• Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: “Out of the Vault: Lessons and Experiences from the View the Vault Project.”

    Kristen Marchetti and Erynn Bentley will share the lessons they learned along with some of their experiences while managing the Joukowsky Institute’s collection of ancient objects, as well as curating and installing multiple exhibits in Rhode Island Hall.

    The talk will also be available on zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/92999513911 | Meeting ID: 929 9951 3911

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit our blog: http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 921 8204 0847
    Passcode: RIHall

    Come celebrate our hard work! The students of ARCH 1170 Community Archaeology in Providence and Beyond have spent the semester collaborating with four local community partners to complete heritage projects. These engaged scholarship projects were designed to create links between students and community members/practitioners as co-learners and co-creators. At this event, ARCH 1170 students will give final presentations sharing what they have accomplished over the course of the semester. The event is free and open to the public.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Social Sciences
  • Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Sara Al-Rabiah, Zhiping Ding, and Sam Kimball will give 10-minute presentations on their thesis research:
    Sara Al-Rabiah
    Honors Thesis Title: “Saudi Arabia’s ‘New’ Ancient Past”

    Zhiping Ding
    Honors Thesis Title: “PESTILENTIAE EVRASIAE ANNIS ANTONINI JIANANIQVE: Eurasian-Scale Pestilences in the Antonine and Jianan Periods: The Antonine Plague, the Han Chinese outbreaks, the inter-continental trade routes, and the Sino-Romano Climate Optimum”

    Sam Kimball
    Honors Thesis Title: “Breaking Laws and Burning Bridges: A DIY Contemporary Archaeology of the East Side Railroad Tunnel and Crook Point Bascule Bridge”
     
    This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!
    For those who cannot join us in person, the talks will be viewable on Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97549560629
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  • North Burial Ground Tour

    On May 7 at 2 pm (5 Branch Ave, Providence) join us for a tour of the North Burial Ground, Providence’s oldest and largest cemetery! With so much history in one place, there’s plenty to learn and see. A brief tour (about 20 minutes) will be followed by a scavenger hunt with the potential to win prizes.

    Please dress warmly if you’re coming! The NBG can get quite windy. We hope to see you there!

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  • The pieces in this show include manuscripts from various ancient cultures, never-before seen modern books, rare musical and dance performances, vintage bottles of wine, popular foodstuffs, even the tooth of an extra-planetary creature. Some of these pieces were made expressly for this exhibition, others were purloined or kindly lent to us by their makers, many of them expert forgers.

    The objects on display have only two things in common: first of all, they were collected or produced in the Spring of 2022. Second, and perhaps more importantly, they all remain under the shadow of forgery.

    As Umberto Eco once argued, “there certainly exist tools, either empirical or conjectural, to prove that something is a fake, but every judgment on the question presupposes the existence of an original that is authentic and true, against which the forgery is compared … the real cognitive problem consists not only in proving that something is a forgery but in proving that the authentic object is just that: authentic.” Ultimately, then, the viewer will have to decide what distinguishes a fake object from an authentic one.

    The exhibit opens with a reception on May 6th, from 7:00-7:30pm. The art will be on show through the end of May.

    More Information Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology invites our community to join us in a celebratory reception to honor the recent publication of books by Joukowsky Institute faculty members. Please join us on Friday, May 6 at 4:30 PM in the First Floor Atrium of Rhode Island Hall to toast:

    An Archaeological History of Montserrat in the West Indies, by John F. Cherry and Krysta Ryzewski (2020)

    Megiddo VI: The 2010-2014 Seasons, edited by Israel Finkelstein, Mario A. S. Martin, and Zachary C. Dunseth (2022)

    English Landscapes and Identities Investigating Landscape Change from 1500 BC to AD 1086, by Chris Gosden, Chris Green, Anwen Cooper, Miranda Creswell, Victoria Donnelly, Tyler Franconi, Roger Glyde, Zena Kamash, Sarah Mallet, Laura Morley, Daniel Stansbie, and Letty ten Harkel (2021)

    Archaeology, Nation, and Race: Confronting the Past, Decolonizing the Future in Greece and Israel, by Raphael Greenberg and Yannis Hamilakis (2022)

    Ulus Ve Harabeleri: Yunanistan’da Antikite, Arkeoloji ve Ulusal Imagelem, by Yannis Hamilakis (2020)

    Afterlives of Ancient Rock-cut Monuments in the Near East: Carvings in and out of Time, edited by Felipe Rojas Silva and Jonathan Ben-Dov (2021)

    Otros Pasados: ontologías alternativas y el estudio de lo que ha sido, edited by Felipe Rojas Silva, Byron Ellsworth Hamann and Benjamin Anderson

    and

    Il Mediterraneo occidentale dalla fase fenicia all’egemonia cartaginese. Dinamiche insediative, forme rituali e cultura materiale nel V secolo a.C, edited by Peter van Dommelen, Andrea Roppa, and M. Botto (2021)

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This talk is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.

    Peggy Brunache is Lecturer in the History of Atlantic Slavery and Director of the Beniba Centre for Slavery Studies at the University of Glasgow. Her talk is entitled, “A Negro in the Shire: A Black Woman’s Journey for Activism through Scottish Academia”.

    This webinar is part of the series New Directions in Caribbean Archaeology.

    Register in advance More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research
  • May
    6

    The pieces in this show include manuscripts from various ancient cultures, never-before seen modern books, rare musical and dance performances, vintage bottles of wine, popular foodstuffs, even the tooth of an extra-planetary creature. Some of these pieces were made expressly for this exhibition, others were purloined or kindly lent to us by their makers, many of them expert forgers.

    The objects on display have only two things in common: first of all, they were collected or produced in the Spring of 2022. Second, and perhaps more importantly, they all remain under the shadow of forgery.

    As Umberto Eco once argued, “there certainly exist tools, either empirical or conjectural, to prove that something is a fake, but every judgment on the question presupposes the existence of an original that is authentic and true, against which the forgery is compared … the real cognitive problem consists not only in proving that something is a forgery but in proving that the authentic object is just that: authentic.” Ultimately, then, the viewer will have to decide what distinguishes a fake object from an authentic one.

    More Information Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Join Zoom Meeting

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/92451878473

    Meeting ID: 924 5187 8473

    Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: “Kraters in Context: Expanding Our Understanding of Group Drinking in Classical Greece.”

    Despite the widely embraced notion that the ancient Greeks drank their wine mixed with water, the krater, or mixing bowl, is still largely and almost exclusively associated with the formal symposium. In her talk, Nadhira Hill will discuss how a closer look at the iconographic and archaeological evidence provides us with a much broader view of the contexts in which the krater was used in the Classical Greek world.

    Nadhira’s Brown Bag Talk will also be available on zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/92451878473 Meeting ID: 924 5187 8473

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit our blog: http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2019/11/21/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2020/

    Join via Zoom More Information Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • An exhibition created and curated by the students in the course “A
    Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience” (taught by
    Professor Yannis Hamilakis)

    Exhibition opening: Tuesday 3 May, 4.30 pm, Rhode Island Hall, floor 2.

    Admittedly, forced and undocumented migration is at the centre of public discourse, both in this country and internationally. In addition to sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists and others, archaeologists of the contemporary past have started exploring the phenomenon, focusing in particular on the materiality and temporality of the experience. They have also researched the
    role of social and material memory in shaping contemporary responses, and have studied the material traces of border crossing and undocumented migration. These traces are poignant and affective material components which can help us understand the phenomenon and elicit public reaction. The course explored these themes, paying specific attention to two geographical areas, the Mexico-USA border, and the Mediterranean borders of the European Union.

    In this exhibition, students who took the course in the spring of 2022 displayed and curated objects-remnants of migration and border crossing which were retrieved or purchased on the border island of Lesvos in Greece, located at the fault line between the Global South and Global North. From children’s drawings produced in migrant camps, to a fragment of a rubber dinghy found on a beach, and to a broken CD linked to digital fingerprinting, the objects exhibited speak for both the brutality of the border and the agony of border crossing, as well as the optimism, creativity and resilience of people on the move.

    The students who curated this exhibition are: Melissa Aldana, Madison Bates, Robbie Combs, Shenandoah Duraideivamani, Angelo Giannopoulos, Ellyse Givens, Casandra Gutierrez, Alex Manioudakis, Tyler Melwani, Noah Montemarano, and Monik Rodriguez.

    More Information Arts, Performance, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement