• Curious what fieldwork looks like without the field? Vaguely interested in archaeology and the myriad exciting forms it might take? Filled with burning questions about virtual research opportunities, what kinds of archaeological research “count”, or how to do archaeology from home?

    The DigDUG invites you to join Professors Felipe Rojas and Yannis Hamilakis as they lead a discussion on archaeological research opportunities for the summer. It will be extremely low-key, we promise, with brief accounts of faculty research this summer, discussion of ongoing opportunities for undergrads to get involved, and space for q&a to close. Even if you don’t have specific questions or a plan to do archaeologically-related work this summer, it’s always a great idea to hear more about potential opportunities and hang out with fellow archaeology enthusiasts!

    An awesome thing about archaeology is that even in precedented times so much of the discipline combines a range of skills and tools beyond actually going into the field. If this sounds at all interesting, come drop in!

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, International, Global Engagement, Research, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Please join us in celebration as we confer Brown University degrees at The Virtual Degree Conferral Ceremonies on Sunday, May 24, at 1 p.m. EDT.

    The ceremonies will feature remarks from University leaders and moments of celebration shared on social media with the graduates and well-wishers from around the world.

    Post photos and videos to Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter using the hashtags #Brown2020 and #BrownU to help us recognize this important milestone as we gather virtually.

    Questions can be directed to the Office of University Event & Conference Services at [email protected]

    University Events and Conference Services Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events
  • Every Wednesday this summer, take a peek into the Joukowsky Institute’s Virtual Vault to see some of the archaeological objects stored and studied at Brown University! A team of curators and archaeologists, convened by the Joukowsky Institute, will be posting a new object every week – from lithics to lekythoi,shabtis to sherds – so you can explore Brown’s archaeological collections from wherever you are.

    Find the Virtual Vault on the Archaeology at Brown blog , a website highlighting programming and events organized by archaeologists in Brown University’s Departments of Anthropology, Classics, Egyptology and Assyriology, and History of Art and Architecture, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and Program in Early Cultures.

    Visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/category/virtual-vault/  to see past entries and to read new updates every week!

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Join Virtual Event Code: ArchThesis

    Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World will give 10-minute presentations on their thesis research.

    Kelley Tackett
     Constructed Pasts and the Contested Present in Petra Archaeological Park

    Ingrid Mader
    Designing and Implementing Ethical Archaeogenetic Research Across Latin American Indigenous Communities: Engaged Scholarship in Molecular Anthropology

    Aliosha Bielenberg
    How Do We Make A World? Hannah Arendt, the Khoi-San, and the Problems of Alterity and Humanism

    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!

    Watch a video of the presentations here: 2020 Archaeology Senior Thesis Presentations

    More >
  • Sarah Cahlan, Video Editor for the Fact Checker at The Washington Post, will be screening and discussing her film, TheirStory. The film focuses on archaeologists who are pushing back against a male-centered narrative of our history, and in doing so complicating our assumptions of gender and our understandings of the past.

    TheirStory takes viewers on an eye-opening journey through archival footage, animations and interviews to ask how a reconfiguring of past gender perceptions – such as man the hunter and woman the gatherer - can radically change the ingrained beliefs we hold about who we are and where we come from. ​

    Sarah Cahlan edits and produces videos for the Fact Checker at The Washington Post. Before coming to The Post, she directed a short documentary about the historical inaccuracies of gender roles. As an NBC/NAHJ fellow, she reported, produced and wrote stories about science, tech and Latino culture. Cahlan has also covered health and the environment in California.

    More > Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Dr. Rocco Palermo is a Researcher and VENI Grant Recipient at the University of Groningen. His research interests focus on several aspects of the Hellenistic and Roman Near East. In particular he concentrates on the settlement patterns, the material culture and the imperial impact of the Seleucid period in Mesopotamia and on the archaeology of the Roman eastern frontier in Syria and Mesopotamia. Other interests include the archaeology of ancient territorial Empires, the landscape archaeology of the Near East and the role of pottery in the archaeological record.

    He has conducted fieldwork in Italy, Syria, Jordan, and Iraq and is currently Associate Director of the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey (Harvard University) and a member of the Land of Nineveh Archaeological Project (University of Udine), both projects operating in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Since 2019 he has also been in charge of the excavation of the Hellenistic period level at the site of Tell Aliawa (Iraqi Kurdistan) under the direction of Prof. Luca Peyronel (University of Milan, Italy).

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Laurel Darcy Hackley, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation, “Social Landscapes of the Egyptian Deserts, 3000-1100 BCE”, in a public lecture via Zoom. All are welcome.

    Watch a video of the presentation here: L. Darcy Hackley: Social Landscapes of the Egyptian Deserts, 3000-1100 BCE

    More >
  • Kristian Kabuay is a Filipino-American artist and activist. His work critically interrogates calligraphy and graffiti, both indigenous to the Philippines and from elsewhere, to explore larger themes of colonialism and cultural heritage. Kristian’s talk will focus on Baybayin, a pre-Hispanic Filipino script, and will address the relationship between academic study of material culture and precolonial worlds, artistic practice, and decolonial activism.

    Free and open to the public.

    Sponsored by the Southeast Asian Studies Initiative and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.

    More > Arts, Performance, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Kathleen Forste, a PhD candidate in Archaeology at Boston University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • The Second Student-Led Symposium on John Wesley Gilbert (1864-1923)
    Research conducted and presented by students of MGRK 1220: Decolonizing Classical Antiquity, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis

    Join us to learn and explore the life and legacy of the first African American to receive a graduate degree at Brown University. A scholar of Classics, archaeology, and religion, and an educator, John Wesley Gilbert is also considered the first African American archaeologist.

    Introductory Remarks by Professor Yannis Hamilakis

    “Thou art not a Christian, but a Ciceronian”: Christianity and Classical Heritage in the Life of John Wesley Gilbert
    Christopher Packs

    John Wesley Gilbert and Paine College: An Examination of the Institution’s Foundation and Establishment
    Elena Panzitta

    Racial Colorblindness in the Institutions of Classics
    Mia Mitchell

    More >
  • The State of the Field 2020: Archaeology of the Levant, scheduled for March 13-14, 2020, has been postponed until Fall 2020. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, and will circulate the new schedule as soon as it is confirmed.

    The Levant, a loosely defined region encompassing the modern countries of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, and Cyprus, is rich in archaeology and history. The region has been central to the discipline of archaeology since the nineteenth century, and arguably even earlier. A long history of colonial rule, political and religious differences, academic specializations and passions, stark financial inequalities and war continue to inform and limit dialogue not only among local and foreign archaeologists working there, but also among scholars, local communities, government officials, and other stakeholders. Aware of the ancient and modern importance of the region, the peculiar challenges it poses, the possibilities for collaboration, and the need for creative perspectives, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University will host a conference in March 2020 dedicated to addressing these unique aspects of the Levant through constructive discussion of:

    • Current directions, critical trends and lacunae in archaeological research
    • Museum, archival studies, and other investigations that rely primarily on archaeological legacy data
    • The effects of colonial rule, modern geopolitics, fluctuating national boundaries, war, and migration, among many other factors on the practice and interpretations of archaeological work in the region.

    The event is part of the “State of the Field” conference series, a yearly meeting which aims to highlight and reflect upon specific thematic or regional archaeological topics within a community of its scholars.

    Free and open to the public. No pre-registration necessary.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Catherine Scott, a Lecturer in University Writing at Brandeis University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Alex Marko, Dan Plekhov, and Miriam Rothenberg, doctoral candidates in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing their research on God’s Little Acre in Newport, RI in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Talk about what archaeological fieldwork is really like (and how to find funding) with faculty, grad students, and other undergrads. Faculty who can take undergrads on their field projects this summer will be present to answer your questions about how to get involved!

    Sponsored by the Archaeological Department Undergraduate Group

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Contemporary discourses of denial in Turkey do not reject forensic archaeology; in fact, state agents ostensibly encourage ‘objective scientific inquiry’ against ‘biased accusations of genocide.’ In this talk, I analyze the first court-ordered exhumation of a mass grave in Dersim, a Kurdish Alevi city in Turkey’s east and Kurdistan’s north, which has suffered waves of state violence since the 1930s. The exhumation, analysis, and reburial of human remains took place in the contradictory contexts of Turkey’s short-lived peace and reconciliation process in 2015. In the end, the medico-legal discourse of truth crafted a new layer of denial, yielding factual fragments that could not be translated into the ‘moral truth’ of genocide. Meanwhile, the interlocutors of Dersim’s memory started to borrow from the archaeological toolkit themselves, to engage more intimately and reflexively with conflict heritage.

    Hande Sarikuzu is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University.

    More > Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • The Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology is proud to announce our next exhibit installation, opening February 20th, 2020, Transient Matter: Assemblages of Migration in the Mediterranean.
        
    Transient Matter: Assemblages of Migration in the Mediterranean brings the realities, perils, and the humanity of migrations and border-crossings to the Haffenreffer Museum through an exhibition of things discarded by migrants who crossed the Aegean to reach Greece, artwork created by migrants in camps and detention centers once there, and photographs and videos produced by the curators…  
     

    This is a two-part event, beginning with the Curator’s Talk at 5 PM in Friedman Hall, followed by the Reception at 6 PM at the Haffenreffer Museum Gallery at Manning Hall. Both the Talk and Reception are open and free to the public, supported by generous donation to the Friends of the Haffenreffer Museum and the Decolonial Initiative at Brown University.    

    Transient Matter - Curators’ Talk
    Feb. 20, 2020 | 5 PM - 6 PM 
    Friedman Hall, Room 102
    Discuss the people, matter, and research behind the exhibition with the curatorial team, including Yannis Hamilakis, L. Darcy Hackley, Sherena Razek, and Ayşe Şanlı. 

    Transient Matter - Opening Reception

    Feb. 20, 2020 | 6 PM - 8 PM
    Manning Hall Gallery
    21 Prospect Street, Providence RI 
    Celebrate this first look at the new exhibition alongside museum staff and curators. 
       
    Content Warning: The content of this exhibition may be emotionally stressful or upsetting for some visitors, including mentions of war and violence, political, religious, or gender-based persecution, racism, loss, and death.
    Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology Government, Public & International Affairs, Haffenreffer Exhibition, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • Débora Leonel Soares, a PhD candidate at the University of São Paulo and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Tamar Hodos is a Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol. Her work is focused on the impact of colonisation, and the construction and expression of social identities in the Mediterranean’s Iron Age. She uses postcolonial and globalisation theories to examine the interactions and influences between the various communities and cultures of the Mediterranean during this period of unprecedented connectivity. Her major recent publications on this topic include The Routledge Handbook of Archaeology and Globalization (Routledge 2017) and The Archaeology of the Mediterranean Iron Age (Cambridge University Press 2020).

    Decorated ostrich eggs were traded as luxury items from the Middle East to the western Mediterranean during the second and first millennia BCE. The eggs were engraved, painted, and occasionally embellished with ivory, precious metals and faience fittings. While archaeologists note their presence as unusual vessels in funerary and dedicatory contexts, little is known about how or from where they were sourced, decorated and traded. An ongoing project between researchers at Bristol University and the British Museum has established techniques to identify where the eggs originated and how they were decorated. This talk shares the results of our study, revealing the complexity of the production, trade, and economic and social values of luxury organic items between competing cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • This Friday is Valentine’s Day, and l o v e will be in the air. But what we love? is pancakes.

    Please join us on Friday from 11-1 in the common room (RI Hall 109) for:
    - free pancakes
    - archaeology-themed valentines
    - ♥

    “Emphasize how it will be the best day of their lives.” (Personal correspondence, Kelley Tackett ’20 to Amanda Brynn ’21 regarding the contents of this email. Emphasis is author’s own.)

    P.S. we did pancake stratigraphy for this please come

    More > Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Dan Plekhov, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Holly Shaffer, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Ashish (Chadha) Avikunthak, an associate professor in the University of Rhode Island’s Harrington School of Communication and Media, will be screening his short film Rummaging for Pasts: Excavating Sicily, Digging Bombay. The film is an experimental juxtaposition of two cinematic documents: the video diary of an international archaeological excavation and a collection of assorted eight millimeter found footage. The archaeologists, digging on the site of Monte Pollizzo in Sicily, are in pursuit of an ephemeral past, its people and its meaning; the found footage, excavated from a roadside junkyard in a Bombay flea market, embodies forgotten images of a collective memory. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Paul J. Kosmin is a Professor in the Department of the Classics at Harvard University. His research addresses the political, cultural, and intellectual history of the ancient Greek world, and he has taught and published on historical questions from the archaic period in the seventh century BCE down to the total Roman dominance of the east Mediterranean at the turn of the eras. The core of his work to date has focused on the Hellenistic east, that is, on the political landscape that extended from the Greek mainland to India and Central Asia in the last three centuries BCE.

    His research is focused on two broad historical themes. First, the relationship between empires and systems of knowledge and practice, and, second, the interaction between the Greek world and its Near Eastern neighbors. He has begun a third big research project, provisionally titled The Ancient Shore. This will be a cultural history of the coastline in Greek antiquity, explored as a site of social processes, as a dynamic of claim-making and territorialization, and as an inducement to thinking, wonder, and religious experience.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • The Archaeology DigDUG is serving up cookies and hot chocolate in the atrium of the Joukowsky Institute from 3 to 5 PM. Please stop by and take a break from studying or writing! 

    More >
  • tiny—a gallery of miniature might and meaning
    artifacts from the collections of ARCH 0303 students
     

    Students in the Brown University class, tiny (ARCH 0303), which is devoted to the archaeology of miniaturization, curated a gallery exhibition at Rhode Island Hall. 

    The exhibit includes a one-minute short by Archaeology concentrator Alexander Dorosin on learning embodied practices by handling miniatures, a video game by Emily Wright (RISD) having to do with miniatures and memory (both created specifically for the class), and holograms that Katrina Wardhana has curated using material from Koutrolou Magoula provided by Yannis Hamilakis.

    The shadowboxes that will be up in Rhode Island Hall should be examined along with their respective short essays, which are available in accompanying catalogues.

    All free and open to the public.

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  • tiny—a gallery of miniature might and meaning
    artifacts from the collections of ARCH 0303 students
     
    with a screening of nina katchadourian’s
    “the recarcassing ceremony”

     

    Students in the Brown University class, tiny (ARCH 0303), which is devoted to the archaeology of miniaturization, are curating a gallery exhibition at Rhode Island Hall. 

    The artist Nina Katchadourian has kindly granted us permission to screen her film, “The Recarcassing Ceremony”, which is a powerful reflection of many of the themes discussed in class, including the cross-cultural role of miniatures as capsules of memory, the blurry lines between play and ritual among both children and adults, and how the scaling of anthropomorphic figurines can serve to trouble the divide between (animate) mind and (inanimate) matter.  

    The opening will take place on Thursday, December 5, in Rhode Island Hall from 6 to 8pm.

    More >
  • Aviva Cormier, Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities with the Department of Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Join us for a book launch party to celebrate the publication of Shiyanthi Thavapalan’s The Meaning of Color in Ancient Mesopotamia (Brill, 2019)!

    In The Meaning of Color in Ancient Mesopotamia, Shiyanthi Thavapalan offers the first in-depth study of the words and expressions for colors in the Akkadian language (c. 2500-500 BCE). By combining philological analysis with the technical investigation of materials, she debunks the misconception that people in Mesopotamia had a limited sense of color and positions the development of Akkadian color language as a corollary of the history of materials and techniques in the ancient Near East.

    Organized by the Department of Egyptology and Assyriology and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Nov
    26

    Learn to produce technical illustrations! Handle ancient objects close up!
    Casual atmosphere, no experience or artistic confidence necessary!

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Learn to produce technical illustrations! Handle ancient objects close up!
    Casual atmosphere, no experience or artistic confidence necessary!

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Luca Zavagno is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Bilkent University. His research interests include Byzantine history and archaeology, early Islamic history, and Cypriot and Eastern Mediterranean history from the 6th to the 10th century. Dr. Zavagno is the author of many articles on the early Medieval Mediterranean and his most recent book is Cyprus between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (ca.600-ca.850 A.D.), An Island in Transition (Routledge, June 2017). He is also the co-organizer of the Conference of the Mediterranean Worlds, Associate Scholar of the Mediterranean Seminar, member of the Princeton University FLAME-Framing the early Medieval Coinage and former Visiting professor in Byzantine Art History at the University of Venice.

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Luca Zavagno - The Worlds of Byzantine Islands

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • This whole week, Monday, November 18-Friday, November 22, we’re focusing on archaeological Fieldwork!

    Students can stop by Rhode Island Hall any time to find out more about how to participate in an archaeological fieldwork project this summer.

    Get tips and advice on projects, funding, and what to think about when choosing a project. You don’t have to be an archaeology concentrator, or even have taken archaeology class!

    Visit Rhode Island Hall to pick up information and talk to faculty during their office hours!

    Find more information on projects and funding at www.brown.edu/go/dig

    For a list of faculty office hours this week, visit https://www.brown.edu/academics/archaeology/people/faculty-office-hours

    More >
  • Join the [email protected] for a Wikipedia edit-a-thon aimed at improving content on women and other minority or historically marginalized communities in archaeological research. Drop in anytime between 11am and 2pm - no background in archaeology or experience editing Wikipedia is needed! Instruction and resources (and food) will be provided. We recommend that you bring your own laptop if possible and that you create a Wikipedia account ahead of time.

    [email protected] is a group of early career researchers from historically underrepresented communities and their allies coming together in solidarity to reflect on experiences in the field and academia and engage in meaningful exchanges related to gender issues and accessibility. This group is striving towards a more intersectional understanding of what it means to be a woman in archaeology and the challenges one may or may not face in doing so.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Kaijun Chen, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dr. Pablo Vidal is Director of the Anthropology Research Institute at the Universidad Cat’olica de Valencia, Spain and currently a Visiting Fellow at the Yale MacMillan Center Council on Latin American & Iberian Studies. His research focuses on the relationship between people and nature (mountains, nomadic and transhumance people, immaterial heritage, and hiking) and is based in the Mediterranean, especially Corsica, Morocco, southern France, and the Iberian Peninsula.

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Pablo Vidal - Mediterranean Transhumance

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Keynote by Nicanor Dominguez
    “Farewell to the Panakas?: Royal “Ayllus,” Kinship and Language(s) among the Inkas

    Brown University is pleased to host the 38th Northeast Conference on Andean and Amazonian Archaeology and Ethnohistory. This annual two-day conference consists of lectures and posters about recent and ongoing archaeological, ethnographic and ethnohistorical research in the Andean and Amazonian regions of South America. We welcome scholars from across the world. We look forward to seeing you in Providence, RI for the first time since 1995!

    Program in Early Cultures Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Social Sciences
  • Laurel Bestock, Associate Professor of Egyptology and Archaeology and the Ancient World and Lutz Klein, Research Associate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, will be discussing their research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dr. Ahmad Al-Jallad is the Sofia Chair in Arabic Studies and Associate Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Culture at The Ohio State University. Dr. Al-Jallad is a philologist, epigraphist, and historian of language. His work focuses on the languages and writing systems of pre-Islamic Arabia and the ancient Near East. He has authored and edited four books and nearly thirty articles on the early history of Arabic, language classification, North Arabian and Arabic epigraphy, and historical Semitic linguistics.

    Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, the Center for Middle East Studies, the Program in Early Cultures, and the Department of Egyptology & Assyriology

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Ahmad Al-Jallad - Writing and Rock Art in the Black Desert of Northern Jordan

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Zachary Dunseth, a postdoctoral fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • See ancient coins from Greece and Rome up close! Touch human and animal bones! Try on a Roman legion helmet! Examine and draw Persian and Roman ceramics, prehistoric tools, precious metals, and other artifacts from thousands of years ago – coached by experts!  And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

    More > Family Weekend, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Come be part of an active archaeological excavation! Students will be digging on the grounds of Moses Brown School (next to Brown’s athletic center), uncovering the foundations of a 19th century home and processing artifacts from that household. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what artifacts students are discovering or even try your hand at digging.

    Moses Brown School (Excavation at the corner of Hope St and Lloyd Ave)

    More > Family Weekend, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Raphael (Rafi) Greenberg, Associate Professor of archaeology at Tel Aviv University and Visiting Scholar at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Kathryn A. Catlin, Voss Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Join us for the Joukowksy Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World’s Field Dirt: The Undergraduate Edition, where undergraduate students will discuss their summer fieldwork in a casual forum.

    This event is free and open to the public - all are welcome!

    More >
  • Oct
    4
    1:00pm - 2:00pm

    [email protected]

    [email protected] will be having its first meeting next Friday, October 4th, from 1-2pm in Room 109, Rhode Island Hall (aka the Common Room). This event is open to everyone, and is intended to be an informal opportunity to get to know other people in the community and discuss possible goals and directions for the group this semester. Please invite people to come along, share their views, and have some snacks!
    For those who aren’t aware of or haven’t participated in Trowel Blazers events before, a brief description can be found below:

    In [email protected] you’ll find a group of early career female and queer identifying scientists and their allies coming together in solidarity to reflect on experiences in the field and academia and engage in meaningful exchanges related to gender issues and accessibility. We are striving towards a more intersectional understanding of what it means to be a woman in archaeology and the challenges one may or may not face in doing so. Come join us at our monthly meetings and mixers to support each other in our endeavors and work together to advocate for positive changes in our discipline, university, fieldwork, etc.

    The name of the group is a reference to the women-in-the-field movement called Trowelblazers (http://trowelblazers.com/ ), although we are not officially affiliated with them. You can find us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1179629722128068/ ) – join the group for updates and event info.
    More >
  • Tyler Franconi, a Visiting Assistant Professor of Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Claudia Glatz is a senior lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Glasgow. Her research interests include early states and empires, highland-lowland encounters and relationships, the politics of craft production, settlement and landscape archaeology, food ways and identity, border and frontier dynamics, and cultural heritage and heritage protection in Iraq and the Middle East. Dr. Glatz leads the Qala Shirwana Cultural Heritage Project, aimed at stabilizing and restoring the earthquake damaged 19th century AD baked brick castle called Qala Shirwana, and co-directs the Sirwan Regional Project, an international archaeological research project that has been exploring the Kurdish Region of Iraq since 2013.

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Claudia Glatz - Imperial and Other Encounters in a Highland-Lowland Transitional Zone

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Rui Gomes Coelho, a postdoctoral fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/08/19/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Nicola Terrenato is a Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Michigan. He specializes in first millennium BCE Italy, with particular reference to northern Etruria, early Rome and the period of the Roman conquest, and has been involved in fieldwork in and around Rome, Volterra, and Potenza. He currently directs a major new excavation of the Latin city at Gabii, as well as a new investigation of the Sant’Omobono sanctuary in the river harbor of Rome. At Gabii, the NYT-featured discovery of extensive architecture dating to the 4th-3rd centuries BCE has provided an important glimpse into the early stages of Roman monumental construction. Other interests include field survey methods, history of archaeology and especially the role of elite mentality in the formation of cities and empires in the Mediterranean. Taking apart the view of these political abstractions as all-powerful entities, he explores with the help of archaeology the role of specific human groups in political decision-making.

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Nicola Terrenato - Elite Negotiation and Family Agendas

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Research
  • Professors Yannis Hamilakis, Candace Rice, Felipe Rojas, Andrew Scherer, and Peter van Dommelen will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork in Greece, Italy, Turkey, Jordan, and Mexico.

    Free and open to the public. All are welcome.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Michael Garth and Emily McCarthy, will give 10-minute presentations on their thesis research.
     
    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
    More >
  • Transient Matter is a student-organized and curated exhibition of artifacts linked to the migrant and border crossing experience and collected from the island of Lesvos, on the Greek-Turkish Border. It was prepared as part of the course, MGRK1210: A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis. It asks us to reflect on the physical traces and remnants of border crossing, and invites us to understand the phenomenon paying attention to “small things forgotten”, to life-vests, thermal blankets, prayer mats and other personal objects that migrated and crossed borders together with humans. It addresses the whole assemblage of border crossing and migration, from migrants to volunteers and solidarity networks, and foregrounds both the agony and pain of displacement as well as the resilience, determination and inventiveness of the new nomads of our age.

    Transient Matter can be found in spaces on the first, second, and third (mezzanine) floors of Rhode Island Hall and will be on view until Fall 2019.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Transient Matter is a student-organized and curated exhibition of artifacts linked to the migrant and border crossing experience and collected from the island of Lesvos, on the Greek-Turkish Border. It was prepared as part of the course, MGRK1210: A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis. It asks us to reflect on the physical traces and remnants of border crossing, and invites us to understand the phenomenon paying attention to “small things forgotten”, to life-vests, thermal blankets, prayer mats and other personal objects that migrated and crossed borders together with humans. It addresses the whole assemblage of border crossing and migration, from migrants to volunteers and solidarity networks, and foregrounds both the agony and pain of displacement as well as the resilience, determination and inventiveness of the new nomads of our age.

    Transient Matter can be found in spaces on the first, second, and third (mezzanine) floors of Rhode Island Hall and will be on view until Fall 2019.

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Student Publications
  • May
    14

    This exhibit recognizes and highlights those voices that have too long been buried beneath the dominant narratives in archaeology. Hidden Figures aims to recognize the lives, scholarship, contributions, and stories of archaeologists from minority or historically marginalized communities to archaeological research, past and present.

    Throughout Rhode Island Hall, [email protected] have placed images and biographies of some of the hidden figures in archaeology. We invite you to find them (some are more hidden than others - look carefully!), to learn about their lives and contributions to our field, and to suggest the names of others you would like to add to our exhibit.

    Find out more about [email protected] and the hidden figures in this exhibit at:
    www.brown.edu/go/trowelblazersatbrown

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Dr. Cameron Petrie is a Reader in South Asian and Iranian Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge. Dr. Petrie’s research primarily focuses on the investigation of complex societies and the archaeology of India, Pakistan and Iran. He is particularly interested in the rise of complexity, the social and economic aspects of state formation, the impact that the growth of states and empires has on subjugated regions, and the relationships between humans and the environment. He has extensive field and research experience at archaeological sites dating from the Neolithic up to the medieval period in India, Pakistan and Iran, and co-direct projects in each of these countries.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Martin Uildriks, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Renaud Gagné is a Reader in Classics at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Pembroke College. His research interests include early Greek poetry, Greek religion, Greek drama, ancient cultural history, and the history of classical scholarship. Dr. Gagné recently co-edited (with Simon Goldhill and Geoffrey Lloyd) Regimes of Comparatism: Frameworks of Comparison in History, Religion and Anthropology (Brill 2018) which looks at how different theories and practices of writing and interpretation have developed at different times in different cultures and reconsiders the specificities of modern comparative approaches within a variety of comparative moments.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Alexander Ahrens is a Senior Researcher with the Damascus Branch, Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute and, as the recipient of a 2019 AIA/DAI Study in the U.S. Fellowship, a Visiting Scholar at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World. His current project, entitled “Connecting Lowlands and Highlands: The Trajectories and Dynamics of an ‘Archaeological Transit Zone’”, uses the Wadi Shu’aib in west central Jordan as a case study in modes of communication and interaction between the Jordan Valley and the Transjordanian Plateau during the Iron Age. The focus of his research while at the Joukowsky Institute is especially directed towards possible socio-political dynamics lying behind highland-lowland interactions. Besides excavating in Jordan, he has worked at several sites in Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, and Turkey.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Blind Origin will be on view at Brown’s Joukowsky Institute for Archeology and the Ancient World from April 17 - July 19, 2019** (**Note: dates extended), and explores the use of art to reinterpret archeological objects. Artist and Professor Judd Schiffman responded to objects selected from the Joukowsky Institute’s collection by creating a new series of ceramic sculptures. Interweaving these transmutations with his personal accumulation of imagery, this work speaks to the meaning, stories and power we ascribe to objects, ancient and contemporary. In his talk, Schiffman will discuss some of his previous work which investigates the relationship between objects, identity, and culture and will speak to the energetic and aesthetic ways we interact with the world around us.

    Judd Schiffman is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Art Department at Providence College and a Providence based artist working primarily in ceramics. His work explores the reinterpretation of family heirlooms, personal mementos, and historic artifacts into sculpture. In the studio he explores the use of clay as a drawing material and evokes a psychedelic concoction of real and imagined experiences that ponder the power of our personal stories.

    Project/Exhibit Curation by Pinar Durgun (Curatorial Assistant, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University) and Project Coordination by Jessica Porter (Operations and Events Coordinator, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University)

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Parker VanValkenburgh, an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, will present his work in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Blind Origin will be on view at Brown’s Joukowsky Institute for Archeology and the Ancient World from April 17 - May 31, and explores the use of art to reinterpret archeological objects. Artist and Professor Judd Schiffman responded to objects selected from the Joukowsky Institute’s collection by creating a new series of ceramic sculptures. Interweaving these transmutations with his personal accumulation of imagery, this work speaks to the meaning, stories and power we ascribe to objects, ancient and contemporary. In his talk, Schiffman will discuss some of his previous work which investigates the relationship between objects, identity, and culture and will speak to the energetic and aesthetic ways we interact with the world around us.

    Judd Schiffman is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Art Department at Providence College and a Providence based artist working primarily in ceramics. His work explores the reinterpretation of family heirlooms, personal mementos, and historic artifacts into sculpture. In the studio he explores the use of clay as a drawing material and evokes a psychedelic concoction of real and imagined experiences that ponder the power of our personal stories.

    Project/Exhibit Curation by Pinar Durgun (Curatorial Assistant, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University) and Project Coordination by Jessica Porter (Operations and Events Coordinator, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University)

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • The material traces of undocumented and clandestine migration in heavily securitized border landscapes are lenses into the grounded outcomes and fallout of immigration enforcement policies. With this premise, Dr. Soto will make a case for archaeologists to have a seat at the table among other disciplines more traditionally focused on migration studies and geopolitics. Dr. Soto will discuss three interconnected material timelines concerning undocumented migration and enforcement in the southern Arizona: the building of the border wall from 2004-2009, the evolution of direct action humanitarianism in southern Arizona from 2003-present, and the history of water bottles on the border from 2000 to present. The aim is to showcase the plural temporality of undocumented migration as process and to widen the conceptualization of migrant material assemblages in order to generate a more holistic understanding of the reverberating effects and affects of border security policies.

    Dr. Gabriella Soto is the Postdoctoral Fellow for the Graduate Program in American Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Her research focuses on the archaeology of contemporary undocumented migration, methodologies for contemporary archaeological research, heritage, and on postmortem investigations of undocumented migrants who die during border crossings. Gabriella’s work has been published in Political Geography, American Anthropologist, the Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, and recently appeared in the edited volume, Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation: Perspectives for Forensic Science. Gabriella is currently working on her first co-authored manuscript for the University of Arizona Press, When Death Comes Knocking: Postcoloniality, Postmortem Investigation, and Undocumented Migration on the U.S.-Mexico Border.

    More > Government, Public & International Affairs, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Apr
    12
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    [email protected]

    [email protected] will hold our next meeting on Friday, April 12, from 3-5pm in the Rhode Island Hall common room! Our primary agenda item will be putting together an exhibit on hidden voices in archaeology, to recognize the lives, scholarship, contributions, and stories of archaeologists from minority or historically marginalized communities. Anyone who would like to be involved is welcome to attend this meeting, and we would love to hear about hidden figures from all aspects of archaeology, anywhere in the world.

    We will be writing short (approximately 200 word) biographies of these figures and printing images to hang or hide in spaces around Rhode Island Hall. If you’re not sure where to start looking for historically marginalized voices in archaeology (in any of its forms), the official TrowelBlazers website is a great place to start. Please mark your calendars for April 12!

     

    In [email protected] you’ll find a group of early career female scientists and their allies coming together in solidarity to reflect on experiences in the field and academia and engage in meaningful exchanges related to gender issues and accessibility. We are striving towards a more intersectional understanding of what it means to be a woman in archaeology and the challenges one may or may not face in doing so. Anyone who believes they might be able to contribute or benefit from being in a supportive and comfortable environment and participating in such discussions is welcome to join us!

    Join our Facebook group!

    More >
  • Karl Krusell, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Students in ARCH 763 The Private Life of the Privy: A Secret History of Toilets will present posters of their research projects. The posters explore (and critique) how an ancient toilet/sewer system has been studied by archaeologists or think about how a particular methodology could be applied to the study of ancient toilets and how this might change our understanding of these. The role of pigs in Middle Kingdom Egyptian waste disposal, the possibility that Amazonian terra preta soils represent human and animal faeces, a critique of the Qumran excavations, coprostanols at Cahokia, the public and private nature of toilets at Pompeii, and much more – there is something for everyone!

    More >
  • The Archaeology DUG (the DigDUG!) will be hosting an event where all undergraduates are welcome to give brief presentations on their past, present, or future research projects – or to come and listen to what archaeology students have been up to! Each presentation will be followed by a brief discussion/Q&A.
    In addition, Professor Rojas will also be talking on his role as Director of Undergraduate Studies for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and undergraduate fieldwork. Anyone who is interested in Brown’s fieldwork opportunities at Petra is especially encouraged to attend!
    The event will take place in Rhode Island Hall 108, April 6th at 5:00 PM.
    More >
  • Reinhard Bernbeck is professor at the Institute for Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin. His research interests include the Late Neolithic of the Middle East, Iranian archaeology, New Assyrians and Urartu, imperialism, and social inequality in early complex societies. He is also interested in the ideological and political dimensions of archaeology as well as narrative constructions in his field. He has co-directed fieldwork in many different contexts, ranging from Jordan and the Occupied Palestinian Territories to Turkey, Iran, and Turkmenistan.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Susan Pollock, a Professor at the Institute for Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Isotopic and elemental analysis of skeletal remains informs us about diet of individuals, at different points in their lives, and allows group comparisons based on sex, age, status as well as site locations and time periods. Examples will be presented on the importance of maize for different cultures in the Americas, and for aquatic resources and millet in the Mediterranean.

    Robert Tykot is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. His research interests include archaeological science, Mediterranean prehistory, Old World archaeology, ancient diets around the world, bone chemistry, exchange studies, obsidian, marble, Sardinia, and Sicily. His most recent work looks at prehistoric obsidian trade in the Central Mediterranean, bone chemistry and ancient diets, and the use of portable XRF on archaeological materials.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Gretel Rodríguez, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, and Willis Monroe, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia will present their work on The Database of Religious History in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Lennart Kruijer, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • The recent move beyond representation in the discipline of archaeology did not lead to consensus in archaeological theory, luckily! On March 11 we will put two thinkers together in one room to disentangle the underlying premises of their work, New Materialism (Benjamin Alberti) versus Sensorial Archaeology (Yannis Hamilakis). Join us for some friendly ontological disagreement and debate!

    Benjamin Alberti is a Professor of Anthropology at Framingham State University. He received his PhD from Southampton University in the UK, where he studied gender and the artwork of Bronze Age Knossos from a feminist perspective. He has since gone on to publish widely on this topic as well the ceramics of northwest Argentina and the Archaic rock art of northern New Mexico, where he also co-directs projects. Teaching what he loves, Dr. Alberti incorporates archaeology, anthropology, art, and materiality into many of his classes. In addition, queer theory, feminism, studies of masculinity, and social theory all feature prominently. During the summer, Dr. Alberti teaches on the graduate anthropology program at Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina.

    Yannis Hamilakis is a Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies at Brown University. His main research and teaching interests are the socio-politics of the past, the body and bodily senses, the archaeology of eating and drinking, the ontology and materiality of photography, archaeology and nationalism, archaeological ethnography, and critical pedagogy in archaeology. His main geographical research focus has been Greece and the Aegean, and he co-directs the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Alex Marko, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • This will be an open forum for a community wide discussion of Felwine Sarr and Bénédicte Savoy’s report for the French government regarding the nature and future of looted art held in public museums. Please join us!

    Organized by Ariella Azoulay , Yannis Hamilakis , and Vazira Zamindar .

    Art History from the South

    Center for Contemporary South Asia (CCSA)
  • Thomas Tartaron is Associate Professor with the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is also Chair of the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group. His research interests include Greek Bronze Age archaeology, Classical Archaeology, landscape archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and archaeometry. Dr. Tartaron is currently working on oral history projects among traditional fishing communities in Greece (Thrace) and India (Kerala) as well as archaeological field survey at Molyvoti, Thrace (Greece). He has excavated extensively in Greece, and is the Co-Director of the Saronic Harbors Archaeological Research Project.

    Network approaches to maritime interaction in the ancient Mediterranean have proliferated in recent years. Six years after publishing a qualitative, multi-scalar model of Mycenaean maritime networks (Maritime Networks in the Mycenaean World), I assess the responses to it and discuss new directions in my research. In addition to collecting archaeological data on ancient “coastscapes” and “small worlds,” these new directions include ethnoarchaeological (oral history) research with “traditional” fishing and coastal communities in Greece, Cyprus, and India, as well as mining of textual sources cross-culturally. These studies highlight similarity and difference, and help to make network models more adaptable to local cultural and environmental conditions.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences
  • Elizabeth Davis is Associate Professor of Anthropology and a Behrman Faculty Fellow in the Humanities. Her research and writing, grounded in the European horizons and the Ottoman history of the Greek-speaking world, focus on the intersections of psyche, body, history, and power as areas for ethnographic and theoretical engagement. Her particular interest is in how the ties that bind people to communities and states are yielded and inflected by knowledge: that is, how certain kinds of truths mediate conceptions of self and conceptions of others – as psychiatric subjects, for example, or as subjects of history. Her first book, Bad Souls: Madness and Responsibility in Modern Greece (Duke University Press, 2012), is an ethnographic study of responsibility among psychiatric patients and their caregivers in the “multicultural” borderland between Greece and Turkey. She is currently working on her second book, The Good of Knowing: War, Time, and Transparency in Cyprus (forthcoming from Duke University Press), a collaborative engagement with Cypriot knowledge production about the violence of the 1960s-70s in the domains of forensic science, documentary film, and “conspiracy theory.”

    Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and the Program in Modern Greek Studies.

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Elizabeth Davis - The Wrong Kind of Politics

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Faidon Moudopoulos Athanasiou, a doctoral student at the University of Sheffield and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, will be discussing his research in an informal talk.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a conference titled State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology on February 22-23, 2019. Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field ” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological research. This year’s conference aims to address the many issues surrounding the development and uses of ancient DNA methods around the world and to promote discussion between archaeologists, anthropologists, and geneticists in order to examine new opportunities and challenges for ancient DNA research in archaeology.

    Keynote Panelists:
     Logan Kistler, Smithsonian Institution
    Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith, University of Otago
    Christina Warinner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Oklahoma

    Find more information at: brown.edu/go/sotf2019

    This workshop is free and open to the public.
    No preregistration is required.

    Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Program in Early Cultures, Department of Anthropology, and Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.

    More > Biology, Medicine, Public Health, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences
  • Christina Warinner is a Presidential Research Professor and Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma and holds a W2 position at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Dr. Warinner is pioneering the study of ancient human microbiota by using tissue samples from ancient skeletons and mummies to research how humans have evolved to adapt to changing diets, diseases, and environments over the last 10,000 years. Her research focuses on the exploration of calculus, a kind of fossilized dental plaque, as a novel biomolecular reservoir of ancient health and dietary indicators. This long-neglected mineralized biofilm is revealing itself to be a vital source of information about past human infections and a rich substrate for the study of bacterial evolution.

    Dr. Warinner will also be a keynote speaker in the State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology starting on Friday, February 22 at 4:00pm in RI Hall 108.

    Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Program in Early Cultures, Department of Anthropology, and Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.

    More > Biology, Medicine, Public Health, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research
  • Logan Kistler is a Curator of Archaeobotany and Archaeogenomics in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Kistler studies plant domestication and evolutionary ecology in the human context using ancient DNA and genomics and is particularly interested in the adaptability of maize and the domestication and movement of gourds and squashes. He also collaborate on issues of biodiversity and endemic ecosystem conservation in eastern Cuba, and on genomic research into Madagascar’s giant, extinct, subfossil lemurs. Broadly, his work deals with human-environment interactions and human impacts on ancient and modern ecosystems.

    Dr. Kistler will also be a keynote speaker in the State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology starting on Friday, February 22 at 4:00pm in RI Hall 108.

    Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Program in Early Cultures, Department of Anthropology, and Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research
  • Professor Matisoo-Smith is a molecular anthropologist and Professor at the University of Otago’s Department of Anatomy; she holds her degrees from the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Auckland (MA and PhD).  Her areas of specialization are Pacific prehistory and origins of Pacific peoples, ancient and modern DNA analysis, and she has recently begun work on tracking Phoenician expansions across the Mediterranean.  Professor Matisoo-Smith is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Society of Antiquities, London, and her publications include DNA for Archaeologists (with K.A. Horsburgh, 2012).

    This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is part of the AIA’s Jo Anne Van Tilburg Lecture Series.

    Dr. Matisoo-Smith will also be a keynote speaker in the State of the Field 2019: The Ancient DNA Revolution in Archaeology starting on Friday, February 22 at 4:00pm in RI Hall 108.

    Watch a video of the lecture here: Elizabeth Matisoo-Smith - Recent Advances in Understanding the Human Settlement of the Pacific

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences
  • Eduardo Góes Neves is a Professor of Archaeology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. From 1995 to 2010, Eduardo directed the Central Amazon Project in the Brazilian Amazon. His current area of research is southwestern Amazonia, at the current border of Bolivia and Brazil, where he has been studying middle Holocene occupations on fluvial shell mounds, as well as the archaeology of late pre-colonial mound building societies.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Ilaria Patania, a Research Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • From Documentation to Restoration, What Role for New Technologies in the Protection of Cultural Heritage
    Yves Ubelmann, President and Co-founder, Iconem
    Bastien Varoutsikos, Director of Development, Iconem

    Today’s innovative technologies are transforming cultural heritage and archaeology. Within the realm of heritage preservation, 3D modeling has been the focus of conflicting opinions.

    These new forms of recording and representation are, at the very least, seen as a new answer to old questions, but can also provide an entirely new approach to knowledge. However, 3D modeling and, sometimes, reconstruction, have also been accused of representing a particular type of cultural reappropriation, digital colonialism, or, at best, a digital gadget.

    This talk will provide an overview of the work of Iconem, a French start up created in 2013 and operating in 30 countries around the world. After an introduction to Iconem’s approach, based on drone data acquisition and algorithms, to producing digital models of archaeological and cultural heritage sites, it will present how precise 3D models facilitate the documentation, assessment, preventative conservation, and restoration work of archaeologists and architects. It will finally address how developing an integrated network connecting academics, local communities, and the general public, that collaborate from acquisition to production, can help avoid the potential pitfalls of this field.

    Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • David Mixter, a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Join the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World for presentations on the theme of engaged archaeology. The presenters include two graduate students and a postdoctoral fellow. Themes include oral history in Montserrat and JIAAW’s new podcast, called the Joukbox. This will be the third in a series of three events around the theme of engaged archaeology that will be held on 1, 4, and 6 February.

    Archaeology and Oral History in the Shadow of the Soufrière Hills Volcano
    Miriam Rothenberg (Graduate Student in Archaeology and the Ancient World)

    The Promise and Pitfalls of Building Community and Mobilizing Knowledge with Podcasts
    Karl Krusell (Graduate Student in Archaeology and the Ancient World)

    Concluding Thoughts
    Lauren Yapp (Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities)

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Join the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World for presentations on the theme of engaged archaeology. All presenters are undergraduate concentrators and members of the Engaged Scholars Program (a partnership with the Swearer Center). Themes include the US-Mexico border, historical female archaeologists, and bioarchaeology. This will be the second in a series of three events around the theme of engaged archaeology that will be held on 1, 4, and 6 February.

    Looking Back at the Border: Political Archaeology and Sousveillance at the U.S.-Mexico Border in San Diego
    Amanda Brynn

    “On whose toil?” Married Women and the Foundations of Engaged Archaeology
    Kelley Tackett

    Engaging with Bioarchaeology: Humanizing the Past
    Ingrid Mader

    More >
  • “Heritage in the Metropolis” (ARCH 0317) and “The Archaeology of College Hill” (ARCH 1900) are teaming up to present students’ final projects which focus on conducting research on an aspect of Providence’s history and then imagining/designing/proposing a way to tell that history to a broader public.

    Providence is a city of hidden histories, some lying beneath the ground waiting to be unearthed and others tucked away in overlooked buildings and backstreets. Join Brown and RISD students as they share a diverse range of stories from Providence’s past that they have uncovered through archaeological excavations, archival research, and collecting local memories and oral histories. Short presentations and posters will also feature the students’ original proposals for how we might interpret and preserve these pieces of Providence’s heritage in creative, accessible, and sensitive ways.

    This event is part of The Year of the City: The Providence Project, a year long exploration of the history, life and culture of Providence and the first in a series of three events around the theme of engaged archaeology that will be held at the Joukowsky Institute on February 1, 4, and 6, 2019.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Jan
    31

    Learn to produce technical illustrations

    Handle ancient objects close up

    Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

    No experience or artistic confidence necessary

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dan Plekhov, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dr Manuel Fernández-Götz is a Reader in Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh, Executive Board Member of the European Association of Archaeologists, and winner of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Archaeology. He has authored more than 140 publications on Iron Age societies in Central and Western Europe, the archaeology of identities, and the archaeology of the Roman conquest.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Sunday, January 27
    Presentations and discussion about archaeogaming

    10:00am-5:30pm
    Patrick Ma Digital Scholarship Lab
    No registration required

    Monday, January 28
    Workshop Interactive Historytelling with Twine

    10:00am-3:00pm
    Sidney E. Frank Digital Studio
    Registration required for Monday’s workshop - to register, email [email protected]

    The value of video games to archaeology and vice versa has been discussed and shown in a number of related fields such as cultural heritage, ethnography, media studies, education and in a variety of archaeological thought and practice. The combination of games and archaeology, also known as archaeogaming, has grown to be a rich and multifaceted aspect in both scholarly discourse and heritage outreach. It functions not only to educate about the past and to recreate it, but also as a tool to think differently and more reflexively about archaeology and the way we engage with the past.

    This two-day series of talks combined with a workshop will discuss the state of the field in gaming and archaeology with a specific focus on how interactive, virtual media function as a differential space for theory-crafting, historytelling, and public outreach. As the most popular form of entertainment globally, it is a given that games are instrumental in democratizing access to the past. Yet this often happens outside of the realm of disciplines that normally produce knowledge of the past. In short, any engagement with games includes confronting our materially-constructed and linear versions of the past with those that take place in digital playgrounds. How do games afford experiences of the past and the practice of archaeology? How do game developers craft specific versions of the past through playful, nonlinear and multi-vocal narratives in alternative virtual worlds? How can games produce awareness on past and present matters, create communities,and forge new relations between different people? But also, how can playing with time, materiality, and history in this interactive, digital medium shape the analogue study of the past?

    Registration is required only for the Monday, January 28th Twine workshop. To sign up, please email: [email protected]

    More info at: brown.edu/go/playingthepast

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences
  • Martina Rugiadi, Associate Curator of Islamic Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will present a talk entitled Expanding the Field, Disrupting Canons: Iranian Ceramics, Trade, and Collecting Practices. Kept in storage until recently, the Minassian collection of Iranian ceramics defies expectations of what Iranian art is supposed to be. In this lecture, Martina Rugiadi will explore how trade and collecting patterns from the late nineteenth century onwards have shaped canons and (literally) fashioned objects visible in museums. Immersing ourselves in this often dismissed past is critical for expanding the field and disrupting received notions of history and art.
    Co-sponsored by History of Art & Architecture, John Hay Library, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, and Middle East Studies.
    History of Art and Architecture Arts, Performance, Humanities
  • Dr. Candace Rice is an Assistant Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on Mediterranean maritime trade and economic development during the Roman period. She is particularly interested in exploring what the archaeological record reveals about the ways in which connectivity changed the nature of the Roman economy through enhanced supra-regional integration and specialized local economic development. Dr. Rice is also an active field archaeologist and has excavated at Etruscan, Samnite, Roman, and Medieval sites in Italy, France, and Tunisia, and spent considerable time at Roman and Late Antique sites in Turkey. She currently co-directs the Upper Sabina Tiberina Project, focused on the excavation of a late Republican to mid Imperial villa in the Sabina and, as part of this project, runs the University of Alberta Archaeological Field School in Italy.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • The Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project: An interdisciplinary field project in central Greece

    Yannis Hamilakis
    Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies ([email protected])

    Koutroulou Magoula is a multi-period archaeological site (a tell - artificial mound) in central Greece, which is becoming increasingly known internationally due to its astonishing preservation and its diverse and unusual material record, as well as the pioneering archaeological and ethnographic methodologies adopted in its exploration. The main period of use of the site is the Middle Neolithic (c. 6000-5800 BCE) when it was a habitation settlement; in the Late Bronze Age (c. 1500 BCE) the site was used for burials, and an elaborate tholos (bee-hived) tomb was constructed at the top of the mound, next to the Neolithic buildings. In the 12th c. CE the site was used again for burials, and an inhumation burial of a young woman was excavated by our team.

    Since 2009 the site is being explored as part of the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography interdisciplinary project, under my co-direction. The project relies on the participation of a large number of scholars and other specialists, including anthropologists, geoarchaeologists, archaeobotanists, archaeozoologists, organic residue specialists, ceramic petrographers, bioarchaeologists and physical anthropologists, soil micro-morphologists, computing application specialists, even performance artists and theatre specialists. Three Universities are currently participating with students and specialists in this project: Brown, University College London (UCL), and National University of Taiwan, in addition to individual scholars from many institutions around the world.

    Through this detailed interdisciplinary work, we have unearthed a very elaborate settlement with extremely well preserved, stone and mud brick buildings, occupied by a community which was engaged in large scale communal projects, including terracing and the construction of large, perimeter ditches around the settlement. This community also produced and used impressive material culture, including clay figurines, c. 500 of each have already being unearthed and studied, one of the largest such collections from the Neolithic of South Eastern Europe. They are extremely diverse in terms of technology, form, and decoration, and they often depict hybrid human-animal beings or entirely fantastic entities.

    The project has the potential to rewrite the archaeology of the Balkan and European Neolithic, given its unique features, preservation, and interdisciplinary nature of our work.

    Excavation dates for 2019: mid June to mid-July
    Info meeting: 13 December 4.30 pm, RIH 008.

    Deadline for expression of interest (inc. bio, and an idea of an independent project): 23 December 2018

    More >
  • Study Break with the DigDUG
    Dec
    12

    The Archaeology DigDUG is serving up cookies and hot chocolate in the atrium of the Joukowsky Institute from 11 AM to 1 PM. Please stop by and take a break from studying or writing! 

    More >
  • On December 11, Rev. Lysander Dickerman, D.D., Class of 1851 (portrayed by Sean Briody ’19), will lecture on “The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt,” one of his world famous Egyptological lectures illustrated with stereopticon views. The lecture will be presented exactly as it was when Dr. Dickerman spoke before an audience of Brown University students on January 4, 1893. The event will take place in Rhode Island Hall, Room 108 at 1:30 pm. A short discussion about Dickerman, the field of Egyptology, and “Egyptomania” in the Victorian era will follow. Open to the public; all are welcome!
    This event serves as the final project for an Independent Study with Professor Laurel Bestock.

    More >
  • Dr. Laura Banducci, Assistant Professor in Greek and Roman Studies at Carleton University, is an archaeologist, with a particular interest in the Roman republican period and in the Etruscan civilization of central Italy. Her research focuses on three principal areas: diet and dining practices, collectively referred to as ‘foodways’; how artefacts were made, used, re-purposed and discarded; and entertainment and leisure culture. Her research is grounded in the idea that an individual’s daily behavior, as reflected by the material record, can provide important insights into large-scale societal changes in the ancient world. She is currently completing a book that investigates the foodways of several sites in central Italy.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • This symposium explores “geologics”: systems of thought that have accounted for the relation between humans and what modern scientists consider geological features (caves, volcanos) and geomorphological processes (weathering, erosion, deposition). Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of scholars, we mobilize the insights of the literary and visual arts, archaeology, anthropology, and history to excavate deep histories and sculpt speculative futures of the earth.

    Information on participants, and abstracts.

    Sponsored by the Hsiao Family Fund in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Program in Early Cultures, Joseph Edinburg Fund in the History of Art and Architecture Department, Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and the Brown Arts Initiative.

    History of Art and Architecture
  • Karen Carr, Associate Professor Emerita in the Department of History at Portland State University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dr. Andrea Brock is a Lecturer in Ancient History in the School of Classics at the University of St. Andrews. Her work integrates the literary record on early Rome with new archaeological evidence, in order to produce an environmental and topographical reconstruction of Rome’s river valley. As director of the Forum Boarium Project, she has conducted a coring survey of the city’s original river harbour and harbour sanctuary. Among other findings, her research is revealing new insights on the effects of environmental stress—in particular frequent flooding and rapid sedimentation in the river valley—on Rome’s urbanization process.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Jen Thum, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation, “Words in the Landscape: The Mechanics of Egyptian Royal Living-Rock Stelae”, in a public lecture. All are welcome.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research
  • Praveena Gullapalli, an Associate Professor in Anthropology at Rhode Island College, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Liana Brent is a PhD candidate in the Department of Classics at Cornell University. She is the recipient of a two-year Andrew W. Mellon Foundation / Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (2017-2019). Her dissertation, Corporeal Connections: Tomb Disturbance, Reuse, and Violation in Roman Italy, examines post-depositional skeletal manipulation in reopened and reused inhumation graves throughout Roman Italy. She conducts archaeological fieldwork in southeast Italy as the assistant director of the Vagnari Cemetery excavations, where she has excavated since 2011.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion
  • Surekha Davies, an InterAmericas Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Join us for the opening reception of Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018, an exhibit of photographs taken by Fotis Ifantidis at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece and curated by Professor Yannis Hamilakis and undergraduate students Justin Han and Kelley Tackett.

    Koutroulou Magoula was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.

    More >
  • Dr. John W.I. Lee is an Associate Professor at the UCSB Department of History. He studies the history of ancient West Asia with a focus on war and culture in the Greek and Achaemenid world from ca. 650-330 BC. He is currently writing two books: one about Civil War and Revolt in Achaemenid Persia; and another about John Wesley Gilbert (1863-1923), the first African American to attend the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the first African American to receive an advanced degree from Brown (Class of 1888).

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • Nicholas Emlen, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library and a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Walter Crist is a Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History and a Visiting Researcher in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. His research focuses on Bronze Age Cypriot, Egyptian, and Near Eastern board games and their roles in intercultural transmissions and as social lubricants and enablers in communities.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Jennifer Bates, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Georgia Andreou, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.

    View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://www.brown.edu/academics/archaeology/undergraduate/life-after-brown

    More > Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Come be part of an active archaeological excavation! Students will be digging on the grounds of Moses Brown School (next to Brown’s athletic center), uncovering the foundations of a 19th century home and processing artifacts from that household. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what artifacts students are discovering or even try your hand at digging.

    Moses Brown School (Excavation at the corner of Hope St and Lloyd Ave)

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • See ancient coins from Greece and Rome up close! Touch human and animal bones! Examine and draw Persian and Roman ceramics, prehistoric tools, precious metals, and other artifacts from thousands of years ago – coached by experts!  And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

    More > Family Weekend, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Light-Writings: Koutroulou Magoula 2017-2018


    Photography by Fotis Ifantidis
    Curated by: Yannis Hamilakis, Justin Han, Kelley Tackett


    An exhibit of photographs taken at the archaeological site of Koutroulou Magoula in central Greece, a site which was a Neolithic village for several centuries in the 6th millennium BCE and also used for burials in later periods. Since 2009, the site has being explored by the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project and is currently a collaboration between the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, other universities, and the Greek Archaeological Service (Dr. Nina Kyparissi). The selected photos, out of the many hundreds taken, come from the 2017 and 2018 seasons and fall into five themes: Diggers, Landscapes, Bodies, Tactilities, Theatre/archaeologies. The photographs are accompanied by passages from the reflective, personal diaries of some of the Brown and RISD students who participated in the project in 2018.


    Archaeologists use photographs all the time, primarily for the purposes of recording and documentation. In the field, many other, non-official, “social” photographs and snapshots are taken, which rarely become part of the archaeological story. There is, however, a third kind of photographic-archaeological production: photographs that comment visually on the process of archaeology, on excavation and on field practices, photographs which are at the same time artistic creations but which can also operate as photo-ethnographic objects; as one of the outcomes of the archaeological process which can be disseminated in various ethnographic contexts, and provoke and elicit responses and reactions that can lead to further reflection and research. This is the kind of photography we exhibit here. In doing so, we foreground the archaeological site not only as a site of research and education but also as a site of cultural and artistic production.

    More >
  • Lauren Yapp, a Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Robert Preucel, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Haffenreffer Museum at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk titled, “The Predicament of Ontology”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Philosophy, Religious Studies
  • Where can you do archaeological fieldwork this summer?  How can you pay for it?  How do you apply?  What’s an UTRA grant?  Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer?  What courses should you take to prepare?  Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator?  What is fieldwork, anyway?  And what about study abroad?

    Joukowsky Institute faculty will provide an overview on how students can get involved in archaeological fieldwork this summer.  We will discuss how to find and choose a project and how to find funding, and then lead a more general discussion on what to expect on a fieldwork project and what kinds of preparation might be necessary.  Open to all interested students.

    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Oct
    4

    Learn to produce technical illustrations

    Handle ancient objects close up

    Drop in sessions, casual atmosphere

    No experience or artistic confidence necessary

    More >
  • Gretel Rodríguez, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/08/02/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2018/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Philosophy, Religious Studies
  • Dr. Kathryn Sampeck is an an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Illinois State University. Her research interests historical archaeology, archaeology of Spanish colonialism, political economy, ethnohistory, food history.

    In this lecture, Dr. Sampeck asks: What was daily life like for Cherokees just at the moment when groups of people from across the Atlantic—Spaniards and Africans—started to become part of their world? A tour of one settlement, Cowee, lets audience members understand what Cherokee homes, communities, and networks of communities were like and the kinds of activities that were important to peoples’ lives. Each example is based on archaeologically-recovered information as well as community history and knowledge. This visit shows what an important historical moment this time was for Cherokees and colonists alike, why these settlements are places of enduring importance, and how Cherokee peoples were crucial in early colonial encounters and subsequent political and economic developments.

    This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America and is part of the AIA’s Nadzia Borowski Lecture series.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • See Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander), the daughter of an eccentric adventurer, embark on a perilous journey to a fabled tomb on a mythical island in an attempt to solve the mystery of her father’s disappearance – on a giant screen, with surround sound! The movie will be followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie. And free popcorn! Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • We’d like to invite female identifying or presenting undergrads, grads, postdocs and professors to our first meeting. In this gathering we’ll discuss amongst each other whatever comes to mind - whether summer experiences, general concerns, things we’re looking forward to this year or in the near future, any ideas we might have for events etc.

    Sponsored by the DigDUG (Archaeology and the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group) *If there are any considerable conflicts, do let us know and we’ll try to find a more accommodating time/date*

    More >
  • The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group (aka DigDUG) welcomes all Archaeology concentrators, as well as any students interested in archaeology and the ancient world, back to campus. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!

    Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

    More >
  • Brown University’s Professors Laurel Bestock, Sheila Bonde, Yannis Hamilakis, Felipe Rojas, Andrew Scherer, and Peter van Dommelen will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in Jordan, France, Greece, Turkey, Mexico, Guatemala, and Italy.

    Free and open to the public. All are welcome.

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Sep
    4
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    255th Opening Convocation

    All students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend the 255th Opening Convocation to celebrate the start of the academic year and welcome new students to Brown. President Christina Paxson will officially open the school year. Provost and Schreiber Family Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Richard M. Locke, will deliver the keynote address. The Convocation procession of incoming students will form on College Street beginning at 3:40 PM and the ceremony will begin at 4 PM on the Main Green. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be moved to the Pizzitola Gymnasium.

    University Events and Conference Services University Services & Operations
  • Learning to Look
    Rhode Island Hall Atrium Alcove
    May 9, 2018-June 1, 2018
    Archaeological illustration requires us to pay close attention to the material world. Learning to draw is tied up with learning to look and by extension, to see objects in more detail. The work presented in this exhibit was produced by the Archaeological Illustration Club and members of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology’s community.
    More >
  • Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Maria Averkiou, Axel Getz, Ciara Hayden, and Luiza Silva, will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations.
    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
    More >
  • The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group is hosting an informal reception to celebrate the seniors presenting their thesis research at 3:00. Anyone interested in archaeology and/or the ancient world, or who wants to support the presenters, is welcome to attend. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology!
    Refreshments will be served!
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group
    More >
  • From 2000-1550 BC, the region of Nubia in present day Sudan was controlled by the powerful, but little understood, Kerma state. This African kingdom, named after the monumental and royal site of Kerma, is famous for its theatrical and opulent funerary traditions which seemingly involving large-scale human sacrifices. However, little research has been done on interpreting the role of these unusual funerary traditions, and how they can inform us about the nature and ideology of the Kerma state. In this talk and discussion, Elizabeth Minor (Wellesley College) and Carl Walsh (Joukowsky Institute), put forward new interpretations and ideas regarding these enigmatic burial practices based on their recent research, moving to shed light on this mysterious African rival of ancient Egypt.
    More >
  • Stephen Houston (Anthropology, Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison University) will be discussing their research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
    More >
  • Apr
    24
    Students in ARCH 1630 Fighting Pharaohs: Ancient Egyptian Warfare will recreate an ancient Egyptian battle on Brown’s Quiet Green. Details to be announced.
    More >
  • The archaeological study of memory in the ancient Mediterranean has spread like a forest fire. Although several scholars are responsible for igniting the initial tinder, it would be hard to overstate the impact of Susan Alcock on the ways archaeologists approach the challenge of exploring how people imagined their own pasts in the ancient Mediterranean and neighboring regions. 15 years after the publication of her main book on the subject, Archaeologies of the Greek Past: Landscape, Monuments, and Memories (2002), the moment is ripe for an assessment of the field after the conflagration, as it were, as well as a discussion about new and promising directions in the archaeological study of ancient memory and forgetting. Rather than collecting ever more refined case studies, we invite scholars to engage in comparative analyses.
    Speakers:
    Susan Alcock, University of Michigan
    Andrew Johnston, Yale University
    Carolina López-Ruiz, The Ohio State University
    Naoise Mac Sweeney, University of Leicester
    Josephine Quinn, Worcester College, University of Oxford
    Felipe Rojas, Brown University
    Peter van Dommelen, Brown University
    Find more at: www.brown.edu/go/otherpasts
    More >
  • Katherine Brunson, Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
    More >
  • We regret that we must CANCEL Matthew Barnes’s lecture, and apologize for any inconvenience.
    —-
    Matthew Barnes is a 2010 graduate from the International Yacht Restoration School (IYRS) and is currently a boat builder and lead shipwright for the Mystic Seaport overseeing the 30 month restoration of the Mayflower II (in Mystic Seaport, Connecticut.)
    In the summer of 2016, Matthew spent 12 weeks apprenticing at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, Denmark assisting in the traditional reconstruction of the Gislinge Boat, a 30’ fishing boat from the Viking Age. During his trip, he also visited 7 countries in Europe and Scandinavia, following the path westward of the Norse people of the Viking Age including Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Amsterdam, Scotland, Norway, Sweden and England researching and documenting the effect this expansion had on wooden boatbuilding.
    In his lecture he will be discussing the traditional building methods used in the construction of a ship during the Viking Age. He will also be covering his findings of the Norse effect on wooden boat building in the North Atlantic and the World, which is still evident today over a 1000 years later.
    Visit his blog at http://www.americanshipwright.com.
    More >
  • Darcy Hackley, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Dr. Jane Webster is Senior Lecturer in Historical Archaeology and Head of Archaeology in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Newcastle University. She is a historical archaeologist whose research focuses on colonial material culture, from the early Roman Empire to the eighteenth century. She works mainly in two fields: Romano-British iconography and the archaeology of slavery (looking at the latter in both in the Roman period and between 1660 and 1807). Webster is currently writing a book called “Material Culture of the Middle Passage,” looking at the social world of slave ships making the Atlantic sea crossing that took slaves to the New World during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
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  • JIANG Jianxin is the director of the Jingdezhen Institute of Archeology, the director of the Chinese Ancient Ceramics Society, and president of Jingdezhen Tang Ying Institute. Since the 1980s, he has engaged in archaeological studies on Jingdezhen ancient ceramics remains and led multiple archeological excavations of kiln ruins from the Ming and Qing dynasties, including excavations of kiln factory ruins. He has authored more than twenty academic papers and is a chief editor for multiple archaeological journals and catalogues.
    The lecture, “Study and Appreciation of Guan Yao Porcelain of the Ming Dynasty,” recognizes and appreciates the main characteristics and transformation in style of porcelains from the kiln of Guan Yao across different periods of the Ming Dynasty, highlighting the history and culture, ceramic technology, and art history. It also presents new explorations on Guan Yao porcelain from a variety of historical periods and perspectives, including: the beginning and ending years of the Ming Dynasty, the “blank period” of Guan Yao, Yong-Le Guan Yao porcelain and Zheng He’s Voyage porcelain, Xuan-De Guan Yao’s impact on Cheng-Hua Guan Yao and technological achievements, and others.

    Based on recent archaeological studies and excavation data, the history of the porcelain industry in Jingdezhen can be traced back to the middle and late Tang Dynasty. The Leping South Kiln surrounding Jingdezhen started producing celadon and ceramic whiteware, its high quality influenced by Yue kilns and Xing kilns. This laid the foundation of the early Jingdezhen porcelain industry and provided a technological foundation for the future success of a celadon production.
    New archeological findings at the Luomaqiao Yuan Ming Kiln Site also revealed important artifacts, such as many blue-white glazed porcelains from late Song and early Yuan Dynasty, blue-white porcelains and white porcelains from the Yuan Dynasty, and early-to-middle Ming Dynasty utensils with various styles, many methods of decoration, and a high technological level. According to the quality of the unearthed porcelains, the kiln site may have been an important fixed-point firing kiln site for the Yuan Dynasty Fuliang Porcelain Bureau.
    Presented in Chinese with English translation
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  • Apr
    6
    The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group is hosting an informal reception to welcome new Archaeology concentrators. All new and current Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and/or the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology!
    Refreshments will be served!
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group
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  • Ian Randall, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.
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  • Linda Reynard, a Research Associate and Lecturer in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • A research poster session by the students of ARCH 310, “Interactions with the Dead”. Posters will be displayed on the lower level of Rhode Island Hall, outside the Seminar Room (RIH 008).
    Snacks will be provided. Everyone welcome (open to public)!
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  • The deserted Anglo-Norman royal town and castle of Rindoon lies on a peninsula jutting out into Lough Ree – one of the great lakes of the Shannon River system that runs through central Ireland. It is regarded as one of the best examples of a deserted medieval town in the British Isles, as it only existed for just over a hundred years before its mainly English inhabitants deserted it in the early 14th century. This lecture, drawing on a recent multi-disciplinary study that included field survey, geophysics and an analysis of the surviving historical sources, will discuss each of the various elements that made up the town, particularly its multi-phase castle, and will argue that elements of what certain British archaeologists have called ‘an elite landscape’ occur at Rindoon.
    This lecture is co-sponsored with the Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, the Narragansett Society (the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America) and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. For more information, visit http://aianarragansett.org.
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  • Miriam Rothenberg, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Catherine Steidl, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.
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  • Anita Casarotto, a PhD student in Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit
    http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Where can you do fieldwork this summer? How can you pay for it? How do you apply? What’s an UTRA grant? Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer? What courses should you take to prepare? Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator? What is fieldwork, anyway? And what about study abroad?
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a workshop called State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice on March 2-3, 2018. The workshop will be the culmination of two years of discussion on this theme, but is also intended to raise new issues, ask new questions, and encourage ongoing dialogue.
    Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students. While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event will focus on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.
    Within the context of archaeology, we conceive of social justice as pertaining to issues of privilege and opportunity that affect the makeup of scholars in the field, efforts among archaeologists to engage with the public and with broader social and political discussions, and the degree to which archaeological scholarship and pedagogy intersect with or impact these issues. It also refers to the asymmetries of power and structural inequalities in society at large. This choice of topic has been inspired by recent global social and political concerns, responses from universities and academia that seek to address issues of representation and access, and most importantly, grassroots movements for social justice.
    This workshop thus seeks to engage primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present.
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  • Archaeology, Classics, and Social Justice: The Life and Legacy of John Wesley Gilbert (1864-1923), African American Classicist and Archaeologist, Educator, and Advocate
    A student-led symposium
    Friday, March 2nd
    3:00 – 4:00pm
    Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
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  • Jamie Forde, a Consulting Scholar in the Penn Cultural Heritage Center at the University of Pennsylvania and current Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow at Brown University’s John Carter Brown Library, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Trials, Tragedy & Resilience
    Rhode Island Hall Atrium
    March 1 – April 20, 2018
    ‘Trials, Tragedy & Resilience’ is an exhibit recognizing and celebrating Montserrat’s rich cultural heritage on the 250th anniversary of the attempted St. Patrick’s Day slave uprising on 17 March 1768. The histories presented here commemorate the resilience that Montserratians have displayed over time in their responses to difficult conditions imposed by slavery, colonialism, resource scarcity, and catastrophic natural disasters.
    This international exhibit is running concurrently at the National Museum of Montserrat, Wayne State University (Detroit, Michigan), Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island), and Aarhus University (Denmark) and presents information collected during the Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat project (co-directed by Brown University Professor John F. Cherry), the Endangered Archives/ICT Project, and other initiatives led by the Montserrat National Trust.
    – Montserrat is a small island (102km2) and British Overseas Territory located in the Caribbean Lesser Antilles. First inhabited by Amerindian peoples around 4,000 years ago, Montserrat has been home to many different cultural groups over the course of its human history. Some of these groups freely migrated to Montserrat, while others, like enslaved Africans, were brought against their will during the plantation era. Lasting contributions from Amerindian, African, Irish, and British inhabitants survive in the surnames, place-names, food, architecture, flora, landscape, and material culture of the island.
    Montserrat has been radically transformed in the past two decades by the Soufriere Hills volcano. Beginning in 1995, pyroclastic flows from the eruptions buried the former capital city of Plymouth, rendered the southern half of the island an inaccessible Exclusion Zone, displaced two-thirds of the population, and killed nineteen residents. The volcano is still active. Demonstrating Montserratian resilience in the face of disaster, the island has recently reconfigured its settlements and society to accommodate a new way of life in the island’s north.
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  • Feb
    23
    Our first event of the semester is an informal coffee/tea/cookie hour! It is open to everyone, and is intended to be an opportunity to get to know other people in the community and chat about possible goals and directions for the group. Please invite anyone you think might be interested in joining us!
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  • Lynnette Arnold, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Emmanuel Botte, a researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Craig Cipolla (Royal Ontario Museum), Oliver Harris (University of Leicester), Sophie Moore (Joukowsky Institute, Brown University), Robert Preucel (Anthropology, Brown University), and Peter van Dommelen (Joukowsky Institute, Brown University)
    Tuesday, February 13th, 2018 at 5:30pm
    Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108
    A discussion of current issues in archaeological theory, focusing on Chapters 10 and 11 of “Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium: Introducing Current Perspectives” by O. Harris and C. Cipolla (2017).
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  • Cristiano Nicosia, a researcher in the Department of Cultural Heritage at the University of Padua, will be discussing his research and new book “Archaeological Soil and Sediment Micromorphology” in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Gina Borromeo (Curator of Ancient Art at the RISD Museum), Matt Glendinning (Head of School at Moses Brown School), and Bill Monroe (Senior Scholarly Resources Librarian, Humanities, at Brown University’s Library) will discuss how their degrees in ancient art, early history, and archaeology led them to their current positions.
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  • Marleen Termeer, a lecturer in Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Brown and Brown-RISD undergraduate students of all backgrounds can now be funded (through I-UTRA) to participate in the excavation of the Neolithic village of Koutroulou Magoula in Greece (c. 6000 BCE) and carry out their own inter-disciplinary research, under the supervision of a team of international leading specialists. The research will be conducted in the summer of 2018, as part of the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project, under the direction of Professor Yannis Hamilakis (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World).
    Come to an information session on Friday 15 December, 4 pm (Rhode Island Hall, Common Room) to find out more!
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  • Lindsey Mazurek is Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Bucknell University. She is an art historian and archaeologist of the Roman provinces, whose research applies Second Sophistic literature and religious studies to the study of Greek identity. Dr. Mazurek co-directs the Ostian Connectivity Project, a collaborative digital initiative to study social and migration histories of Rome’s port in the imperial period.
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  • Pinar Durgun, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.
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  • Eva Mol is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. She is a Dutch Mediterranean archaeologist (PhD from Leiden University). Prior to coming to Brown University, she had been working as a postdoctoral researcher at the UChicago Classics Department on the project: ‘The materiality of ancient Mediterranean myth’. Her dissertation focused on the experience and use of Egyptian style and objects in the domestic contexts of Roman Pompeii.
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  • Jenny Kreiger received her doctorate in classical art and archaeology from the University of Michigan in 2017. Her research focuses on late antique funerary laborers and the material evidence for their working practices, social relationships, and contributions to urban economies. Dr. Kreiger is now a Graduate Intern at the Getty Foundation where she administers grants related to art historical research and conservation.
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  • Graham Oliver, Professor of Classics and History at Brown University, will share his research in an informal talk titled, “Re-Thinking Things: Archaeological Theory, Words on Objects, and Mediation. Reflections from the Greek Inscriptions in the RISD Museum”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Maggie Popkin, Robson Assistant Professor of Art History in the Department of Art History and Art at Case Western Reserve University, specializes in ancient Roman art and architecture. Her research interests include the relationship between architecture, spectacle, and ritual in the Roman world and the impact of visual culture on individual and social remembering in the classical world.
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  • The conference will explore the transformation of Mediterranean islands with a primary focus on settlement patterns and the transformation of landscapes and mindscapes. The idea is to explore how the models of occupation of the islands changed from the Roman to the Medieval Period focusing in change and resilience, in innovation and tradition, in the creation of new settlements and the reoccupation of prehistoric sites. Synthesis on particular large islands or archipelagos will be prioritized as oral presentations by invitation only. Our overarching goal for these workshop is to foster the exchange of ideas between a small number of scholars. Papers delivered are short (20 minutes), and are intended to open up discussion of the state of the field concerning the occupation of Mediterranean islands between the Roman and the Medieval period. We also wish to emphasize the need for discussion of potential cooperative ventures, and of how things might progress in the coming years in the study of Mediterranean island systems in Late Antiquity.
    Friday, December 1st 2017
    Rhode Island Hall 108
    4:30-6:00pm - David Abulafia (Cambridge University): “Early Medieval Maritime Linkages: The Mediterranean and the Oceans Compared”
    Rhode Island Hall 108
    Saturday, December 2nd, 2017
    Rhode Island Hall 108
    9:00-12:00pm - Session I: The Western and Central Mediterranean
    2:00-4:00pm - Session II: The Eastern Mediterranean
    Sunday, December 3rd, 2017
    Rhode Island Hall 108
    9:00-12:10 - Session III: Island Mindscapes
    Full schedule is online at www.brown.edu/go/changeandresilience
    Free and open to the public. No registration required.
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  • Brian Lander, Assistant Professor of History and Fellow at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, will discuss his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Irina Podgorny (CONICET and Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library), Katherine Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology), Felipe Rojas (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology) examine how archaeological artifacts – and dinosaur bones! – are rightly and wrongly labeled “fake”.
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  • Where can you do fieldwork this summer? How can you pay for it? How do you apply? What’s an UTRA grant? Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer? What courses should you take to prepare? Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator? What is fieldwork, anyway? And what about study abroad?
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • Kaitlin McCormick, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Museum Studies at Brown University’s Department of Anthropology, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Dr. Barbara Horejs is Director of the Institute for Oriental and European Archeology (OREA) at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna. Dr. Horejs specalizes in prehistoric archeology in south-eastern Europe, the Aegean, and Anatolia, excavations and studies on the Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Age, including the advanced civilizations of Late Bronze Age. She also has interests in the intersections of different cultural areas, knowledge transfer and communication networks and landscape archaeology and social developments in the context of their environment.
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  • Katia Schörle, a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and Assistant Editor of the Journal of Roman Archaeology, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit
    http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Start your celebration of Halloween with a free screening of the movie “The Mummy” (2017). See Tom Cruise and Russell Crowe battle an ancient princess (played by Sofia Boutella) awakened from a crypt – on a giant screen, with surround sound! Followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie.
    And free popcorn! Free and open to the public.
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • Scott MacEachern is Professor of Anthropology at Bowdoin College. He specializes in African archaeology and ethnoarchaeology; and his research involves the study of state formation and ethnicity in Iron Age Central Africa. He is the Director of DGB Archaeological Project, an archaeological research project in northern Cameroon.
    This lecture, “African Crossroads: The Rise of States around Lake Chad,” is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit https://aianarragansett.org.
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  • Nicholas Laluk, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Native American Studies at Brown University’s Department of Anthropology, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Byron Hamann (The Ohio State University), Irina Podgorny (CONICET and Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library), and Felipe Rojas (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology) examine how archaeological artifacts rightly and wrongly labeled “fake” are part of the production of knowledge about the past in the Americas. Short presentations will be followed by open discussion.
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  • Eva Mol, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Dr. Anthony Tuck is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He serves as Director of Excavations at Poggio Civitate (Murlo), an Etruscan site dating to the 8th to 6th centuries BCE. His research focuses on social, economic, and political development in early urban Italy.
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  • Watch Brown students digging (yes, really digging)! This year, students will be excavating at the Moses Brown School. Stop by the corner of Hope Street and Lloyd Avenue(with your family or on your own) during the dig between 11am and 2pm to see what we’re up to or try your hand at digging.
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  • Come visit the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World in Rhode Island Hall. Faculty and students will be on hand to tour you through the building, as well as to show you artifacts and images, both from some of our current fieldwork (in the Caribbean, Italy, Turkey, and Rhode Island) and from the Institute’s collections.
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  • Shiyanthi Thavapalan, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Brown University’s Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.
    View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://www.brown.edu/academics/archaeology/undergraduate/life-after-brown
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  • Sep
    29
    We’d like to invite female identifying or presenting undergrads, grads, postdocs and professors to our first meeting, scheduled for Friday, September 29th at around 4:45 (following ‘Field Dirt Part II’). In this gathering we’ll discuss amongst each other whatever comes to mind - whether summer experiences, general concerns, things we’re looking forward to this year or in the near future, any ideas we might have for events etc.
    Sponsored by the DigDUG (Archaeology and the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group)
    *If there are any considerable conflicts, do let us know and we’ll try to find a more accommodating time/date*
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  • Can’t get enough Field Dirt? We can’t either! Brown University faculty members Katherine Brunson, Miguel Cau Ontiveros, Catalina Mas Florit, Sophie Moore, and Katia Schorle will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in China, Menorca, Turkey, and Croatia.
    Free and open to the public. All are welcome.
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  • Itohan Osayimwese, Assistant Professor in Brown University’s History of Art and Architecture and current Joukowsky Institute Faculty Fellow, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Carl Walsh, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Brown University’s Professors Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Itohan Osayimwese, Felipe Rojas, and Peter van Dommelen
    will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in France, Montserrat, Greece, Barbados, Turkey, and Italy.
    Free and open to the public. All are welcome.
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  • Sep
    20
    Archaeological Illustration Club, led by Brown faculty member Dr. Sophie Moore, meets every Wednesday afternoon from 3:30-5:00. Drop by the Common Room in Rhode Island Hall (room 109) and have some tea -- and do a bit of drawing. Meetings are informal, and all are welcome. No commitment, talent, skill, materials, experience, or aptitude necessary.
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  • Reuse Reconsidered Conference, September 15-17, 2017, Granoff Center, 154 Angell Street, Providence, RI. Keynote on Friday, September 15, 5:30 p.m.:
    Dr. Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Univ. of Pittsburg, “The Alchemy of Monuments:150 Years of Reuse in Dehli, India”
    Reuse Reconsidered is a cross-disciplinary conference exploring the motivations behind the reuse of cultural heritage. It seeks to unite scholars, from graduate students to senior faculty members, that study a variety of time periods, cultures, and types of reuse. It will expand how we understand the phenomenon of cultural identity in relationship to the appropriation, memorialization, and reimaging of the past. Reuse Reconsidered is sponsored by The Brown Arts Initiative (BAI), Brown’s Department of the History of Art and Architecture and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World. The conference, including the keynote presentation on Friday, September 15, at 5:30 pm, is free and open to the public.
    For more information, including the conference program, visit www.reusereconsidered.com or email: [email protected]
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  • Chelsea Halstead will be unable to visit Brown this April. We regret that we must cancel her talk, and apologize for any inconvenience.
    Chelsea Halstead is the Program Manager for the Colibrí Center for Human Rights and heads Colibrí’s Family Advocacy program, speaking with families to collect information on missing persons and making case matches by comparing reports to forensic data. Chelsea also works to build relationships between Colibrí and various partners across the region.
    This lecture is part of the “Materiality of Migration” series and is co-sponsored by Brown University’s Modern Greek Studies Program, Department of Anthropology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
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  • Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, David Elitzer, Angela Marie Teng, and Charlotte Tisch, will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations.
    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
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  • Sergio Escribano Ruiz is a Professor in Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country and currently a Research Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library. He will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • A lecture by Dr. Morag Kersel (DePaul University) on new approaches and reactions to cultural heritage preservation in the Middle East.
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  • Jana Anvari recently finished her PhD at Flinders University and will present her in-progress work on house use lives and building materials of the latest levels at Neolithic site Çatalhöyük in Turkey. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Each year, the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society sponsors an interdisciplinary program under the title of “Earth, Itself,” designed to stimulate conversations and collaborations across the natural and social sciences, humanities and the arts.
    What Fire Does will be held primarily from April 18-28, 2017, and will focus on the productive, creative, destructive, and transformative powers of fire. The creative arts are the ‘fire arts’—particularly ceramics and glass—with exhibitions and performances conducted in collaboration with RISD (Rhode Island School of Design).
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  • The graduate students of the Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology and the Ancient World will be holding a graduate student workshop on April 15th, with the aim of encouraging dialogue between students, exchanging ideas, developing networks, and collaborating in the sharing of resources. The structure of the workshop will be very informal. To RSVP and for questions please email: [email protected]
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  • Samantha Lash, doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Axel Posluschny is the Head of the Research Centre of the Keltenwelt am Glauberg (World of the Celts at the Glauberg) in Germany and a Visiting Scholar in Archaeology and the Ancient World at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology. His work focuses on landscape archaeology, settlement archaeology, remote sensing, and other surveying techniques. He has been involved in the Fürstensitze & Umland project using geophysics and LiDAR scans to understand Iron Age landscapes in Europe, and more recently has played a leading role in the ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project which aims for better use and appreciation of landscape archaeology tools like geophysics, aerial archaeology, satellite imagery, and LiDAR.
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  • Kostis Kourelis is Associate Professor of Art History at Franklin & Marshall College. Dr. Kourelis is an architectural historian specializing in archaeology, historic preservation, and architectural theory. His research also includes Byzantine studies, urbanism, modern Greek studies, and cultural studies.
    This lecture is part of the “Materiality of Migration” series and is co-sponsored by Brown University’s Modern Greek Studies Program and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
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  • Neil Brodie is a Senior Research Fellow on the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa (EAMENA) project at the University of Oxford.
    Brodie is an archaeologist by training, and has held positions at the British School at Athens, the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, where he was Research Director of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre, Stanford University’s Archaeology Center, and the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research at the University of Glasgow. He has worked on archaeological projects in the United Kingdom, Greece and Jordan, and continues to work in Greece.
    He has been researching the illicit trade in cultural objects since 1997. He was co-author (with Jennifer Doole and Peter Watson) of the report Stealing History, commissioned by the Museums Association and ICOM-UK to advise upon the illicit trade in cultural material. He also co-edited Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities Trade (with Morag Kersel, Christina Luke and Kathryn Walker Tubb, 2006), Illicit Antiquities: The Theft of Culture and the Extinction of Archaeology (with Kathryn Walker Tubb, 2002), and Trade in Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World’s Archaeological Heritage (with Jennifer Doole and Colin Renfrew, 2001).
    Brodie’s visit is part of the year-long series, “Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East,” sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
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  • Tamar Hodos, Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Tamar Hodos is a Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol. She is a specialist in the archaeology of the Mediterranean’s Iron Age, a period that extends between c.1200-c.600 BCE, with particular interest in the impact of colonization, and the construction and expression of social identities. She is currently collaborating with the British Museum on a project that explores the role of luxury objects as expressions of status, power and authority in the first millennium BCE wider Mediterranean. The project seeks to understand the creation, circulation, use and purpose of luxury objects within a cross-cultural framework that examines how luxuries transcend cultural differences in Iron Age societies; an early example of globalization.
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  • Catalina Mas Florit, Visiting Scholar in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk titled, “From Roman to Byzantine: Shaping the Rural Landscape in Late Antique Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Eduardo Neves is a CAPES Distinguished Visiting Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University and Professor of Archaeology at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. His current area of research is southwestern Amazonia, at the current border of Bolivia and Brazil, where he has been studying middle Holocene occupations on fluvial shell mounds, as well as the archaeology of late pre-colonial mound building societies.
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  • ‘“Actually, We Are Mongols!”: Ancestral Narratives and Identity Shifts Derived from Yuan Steles in North China, ca. 1400 to Today’

    Drawing on stele inscriptions and interviews conducted during my recent epigraphic field researches in north China, this talk aims to shed light on a pattern of identity shifting before the Ethnic Classification Project (minzu shibie gongzuo) during the 1950s to 1960s. As Thomas Mullaney has empirically revealed in his Coming to Terms with the Nation, the ethnic demarcation drawn by the PRC exerted an enormous impact over social and cultural landscape in China, while it was conceptually and methodologically inspired by ethnographic works from the early twentieth century. How did people perceive and define themselves before the coming of “ethnicity”? Did they ever need to claim and change their “ethnic” identity? If so, how did they prove it? Combining epigraphic evidence and oral history, this talk demonstrates that genealogical inscriptions from the Mongol Yuan period (1234-1368) have functioned as an ongoing determinant in justifying and legitimizing one’s claims, as well as promoting the status of his descent group in local society. In the process, the memory of non-Chinese migration into north China in the Mongol empire has been renovated, manipulated, and generated by (re)interpreting the stele inscriptions over time, and occasionally by fabricating a stele. The resurgence of “original” Yuan ethnic identity took place during the late nineteenth century (when genealogy compilation diffused in the north), early twentieth century (when Chinese nationalism emerged), and today as the movement to “seek ancestral roots (xungen)” arose nation-wide. Taken together, the talk articulates the impact of Mongol rule in the historical narration of local ancestry, as well as the role of epigraphy in verifying ancestry in north China.
    Dr. Iiyama is an Adjunct Researcher at Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Tokyo, Japan. He is an expert on medieval Chinese tomb epitaphs, genealogical steles, and other inscriptive practices. He has worked on northern Chinese social history during the Jin-Yuan-Ming and published Northern Local Literati: Civil Service Examination and Its Social Influence in North China, 1127-1368 (in Japanese) in 2011.
    Sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Chen Family Fund, and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University.
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  • Nancy Jacobs, Professor of History at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Cristiano Nicosia received his PhD in Natural and Environmental Sciences from the University of Milano (Italy) in 2012. He is currently a Researcher at ULB – Brussels and a freelance consultant in Geoarchaeology, soil micromorphology and archaeo-pedology.
    This lecture is co-sponsored by the Institute at Brown for Environment & Society and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
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  • This lecture is co-sponsored with the Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit http://aianarragansett.org.
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  • Axel Posluschny, Head of the Research Centre of the Keltenwelt am Glauberg (World of the Celts at the Glauberg) in Germany will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Naor Ben-Yehoyada is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. His work examines unauthorized migration, criminal justice, the aftermath of development, transnational political imaginaries in the central and eastern Mediterranean, and he is specifically interested in the processes through which transnational regions form and dissipate. His forthcoming monograph, The Mediterranean Incarnate: Transnational Region Formation between Sicily and Tunisia since World War II, offers a historical anthropology of the recent re-emergence of the Mediterranean.
    This lecture is part of the “Materiality of Migration” series and is co-sponsored by Brown University’s Modern Greek Studies Program, Department of Anthropology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
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  • Is it too late to apply to do fieldwork this summer? How can you tell if a field project is well run and will be a positive experience? How can you pay for it?
    Don’t worry! There are still many, many opportunities for fieldwork this summer. Brown Archaeology professors Peter van Dommelen and Laurel Bestock will help guide you through the process of how to find a great field project in Europe, the Near East, South America, the United States, or wherever you may be interested in going.
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • Lia Dykstra, doctoral candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Modern museums owe a great debt to Classical Antiquity. Not only are they named after the Muses; their very character has been forged upon the logocentric view of the universe introduced by ancient Greek philosophers, and revived by the thinkers of the Renaissance and the European Enlightenment. Of crucial importance for the success of 19th century museums was their open, public character and their adherence to the (by then) revolutionary principles of critical thought, empirical knowledge, scientific research and the questioning of axiomatic ‘truths’.
    Almost two centuries later, museums continue to thrive around the world, often promoting pioneering ways of perceiving the past. This is in contrast to Classical studies, which suffer a bleak recession, with academic positions diminishing rapidly and the number of students in Classics Departments falling abruptly. Why is it so? Why does academia fail where museums succeed? How do they differ in “treating the past”? And how can this divide be bridged?
    In this lecture, Dr. Nikolas Papadimitriou, Curator of Antiquities at the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, will review the history of museums, discuss the social and political conditions that allowed them to become broadly relevant to modern societies, and address the role of institutionalized education in the modern world.
    Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Program in Modern Greek Studies.
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  • Carvings in and out of Time:
    Afterlives of Rock-Cut Monuments in the Ancient Near East
    Wednesday, February 15th, 2017
    5:30pm - 7:00pm
    Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
    Thursday, February 16th, 20179:00am - 4:30pm
    Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
    From the moment rock-cut monuments were carved people have asked themselves who made them, when, and why? They are part of the natural landscape, yet are conspicuously anthropogenic. Many of them became part of the regional and cultural memory of their environs. They traverse cultural and chronological boundaries.
    Our purpose is to study the monuments’ successive re-interpretations and manipulations, their cultural recycling. The history of their re-interpretations exemplifies the intricate interaction of ancient cultures with their own, even more ancient, past. The result is a layered landscape of cultural meaning and natural transformations that can furnish precious evidence about the pre-modern archaeological imagination.
    We aim to bring diverse specialists on the ancient world to Brown University to tackle the following questions: who in the pre-modern period was interested in rock-cut monuments? How did ancient interpreters make sense of their images and texts? And, how can we as contemporary scholars, begin to address such questions?
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
    http://brown.edu/go/rockcutmonuments
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  • Dr. Jonathan Hall is a Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities and Professor in the Departments of History and Classics and the College at the University of Chicago. His most recent book, Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian (Chicago, 2014), examines a series of case studies from the Greek and Roman worlds as part of a reflection on the relationship between documentary evidence and material culture. He is also the author of a series of articles and chapters concerning the early polis, Greek colonization, and cultural identities. Currently he is interested in nineteenth-century Greece and especially issues of cultural heritage in the newly independent kingdom.
    This lecture is part of the 2016-2017 Mellon Graduate Workshop, “Colonial Entanglements: Land, Economy, and Connected Communities.”
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  • Kostis Kourelis is Associate Professor of Art History at Franklin & Marshall College. Dr. Kourelis is an architectural historian specializing in archaeology, historic preservation, and architectural theory. His research also includes Byzantine studies, urbanism, modern Greek studies, and cultural studies.
    This lecture is part of the “Materiality of Migration” series and is co-sponsored by Brown University’s Modern Greek Studies Program and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.
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  • All concentrators – and prospective concentrators (or just enthusiasts!) – in Archaeology and the Ancient World are invited to enjoy some pizza and share stories of what they did over the winter break!

    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • Brown University’s Yannis Hamilakis, Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies, has openings for multiple students to participate in his archaeological field project in Greece this summer (June 5-June 30, 2017). He is holding an informal infosession this Friday, for interested students to find out more about the project and how they might get involved. No previous field experience is required.
    Koutroulou Magoula is a multi-period archaeological site in central Greece with the main period of occupation around 6000 BCE (Middle Neolithic period). There are also burials dating to the Bronze Age (1500 BCE), and the Medieval period (c. 1200 CE). It is a finds-rich site, with buildings surviving to more than 1 m. in height, pottery, lithics, animal bones, and an impressive corpus of more than 350 clay figurines.
    In addition to excavation, the field team will be carrying out ethnography, a theatre-archaeology program, and a series of community archaeology events.
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  • Brendan Weaver, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Berea College, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Dr. Laurie Rush is Cultural Resources Manager and Army Archaeologist at Fort Drum, NY. Dr. Rush is also a Board Member of the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield.
    This lecture is the second event in the series, “Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East,” sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
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  • How can we find alternative, sensorially rich and affective ways of engaging with the material past in the present?
    How can photography play a central role in archaeological narratives, beyond representation and documentation?
    These questions area explored in a photography exhibition on the first floor of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World (Rhode Island Hall).
    Ancient and not-so-ancient stones, pine trees that were “wounded” for their resin, people who lived amongst the classical ruins, and the tensions and the clashes with the archaeological apparatus and its regulations, all become palpable, affectively close and immediate.
    The exhibition is based on the book, “Camera Kalaureia: An Archaeological Photo-Ethnography”, by Yannis Hamilakis and Fotis Ifantidis (Oxford, Archaeopress, 2016). It is curated by the class ARCH2153 “Archaeological Ethnography”, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis.
    Open weekdays from 8:30am-5:00pm.
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  • Andrew Dufton, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.
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  • Guo Jue is Assistant Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures and Co-Chair of the Columbia Early China Seminar at Barnard College. She received her Ph.D (2008) in Early China from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining Barnard, she was an Assistant Professor of Chinese Religions at Western Michigan University (2008-2013) and a visiting research fellow at the Cluster of Asia and Europe at Universität Heidelberg (2012-2013), Germany. She specializes in Early China, especially from the Warring States period to Han times (5th century B.C.E.-3rd century C.E.). Her research interests are primarily in ritual practices, material culture, and social, religious, and cultural history of early societies. Using both received history and archaeological sources, she is interested in looking at the intersection and interaction between writing and object, and studying topics including divination, death rituals, tombs and burials, and everyday life in early to medieval China from anthropological and historical perspectives, as well as the way they are theorized in comparative studies.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Department of History of Art and Architecture, Program in Early Cultures, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • Emily Booker, doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • The Destruction of Memory: A Film Screening and Q&A with the Director
    Tim Slade (Vast Productions USA)
    Over the past century, cultural destruction has wrought catastrophic results across the globe. This war against culture is not over - it’s been steadily increasing. In Syria and Iraq, the ‘cradle of civilization’, millennia of culture are being destroyed. The push to protect, salvage and rebuild has moved in step with the destruction. Legislation and policy have played a role, but heroic individuals have fought back, risking and losing their lives to protect not just other human beings, but our cultural identity - to save the record of who we are. Based on the book of the same name by Robert Bevan, The Destruction of Memory tells the whole story - looking not just at the ongoing actions of Daesh (ISIS) and at other contemporary situations, but revealing the decisions of the past that allowed the issue to remain hidden in the shadows for so many years. Interviewees in the film include the Director-General of UNESCO, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, as well as diverse and distinguished international experts, whose voices combine to address this urgent issue.
    This screening is the first event in the series, “Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East,” sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.
    List Art Building, Room 120
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  • Meltem Toksoz, Visiting Associate Professor of Middle East Studies at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Mirjam Brusius is a Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow in the History of Photography, a post she holds in conjunction with the Bodleian Library, at Oxford University. She previously held Postdoctoral Fellowships at Harvard University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz. Her research addresses the intersection of modern history of science and the history of European and Islamic art. It centres on the history of photography, museums, collecting, and scientific voyages in and between Europe and the Middle East.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Center for Middle East Studies, Department of History of Art and Architecture, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • Benjamin Alberti, Chair and Professor of Sociology at Framingham College, will present his research in an informal talk, titled, “Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Naoise Mac Sweeney is Associate Professor in Ancient History at the University of Leicester, specialising in the study of ethnicity, identity and migration. She has published widely in the fields of ancient history, archaeology, race relations, international development and peacebuilding studies, and she is the author of Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013). She has also pursued her research interests through archaeological fieldwork in Turkey, in particular as part of the Kilise Tepe Archaeological Project.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • Playing with Fire: Experimental Neolithic Cooking in Cyprus
    Andrew P. McCarthy (Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute, and University of Edinburgh)
    The Neolithic period in Cyprus had a range of site-types (permanent village, hunting camp, seasonal inhabitation, ritual centres, etc.) and mobility must be considered a factor in the use of the landscape. Without many more excavated sites, however, it is difficult to examine the relationships between sites of different type and their place in the landscape. The Neolithic remains at Prasteio Mesorotsos have recently revealed two cooking installations that can shed light on both mobility and sedentism and possibly provide the fulcrum between the various types of sites that we know about. One feature is a domestic -scale domed oven, which reflects the cooking habits of the inhabitants that resided at this location for at least some part of the year. Another feature is a remarkable large-scale pit oven that would have been capable of feeding a great many people, more than is presumed for a single community. These two features provide contrasting habits that reflect the interactions between mobile (possibly hunting or pastoral) groups and seasonal sedentary populations. In particular, the pit-oven can be thought to have been used in feasts that gathered multiple communities into a single place. In order to understand these activities, in 2015 and 2016 an experimental project was conducted reconstructing the the pit oven and a large feast was organized for local communities in order to test hypotheses about the labor involved in production, the number of people that could have been fed and the possibilities for inter-community interaction.
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  • Making a Mark: Graphs Beyond Language
    Sponsored by the Program in Early Cultures at Brown University
    4–5 November 2016
    Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106 (95 Cushing Street, Providence, RI)
    Humans have an urge, even a compulsion, to mark meaning through visible graphs. These signs range from coats of arms to emojis, potter’s marks to gang signs, and Paleolithic graphs to ISOTYPE or other cross-linguistic vehicles for communicating ideas. All can project meaning directly, without necessary recourse to language. For all their importance, however, there is little of a comparative nature to probe their use, meaning, makers, setting, and variance, or what they share as an expressive potential of all humans. In this conference, specialists in diverse scriptural and semiological systems explore semasiography, the phenomenon of non-linguistic forms of graphic communication organized into patterned, often codified ways. Talks address the techniques and systems employed in such mark-making, the media and modes of representation, and the uses and limitations of symbols and graphemes. The overall objective is to underscore the vitality of such visible signs at all times and periods, and to delight in their wondrous variety.
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  • Laura Hawkins, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Egyptology and Assyriology at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk, titled, “Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Nov
    1
    Note: Date and time not yet finalized.
    The Archaeology & the Ancient World DUG will be hosting a social at 5pm in RI Hall, Room 108. All Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group
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  • Note: Date and time not yet finalized.
    Where can you do fieldwork this summer? How can you pay for it? How do you apply? What’s an UTRA grant? Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer? What courses should you take to prepare? Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator? What is fieldwork, anyway? And what about study abroad?
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • Archaeologists from Durham University, UK, will tell the fascinating history of how prisoners from a seventeenth century battle between England and Scotland came to Massachusetts. Transported to the US as indentured servants, some of the men went on to become successful farmers and there are now hundreds of descendants of these soldiers living in New England and beyond. The talk will also set out the research methods used by the archaeologists on human remains, discovered during construction of a new café at Durham University in 2013. This research has helped solve the almost 400-year-old mystery of where hundreds of soldiers, who died whilst held captive in Durham, were buried. #ScotsSoldiers
    Sponsored by Durham University Department of Archaeology (@ArcDurham).
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  • Jeff Moser, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, will present his research in an informal talk, titled, “Excavating China’s First Archaeologist”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • What is Venice worth? To whom does this urban treasure belong? Internationally renowned art historian Salvatore Settis urgently poses these questions, igniting a new debate about the Pearl of the Adriatic and cultural patrimony at large. Venetians are increasingly abandoning their hometown—there’s now only one resident for every 140 visitors—and Venice’s fragile fate has become emblematic of the future of historic cities everywhere as it capitulates to tourists and those who profit from them. In If Venice Dies, a fiery blend of history and cultural analysis, Settis argues that “hit-and-run” visitors are turning landmark urban settings into shopping malls and theme parks. He warns that Western civilization’s prime achievements face impending ruin from mass tourism and global cultural homogenization. This is a passionate plea to secure the soul of Venice, written with consummate authority, wide-ranging erudition and élan.
    Salvatore Settis is Emeritus Professor of the History of Classical Art and Archaeology at the Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Departments of Italian Studies and History of Art and Architecture, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research.
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  • Watch Brown students digging (yes, really digging)! This year, students will be excavating at the Moses Brown School. Stop by the corner of Hope Street and Lloyd Avenue(with your family or on your own) during the dig between 11am and 3pm to see what we’re up to or try your hand at digging.
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  • Come visit the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World in Rhode Island Hall. Faculty and students will be on hand to tour you through the building, as well as to show you artifacts and images, both from some of our current fieldwork (in the Caribbean, Italy, Turkey, and Rhode Island) and from the Institute’s collections.
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  • Mary Bachvarova is Professor of Classics and Department Chair of Classical Studies at Willamette University. She is the author of the forthcoming book, From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Greek Epic, and co-editor of Anatolian Interfaces: Hittites, Greeks, and Their Neighbors: Proceedings of an International Conference on Cross-Cultural Interaction, Sept. 17-19, 2004, Emery University, Atlanta, GA.

    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • Bathsheba Demuth, Assistant Professor of History and Fellow at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, will present her research in an informal talk titled, “Agency Sits in Places: Arctic Ecology and Modern Ideology in the Bering Strait, 1840-1980”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Owen Doonan is Associate Professor of Art in the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Program at California State University Northridge. He focused on early Sicilian Architecture and society in his PhD (1993) at Brown University’s Center for Old World Archaeology and Art. Since 1996 he has led the Sinop Regional Archaeological Project, a regional study of archaeology, culture and environment in the Sinop Province, northern Turkey. He has authored one book (Sinop Landscapes: Exploring Connection in the Hinterland of a Black Sea Port), edited another and published more than forty articles relating to the archaeology of the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions. In 2010 he co-founded the New Sahara Gallery in Northridge, the first Los Angeles area gallery to specialize in the contemporary fine art of the Middle East and North Africa.
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  • Tamar Hodos is a Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol. She is a specialist in the archaeology of the Mediterranean’s Iron Age, a period that extends between c.1200-c.600 BCE, with particular interest in the impact of colonisation, and the construction and expression of social identities. Until 2012, she co-directed the Çaltılar Archaeological Project, a collaboration between Bristol, Liverpool and Uludağ (Turkey) Universities. This project, based in the south-western Turkish region of Lycia, examined the role this area played with the Aegean, Greek and wider Mediterranean worlds during the Bronze and Iron Ages. She is the author of the book, Local Responses to Colonization in the Iron Age Mediterranean, and co-editor of Material Culture and Social Identities in the Ancient World.
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  • During the Renaissance, Italian humanists attempted to recover the maritime golden age of ancient Greece and Rome. In resurrecting ancient warships, humanists looked at the most magnificent period in maritime history, the Hellenistic Age (323-31 B.C.), which produced a burst of unprecedented proportions resulting in warships of increasingly large size that eventually came to replace the trireme. Since no archaeological remains of ancient warships were available and have yet to be found, the study of ancient texts was crucial to the recovery of ancient naval architecture. Based on the study of several Renaissance naval treatises and unpublished archival sources, two shipbuilding projects are known: the quinqueremis built in 1529 by the Venetian humanist Vettor Fausto (1490-1546), and the grandiose and yet completely unknown attempt in 1570 by the erudite Filippo Pigafetta (1533-1604) to recover the design of the tessarakonteres of Ptolemy IV Philopator (r. 221-204 B.C.), the biggest ship ever built in the ancient Mediterranean. Both Fausto and Pigafetta believed that the knowledge of ancient texts was centrally relevant to the design of their ships and to the solution of practical problems of naval architecture in the material world.
    This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit http://aianarragansett.org.
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  • Sophie Moore, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.
    View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: http://brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/undergrad/grad.html
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  • Carolina López-Ruiz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at the Ohio State University. Her research focuses on understanding Greek culture in its broader ancient Mediterranean context, particularly looking at cultural exchanges and processes of integration and adaptation in Near Eastern and Greek interaction. She edited Gods, Heroes, and Monsters: A Sourcebook of Greek, Roman, and the Near Eastern Myths in Translation (2014) and is the author of When the Gods Were Born: Greek Cosmogonies and the Near East (2012), as well as many other publications.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • Katherine Brunson, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk, titled “Zooarchaeological and Genetic Evidence for Cattle Domestication in Ancient China”. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • A free screening of the movie “Gods of Egypt”, on a giant screen, with surround sound! Followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis (or lack thereof…) of the movie.
    And free popcorn! Free and open to the public.
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group
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  • John Baines is Professor Emeritus of Egyptology and Fellow of The Queen’s College at the University of Oxford, where he taught from 1976 to 2013. His principal areas of interest are Egyptian art, literature, religion, self-presentation, the position of writing in Egyptian society, and modelling social forms. He is currently working on elite uses of the wider environment, particularly in forms and practices, such as hunting, that must be approached indirectly because they leave little physical trace.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • The Archaeology of Egypt: State of the Field 2016
    Friday, September 23rd-Saturday, September 24th, 2016
    The Archaeology of Egypt: State of the Field 2016 is a two-day workshop, focusing with the ways in which boundaries are being broken in Egyptian archaeology – temporally, geographically, methodologically, and politically. This workshop is meant to highlight the ways in which the field is still struggling in each area, how it can improve, and why it needs to do so.
    Keynote:
    Stuart Tyson Smith
    Session Participants:
    Elizabeth Bolman
    Pearce Paul Creasman
    Monica Hanna
    Gregory Marouard
    Gerry Scott
    Neal Spencer
    Josef Wegner
    Willeke Wendrich
    Full schedule available at http://brown.edu/go/egypt2016
    Free and open to the public. No pre-registration required.
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  • Sep
    13
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    EEB Tuesday Seminar Series

    Richard Wrangham,
    Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University
    Talk Title: The Evolution of Good and Evil
    Richard Wrangham (PhD, Cambridge University, 1975) is Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University and founded the Kibale Chimpanzee Project in 1987. He has conducted extensive research on primate ecology, nutrition, and social behavior. He is best known for his work on the evolution of human warfare, described in the book Demonic Males, and on the role of cooking in human evolution, described in the book Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. Together with Elizabeth Ross, he co-founded the Kasiisi Project in 1997, and serves as a patron of the Great Apes Survival Partnership.
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  • Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Nathan Lovejoy, Monica Roth, and Robert Weiner, will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations.
    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
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  • The Archaeology & the Ancient World DUG will be hosting a social at 3:30 pm in RI Hall, outside Room 108. All those interested in archaeology and the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group
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  • Yongsong Huang is Professor of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences at Brown University. He will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Paul Meiliara is chairman of the South Rift Association of Landowners (SORALO), a collaborative, community-based organization that represents Maasai landowners from 17 communities located across the 2.5 million acre South Rift Valley region of Kenya.
    Co-sponsored by Brown University’s IBES, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
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  • Lorenzo Nigro (“La Sapienza” University in Rome)
    The Phoenicians at the World’s Ends: the formation of Mediterranean Civilization as seen from the island of Motya in Sicily
    Fourteen seasons of excavations at Motya (2002-2015) revealed traces of the earliest Levantine and Phoenician habitation of the central Mediterranean, bringing to light the formative phase of Phoenician expansion to the West. The discovery of Building C8 and a series of wells in the earliest settlement, matched with other recent finds in the Iberian Peninsula (Cadiz), North Africa (Utica, Carthage) and Sardinia (Sulky) have significantly transformed the history of the 2nd and1st millennium BC Mediterranean. Examining the sea routes across the Mediterranean may help disentangle the intricate roots of our civilization—or suggest that a multicultural/ethnical approach is better for studying the historical scenario of the earliest centuries of the 1st millennium BC, when this enclosed sea became a melting pot for peoples and cultures.
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  • Itohan Osayimwese, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Archaeology and Futurity
    Thursday, April 14th–Friday, April 15th, 2016
    Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
    In a particularly troubling academic climate that is witnessing departmental amalgamation and a relative dearth in full-time faculty hires, how does the discipline of archaeology envision its future? What is its role beyond the walls of the academy? Should archaeology be useful and, if so, for what purposes? This conference addresses archaeology’s potential role in contributing to pressing world problems including climate change, economic inequality, human rights, neocolonialism, and militarism.

    This conference also seeks to address how futurity plays a role in how archaeologists confront the past in the present. Through a departure from linear time, this conference will explore alternative notions of time, material vestiges of the past in the present, and embodied experiences that transcend temporalities. If we accept that archaeology is a discipline about the present, how are we to think about time and futurity?
    Keynote:
    Thursday, April 14th at 4:00 pm
    Laurent Olivier (National Museum of Archaeology at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France)
    Closing Plenary:
    Friday, April 15th at 4:30 pm
    Cornelius Holtorf (Linnaeus University, Sweden)
    Session Participants:
    Laura McAtackney (Aarhus University, Denmark)
    Uzma Rizvi (Pratt University, New York City, NY)
    Chris Witmore (Texas Tech, Lubbock, TX)
    Shannon Novak (Syracuse University, NY)
    Krysta Ryzewski (Wayne State University, Detroit, MI)
    Dimitris Papadopoulos (Columbia University, New York City, NY)
    Bob Preucel (Brown University, Providence, RI)
    Francois Richard (University of Chicago, IL)
    LouAnn Wurst (Michigan Technical University, MI)
    Yannis Hamilakis (Southampton University, UK)
    Free and open to the public. No pre-registration required.
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  • Ignasi Grau Mira is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology in the Department of Prehistory, Archaeology, Ancient History, Greek Philology and Latin Philology at the University of Alicante in Spain. He will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Lin Foxhall is Professor of Greek Archaeology and History in the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at the University of Leicester. She has also held posts at Oxford University and University College London. She is the lead on the major Tracing Networks Project funded by the Leverhulme Trust and is co-director to the Bova Marina project in southern Italy. Since the academic year 2012-13 she has been Head of School for the University of Leicester’s School of Archaeology and Ancient History.
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  • Apr
    11
    9:00am - 5:30pm

    Hidden Writing

    Hidden Writing
    Organized by John Bodel and Stephen Houston
    Monday, April 11, 2016
    Location TBA
    This full-day workshop explores “hidden writing” – scripts intended by form or placement to challenge, puzzle, and present difficulties of access, yet, with effort and skill, meant eventually to be legible by human and, at times, supernatural “readers.” Examples would include Maya full-figure glyphs, “insect” or “bird script” from the Warring States period, puzzle-writing, “wild calligraphy” from China or Japan, and Arabic script so stylized as to be difficult to fathom.
    “Hidden writing” contrives additional obstacles and challenges through formal embellishments or what might be called “sign involution” – that is, by taking a perfectly lucid system of script and expanding, embellishing, adding extraneous elements for design reasons or reasons of ideology. Additional training or knowledge (or at least effort) is required. It is writing with self-conscious, deliberate impediments built in. Or it may be script whose aesthetic or formal component outweighs any impulse to “efficient” parsing. Other writing might be of abridged access, placed in hidden locations, not intended for human eyes, and possessed of magical efficacy that departs from any conventional notion of reading.
    The workshop will divide sessions into two themes: “hidden by form” and “hidden by placement”.
    Presenters:
    John Bodel (Brown University, Latin epigraphy, history, https://vivo.brown.edu/display/jbodel)
    Stephen Houston (Brown University, Maya text & image, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_D._Houston)
    Jeffrey Moser (Brown University, Chinese art, later periods, https://vivo.brown.edu/display/jmoser)
    Graham Oliver (Brown University, Greek epigraphy, https://vivo.brown.edu/display/goliver)
    Scott Redford (SOAS, U of London, Islamic art & archaeology, http://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff92807.php)
    Rachel Saunders (Harvard Art Museums, Japanese art, http://www.harvardartmuseums.org/teaching-and-research/curatorial-divisions/division-of-asian-and-mediterranean-art)
    Andréas Stauder (EPHE, Egyptian writing & civilization, https://ephe.academia.edu/AndreasStauder)
    Haicheng Wang (U of Washington, Chinese art, early periods, http://art.washington.edu/art-history/art-history-faculty/haicheng-wang/)
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  • Massimo Osanna is Superintendent of the Archaeological Site of Pompeii and Special Superintendence for Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabia, in Italy’s Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism. He is also Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Basilicata (Potenza/Matera).
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  • Miguel Ángel Cau Ontiveros is a research professor with the Catalan National Research Institute ICREA, and is based at the University of Barcelona. He is currently a Visiting Scholar in Archaeology at Brown University, and will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Emanuela Bocancea, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation. This talk is open to the public.
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  • Pinar Durgun, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Jessica Nowlin, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation. This talk is open to the public.
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  • Dr. Constantakopoulou (Birbeck University of London) is an ancient historian who works on the history and culture of the ancient Greek world from the archaic to early hellenistic periods. Her main area of research is the history of the Aegean world and its islands. Her book, entitled The Dance of the Islands: Insularity, Networks, the Athenian Empire and the Aegean World, explored both the history of the islands in the archaic and classical period, as well as the way islands were portrayed in the sources of the period. The focus was on the way islands interacted and formed networks through maritime communications.
    This lecture is part of the Graduate International Colloquium Series entitled, “Before Mare Nostrum Redivivuum: The Place of Islands in the Mediterranean”.
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  • Linda Gosner, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation. This talk is open to the public.
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  • Closely reexamining steles in an eminent ancestral hall in Shanxi, China, this talk explores the hidden history of the hall from the fourteenth to sixteenth century. The steles collectively testify to the innovative strategies of redeployment and forgery that premodern Chinese families used to proclaim cultural authority over their local communities.
    Dr. Iiyama is a Visiting Research Scholar in East Asian Studies at Yale University, and an Adjunct Researcher at Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Tokyo, Japan. He has worked on northern Chinese social history during the Jin-Yuan-Ming and published Northern Local Literati: Civil Service Examination and Its Social Influence in North China, 1127-1368 (in Japanese) in 2011.
    Sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Chen Family Fund, Program in Early Cultures, and the Department of Religious Studies at Brown University.
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  • Katherine Harrington, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation. This talk is open to the public.
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  • Catherine Steidl, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • David Quixal Santos is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Valencia and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology. He will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • Clive Vella, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation. This talk is open to the public.
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  • Jonathan Ruane earned his doctorate in Archaeology from Boston University in May 2015. He will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • The Egyptology and Archaeology & the Ancient World DUGs will be hosting a social at 3pm in the atrium outside Rhode Island Hall, Room 108. All those interested in archaeology, Egyptology, and the ancient world are welcome to attend. It’s a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of ancient things! Refreshments will be served!
    Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group and the Egyptology Departmental Undergraduate Group
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  • Dr. Christopher Thornton is Senior Director of the Cultural Heritage Initiative, and Lead Program Officer of Research, Conservation, and Exploration at the National Geographic Society.
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  • Craig Cipolla is Associate Curator of North American Archaeology at the Royal Ontario Museum and Director of the Mohegan Archaeological Field School (in collaboration with the Mohegan Tribe of Connecticut). He will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.
    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.
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  • In conjunction with Matthew Reilly’s Spring course, ARCH 0340 Bad Things: Archaeologies of New World Vices (https://canvas.brown.edu/courses/1034224), the Joukowsky Institute is hosting a small exhibition in Rhode Island Hall called “Bad Things? Colonialism and Vice in the Americas”. This collection of objects from the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology will be on display on the Mezzanine (the top floor) all semester.

    Open weekdays from 8:30am-5:00pm.
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  • Dr. Scott M. Fitzpatrick (University of Oregon) is an archaeologist who specializes in the archaeology of island and coastal regions, particularly the Pacific and Caribbean. Much of his research focuses on colonization events, seafaring strategies, adaptations to smaller islands, exchange systems, chronometric techniques, and human impacts on ancient environments. He has active field projects in Palau (western Micronesia) and several islands in the Caribbean, including Carriacou and Mustique in the Grenadines, as well as Nevis.
    This lecture is part of the Graduate International Colloquium Series entitled, “Before Mare Nostrum Redivivuum: The Place of Islands in the Mediterranean”.
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  • “Archaeothanatology - a taphonomy of ritual practice. Reconstructing mortuary practices from archaeological sources. Examples from Mesolithic and Neolithic Europe.”
    Liv Nilsson Stutz is Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Anthopology at Emory University. She is an archaeologist and a biological anthropologist with an interest in the implementation of social theory in archaeology, especially practice theory, body theory and ritual theory. Her research related to these interests has been focused in burial archaeology. She is also interested in ethics and archaeology, cultural heritage politics and identity politics, especially as manifested in the repatriation debate. Stutz is involved in field projects in Latvia and Jordan.
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  • Dr. Chen Chanratana is the Founder/President of Kerdomnel Khmer (KDNK) Group, mainly focused on Cambodian culture preservation and protection through a culture-themed magazine called “Kerdomnel Khmer”. He received a post-graduate degree in Archaeology, Art history of Southeast Asia from University of Sorbonne Paris III in France (2011). Then, he worked as a professor of archaeology, Khmer arts history and history of Southeast Asia and social research at Faculty of Archeology, Royal University of Fine Arts, Cambodia (in 2004). He was also in charge (2009-2010) of multiple programs at Southeast Asia Television (SEATV), and continues to publish in KDNK magazine and to and colloborate with Khmer Film Foundation to produce culture-themed films and the Cultural Road Show (starting 2013).
    Sponsored by Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Center for Language Studies, and Department of History of Art and Architecture.
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  • Laurel Bestock, fresh from the trenches, will discuss her team’s recent archaeological field season at the site of Uronarti, Sudan. Best known as the location of an Egyptian fortress built almost 4000 years ago, Uronarti is providing the Brown team an unprecedented opportunity to address strategies of living and colonial interactions in an ancient outpost. Prof. Bestock will present the most recent finds, showing how they help us to understand the nuances of Egyptian colonialism. She will also give a taste of the rigors of Uronarti life, modern and ancient, and highlight the methodological challenges and delights of working off-grid.
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