Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Marleen Termeer (Leiden University) - Coining Roman Rule? The...

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Marleen Termeer, a lecturer in Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

What Can You Do with a Degree in Archaeology?

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Gina Borromeo (Curator of Ancient Art at the RISD Museum), Matt Glendinning (Head of School at Moses Brown School), and Bill Monroe (Senior Scholarly Resources Librarian, Humanities, at Brown University's Library) will discuss how their degrees in ancient art, early history, and archaeology led them to their current positions.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Cristiano Nicosia (University of Padua) - Soil Micromorphology...

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Cristiano Nicosia, a researcher in the Department of Cultural Heritage at the University of Padua, will be discussing his research and new book "Archaeological Soil and Sediment Micromorphology" in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Craig Cipolla (Royal Ontario Museum), Oliver Harris (University of Leicester), and Joukowsky Institute Faculty

Tuesday, February 13th, 2018 at 5:30pm

A discussion of current issues in archaeological theory, between Joukowsky Institute faculty members and Craig Cipolla (Royal Ontario Museum) and Oliver Harris (University of Leicester), authors of the recent book, Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium: Introducing Current Perspectives.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Emmanuel Botte (French National Centre for Scientific Research)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Emmanuel Botte, a researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Lynnette Arnold (Anthropology, Brown University)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Lynnette Arnold, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice

Friday, March 2, 2018 to Saturday, March 3, 2018
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a workshop called State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice on March 2-3, 2018. The workshop will be the culmination of two years of discussion on this theme, but is also intended to raise new issues, ask new questions, and encourage ongoing dialogue.

Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students. While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event will focus on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.

Within the context of archaeology, we conceive of social justice as pertaining to issues of privilege and opportunity that affect the makeup of scholars in the field, efforts among archaeologists to engage with the public and with broader social and political discussions, and the degree to which archaeological scholarship and pedagogy intersect with or impact these issues. It also refers to the asymmetries of power and structural inequalities in society at large. This choice of topic has been inspired by recent global social and political concerns, responses from universities and academia that seek to address issues of representation and access, and most importantly, grassroots movements for social justice.

This workshop thus seeks to engage primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018.