• Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Tyler Franconi, a Visiting Assistant Professor of Archaeology and the Ancient World, will discuss his research in an informal talk, The English Landscapes and Identities Project and the Changing Face of the English Landscape From 1500 BC to AD 1086.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual
    12:05pm - 1:00pm

    Curatorial Accountability

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    Passcode: publichum

    How can curators use the content of the world around them to create a better one? Moving on from the assumed hierarchical reliance of curators on artists and artworks, Rob Blackson will explore the expanding limits of curatorial work when applied to social, cultural, and economic need. Through examples of past and current curatorial work, Blackson will discuss how such efforts foreground reciprocity and accountability to the needs of multiple publics.

    Robert Blackson is the co-director of curatorial programs and curator of citywide initiatives of Philadelphia Contemporary. From 2011 - 2021 he was the founding director of Temple Contemporary at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art and Architecture, USA. Prior to moving to Philadelphia from the UK in 2011, Blackson was curator of public programs at Nottingham Contemporary and curator of BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Newcastle/Gateshead. Temple Contemporary’s signature initiatives include Funeral for a Home (2013-2014), reForm with Pepón Osorio and the Fairhill community (2014-2015), Symphony for a Broken Orchestra (2016-2019), and 100 People Listening: A Shared Decade, 2021 - 2031. Rob’s curatorial purpose focusses on the ways in which programming of, by, and for a community leads to targeted impact. Over the past nine years, his work has illustrated a curatorial shift in the way programs can be crafted to build a healthy mutuality of institutional momentum and social purpose.

    Moderator: Susana Turbay

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Alex Marko and Miriam Rothenberg, Visiting Assistant Professors of Archaeology and the Ancient World, and Anna Soifer, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World will discuss findings from the course ARCH 1900: The Archaeology of College Hill in an informal talk.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This panel is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.

    This webinar is intended for anyone who has ever considered, or might consider, graduate school. It is free and open to all members of the public. We hope this can be an opportunity for curious individuals or all ages, all levels of experience (or inexperience), and all academic backgrounds to find out more about graduate school in archaeology.

    This is a step-by-step walk-through of the graduate application process by the faculty members who review applications for Brown University’s doctoral program in Archaeology and the Ancient World. These professors will tell you exactly what they look for in applications, how to write a personal statement, who to ask for letters of recommendation, what courses to take to prepare yourself for graduate school, and what jobs a graduate education in archaeology prepares you for. It’s a rare insider’s view of the process, and the best advice you can get about applying to grad school.

    For more on applying to our doctoral program, please see our FAQ’s at brown.edu/go/archFAQs.

    Registration for the webinar is free.

    Register in advance More Information Advising, Mentorship, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This panel is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.

    This webinar is intended for anyone who has ever considered, or might consider, graduate school. It is free and open to all members of the public. We hope this can be an opportunity for curious individuals or all ages, all levels of experience (or inexperience), and all academic backgrounds to find out more about graduate school in archaeology.

    This is an overview of the graduate application process by the faculty members who review applications for Brown University’s doctoral program in Archaeology and the Ancient World. These professors will tell you exactly what they look for in applications, how to write a personal statement, who to ask for letters of recommendation, what courses to take to prepare yourself for graduate school, and what jobs a graduate education in archaeology prepares you for. It’s a rare insider’s view of the process, and the best advice you can get about applying to grad school.

    For more on applying to our doctoral program, please see our FAQ’s at brown.edu/go/archFAQs.

    Registration for the webinar is free.

     

    Register in advance More Information Advising, Mentorship, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Advance registration is required, but this talk is free and open to the public.

    The overwhelming majority of scholarly specialists studying the pre-Columbian Caribbean are archaeologists. This has generated a century’s-worth of archaeological data, which the very few art historians working in this area can explore in their search for meaning, and the interiority of ancient Antillean lives.

    Lawrence Waldron, an assistant professor of art history at Queens College of the City University of New York. He received an M.F.A. in Illustration from School of Visual Arts in 1998 before going on to earn a Ph.D. in Art History from the CUNY Graduate School and University Center in 2010. His doctoral studies covered a range of pre-Columbian topics, with secondary concentrations in Non-Western and Latin American art. His dissertation focused on zoomorphic iconography in ancient Caribbean ceramics. Waldron has taught studio art and art history at the university level since the late 1990s. He has presented and published papers on the art and architecture of the pre-Columbian Americas, the Caribbean, Hindu and Buddhist Asia, and Islamic Africa. He is the author of Handbook of Ceramic Animal Symbols in the Ancient Lesser Antilles (2016) and Pre-Columbian Art of the Caribbean (2019).

    This webinar is part of the series New Directions in Caribbean Archaeology.

    Register in advance More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Gnecco follows the so-called Inca trails through several countries examining why and when various sites were declared “World Heritage” and by whom, as well as the consequences of those declarations. Analyzing narratives, audiences, and stagings, he considers how local communities relate to the trails as heritage. He discusses how national and post-national conceptions of heritage can only be imposed by means of violence —symbolic and otherwise—. Adopting a postarchaeological approach, Gnecco attends to relationships between beings as opposed to things; to the effects of heritage declarations on people as well as to how those people relate to heritage sites and the discourses surrounding them; finally, he considers sites, museums, books, videos, and brochures as places of interaction where the materiality of the social and the political unfolds.

    Cristobal Gnecco is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Universidad del Cauca in Colombia. His research interests include the political economy of archaeology, discourses on the other, geopolitics of knowledge, and ethnographies of heritage.

    Register More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • Joukowsky Institute faculty members Professor Candace Rice and Professor Felipe Rojas will provide tips and advice on projects, funding, and what to think about when choosing a project. Open to all interested students - you don’t have to be an archaeology concentrator, or even have taken an archaeology class!

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Yannis Hamilakis, a Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies at Brown University, and Raphael Greenberg, a Professor of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University, will discuss their forthcoming book, Archaeology, Nation, and Race: Confronting the Past, Decolonizing the Future in Greece and Israel in an informal talk.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences
  • In recognition of Indigenous People’s Day and International Archaeology Day, join Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology Director, Dr. Robert Preucel as he welcomes the Chongo Brothers: Diego and Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo).

    This virtual program will include a screening and lively conversation of the Chongo Brothers production: The Search for the Anasazi. This film is a satirical take on archaeologist’s fascination with Pueblo culture and a Native commentary on archaeologist-Native relations. Diego and Mateo Romero are both acclaimed contemporary artists working in pottery and painting, respectively.

    More Information Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences