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Kathleen Morrow, PHD, MA

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Kathleen Morrow

Title: Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior (Research) and Associate Professor of Behavioral & Social Sciences
Department: Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior and Brown University School of Public Health

Kathleen_Morrow@Brown.EDU
+1 401 793 8180

Download Kathleen Morrow's Curriculum Vitae in PDF Format

 
Overview | Research | Grants/Awards | Teaching |

Kathleen Morrow, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, CBPM, The Miriam Hospital. Her research focuses on behavioral HIV/STI prevention interventions, and the development of biomedical products and devices for HIV/STI prevention, including characterizing user sensory perceptions and experiences of product use (perceptibility), acceptability of and adherence to vaginal and rectal microbicides. Her work incorporates quantitative, qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Biography

Dr. Morrow received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Western Michigan University. She completed an NIAAA Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship at the Centers for Alcohol & Addiction Studies at Brown University and is currently Associate Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Staff Psychologist at The Miriam Hospital. Her primary research interests focus on the behavioral prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections through the development of biomedical and behavioral prevention interventions, and the exploration of biophysical, behavioral, and social (contextual) factors impacting prevention behaviors. Her current research explores the user sensory perceptions and experiences (USPEs) of topical microbicides and other drug delivery devices, and their role in product acceptability and adhereance.

Institutions

MH

Research Description

CURRENT RESEARCH:

(see Dr. Morrow's cv for additional studies not described here)

Project MIST (R33 AI076967; Morrow, sub Principal Investigator) is an NIH Microbicide Innovation Program (MIP) award, an award mechanism designed to accelerate and advance innovation in the development of anti-HIV microbicides. The project is designed to expand the findings of Project LINK (below) by specifically exploring the impact of formulation volume on user sensory perceptions and experiences (USPE), as well as being the first study to explore USPE in vaginal film use. Like Project LINK, the ultimate goal is to develop a framework for developing vaginal formulations that meet specific preclinical criteria for user sensory perception and experience measures (developed in Project LINK), thus conserving resources (by removing unacceptable products from the pipeline early) and accelerating acceptable products through the development pipeline and increasing the likelihood of greater adherence during clinical trials.

Project LINK (R21/R33 MH80591; Morrow, Principal Investigator) is an NIH Microbicide Innovation Program (MIP) award, an award mechanism designed to accelerate and advance innovation in the development of anti-HIV microbicides. The project is designed to provide proof-of-concept that vaginal microbicide users can feel and discriminate variations in product formulations, and that these perceptions impact the user's willingness to use the product. The ultimate goal is to develop a framework for developing vaginal gels that meet specific preclinical criteria for acceptability dimensions, thus conserving resources (by removing unacceptable products from the pipeline early) and accelerating acceptable products through the development pipeline and increasing the likelihood of greater adherence during clinical trials.

Project MAPLE (U19 AI077289 (Buckheit, PI): Long Acting Acceptable Microbicides: Novel Delivery, Activity & Pharmacodynamics, Project 3) was one of three studies within the larger U19 mechanism. Its purpose was to explore the biophysical and biomechanical variables that impact product acceptability with respect to long-acting vaginal gels (LAGs) and intravaginal rings (IVRs). The goal was to provide guidance for the development of acceptable LAGs and IVRs for use as anti-HIV microbicides.

PAST RESEARCH:

AID.1233-14-07567(Coffey, PI)was a USAID-funded study exploring the "Feasibility and Acceptability of SILCS Diaphragm as a Microbicide Delivery System." The study aim was to test the deployment characteristics, as well as feasibility and acceptability of, a delivery system combining a microbicide gel and the SILCS diaphragm to effectively deliver a vaginal gel formulated microbicide.

The Phoenix Project (R01 MH 064455; Morrow, Principal Investigator) was a NIMH-funded project with the primary goal of designing and evaluating measures of factors hypothesized to be related to vaginal microbicide acceptability. Several scales were identified and psychometrically validated. They include a "Willingness to Use Microbicides" scale, a "Relationship Quality " measure, a "Microbicide Confidence" Scale, a scale measuring the "Importance of Microbicide Characteristics," and a cognitive/behavioral Risk Index. Analyses support Dr. Morrow's conceptualization of microbicide acceptability as a multi-factorial construct highly impacted by person-, product-, and context-related factors.

Dr. Morrow served as the acceptability studies chair in both the HIV Prevention Network (HIVNET) and the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN). Across four Phase-1 clinical safety trials of candidate vaginal microbicides (HPTN 009, HPTN 020, HPTN 050, HPTN 049) she and her teams have confirmed the overall acceptability of gel-formulated microbicides, and have explored factors hypothesized to be related to microbicide acceptability. These include the relationship context, the need or desire for a microbicide that not only prevents or reduces the likelihood of HIV infection, but also provides protection from other STDs and pregnancy, the need or desire to use a microbicide "covertly," such that the partner is unaware of its use, and the product's impact on sexual pleasure.

As Principal Investigator of Project START, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded HIV/STD behavioral prevention intervention development and evaluation project designed for young men leaving the incarcerated setting, she and her colleagues successfully conducted formative qualitative and quantitative studies culminating in the development of two intervention strategies. Primary outcome data from a randomized trial showed that the enhanced intervention (which focused on both HIV/STD prevention and transitional needs as men re-entered their communities) resulted in greater proportions of safer sex behavior than the standard intervention (a single-session HIV/STD prevention session). The intervention has completed development as a CDC REP study and currently enjoys its status as a CDC DEBI (Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions) program.

Awards

2003 Citation Award. For Morrow, K., Costello, T., and Rosen, R. (2003, March). "Coloring in the Lines: Using Qualitative Data to Enhance Quantitative Findings: The Case of Microbicide Acceptability." Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 25 (supplement), D47.

2010-2011 Faculty Mentoring Award, Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

2011 The Betty Marcus Women's Health Endowment Fund Award, Recognizing and Promoting Excellence in Community Service, Research, and Clinical Services for Women

Affiliations

Member, Society of Behavioral Medicine
Member, International Society of Behavioral Medicine
Member, American Psychological Association
APA, Division 38 (Health Psychology)
Member, Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
Member, American Public Health Association

Training Faculty, Center for Alcohol & Addictions Studies, Brown University
Training Faculty, International Health Institute, Brown University

Funded Research

CURRENT RESEARCH:

K24HD062645 (Morrow, PI):NICHD: 04/01/2012-03/31/2017
Advancing Reproductive Health: Qualitative Methods & Interdisciplinary Mentorship

R21/R33MH080591 (Morrow, PI): NIMH 09/01/06-08/31/12
Linking Biophysical Functions of Microbicides to user Perception & Acceptability

R33 AI076967 (Morrow, subPI: Buckheit, PI): NIAID 11/1/09-2/28/13
Rational Development of Combination Microbicide Therapies

U19 AI077289 (Morrow, subPI; Buckheit, PI): NIAID 06/27/08-5/31/13
Development of Long Acting Acceptable Microbicides: Novel Delivery, Activity & Pharmacodynamics
Lead Investigator for Project 3, "Preclinical User Acceptability Studies of Long-Acting Vaginal Gels and Intravaginal Rings."

U19 AI0196-1 (Morrow, SubPI, Buckheit, PI) NIAID: 06/01/12 – 05/31/17
Development and Evaluation of Dual Compartment Combination Microbicides

U19 AI096398 and Supplement (Morrow, suppPI; Anderson, PI) NIAID 8/1/2011-7/31/2016
Monoclonal Antibody-Based Multipurpose Microbicides

R21/R33 AI094514 (Morrow, subPI; Hayes, PI)NIAID: 5/20/2011-4/30/2016
Designing Optimal Microbicide Delivery Integrating Rheology and Acceptability

RECENT/PAST RESEARCH:

PPA-09-023 (Morrow, PI); CONRAD 09/01/09-8/31/11
Evaluation of the Behavioral Measures of Acceptability of Two Vaginal Gels

AID.1233-14-07567-SUB (Coffey): USAID 11/01/07-02/28/10
Feasibility and Acceptability of SILCS Diaphragm as a Microbicide Delivery System.

R34 MH 078750 (Houck): NIMH 05/01/07-04/30/10
Affect Management Intervention for Early Adolescents with Mental Health Problems

R01 DA018079 (Niaura): NIDA 08/05/05-07/31/10
Reducing Ethnic Health Disparities: Motivating HIV+ Latinos to Quit Smoking

1 R21 DA027142-01 (Bock)NIDA 08/01/09-07/31/11
Examining a Text Message Intervention for Smoking Cessation

Teaching Experience

1996-present Lecturer: Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Pre-doctoral Core Seminar Series: HIV/AIDS seminar; Gay and Lesbian Issues.

1997-1999 Research Supervisor, Pre-doctoral Internship. Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium.

1997-2008 Guest Lecturer: Department of Anthropology/Department of Community Health, Brown University. AIDS: An International Perspective (BC0168).

1998-present Lecturer: Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Pre-doctoral Behavioral Medicine Track: HIV Prevention Interventions; Assessing HIV Risk.

1998-present Faculty Mentor: Brown University Senior Honors Theses and Medical School students.

1998-present Faculty Predoctoral Research Mentor (and/or Clinical Supervisor), Postdoctoral Research and Clinical Fellows. Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Department of Community Health, Brown University.

1999-2003 Guest Lecturer: Department of Psychology, Brown University. Behavioral Medicine (PY0130).

2001-2004 Guest Lecturer: Department of Community Health, Brown University: Introduction to Public Health (BC0032).

2002 Faculty Preceptor: Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University: Medical Interviewing (BI 371).

2002-present Faculty Mentor: NIH K-Award Recipients and junior faculty (see "Mentoring" table below).

2003-2005 Adjunct Assistant Professor: Department of Psychology, Providence College: Introduction to Psychology (PSY100); Health Psychology (PSY225).

2008-present Director, Qualitative Methods Seminar Series, Centers for Behavioral & Preventive Medicine, The Miriam Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

2010 Guest Lecturer: Anthropology Department, Brown University: AIDS in Global Perspective (Anthropology 1020).

2011-present Faculty Lecturer. BIARI (Brown International Advanced Research Institutes), Global Health Institute, Office of International Affairs, Brown University.