• tiny—a gallery of miniature might and meaning
    artifacts from the collections of ARCH 0303 students
     

    Students in the Brown University class, tiny (ARCH 0303), which is devoted to the archaeology of miniaturization, curated a gallery exhibition at Rhode Island Hall. 

    The exhibit includes a one-minute short by Archaeology concentrator Alexander Dorosin on learning embodied practices by handling miniatures, a video game by Emily Wright (RISD) having to do with miniatures and memory (both created specifically for the class), and holograms that Katrina Wardhana has curated using material from Koutrolou Magoula provided by Yannis Hamilakis.

    The shadowboxes that will be up in Rhode Island Hall should be examined along with their respective short essays, which are available in accompanying catalogues.

    All free and open to the public.

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  • Study Break with the DigDUG
    Dec
    10
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    Archaeology DUG (The DigDUG) Study Break

    Rhode Island Hall

    The Archaeology DigDUG is serving up cookies and hot chocolate in the atrium of the Joukowsky Institute from 3 to 5 PM. Please stop by and take a break from studying or writing! 

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  • Dec
    10
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Archaeological Illustration Club

    Rhode Island Hall

    Learn to produce technical illustrations! Handle ancient objects close up!
    Casual atmosphere, no experience or artistic confidence necessary!

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Paul J. Kosmin is a Professor in the Department of the Classics at Harvard University. His research addresses the political, cultural, and intellectual history of the ancient Greek world, and he has taught and published on historical questions from the archaic period in the seventh century BCE down to the total Roman dominance of the east Mediterranean at the turn of the eras. The core of his work to date has focused on the Hellenistic east, that is, on the political landscape that extended from the Greek mainland to India and Central Asia in the last three centuries BCE.

    His research is focused on two broad historical themes. First, the relationship between empires and systems of knowledge and practice, and, second, the interaction between the Greek world and its Near Eastern neighbors. He has begun a third big research project, provisionally titled The Ancient Shore. This will be a cultural history of the coastline in Greek antiquity, explored as a site of social processes, as a dynamic of claim-making and territorialization, and as an inducement to thinking, wonder, and religious experience.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Holly Shaffer, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • The Levant, a loosely defined region encompassing the modern countries of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, and Cyprus, is rich in archaeology and history. The region has been central to the discipline of archaeology since the nineteenth century, and arguably even earlier. A long history of colonial rule, political and religious differences, academic specializations and passions, stark financial inequalities and war continue to inform and limit dialogue not only among local and foreign archaeologists working there, but also among scholars, local communities, government officials, and other stakeholders. Aware of the ancient and modern importance of the region, the peculiar challenges it poses, the possibilities for collaboration, and the need for creative perspectives, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University will host a conference in March 2020 dedicated to addressing these unique aspects of the Levant through constructive discussion of:

    • Current directions, critical trends and lacunae in archaeological research
    • Museum, archival studies, and other investigations that rely primarily on archaeological legacy data
    • The effects of colonial rule, modern geopolitics, fluctuating national boundaries, war, and migration, among many other factors on the practice and interpretations of archaeological work in the region.

    The event is part of the “State of the Field” conference series, a yearly meeting which aims to highlight and reflect upon specific thematic or regional archaeological topics within a community of its scholars.

    Free and open to the public. No pre-registration necessary.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Sarah Cahlan, Video Editor for the Fact Checker at The Washington Post, will be screening and discussing her film, TheirStory. The film focuses on archaeologists who are pushing back against a male-centered narrative of our history, and in doing so complicating our assumptions of gender and our understandings of the past.

    TheirStory takes viewers on an eye-opening journey through archival footage, animations and interviews to ask how a reconfiguring of past gender perceptions – such as man the hunter and woman the gatherer - can radically change the ingrained beliefs we hold about who we are and where we come from. ​

    Sarah Cahlan edits and produces videos for the Fact Checker at The Washington Post. Before coming to The Post, she directed a short documentary about the historical inaccuracies of gender roles. As an NBC/NAHJ fellow, she reported, produced and wrote stories about science, tech and Latino culture. Cahlan has also covered health and the environment in California.

    More > Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Amélie Allard, Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at Rhode Island College, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities