Exhibit: Blind Origin - New Work by Judd Schiffman

Friday, April 19, 2019 (All day) to Friday, May 31, 2019 (All day)
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Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Parker VanValkenburgh (Anthropology, Brown University) - Site Seeing: Towards an Ethics and Politics of Archaeological Vision

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Parker VanValkenburgh, an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, will present his work in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

Exhibit: Blind Origin - New Work by Judd Schiffman

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Blind Origin will be on view at Brown’s Joukowsky Institute for Archeology and the Ancient World from April 17 - May 31, and explores the use of art to reinterpret archeological objects. Artist and Professor Judd Schiffman responded to objects selected from the Joukowsky Institute’s collection by creating a new series of ceramic sculptures. Interweaving these transmutations with his personal accumulation of imagery, this work speaks to the meaning, stories and power we ascribe to objects, ancient and contemporary. In his talk, Schiffman will discuss some of his previous work which investigates the relationship between objects, identity, and culture and will speak to the energetic and aesthetic ways we interact with the world around us.

Judd Schiffman is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Art Department at Providence College and a Providence based artist working primarily in ceramics. His work explores the reinterpretation of family heirlooms, personal mementos, and historic artifacts into sculpture. In the studio he explores the use of clay as a drawing material and evokes a psychedelic concoction of real and imagined experiences that ponder the power of our personal stories.

Project/Exhibit Curation by Pinar Durgun (Curatorial Assistant, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University) and Project Coordination by Jessica Porter (Operations and Events Coordinator, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University)

Blind Origin: New Work by Judd Schiffman - Artist Talk and Opening Reception

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Blind Origin will be on view at Brown’s Joukowsky Institute for Archeology and the Ancient World from April 17 - May 31, and explores the use of art to reinterpret archeological objects. Artist and Professor Judd Schiffman responded to objects selected from the Joukowsky Institute’s collection by creating a new series of ceramic sculptures. Interweaving these transmutations with his personal accumulation of imagery, this work speaks to the meaning, stories and power we ascribe to objects, ancient and contemporary. In his talk, Schiffman will discuss some of his previous work which investigates the relationship between objects, identity, and culture and will speak to the energetic and aesthetic ways we interact with the world around us.

Judd Schiffman is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Art Department at Providence College and a Providence based artist working primarily in ceramics. His work explores the reinterpretation of family heirlooms, personal mementos, and historic artifacts into sculpture. In the studio he explores the use of clay as a drawing material and evokes a psychedelic concoction of real and imagined experiences that ponder the power of our personal stories.

Project/Exhibit Curation by Pinar Durgun (Curatorial Assistant, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University) and Project Coordination by Jessica Porter (Operations and Events Coordinator, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University)

Gabriella Soto (Trinity College) - Mapping the Unmappable: A Social Archaeology of Immigration Enforcement by Attrition in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands

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The material traces of undocumented and clandestine migration in heavily securitized border landscapes are lenses into the grounded outcomes and fallout of immigration enforcement policies. With this premise, Dr. Soto will make a case for archaeologists to have a seat at the table among other disciplines more traditionally focused on migration studies and geopolitics. Dr. Soto will discuss three interconnected material timelines concerning undocumented migration and enforcement in the southern Arizona: the building of the border wall from 2004-2009, the evolution of direct action humanitarianism in southern Arizona from 2003-present, and the history of water bottles on the border from 2000 to present. The aim is to showcase the plural temporality of undocumented migration as process and to widen the conceptualization of migrant material assemblages in order to generate a more holistic understanding of the reverberating effects and affects of border security policies.

Dr. Gabriella Soto is the Postdoctoral Fellow for the Graduate Program in American Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Her research focuses on the archaeology of contemporary undocumented migration, methodologies for contemporary archaeological research, heritage, and on postmortem investigations of undocumented migrants who die during border crossings. Gabriella’s work has been published in Political Geography, American Anthropologist, the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, and recently appeared in the edited volume, Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation: Perspectives for Forensic Science. Gabriella is currently working on her first co-authored manuscript for the University of Arizona Press, When Death Comes Knocking: Postcoloniality, Postmortem Investigation, and Undocumented Migration on the U.S.-Mexico Border.

Watch a video of the lecture here: Gabriella Soto - Mapping the Unmappable

[email protected]

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[email protected] will hold our next meeting on Friday, April 12, from 3-5pm in the Rhode Island Hall common room! Our primary agenda item will be putting together an exhibit on hidden voices in archaeology, to recognize the lives, scholarship, contributions, and stories of archaeologists from minority or historically marginalized communities. Anyone who would like to be involved is welcome to attend this meeting, and we would love to hear about hidden figures from all aspects of archaeology, anywhere in the world.

We will be writing short (approximately 200 word) biographies of these figures and printing images to hang or hide in spaces around Rhode Island Hall. If you’re not sure where to start looking for historically marginalized voices in archaeology (in any of its forms), the official TrowelBlazers website is a great place to start. Please mark your calendars for April 12!

 

In [email protected] you’ll find a group of early career female scientists and their allies coming together in solidarity to reflect on experiences in the field and academia and engage in meaningful exchanges related to gender issues and accessibility. We are striving towards a more intersectional understanding of what it means to be a woman in archaeology and the challenges one may or may not face in doing so. Anyone who believes they might be able to contribute or benefit from being in a supportive and comfortable environment and participating in such discussions is welcome to join us!

Join our Facebook group!

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Karl Krusell (Joukowsky Institute, Brown University) - The Social Construction of Ships: Anthropological Perspectives on Mediterranean Nautical Technology and Maritime Practice

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Karl Krusell, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019

Private Life of the Privy Student Poster Session

, Atrium

Students in ARCH 763 The Private Life of the Privy: A Secret History of Toilets will present posters of their research projects. The posters explore (and critique) how an ancient toilet/sewer system has been studied by archaeologists or think about how a particular methodology could be applied to the study of ancient toilets and how this might change our understanding of these. The role of pigs in Middle Kingdom Egyptian waste disposal, the possibility that Amazonian terra preta soils represent human and animal faeces, a critique of the Qumran excavations, coprostanols at Cahokia, the public and private nature of toilets at Pompeii, and much more – there is something for everyone!

Undergraduate Archaeological Research and Fieldwork Discussion

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The Archaeology DUG (the DigDUG!) will be hosting an event where all undergraduates are welcome to give brief presentations on their past, present, or future research projects – or to come and listen to what archaeology students have been up to! Each presentation will be followed by a brief discussion/Q&A.
In addition, Professor Rojas will also be talking on his role as Director of Undergraduate Studies for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and undergraduate fieldwork. Anyone who is interested in Brown’s fieldwork opportunities at Petra is especially encouraged to attend!
The event will take place in Rhode Island Hall 108, April 6th at 5:00 PM.

Reinhard Bernbeck (Freie Universität Berlin) - Jihad Made in Germany

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Reinhard Bernbeck is professor at the Institute for Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin. His research interests include the Late Neolithic of the Middle East, Iranian archaeology, New Assyrians and Urartu, imperialism, and social inequality in early complex societies. He is also interested in the ideological and political dimensions of archaeology as well as narrative constructions in his field. He has co-directed fieldwork in many different contexts, ranging from Jordan and the Occupied Palestinian Territories to Turkey, Iran, and Turkmenistan.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Susan Pollock (Freie Universität Berlin) - Which Bones Matter? Investigations on the Former Property of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute of Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics in Berlin

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Susan Pollock, a Professor at the Institute for Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

Robert Tykot (University of South Florida) - Bone Chemistry and Ancient Diet: Research in the Americas and the Mediterranean

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Isotopic and elemental analysis of skeletal remains informs us about diet of individuals, at different points in their lives, and allows group comparisons based on sex, age, status as well as site locations and time periods. Examples will be presented on the importance of maize for different cultures in the Americas, and for aquatic resources and millet in the Mediterranean.

Robert Tykot is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. His research interests include archaeological science, Mediterranean prehistory, Old World archaeology, ancient diets around the world, bone chemistry, exchange studies, obsidian, marble, Sardinia, and Sicily. His most recent work looks at prehistoric obsidian trade in the Central Mediterranean, bone chemistry and ancient diets, and the use of portable XRF on archaeological materials.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Gretel Rodríguez (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University) and Willis Monroe (University of British Columbia) - Thinking about Religion Digitally: Archaeology and the Database of Religious History

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Gretel Rodríguez, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, and Willis Monroe, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia will present their work on The Database of Religious History in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Lennart Kruijer (Leiden University) Of Mind-Traps and Pornoboskoi: Objects in Motion in the Late-Hellenistic Palace of Samosata

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Lennart Kruijer, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

Ontological Debate in Archaeology - Benjamin Alberti (Framingham State University) and Yannis Hamilakis (Brown University)

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The recent move beyond representation in the discipline of archaeology did not lead to consensus in archaeological theory, luckily! On March 11 we will put two thinkers together in one room to disentangle the underlying premises of their work, New Materialism (Benjamin Alberti) versus Sensorial Archaeology (Yannis Hamilakis). Join us for some friendly ontological disagreement and debate!

Benjamin Alberti is a Professor of Anthropology at Framingham State University. He received his PhD from Southampton University in the UK, where he studied gender and the artwork of Bronze Age Knossos from a feminist perspective. He has since gone on to publish widely on this topic as well the ceramics of northwest Argentina and the Archaic rock art of northern New Mexico, where he also co-directs projects. Teaching what he loves, Dr. Alberti incorporates archaeology, anthropology, art, and materiality into many of his classes. In addition, queer theory, feminism, studies of masculinity, and social theory all feature prominently. During the summer, Dr. Alberti teaches on the graduate anthropology program at Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina.

Yannis Hamilakis is a Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies at Brown University. His main research and teaching interests are the socio-politics of the past, the body and bodily senses, the archaeology of eating and drinking, the ontology and materiality of photography, archaeology and nationalism, archaeological ethnography, and critical pedagogy in archaeology. His main geographical research focus has been Greece and the Aegean, and he co-directs the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Alex Marko (Joukowsky Institute, Brown University) - The Archaeology of Roman Hourly Timekeeping

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Alex Marko, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019

Decolonizing the Museum: A Teach-in

Center for Contemporary South Asia
, Joukowksy Forum

This will be an open forum for a community wide discussion of Felwine Sarr and Bénédicte Savoy’s report for the French government regarding the nature and future of looted art held in public museums. Please join us!

Organized by Ariella Azoulay, Yannis Hamilakis, and Vazira Zamindar.

Art History from the South

Thomas F. Tartaron (University of Pennsylvania) - Ancient Mediterranean Maritime Networks: Reflections and New Directions

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Thomas Tartaron is Associate Professor with the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is also Chair of the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group. His research interests include Greek Bronze Age archaeology, Classical Archaeology, landscape archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and archaeometry. Dr. Tartaron is currently working on oral history projects among traditional fishing communities in Greece (Thrace) and India (Kerala) as well as archaeological field survey at Molyvoti, Thrace (Greece). He has excavated extensively in Greece, and is the Co-Director of the Saronic Harbors Archaeological Research Project.

Network approaches to maritime interaction in the ancient Mediterranean have proliferated in recent years. Six years after publishing a qualitative, multi-scalar model of Mycenaean maritime networks (Maritime Networks in the Mycenaean World), I assess the responses to it and discuss new directions in my research. In addition to collecting archaeological data on ancient “coastscapes” and “small worlds,” these new directions include ethnoarchaeological (oral history) research with “traditional” fishing and coastal communities in Greece, Cyprus, and India, as well as mining of textual sources cross-culturally. These studies highlight similarity and difference, and help to make network models more adaptable to local cultural and environmental conditions.

Elizabeth Davis (Princeton University) - The Wrong Kind of Politics: Forensic and Classical Archaeology in Post-Conflict Cyprus

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Elizabeth Davis is Associate Professor of Anthropology and a Behrman Faculty Fellow in the Humanities. Her research and writing, grounded in the European horizons and the Ottoman history of the Greek-speaking world, focus on the intersections of psyche, body, history, and power as areas for ethnographic and theoretical engagement. Her particular interest is in how the ties that bind people to communities and states are yielded and inflected by knowledge: that is, how certain kinds of truths mediate conceptions of self and conceptions of others – as psychiatric subjects, for example, or as subjects of history. Her first book, Bad Souls: Madness and Responsibility in Modern Greece (Duke University Press, 2012), is an ethnographic study of responsibility among psychiatric patients and their caregivers in the “multicultural” borderland between Greece and Turkey. She is currently working on her second book, The Good of Knowing: War, Time, and Transparency in Cyprus (forthcoming from Duke University Press), a collaborative engagement with Cypriot knowledge production about the violence of the 1960s-70s in the domains of forensic science, documentary film, and “conspiracy theory.”

Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and the Program in Modern Greek Studies.

Watch a video of the lecture here: Elizabeth Davis - The Wrong Kind of Politics

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Faidon Moudopoulos Athanasiou (University of Sheffield) - Between Local History and Landscape Archaeology: The Case of Early Modern Zagori (NW Greece, 15th - 19th c.)

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Faidon Moudopoulos Athanasiou, a doctoral student at the University of Sheffield and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, will be discussing his research in an informal talk.

State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

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Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a conference titled State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology on February 22-23, 2019. Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological research. This year’s conference aims to address the many issues surrounding the development and uses of ancient DNA methods around the world and to promote discussion between archaeologists, anthropologists, and geneticists in order to examine new opportunities and challenges for ancient DNA research in archaeology.

Keynote Panelists:
Logan Kistler, Smithsonian Institution
Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith, University of Otago
Christina Warinner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Oklahoma

Find more information at: brown.edu/go/sotf2019

This workshop is free and open to the public.
No preregistration is required.

Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Program in Early Cultures, Department of Anthropology, and Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.

State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology

Friday, February 22, 2019 4:00 pm to Saturday, February 23, 2019 5:30 pm
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Christina Warinner (Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Oklahoma) - The Archaeology of Microbes

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Christina Warinner is a Presidential Research Professor and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma and holds a W2 position at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Dr. Warinner is pioneering the study of ancient human microbiota by using tissue samples from ancient skeletons and mummies to research how humans have evolved to adapt to changing diets, diseases, and environments over the last 10,000 years. Her research focuses on the exploration of calculus, a kind of fossilized dental plaque, as a novel biomolecular reservoir of ancient health and dietary indicators. This long-neglected mineralized biofilm is revealing itself to be a vital source of information about past human infections and a rich substrate for the study of bacterial evolution.

Dr. Warinner will also be a keynote speaker in the State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology starting on Friday, February 22 at 4:00pm in RI Hall 108.

Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Program in Early Cultures, Department of Anthropology, and Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.

Watch a video of the lecture here: Christina Warinner - The Archaeology of Microbes

Logan Kistler (Smithsonian Institution) - Re-Thinking Plant Domestication in the Archaeogenomic Era

, Swig Boardroom

Logan Kistler is a Curator of Archaeobotany and Archaeogenomics in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Kistler studies plant domestication and evolutionary ecology in the human context using ancient DNA and genomics and is particularly interested in the adaptability of maize and the domestication and movement of gourds and squashes. He also collaborate on issues of biodiversity and endemic ecosystem conservation in eastern Cuba, and on genomic research into Madagascar’s giant, extinct, subfossil lemurs. Broadly, his work deals with human-environment interactions and human impacts on ancient and modern ecosystems.

Dr. Kistler will also be a keynote speaker in the State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology starting on Friday, February 22 at 4:00pm in RI Hall 108.

Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Program in Early Cultures, Department of Anthropology, and Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith (University of Otago) - Recent Advances in Understanding the Human Settlement of the Pacific

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Professor Matisoo-Smith is a molecular anthropologist and Professor at the University of Otago’s Department of Anatomy; she holds her degrees from the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Auckland (MA and PhD).  Her areas of specialization are Pacific prehistory and origins of Pacific peoples, ancient and modern DNA analysis, and she has recently begun work on tracking Phoenician expansions across the Mediterranean.  Professor Matisoo-Smith is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Society of Antiquities, London, and her publications include DNA for Archaeologists (with K.A. Horsburgh, 2012).

This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is part of the AIA’s Jo Anne Van Tilburg Lecture Series.

Dr. Matisoo-Smith will also be a keynote speaker in the State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology starting on Friday, February 22 at 4:00pm in RI Hall 108.

Watch a video of the lecture here: Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith - Recent Advances in Understanding the Human Settlement of the Pacific

Eduardo Neves (University of São Paulo) - From Bloom to Boom: A Deep Landscape History of SW Amazonia

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Eduardo Góes Neves is a Professor of Archaeology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. From 1995 to 2010, Eduardo directed the Central Amazon Project in the Brazilian Amazon. His current area of research is southwestern Amazonia, at the current border of Bolivia and Brazil, where he has been studying middle Holocene occupations on fluvial shell mounds, as well as the archaeology of late pre-colonial mound building societies.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Ilaria Patania (Harvard University) - Investigating Palaeolithic Space: Micromorphological Studies of Cave Sites from China and Tanzania

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Ilaria Patania, a Research Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019

Yves Ubelmann and Bastien Varoutsikos (Iconem) - From Documentation to Restoration, What Role for New Technologies in the Protection of Cultural Heritage

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From Documentation to Restoration, What Role for New Technologies in the Protection of Cultural Heritage
Yves Ubelmann, President and Co-founder, Iconem
Bastien Varoutsikos, Director of Development, Iconem

Today’s innovative technologies are transforming cultural heritage and archaeology. Within the realm of heritage preservation, 3D modeling has been the focus of conflicting opinions.

These new forms of recording and representation are, at the very least, seen as a new answer to old questions, but can also provide an entirely new approach to knowledge. However, 3D modeling and, sometimes, reconstruction, have also been accused of representing a particular type of cultural reappropriation, digital colonialism, or, at best, a digital gadget.

This talk will provide an overview of the work of Iconem, a French start up created in 2013 and operating in 30 countries around the world. After an introduction to Iconem’s approach, based on drone data acquisition and algorithms, to producing digital models of archaeological and cultural heritage sites, it will present how precise 3D models facilitate the documentation, assessment, preventative conservation, and restoration work of archaeologists and architects. It will finally address how developing an integrated network connecting academics, local communities, and the general public, that collaborate from acquisition to production, can help avoid the potential pitfalls of this field.

Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: David Mixter (Binghamton University) - Palimpsest Urbanism: Urban Reworking as Political Action, a Mayanist’s Perspective

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David Mixter, a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

Engaged Archaeology Graduate Presentations

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Join the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World for presentations on the theme of engaged archaeology. The presenters include two graduate students and a postdoctoral fellow. Themes include oral history in Montserrat and JIAAW’s new podcast, called the Joukbox. This will be the third in a series of three events around the theme of engaged archaeology that will be held on 1, 4, and 6 February.

Archaeology and Oral History in the Shadow of the Soufrière Hills Volcano
Miriam Rothenberg (Graduate Student in Archaeology and the Ancient World)

The Promise and Pitfalls of Building Community and Mobilizing Knowledge with Podcasts
Karl Krusell (Graduate Student in Archaeology and the Ancient World)

Concluding Thoughts
Lauren Yapp (Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities)

Engaged Archaeology Undergraduate Presentations

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Join the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World for presentations on the theme of engaged archaeology. All presenters are undergraduate concentrators and members of the Engaged Scholars Program (a partnership with the Swearer Center). Themes include the US-Mexico border, historical female archaeologists, and bioarchaeology. This will be the second in a series of three events around the theme of engaged archaeology that will be held on 1, 4, and 6 February.

Looking Back at the Border: Political Archaeology and Sousveillance at the U.S.-Mexico Border in San Diego
Amanda Brynn

“On whose toil?” Married Women and the Foundations of Engaged Archaeology
Kelley Tackett

Engaging with Bioarchaeology: Humanizing the Past
Ingrid Mader

Providence’s Heritage: Above and Below Ground

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“Heritage in the Metropolis” (ARCH 0317) and “The Archaeology of College Hill” (ARCH 1900) are teaming up to present students’ final projects which focus on conducting research on an aspect of Providence’s history and then imagining/designing/proposing a way to tell that history to a broader public.

Providence is a city of hidden histories, some lying beneath the ground waiting to be unearthed and others tucked away in overlooked buildings and backstreets. Join Brown and RISD students as they share a diverse range of stories from Providence’s past that they have uncovered through archaeological excavations, archival research, and collecting local memories and oral histories. Short presentations and posters will also feature the students’ original proposals for how we might interpret and preserve these pieces of Providence’s heritage in creative, accessible, and sensitive ways.

This event is part of The Year of the City: The Providence Project, a year long exploration of the history, life and culture of Providence and the first in a series of three events around the theme of engaged archaeology that will be held at the Joukowsky Institute on February 1, 4, and 6, 2019.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Daniel Plekhov (Joukowsky Institute, Brown University) - Scrollytelling and Archaeological Publication: Spring 2019 Project for Digital Archaeology Group (DAG)

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Dan Plekhov, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

Manuel Fernández-Götz (University of Edinburgh) - Times of Conflict: Materialities of Violence in Iron Age and Early Roman Iberia

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Dr Manuel Fernández-Götz is a Reader in Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh, Executive Board Member of the European Association of Archaeologists, and winner of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Archaeology. He has authored more than 140 publications on Iron Age societies in Central and Western Europe, the archaeology of identities, and the archaeology of the Roman conquest.

Watch a video of the lecture here: Manuel Fernández-Götz - Times of Conflict

Playing the Past: Archaeology and video-games play well together

Sunday, January 27
Presentations and discussion about archaeogaming

10:00am-5:30pm
Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab
No registration required

Monday, January 28
Workshop Interactive Historytelling with Twine

10:00am-3:00pm
Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio
Registration required for Monday’s workshop - to register, email [email protected]

The value of video games to archaeology and vice versa has been discussed and shown in a number of related fields such as cultural heritage, ethnography, media studies, education and in a variety of archaeological thought and practice. The combination of games and archaeology, also known as archaeogaming, has grown to be a rich and multifaceted aspect in both scholarly discourse and heritage outreach. It functions not only to educate about the past and to recreate it, but also as a tool to think differently and more reflexively about archaeology and the way we engage with the past.

This two-day series of talks combined with a workshop will discuss the state of the field in gaming and archaeology with a specific focus on how interactive, virtual media function as a differential space for theory-crafting, historytelling, and public outreach. As the most popular form of entertainment globally, it is a given that games are instrumental in democratizing access to the past. Yet this often happens outside of the realm of disciplines that normally produce knowledge of the past. In short, any engagement with games includes confronting our materially-constructed and linear versions of the past with those that take place in digital playgrounds. How do games afford experiences of the past and the practice of archaeology? How do game developers craft specific versions of the past through playful, nonlinear and multi-vocal narratives in alternative virtual worlds? How can games produce awareness on past and present matters, create communities,and forge new relations between different people? But also, how can playing with time, materiality, and history in this interactive, digital medium shape the analogue study of the past?

Registration is required only for the Monday, January 28th Twine workshop. To sign up, please email: [email protected]

More info at: brown.edu/go/playingthepast

Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018

, Atrium

Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018


Photography by Fotis Ifantidis
Curated by: Yannis Hamilakis, Justin Han, Kelley Tackett


An exhibit of photographs taken at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece, a site which was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.


Archaeologists use photographs all the time, primarily for the purposes of recording and documentation. In the field, many other, non-official, “social” photographs and snapshots are taken, which rarely become part of the archaeological story. There is, however, a third kind of photographic-archaeological production: photographs that comment visually on the process of archaeology, on excavation and on field practices, photographs which are at the same time artistic creations but which can also operate as photo-ethnographic objects; as one of the outcomes of the archaeological process which can be disseminated in various ethnographic contexts, and provoke and elicit responses and reactions that can lead to further reflection and research. This is the kind of photography we exhibit here. In doing so, we foreground the archaeological site not only as a site of research and education but also as a site of cultural and artistic production.

Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018

, Atrium

Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018


Photography by Fotis Ifantidis
Curated by: Yannis Hamilakis, Justin Han, Kelley Tackett


An exhibit of photographs taken at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece, a site which was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.


Archaeologists use photographs all the time, primarily for the purposes of recording and documentation. In the field, many other, non-official, “social” photographs and snapshots are taken, which rarely become part of the archaeological story. There is, however, a third kind of photographic-archaeological production: photographs that comment visually on the process of archaeology, on excavation and on field practices, photographs which are at the same time artistic creations but which can also operate as photo-ethnographic objects; as one of the outcomes of the archaeological process which can be disseminated in various ethnographic contexts, and provoke and elicit responses and reactions that can lead to further reflection and research. This is the kind of photography we exhibit here. In doing so, we foreground the archaeological site not only as a site of research and education but also as a site of cultural and artistic production.

Iranian Ceramics, Trade, and Collecting Practices

History of Art and Architecture

Martina Rugiadi, Associate Curator of Islamic Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will present a talk entitled Expanding the Field, Disrupting Canons: Iranian Ceramics, Trade, and Collecting Practices. Kept in storage until recently, the Minassian collection of Iranian ceramics defies expectations of what Iranian art is supposed to be. In this lecture, Martina Rugiadi will explore how trade and collecting patterns from the late nineteenth century onwards have shaped canons and (literally) fashioned objects visible in museums. Immersing ourselves in this often dismissed past is critical for expanding the field and disrupting received notions of history and art.

Co-sponsored by History of Art & Architecture, John Hay Library, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, and Middle East Studies.

Candace Rice (University of Alberta) - Beyond Connectivity: A Multi-Regional Perspective on Economic Interdependence in the Roman Mediterranean

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Dr. Candace Rice is an Assistant Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on Mediterranean maritime trade and economic development during the Roman period. She is particularly interested in exploring what the archaeological record reveals about the ways in which connectivity changed the nature of the Roman economy through enhanced supra-regional integration and specialized local economic development. Dr. Rice is also an active field archaeologist and has excavated at Etruscan, Samnite, Roman, and Medieval sites in Italy, France, and Tunisia, and spent considerable time at Roman and Late Antique sites in Turkey. She currently co-directs the Upper Sabina Tiberina Project, focused on the excavation of a late Republican to mid Imperial villa in the Sabina and, as part of this project, runs the University of Alberta Archaeological Field School in Italy.

I-UTRA Koutroulou Magoula Archaeological Fieldwork 2019 InfoSession

, 008

The Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project: An interdisciplinary field project in central Greece

Yannis Hamilakis
Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies ([email protected])

Koutroulou Magoula is a multi-period archaeological site (a tell - artificial mound) in central Greece, which is becoming increasingly known internationally due to its astonishing preservation and its diverse and unusual material record, as well as the pioneering archaeological and ethnographic methodologies adopted in its exploration. The main period of use of the site is the Middle Neolithic (c. 6000-5800 BCE) when it was a habitation settlement; in the Late Bronze Age (c. 1500 BCE) the site was used for burials, and an elaborate tholos (bee-hived) tomb was constructed at the top of the mound, next to the Neolithic buildings. In the 12th c. CE the site was used again for burials, and an inhumation burial of a young woman was excavated by our team.

Since 2009 the site is being explored as part of the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography interdisciplinary project, under my co-direction. The project relies on the participation of a large number of scholars and other specialists, including anthropologists, geoarchaeologists, archaeobotanists, archaeozoologists, organic residue specialists, ceramic petrographers, bioarchaeologists and physical anthropologists, soil micro-morphologists, computing application specialists, even performance artists and theatre specialists. Three Universities are currently participating with students and specialists in this project: Brown, University College London (UCL), and National University of Taiwan, in addition to individual scholars from many institutions around the world.

Through this detailed interdisciplinary work, we have unearthed a very elaborate settlement with extremely well preserved, stone and mud brick buildings, occupied by a community which was engaged in large scale communal projects, including terracing and the construction of large, perimeter ditches around the settlement. This community also produced and used impressive material culture, including clay figurines, c. 500 of each have already being unearthed and studied, one of the largest such collections from the Neolithic of South Eastern Europe. They are extremely diverse in terms of technology, form, and decoration, and they often depict hybrid human-animal beings or entirely fantastic entities.

The project has the potential to rewrite the archaeology of the Balkan and European Neolithic, given its unique features, preservation, and interdisciplinary nature of our work.

Excavation dates for 2019: mid June to mid-July
Info meeting: 13 December 4.30 pm, RIH 008.

Deadline for expression of interest (inc. bio, and an idea of an independent project): 23 December 2018

Reading Period Break with the DigDUG

Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group (The DigDUG)
, Atrium

The Archaeology DigDUG is serving up cookies and hot chocolate in the atrium of the Joukowsky Institute from 11 AM to 1 PM. Please stop by and take a break from studying or writing! 

Sean Briody (Brown University) - The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt

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On December 11, Rev. Lysander Dickerman, D.D., Class of 1851 (portrayed by Sean Briody ’19), will lecture on “The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt,” one of his world famous Egyptological lectures illustrated with stereopticon views. The lecture will be presented exactly as it was when Dr. Dickerman spoke before an audience of Brown University students on January 4, 1893. The event will take place in Rhode Island Hall, Room 108 at 1:30 pm. A short discussion about Dickerman, the field of Egyptology, and “Egyptomania” in the Victorian era will follow. Open to the public; all are welcome!
This event serves as the final project for an Independent Study with Professor Laurel Bestock.

Laura Banducci (Carleton University) - Escaping the Form and Function Trap: Quotidian Objects and Why the Details Matter

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Dr. Laura Banducci, Assistant Professor in Greek and Roman Studies at Carleton University, is an archaeologist, with a particular interest in the Roman republican period and in the Etruscan civilization of central Italy. Her research focuses on three principal areas: diet and dining practices, collectively referred to as ‘foodways’; how artefacts were made, used, re-purposed and discarded; and entertainment and leisure culture. Her research is grounded in the idea that an individual’s daily behavior, as reflected by the material record, can provide important insights into large-scale societal changes in the ancient world. She is currently completing a book that investigates the foodways of several sites in central Italy.

Geologics: Comparative Epistemologies of the Earth

History of Art and Architecture, and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology
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This symposium explores “geologics”: systems of thought that have accounted for the relation between humans and what modern scientists consider geological features (caves, volcanos) and geomorphological processes (weathering, erosion, deposition). Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, we mobilize the insights of the literary and visual arts, archaeology, anthropology, and history to excavate deep histories and sculpt speculative futures of the earth.

Information on participants, and abstracts.

Sponsored by the Hsiao Family Fund in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Program in Early Cultures, Joseph Edinburg Fund in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and the Brown Arts Initiative.

Geologics: Comparative Epistemologies of the Earth

Friday, December 7, 2018 (All day) to Saturday, December 8, 2018 (All day)
History of Art and Architecture, and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology
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Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Karen Carr (Portland State University) - Swimming While White: When Did the Greeks Learn to Swim?

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Karen Carr, Associate Professor Emerita in the Department of History at Portland State University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Andrea Brock (University of St. Andrews) - The Eternal City Rises: Discovering the Dynamic Environment of Rome’s Original Harbor

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Dr. Andrea Brock is a Lecturer in Ancient History in the School of Classics at the University of St. Andrews. Her work integrates the literary record on early Rome with new archaeological evidence, in order to produce an environmental and topographical reconstruction of Rome’s river valley. As director of the Forum Boarium Project, she has conducted a coring survey of the city’s original river harbour and harbour sanctuary. Among other findings, her research is revealing new insights on the effects of environmental stress—in particular frequent flooding and rapid sedimentation in the river valley—on Rome’s urbanization process.

Presentation of Dissertation Research by Jen Thum

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Jen Thum, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation, “Words in the Landscape: The Mechanics of Egyptian Royal Living-Rock Stelae”, in a public lecture. All are welcome.

Sacred Mountains, Climate Change, Resilience, and Adaptation among Southeast Alaskan Natives

85 Waterman, Room 015

Thomas Thorton, 2018.Thomas Thornton (University of Oxford) | Thursday, November 29th 5:30 PM | 85 Waterman Room 015

Flood narratives are common in oral traditions of Northwest Coast and other Indigenous Peoples. Unlike Biblical floods, however, these floods are often linked to rising sea-levels, the same threat humans face today with global climate change in the Anthropocene. In Tlingit tradition, Southeast Alaska was consumed by an epic flood which is linked to the activities of Raven, the Trickster-Demiurge, who also became a catalyst for adaptation to the novel environments wrought by the Flood. Humans were forced to seek refuge in “stone nests” on high mountains which are said to have “saved the people” from the deluge. Tom Thornton suggests that these narratives, still invoked as encapsulations of resilience and adaptation, hold continuing relevance today in the face of anthropogenic climate change.

Tom Thornton is an Environmental Anthropologist with 30 years of research and teaching experience, most recently as Director of the Environmental Change and Management program at the Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, UK .  His research interests are in human ecology, climate change, adaptation, local and traditional ecological knowledge, conservation, coastal and marine environments, conceptualizations of space and place, and the political ecology of resource management among Indigenous peoples of the North Pacific. His most popular books are Being and Place among the Tlingit (2008) and Haa Léelk’w Has Aaní Saax’u / Our Grandparents’ Names on the Land (2012).

Supported by generous donors to the Shepard Krech III Lecture fund. Reception to follow.   

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Praveena Gullapalli (Rhode Island College) - Chronology, Craft, Conundrum: What to Make of the South Indian Iron Age?

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Praveena Gullapalli, an Associate Professor in Anthropology at Rhode Island College, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Liana Brent (Cornell University/American Academy in Rome) - Nameless Bodies and Disembodied Names in Roman Funerary Archaeology

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Liana Brent is a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at Cornell University. She is the recipient of a two-year Andrew W. Mellon Foundation / Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (2017-2019). Her dissertation, Corporeal Connections: Tomb Disturbance, Reuse, and Violation in Roman Italy, examines post-depositional skeletal manipulation in reopened and reused inhumation graves throughout Roman Italy. She conducts archaeological fieldwork in southeast Italy as the assistant director of the Vagnari Cemetery excavations, where she has excavated since 2011.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Surekha Davies (InterAmericas Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, Brown University) - The Global, the Local, and the Ancient: Displaying Antiquities in Early Modern Europe

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Surekha Davies, an InterAmericas Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Opening Reception - Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018

, Atrium

Join us for the opening reception of Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018, an exhibit of photographs taken by Fotis Ifantidis at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece and curated by Professor Yannis Hamilakis and undergraduate students Justin Han and Kelley Tackett.

Koutroulou Magoula was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.

John W.I. Lee (University of California, Santa Barbara) - “This young man deserves special mention:” John Wesley Gilbert at Brown University, 1886-1888

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Dr. John W.I. Lee is an Associate Professor at the UCSB Department of History. He studies the history of ancient West Asia with a focus on war and culture in the Greek and Achaemenid world from ca. 650-330 BC. He is currently writing two books: one about Civil War and Revolt in Achaemenid Persia; and another about John Wesley Gilbert (1863-1923), the first African American to attend the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the first African American to receive an advanced degree from Brown (Class of 1888).

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Nicholas Emlen (National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, John Carter Brown Library, Brown University) - Hearing the Voice of an Indigenous Translator in a 17th Century Aymara Text from Peru

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Nicholas Emlen, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library and a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Walter Crist (American Museum of Natural History) - Anybody’s Game: Overcoming Social Distance through Gameplay in the Ancient Near East

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Walter Crist is a Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History and a Visiting Researcher in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. His research focuses on Bronze Age Cypriot, Egyptian, and Near Eastern board games and their roles in intercultural transmissions and as social lubricants and enablers in communities.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Jennifer Bates - Life in Indus Households: an exploration of SPatial ACtivity Environments

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Jennifer Bates, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018

Wednesday, October 31, 2018 9:00 am to Sunday, January 27, 2019 4:30 pm
, Atrium

Photography by Fotis Ifantidis
Curated by: Yannis Hamilakis, Justin Han, Kelley Tackett

An exhibit of photographs taken at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece, a site which was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.

Archaeologists use photographs all the time, primarily for the purposes of recording and documentation. In the field, many other, non-official, “social” photographs and snapshots are taken, which rarely become part of the archaeological story. There is, however, a third kind of photographic-archaeological production: photographs that comment visually on the process of archaeology, on excavation and on field practices, photographs which are at the same time artistic creations but which can also operate as photo-ethnographic objects; as one of the outcomes of the archaeological process which can be disseminated in various ethnographic contexts, and provoke and elicit responses and reactions that can lead to further reflection and research. This is the kind of photography we exhibit here. In doing so, we foreground the archaeological site not only as a site of research and education but also as a site of cultural and artistic production.

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Georgia Andreou (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University) - The Cyprus Ancient Shoreline Project: How does coastal erosion fit the archaeological narrative?

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Georgia Andreou, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

NEXT STEPS: Information Session on Applying to Graduate School and Searching for Jobs in Archaeology

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A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.

View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://www.brown.edu/academics/archaeology/undergraduate/life-after-brown

Archaeology of College Hill Community Archaeology Day

Come be part of an active archaeological excavation! Students will be digging on the grounds of Moses Brown School (next to Brown’s athletic center), uncovering the foundations of a 19th century home and processing artifacts from that household. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what artifacts students are discovering or even try your hand at digging.

Moses Brown School (Excavation at the corner of Hope St and Lloyd Ave)

Uncover Archaeology: Community Archaeology Day at the Joukowsky Institute

See ancient coins from Greece and Rome up close! Touch human and animal bones! Examine and draw Persian and Roman ceramics, prehistoric tools, precious metals, and other artifacts from thousands of years ago – coached by experts!  And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Lauren Yapp (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University) - Reclaimed or Reified? When Colonial Modernity becomes Cultural Heritage

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Lauren Yapp, a Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Archaeological Illustration Club

, Mezzanine (Third Floor)

Learn to produce technical illustrations

Handle ancient objects close up

Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

No experience or artistic confidence necessary

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Robert Preucel (Anthropology, Brown University) - The Predicament of Ontology

, 108

Robert Preucel, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Haffenreffer Museum at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk titled, “The Predicament of Ontology”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

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Where can you do archaeological fieldwork this summer?  How can you pay for it?  How do you apply?  What’s an UTRA grant?  Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer?  What courses should you take to prepare?  Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator?  What is fieldwork, anyway?  And what about study abroad?

Joukowsky Institute faculty will provide an overview on how students can get involved in archaeological fieldwork this summer.  We will discuss how to find and choose a project and how to find funding, and then lead a more general discussion on what to expect on a fieldwork project and what kinds of preparation might be necessary.  Open to all interested students.

Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Gretel Rodríguez - The Arch of Constantine and the Use of Colored Marbles in Late Antique Architecture

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Gretel Rodríguez, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

AIA Lecture - Kathryn Sampeck (Illinois State University) - A Day in the Life of a Sixteenth-Century Ani-Yunwiya (Cherokee) Village

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Dr. Kathryn Sampeck is an an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Illinois State University. Her research interests historical archaeology, archaeology of Spanish colonialism, political economy, ethnohistory, food history.

In this lecture, Dr. Sampeck asks: What was daily life like for Cherokees just at the moment when groups of people from across the Atlantic—Spaniards and Africans—started to become part of their world? A tour of one settlement, Cowee, lets audience members understand what Cherokee homes, communities, and networks of communities were like and the kinds of activities that were important to peoples’ lives. Each example is based on archaeologically-recovered information as well as community history and knowledge. This visit shows what an important historical moment this time was for Cherokees and colonists alike, why these settlements are places of enduring importance, and how Cherokee peoples were crucial in early colonial encounters and subsequent political and economic developments.

This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is part of the AIA’s Nadzia Borowski Lecture series.

Tomb Raider: See the Movie...Then Think About It...

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See Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander), the daughter of an eccentric adventurer, embark on a perilous journey to a fabled tomb on a mythical island in an attempt to solve the mystery of her father’s disappearance – on a giant screen, with surround sound! The movie will be followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie. And free popcorn! Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group.

[email protected] Meeting

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We’d like to invite female identifying or presenting undergrads, grads, postdocs and professors to our first meeting. In this gathering we’ll discuss amongst each other whatever comes to mind - whether summer experiences, general concerns, things we’re looking forward to this year or in the near future, any ideas we might have for events etc.

Sponsored by the DigDUG (Archaeology and the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group) *If there are any considerable conflicts, do let us know and we’ll try to find a more accommodating time/date*

Archaeology DUG Welcome Back Meet and Greet

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The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group (aka DigDUG) welcomes all Archaeology concentrators, as well as any students interested in archaeology and the ancient world, back to campus. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!

Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown’s 2018 Archaeological Field Seasons

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Brown University’s Professors Laurel Bestock, Sheila Bonde, Yannis Hamilakis, Felipe Rojas, Andrew Scherer, and Peter van Dommelen will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in Jordan, France, Greece, Turkey, Mexico, Guatemala, and Italy.

Free and open to the public. All are welcome.

255th Opening Convocation

All students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend the 255th Opening Convocation to celebrate the start of the academic year and welcome new students to Brown. President Christina Paxson will officially open the school year. Provost and Schreiber Family Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Richard M. Locke, will deliver the keynote address. The Convocation procession of incoming students will form on College Street beginning at 3:40 PM and the ceremony will begin at 4 PM on the Main Green. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be moved to the Pizzitola Gymnasium.

Event Highlights of 2017-2018

The Joukowsky Institute held more than 60 events over the course of the 2017-18 academic year, ranging from a viewing and discussion of the 2017 blockbuster ‘The Mummy’ to our 2018 State of the Field conference on archaeology and social justice. See some of the year’s highlights below!

September 2017

Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown's 2017 Archaeological Field Seasons
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Brown University’s Professors Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Itohan Osayimwese, Felipe Rojas, and Peter van Dommelen shared the latest news from their summer archaeological fieldwork in France, Montserrat, Greece, Barbados, Turkey, and Italy.

October 2017

The Mummy: See the Movie...Then Think About It...
Monday, October 30, 2017

Halloween started early with a free screening of the movie "The Mummy" (2017). Tom Cruise and Russell Crowe battled an ancient princess (played by Sofia Boutella) awakened from a crypt, followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie.

November 2017

Fake Fossils, Fake Bones, and a Dinosaur
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Why do people fake animal skeletons and their petrified remains? How are fake “natural specimens” similar to or different from fake “cultural artifacts”? Is there anything to be gained from sustained reflection about the physical traces of beings that never were? For centuries—if not millennia—people have forged the impressions left by the bodies of animals and the hardest of body parts. To what end? Felipe Rojas (JIAAW), Kate Brunson (JIAAW), and Irina Podgorny (CONICET and Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library) discussed fake fossils and bones in three very short talks followed by a public discussion.

Watch a video of the talk here: Fake Fossils, Fake Bones, and a Dinosaur

December 2017

Change and Resilience: The Occupation of Mediterranean Islands in Late Antiquity
Friday, December 1, 2017 to Sunday, December 3, 2017

This conference explored the transformation of Mediterranean islands with a primary focus on settlement patterns and the transformation of landscapes and mindscapes. Participants explored how the models of occupation of the islands changed from the Roman to the Medieval Period, focusing on change and resilience, innovation and tradition, the creation of new settlements, and the reoccupation of prehistoric sites.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/changeandresilience

Watch video from the conference here:

Keynote
Session 1 - The Western and Central Mediterranean
Session 2 - The Eastern Mediterranean
Session 3 - Island Mindscapes

February 2018

What Can You Do with a Degree in Archaeology?
Monday, February 5, 2018

Gina Borromeo (Curator of Ancient Art at the RISD Museum), Matt Glendinning (Head of School at Moses Brown School), and Bill Monroe (Senior Scholarly Resources Librarian, Humanities, at Brown University's Library) discussed how their degrees in ancient art, early history, and archaeology led them to their current positions and answered student questions about other career options.

March 2018

State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice
Friday, March 2, 2018 to Saturday, March 3, 2018

This workshop built on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students. While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event focused on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.  This workshop engaged primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018

Watch video from the conference here:

Keynote Panel
Session 1 (Constructions of Blackness and Whiteness) and Session 2 (Diversity and Epistemic Justice)
Session 3 (Material Memory and the Archaeologies of Resistance) and Session 4 (Business as Usual? Engaging with Social Justice)

April 2018

Colloquium: Other Pasts: Comparing Landscapes, Monuments, and Memories Across the Mediterranean
Saturday, April 21, 2018

The archaeological study of memory in the ancient Mediterranean has spread like a forest fire. Although several scholars are responsible for igniting the initial tinder, it would be hard to overstate the impact of Susan Alcock on the ways archaeologists approach the challenge of exploring how people imagined their own pasts in the ancient Mediterranean and neighboring regions. Fifteen years after the publication of her main book on the subject, Archaeologies of the Greek Past: Landscape, Monuments, and Memories (2002), the moment was ripe for an assessment of the field after the conflagration, as it were, as well as a discussion about new and promising directions in the archaeological study of ancient memory and forgetting. Rather than collecting ever more refined case studies, scholars were invited to engage in comparative analyses.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/otherpasts

Watch video from the conference here:

Morning Session
Afternoon Session

May 2018

Learning to Look: An Exhibition of Archaeological Illustrations by the JIAAW Community
Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Archaeological illustration requires us to pay close attention to the material world. Learning to draw is tied up with learning to look and by extension, to see objects in more detail. This exhibition presents work produced by the Archaeological Illustration Club and members of the Joukowsky Institute community.

Archaeology and the Ancient World Commencement Ceremony

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

Following the ceremony on the Main Green.

Learning to Look: An Exhibition of Archaeological Illustrations by the JIAAW Community

Wednesday, May 9, 2018 to Friday, June 1, 2018
Rhode Island Hall

Archaeological illustration requires us to pay close attention to the material world. Learning to draw is tied up with learning to look and by extension, to see objects in more detail. The work presented in this exhibit was produced by the Archaeological Illustration Club and members of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology's community.

Presentations of Senior Thesis Research in Archaeology and the Ancient World

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Maria Averkiou, Axel Getz, Ciara Hayden, and Luiza Silva, will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations. This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!

And the DigDUG will be hosting a pre-presentation reception, from 2:30-3:00pm, to celebrate the presenters. Come for the cookies, stay for the conversation!

Archaeology DUG Reception in Honor of Thesis Presentations

Rhode Island Hall

The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group is hosting an informal reception to celebrate the seniors presenting their thesis research at 3:00. Anyone interested in archaeology and/or the ancient world, or who wants to support the presenters, is welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served! Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

Elizabeth Minor (Wellesley) and Carl Walsh (JIAAW) - Power and Sacrifice: Rethinking the Kerma State

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

From 2000-1550 BC, the region of Nubia in present day Sudan was controlled by the powerful, but little understood, Kerma state. This African kingdom, named after the monumental and royal site of Kerma, is famous for its theatrical and opulent funerary traditions which seemingly involving large-scale human sacrifices. However, little research has been done on interpreting the role of these unusual funerary traditions, and how they can inform us about the nature and ideology of the Kerma state. In this talk and discussion, Elizabeth Minor (Wellesley College) and Carl Walsh (Joukowsky Institute), put forward new interpretations and ideas regarding these enigmatic burial practices based on their recent research, moving to shed light on this mysterious African rival of ancient Egypt.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Stephen Houston (Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Stephen Houston (Anthropology, Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison University) will be discussing their research in an informal talk titled "Arrival, Return: Movement and Founding Among the Maya". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

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