Courses for Spring 2015

  • The Greeks

    For centuries Western civilizations have seen the Greeks as their intellectual and spiritual ancestors. The 'Greek miracle' is explored by reviewing its major achievements and discoveries: poetry (heroic epic, tragedy, political comedy), philosophy, historical research, political analysis and institutions, science. All texts read in English. LILE WRIT
    CLAS 0010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • Sport in the Ancient Greek World

    Athletics and sports were as popular and significant in the ancient Greek world as they are today, and so offer an excellent introduction to its archaeology and history. This class will discuss the development of Greek athletics, the nature of individual events, the social implications of athletic professionalism, women and athletics, and the role of sport in Greek education.
    CLAS 0210O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
  • Revolutionary Classics (or, the classical origins of your Brown education)

    When Brown University was founded in 1764 the curriculum was based on classical texts. In early America, the classics of Greek and Roman antiquity – read in the original Greek and Latin – were the foundation of a gentleman’s education. This course will explore early ideas and structures of higher learning in America from the springboard of those classical texts. We will read a sizable portion of Brown’s earliest curriculum (in English translation), but just as importantly we will seek to set that curriculum in the context of early American intellectual history, from roughly the Colonial to the Antebellum Period. FYS WRIT
    CLAS 0210R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
  • Social Welfare in the Ancient Greek City

    What inequalities existed in the ancient Greek city? This course seeks to identify the different treatment of the inhabitants of the Greek city (polis) and the degree to which the city sought to support the disadvantaged by the redistribution of wealth. Ancient Greek communities taxed activity and property, gathered revenue, and redistributed wealth within the community. The wealthy were often liable to redirect part of the wealth to the community. How well did the redistributive economy of the Greek city work? Who were the winners? Who were the losers? What conclusions can we draw about well-being in the Greek polis? WRIT SOPH
    CLAS 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • The Tradition of the Philosophical Dialogue

    This course will examine the Greco-Roman tradition of the philosophical dialogue, from its Socratic origins through its adoption by early Christian authors. As we read dialogues by major practitioners including Plato, Cicero, Plutarch and Augustine, we will consider formal features of the dialogue, including setting, characterization, and authorial self-representation; and we will compare treatments of common subjects and themes, including Socrates, the pursuit of truth, good government, and the happy life. We will also discuss issues of performance and the philosophical, pedagogical, and therapeutic advantages of dialogue. All texts will be read in English.
    CLAS 0770 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McDonald
  • Concepts of the Self in Classical Indian Literature

    Examination of the great Indian epic Mahabharata and related mythology to introduce the context for the most ancient speculations of the Rgveda and the subtle teacher-student dialogues about the self contained in the Bhagavadgita and Upanishads. We will also examine the more systematic Indian philosophical texts and note their resonance in ancient and modern European conceptions of self.
    CLAS 0990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Social Conflict and Political Factions in the Roman Republic

    Traces the evolution of social conflict and political factions at Rome from the foundation to the dissolution of the Republic (C5-C1 BCE). Roman armies secured a vast empire of territory, raw materials, and manpower governed by the senate and the people of Rome itself. The influx of resources, however, destabilized Rome’s constitution and upset political power balances at the city of Rome. How did the Romans—elites and masses—compete amongst themselves for the bounty of empire abroad and confront their own internal conflicts at home? Was concord possible, or were the developments of empire inconsistent with the constitution of the Republic?
    CLAS 1120R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
  • The Age of Constantine: The Roman Empire in Transition

    The reign of Constantine the Great (306-337) and his dynasty heralded a period of remarkable/rapid change in the Roman Empire. Christianity became the sole imperially sponsored religion; the split between Western and Eastern halves of the Empire gradually became permanent and irrevocable; consequently new ways of thinking and writing about the Roman world, past and future, developed. Focusing on generous selections of primary source material in translation and current scholarship, we will explore the history, literature, and culture of Constantinian Empire in order to highlight the role of Constantine and his successors in the evolution of the late Roman Mediterranean.
    CLAS 1120V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Insley
  • Roman History II: The Roman Empire and Its Impact

    The social and political history of the Roman Empire (14-565 CE). Focuses on expansion, administration, and Romanization of the empire; crisis of the 3rd century; militarization of society and monarchy; the struggle between paganism and Christianity; the end of the Empire in the West. Special attention given to the role of women, slaves, law, and historiography. Ancient sources in translation. WRIT
    CLAS 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • Marriage in the Ancient World

    Marriage is a historical phenomenon: it assumes various forms and has distinct meanings in different societies, even those that have been regarded as the fountainhead of Western values. This course (a seminar addressed in particular to upper-level undergraduates) investigates this important social institution in ancient Greece and Rome, using a variety of primary documents (literary, historical, epigraphical, etc.) and taking account of modern approaches to the study of marriage, including anthropological, sociological and psychological theories. All sources will be read in English.
    CLAS 1750N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
  • Parasites and Hypocrites

    The course is a study of the many forms of toadying, groveling, feigning friendship, flattery, ass-kissing, and so on, that were such a large of source of concern — and comedy — in antiquity. The anxieties over hypocrisy in a democracy and parasites in client-patron systems will be explored historically, in literary representations, and in their social, political, and economic contexts. Authors to be read include Aristophanes, Plutarch, Lucian, Plautus, Horace, and Petronius.
    CLAS 1930C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Alcock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Scharf
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    CLAS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    CLAS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Alcock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    CLAS 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep