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January 17, 2011

Office of Media Relations
Darlene Trew Crist, Director

Courtney Coelho, Editor
media_relations@brown.edu
(401) 863-7287




The Providence Journal    16 January 2012
Social programs for poor face many obstacles
Warren Simmons, executive director of the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, took part in a Rhode Island Civil Rights Roundtable titled “Dr. King’s Dream and Wealth Disparities.” Simmons related his experience growing up in East Harlem and how he benefitted from social programs that assisted the poor. He says that such programs have “stagnated” due to lack of funds, and that many of the least inspired teachers are relegated to the most underachieving schools, keeping students in a failed system.


NBC   14 January 2012
Efficiency may motivate Obama’s latest plan
President Obama recently laid out a plan to consolidate several overlapping federal agencies, pending Congressional approval. Wendy Schiller, associate professor of political science, says his plan sounds similar to those proposed by some of the Republican presidential candidates. “This is a way of sort of saying, 'Listen, if Romney’s the nominee and he’s Mr. Efficiency, we can be efficient too,’” Schiller says.


Egypt Independent   15 January 2012
The controversial business of organ transplantation
Sherine Hamdy, assistant professor of anthropology, discusses the deeper sociocultural issues surrounding organ transplantation in Egypt and why it remains such a controversial issue, a topic she elaborates on in an upcoming book. Hamdy says that in countries where the practice is popular, the poor are often victimized: “They are more likely to fall ill, more vulnerable to medical mismanagement, and they are also more likely to be the source of organs.”


The Boston Globe    15 January 2012
Haiti through the eyes of Haitians
Two years after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake shook the island nation of Haiti, an anthology of stories by Haitian natives and those who know the country well was recently published. The purpose of the book is to offer an insider’s perspective amidst the many foreign voices that have shaped how the world saw Haiti over the past two years. Among the contributors to the book is Patrick Sylvain, visiting lecturer in Latin American and Caribbean studies.


Buffalo News   15 January 2012
The science of disgust
A new book by Rachel Herz, adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior, examines the psychology behind the emotion of disgust. A review describes it as “a book we’ve all probably needed for a while – very entertaining, judicious, vastly informative, and by the time Herz has finished, extraordinarily wise about a subject that needs wisdom as do few others but which few would have been creative enough to explore this way.”


Providence Business News   14 January 2012
Corporate partnerships another route for higher ed
As part of their never-ending efforts to forge relationships with likely donors, colleges and universities actively seek donations from targeted businesses, but a $1-million gift spread out over 10 years remains a rare prize in the field of corporate donations. William Layton, executive director of corporate and foundation relations, says individual rather than corporate gifts still make up “the lion’s share” of donations.


The University of Virginia Magazine   12 January 2012
Remembering the past through one man’s story
The University of Virginia will recall the service and legacy of its former bell ringer who was born into slavery, Henry Martin, in a panel discussion that is part of its Martin Luther King Jr. commemoration. Among the panelists will be Corey D.B. Walker, associate professor and chair of Brown’s Department of Africana Studies. “This becomes an opening for us to have a conversation, but we have to be very careful with it, not to engage in a way that the past is behind us but to engage in how the past continues to challenge the ways in which we want to develop our nation and our world,” Walker says.


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