scott, Charlotte Brontë, and Charles Dickens.
    ENGL 0511K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Black Poetics

    This course is interested in poetic thinking: how a poem inclines toward a certain kind of knowing; how a poem’s imagining invites philosophical considerations (as in, what is being, and how to be); how a poem’s language and its formal qualities sustain such thinking. We are interested, also, in how poetic thinking reckons (with) blackness.
    ENGL 0710X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
  • Fantasies of Milton

    Paradise Lost has served as the basis for numerous fantasy novels. Even Comus has become a (supposedly inappropriate) children's story. How can a seventeenth-century poet's treatment of temptation, disobedience, reason and self-regard come to seem relevant in the present? What do contemporary writers feel compelled to preserve and to change? How might we reimagine Milton? Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • American Renaissance

    A course focusing on the writings of the Transcendentalists, reform literature, antislavery and Native American and Indigenous rights. The subjects of history, the capitalist market, Nature, and the development of modern authorship and literary professionalism. Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Alcott, as well as Harriet Wilson, William Apess, and magazine writing.
    ENGL 1561Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Reading New York

    This course explores narratives of New York City in a variety of genres, from the early 20th century to the present. Topics include immigration, mobility, cosmopolitanism and the neighborhood, cruising, gentrification, post-9/11. Work by John Dos Passos, Nella Larsen, E.B. White, Jane Jacobs, Frank O’Hara, Samuel Delany, Patti Smith, Nan Goldin, Ernesto Quinones, Teju Cole. Prerequisite: one previous literature course.
    ENGL 1711D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • The Pursuit of Happiness: Transatlantic Literary Culture in the Long Eighteenth Century

    English and American literature of the long eighteenth century with a focus on emerging concepts of happiness. Reading includes poetry, novels, satire, travel, moral philosophy, and other genres. The right to pursue happiness placed in the context of new forms of social mobility such as education, class, and affectionate marriage, but also in the context of war, empire, slavery, and other metropolitan and colonial cultural formations and exchanges. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2561V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Memory/Matter/Time: Literature and the Changing Earth

    In this collaborative seminar we will consider the flickering edge between metaphor and materiality in the shadow of the Anthropocene. Weekly discussions will be built around a series of “threshold sites”—including Sea, Sun, Silk, Plastic, Forest, Photograph, Shell, Horse, Whale—in which "matter" and "figure" may be seen to be simultaneously in relation and at odds. We will endeavor to think metaphoricity as the imbrication of materiality and semiosis, and in its relationship to ecological time, through readings from Lucretius, Melville, Coleridge, Ponge, Moore, Bervin, Barad, Haraway, Derrida, Ricoeur, among others. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2761R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smailbegovic
  • Bakhtin and the Political Present: Literature, Anthropology, Dialogue

    This collaborative humanities graduate seminar explores the revolutionary ideas of Mikhail Bakhtin, considering their influence in two disciplines, literary studies and linguistic anthropology. The primary historical context of the course is our own political present, characterized by linguistic homogeneity, the unification of power, and the rise of authoritarian governments. How effective are Bakhtin's theories of dialogue, polyphony and carnival as principles of resistance to the challenges of the current moment? Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 15.
    ENGL 2901M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Suspicion and Its Others

    From the hermeneutics of suspicion to post-critique, a range of thinkers and theories have positioned suspicion as a central critical disposition of the modern age. In this collaborative seminar we will explore the concept and practice of suspicion both in relation to the classic objects over against which it emerged—morality, religion, and tradition—and through the lens of other modes of engagement more recently proposed, including charity, reconstruction, attunement, quiet, resonance, and reparative practices of reading. Readings will be drawn from philosophy, critical theory, race and ethnicity studies, gender and sexuality studies, and literary theory and criticism.
    ENGL 2901N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
  • The Medieval King Arthur

    Where did stories of King Arthur come from and how did they develop in the Middle Ages? We will read the earliest narratives of King Arthur and his companions, in histories and romances from Celtic, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English sources, to examine Arthur's varying personas of warrior, king, lover, thief. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Hawthorne and James

    An introduction to a pair of writers whose work continues to shape our understanding of American literature and American identity. Focusing on much of their most important work, our aim will be to understand how their conceptions of the relationship between writing and history both complicate and complement each other. Limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Brontës and Brontëism

    The novels of Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë alongside works (fiction and film) influenced by or continuing their powerful (and competing) authorial visions: Wide Sargasso Sea (Rhys), Rebecca (Hitchcock), The Piano (Campion), and Suspiria (Argento). Among other questions, we will discuss the role of Romanticism, feminism, the bodily imaginary, colonialism, and genre. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.
    ENGL 0150Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parker
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a representative selection of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, considering their historical contexts and their cultural afterlife in terms of belief, doubt, language, feeling, politics, and form. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
  • Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and the Lost Generation

    An introduction to two of the most popular and influential American novelists of the twentieth century, Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. We will read many of their most important novels and stories, including The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, In Our Time, The Sun Also Rises, and A Farewell to Arms. In addition we will examine the work of the contemporary American writers who most influenced them: Gertrude Stein, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and T. S. Eliot.
    ENGL 0710N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

    Middle English narratives by Geoffrey Chaucer's band of fictional pilgrims, read in their 14th-century historical and literary contexts. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1310V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Modern African Literature

    This course considers themes, antecedents, and contexts of modern African literature and related forms. Our readings will include fiction in English or in translation, traditional oral forms like panegyric and festival poetry, and some films. We will examine how these diverse materials explore the interplay of ethnicity, nationality, and race. We will also address the issue of "tradition" in contexts where nationalisms of various stripes are becoming stronger, even as the world becomes more interconnected through trade, immigration, and digital technology. Authors will include Achebe, Adichie, Dangarembga, Kourouma, Ngugi, Salih, Soyinka, Wicomb. Films by Kouyaté, Loreau, Sembène.
    ENGL 1710J S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • History of Criticism from Plato to Postmodernism

    A survey of the major theorists of literature in the western tradition, from the Greeks to the contemporary period. Recurrent issues will include the definition of literary value, the distinctiveness of the aesthetic experience, and the moral and social uses of literature. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.
    ENGL 1900P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Reading Narrative Theory

    Narrative is a powerful category of analysis spanning genres, historical periods, media forms, and the distinction between the "fictional" and the "real." This course examines major narrative theorists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will focus on literary examples, such as theories of the folktale and novel, and scholarship that interrogates the work of narrative in historiography, in cinema and television, and in extra-literary contexts (in the struggle of political campaigners to “control the narrative” or debates on narrative in gaming, medical research, law, and theory itself). Limited to 20 senior English concentrators. Others admitted by instructor permission only.
    ENGL 1950G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Proseminar

    This seminar, required for first-year graduate students in English, considers the state and stakes of literary studies today. The course aims to familiarize students with contemporary critical debates and stances in the wider discipline, and to engage with current methodologies, theories, and analytical tensions. We also address issues of professionalization as they relate to the first years of graduate work. Enrollment limited to 10. S/NC.
    ENGL 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Postcolonial Theory

    In this introduction to postcolonial theory we will consider key Western sources (Hegel, Marx, Lacan, Levi Strauss, Emmanuel Levinas); anticolonial manifestos (Gandhi, Fanon, Césaire, Memmi); political and ethical practices (civil disobedience, armed struggle, friendship). In addition to canonical critics (Said, Bhabha, Spivak), the course will review new interests in the field (transnationalism, non-western imperialisms, the environmental turn).
    ENGL 2900X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
  • Writing Science

    This course explores how science, as an academic way of thinking and a method, affects our critical thinking and expression of culture. Readings examine the various dialects of scientific discourse. Students write three major research essays on self-selected scientific topics from both within and outside their fields of study. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030C S01
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
  • The Artist in the Archives

    While artists can benefit greatly from archival work, they are not typically given the tools to make use of these institutions. This writing intensive course takes a two pronged approach to the problem: embedding students in archives both at Brown and RISD to produce creative, lyrical, and multi-media essays; and exploring how artists have used these institutions for information and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1030F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Backstory

    Everything has a backstory—every object, event or idea. In this workshop-based course we will explore the archives at Brown, RISD and the Rhode Island Historical Society and write about what we find. Expect field trips, time travel, encounters with interesting objects, readings from David Foster Wallace, John McPhee and Katherine Schultz, and in-class prompts to get you going. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Reframing Race in Art Writing

    This seminar will consider how contemporary writers and critics respond to art that directly addresses race and challenges institutional power. We will discuss past and recent controversies involving race and representation in exhibitions and examine the relationships between artists, museums and other art institutions, and public audiences. We will consider how writing about arts and culture can advance public discourse about race, equity, and justice. Enrollment limited to 17. No pre-requisites. Writing sample required. Instructor permission required.
  • Digital Nonfiction

    In this class, we will join the host of other artists, activists, and writers that have used Twitter bots, iPhone apps, virtual reality experiences, and more to tell compelling stories. No previous digital writing experience is necessary, however, as an advanced creative nonfiction class, Digital Nonfiction requires students to have completed ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0930 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required. S/NC
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Enrollment restricted to students in the English Ph.D. program.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0900 S01
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0900 S02
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0900 S03
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0900 S04
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0900 S05
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0900 S06
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0900 S07
    Fall 2020 ENGL0900 sections 03 and 04 are reserved for first-year students; section 02 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
  • Journalistic Writing

    This course, taught by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050G S01
    Fall 2020 ENGL1050G, section 01 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    This course prepares students for their work as Writing Fellows. Course readings, activities, and assignments introduce students to: post-process writing theory and pedagogy; data-based investigations of the revision habits of experienced and inexperienced writers; and effective methods for responding to student writing and conferencing with student writers. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Serial Fictions

    A study of serial and serialized fictional narratives from the nineteenth century the present-- dime novels, serial genre fictions, literary novels comprised of chapters initially published as short stories, radio and film serials, television programs old (The Naked City, Hawaii-Five 0), newer (The Wire, Sex in the City), and new (Americans), podcasts, and video games (Legend of Zelda).
    ENGL 0100U S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors).
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Independence and Modern Literature

    Words like "freedom" and "independence" are central to modern global history. This course introduces students to modernist and postcolonial poetry and fiction, exploring individual and collective self-determination. We address questions of aesthetic autonomy and form, and collective aspirations along disparate lines of nation, race, gender, and sexuality. Readings from Achebe, Bulawayo, Conrad, Eliot, Hurston, Joyce, Kincaid, Lamming, Walcott, and Woolf. Students should register for ENGL 0101A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0101A S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Inventing Asian American Literature

    What insights can literature provide into the complicated workings of race in America? What role can the invention of a literary tradition play in illuminating and rectifying past and present injustices? We explore these questions by examining how the idea of an Asian American literary tradition came into being and by reading influential works that have become part of its canon. Students should register for ENGL 0100V S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0100V S01
    All ENGL 0100s will be temp capped at 100 with reserved seating/registration as follows: For the FALL term: semester-level 01/03 = 25 each; and 02/04 = 5 each yielding: 60 total (40 remaining spots for upper-levels: seniors/juniors)
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • “Killing Shakespeare”: Three Plays and their Afterlives

    Do adaptations of Shakespeare “kill” his texts? In this course, we will explore three plays—Othello, The Tempest, and Hamlet—with some of their most prominent adaptations. We will focus on how these adaptations consider important political questions of their times in relation to Shakespeare. Authors/directors include: Lawrence Olivier, Aime Cesaire, Jawad Al-Asadi, Vishal Bharadwaj, and Julie Taymor. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Piduri
  • In Excess: Rossetti, Hopkins, Wilde

    This seminar will be a focused close reading of three late Victorian writers whose works might be described as radically excessive insofar as they transgress and push beyond the limits of social, ethical, aesthetic, sexual, and political conventions. What does it mean to describe a text as excessive, and how can excess be considered as a constitutive part of its form? We will concentrate on poetry, plays, and theoretical texts, putting our authors into conversation with contemporary thinkers of excess. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1561Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Poetry, Popular Music, and Politics

    Can poetry and popular music transform our understanding of politics? This class examines how poetry and song as representational forms change how we see each other and the world. We also consider non-representational dimensions of lyric, such as sound. Readings and music from key historical moments in the US may include Claudia Rankine, Lucille Clifton, Bob Dylan, and Kendrick Lamar. Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preston
  • Literature and the Problem of Poverty

    This course explores poverty as a political and aesthetic problem for American writers. Examines the ways that writers have imagined the poor as dangerous others, agents of urban decay, bearers of folk culture, and engines of class revolt. Authors include Stephen Crane, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright.
    ENGL 1710K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Blackness and Being

    Through reading criticism, theory, literature, we will think about the representational, aesthetic, and, philosophical (ontological, epistemological, ethical) questions that shape blackness as a conceptual notion. Our study will think through feminist and queer studies, as well as through diaspora and American and ethnic studies, and will consider the historical trajectory of various critical turns in theorizing (literary) blackness. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required. Class list will be finalized after the first day of classes. Please email the professor to add your name to the potential roster.
    ENGL 1761E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Quashie
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0930 S01
    Fall 2020 ENGL0930 sections 01, 02, 04, 05, and 06 are reserved for first-year students; section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    ENGL 0930 S02
    Fall 2020 ENGL0930 sections 01, 02, 04, 05, and 06 are reserved for first-year students; section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    DeBoer-Langworthy
    ENGL 0930 S03
    Fall 2020 ENGL0930 sections 01, 02, 04, 05, and 06 are reserved for first-year students; section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Hipchen
    ENGL 0930 S04
    Fall 2020 ENGL0930 sections 01, 02, 04, 05, and 06 are reserved for first-year students; section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    ENGL 0930 S05
    Fall 2020 ENGL0930 sections 01, 02, 04, 05, and 06 are reserved for first-year students; section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0930 S06
    Fall 2020 ENGL0930 sections 01, 02, 04, 05, and 06 are reserved for first-year students; section 03 is reserved for first-year and sophomore students.
  • Toni Morrison

    This course is an advanced introduction to the oeuvre of Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison. Reading her novels and nonfiction, we investigate concerns that shaped our world in the last century and haunt the current one, foregrounding Morrison’s writing as a key site of trouble and of transformation.
    ENGL 1761F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Abdur-Rahman
  • The Late 60s: Film Countercultures

    On representative late-60s counterculture movies concerned with antiauthoritarianism; hippy Bohemianism; social and sexual experimentation; dropping out; and psychedelia. Bookended by rock music festival documentaries (Monterey Pop; Gimme Shelter; Woodstock), the seminar is mostly concerned with feature films (The Graduate; Bonnie and Clyde; 2001; Midnight Cowboy; Easy Rider; Medium Cool). It will also consider some underground art cinema of Kenneth Anger and Andy Warhol. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors in English and MCM. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1901H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Spenser and Shakespeare

    A comparative study of theme, form, and genre based upon paired works: Shakespeare’s Sonnets/ Amoretti; Faerie Queene I/King Lear; Faerie Queene III/Twelfth Night, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Winter's Tale, Tempest, Venus and Adonis; Shepheardes Calender/As You Like It. Weekly short interpretative exercises (250-500 words) submitted as CANVAS discussions; draft (1250 words) and final essay (3000 words). Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1361F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Gender and Sexuality Studies
    GNSS 1711 Speech and Silence, Trust, Rage and Fear: An Inquiry into the Possibility of Intimacy
    ENGL XLIST 0