• May
    22
    Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Michael Garth and Emily McCarthy, will give 10-minute presentations on their thesis research.
     
    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
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  • May
    14

    Transient Matter is a student-organized and curated exhibition of artifacts linked to the migrant and border crossing experience and collected from the island of Lesvos, on the Greek-Turkish Border. It was prepared as part of the course, MGRK1210: A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis. It asks us to reflect on the physical traces and remnants of border crossing, and invites us to understand the phenomenon paying attention to “small things forgotten”, to life-vests, thermal blankets, prayer mats and other personal objects that migrated and crossed borders together with humans. It addresses the whole assemblage of border crossing and migration, from migrants to volunteers and solidarity networks, and foregrounds both the agony and pain of displacement as well as the resilience, determination and inventiveness of the new nomads of our age.

    Transient Matter can be found in spaces on the first, second, and third (mezzanine) floors of Rhode Island Hall and will be on view until Fall 2019.

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  • May
    14
    All Day

    Exhibit: Transient Matter

    Rhode Island Hall

    Transient Matter is a student-organized and curated exhibition of artifacts linked to the migrant and border crossing experience and collected from the island of Lesvos, on the Greek-Turkish Border. It was prepared as part of the course, MGRK1210: A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis. It asks us to reflect on the physical traces and remnants of border crossing, and invites us to understand the phenomenon paying attention to “small things forgotten”, to life-vests, thermal blankets, prayer mats and other personal objects that migrated and crossed borders together with humans. It addresses the whole assemblage of border crossing and migration, from migrants to volunteers and solidarity networks, and foregrounds both the agony and pain of displacement as well as the resilience, determination and inventiveness of the new nomads of our age.

    Transient Matter can be found in spaces on the first, second, and third (mezzanine) floors of Rhode Island Hall and will be on view until Fall 2019.

    More > Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Student Publications
  • May
    14
    All Day

    Exhibit: Hidden Figures

    Rhode Island Hall

    This exhibit recognizes and highlights those voices that have too long been buried beneath the dominant narratives in archaeology. Hidden Figures aims to recognize the lives, scholarship, contributions, and stories of archaeologists from minority or historically marginalized communities to archaeological research, past and present.

    Throughout Rhode Island Hall, [email protected] have placed images and biographies of some of the hidden figures in archaeology. We invite you to find them (some are more hidden than others - look carefully!), to learn about their lives and contributions to our field, and to suggest the names of others you would like to add to our exhibit.

    Find out more about [email protected] and the hidden figures in this exhibit at:
    www.brown.edu/go/trowelblazersatbrown

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  • Dr. Cameron Petrie is a Reader in South Asian and Iranian Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge. Dr. Petrie’s research primarily focuses on the investigation of complex societies and the archaeology of India, Pakistan and Iran. He is particularly interested in the rise of complexity, the social and economic aspects of state formation, the impact that the growth of states and empires has on subjugated regions, and the relationships between humans and the environment. He has extensive field and research experience at archaeological sites dating from the Neolithic up to the medieval period in India, Pakistan and Iran, and co-direct projects in each of these countries.

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  • Martin Uildriks, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

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  • Renaud Gagné is a Reader in Classics at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Pembroke College. His research interests include early Greek poetry, Greek religion, Greek drama, ancient cultural history, and the history of classical scholarship. Dr. Gagné recently co-edited (with Simon Goldhill and Geoffrey Lloyd) Regimes of Comparatism: Frameworks of Comparison in History, Religion and Anthropology (Brill 2018) which looks at how different theories and practices of writing and interpretation have developed at different times in different cultures and reconsiders the specificities of modern comparative approaches within a variety of comparative moments.

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  • Alexander Ahrens is a Senior Researcher with the Damascus Branch, Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute and, as the recipient of a 2019 AIA/DAI Study in the U.S. Fellowship, a Visiting Scholar at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World. His current project, entitled “Connecting Lowlands and Highlands: The Trajectories and Dynamics of an ‘Archaeological Transit Zone’”, uses the Wadi Shu’aib in west central Jordan as a case study in modes of communication and interaction between the Jordan Valley and the Transjordanian Plateau during the Iron Age. The focus of his research while at the Joukowsky Institute is especially directed towards possible socio-political dynamics lying behind highland-lowland interactions. Besides excavating in Jordan, he has worked at several sites in Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, and Turkey.

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  • Apr
    19

    Blind Origin will be on view at Brown’s Joukowsky Institute for Archeology and the Ancient World from April 17 - July 19, 2019** (**Note: dates extended), and explores the use of art to reinterpret archeological objects. Artist and Professor Judd Schiffman responded to objects selected from the Joukowsky Institute’s collection by creating a new series of ceramic sculptures. Interweaving these transmutations with his personal accumulation of imagery, this work speaks to the meaning, stories and power we ascribe to objects, ancient and contemporary. In his talk, Schiffman will discuss some of his previous work which investigates the relationship between objects, identity, and culture and will speak to the energetic and aesthetic ways we interact with the world around us.

    Judd Schiffman is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Art Department at Providence College and a Providence based artist working primarily in ceramics. His work explores the reinterpretation of family heirlooms, personal mementos, and historic artifacts into sculpture. In the studio he explores the use of clay as a drawing material and evokes a psychedelic concoction of real and imagined experiences that ponder the power of our personal stories.

    Project/Exhibit Curation by Pinar Durgun (Curatorial Assistant, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University) and Project Coordination by Jessica Porter (Operations and Events Coordinator, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University)

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  • Parker VanValkenburgh, an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, will present his work in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2018/12/06/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2019/

    More > History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities