Archaeology and the Ancient World Commencement Ceremony

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

Following the ceremony on the Main Green.

Learning to Look: An Exhibition of Archaeological Illustrations by the JIAAW Community

Wednesday, May 9, 2018 to Friday, June 1, 2018
Rhode Island Hall

Archaeological illustration requires us to pay close attention to the material world. Learning to draw is tied up with learning to look and by extension, to see objects in more detail. The work presented in this exhibit was produced by the Archaeological Illustration Club and members of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology's community.

Presentations of Senior Thesis Research in Archaeology and the Ancient World

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World, Maria Averkiou, Axel Getz, Ciara Hayden, and Luiza Silva, will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations. This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!

And the DigDUG will be hosting a pre-presentation reception, from 2:30-3:00pm, to celebrate the presenters. Come for the cookies, stay for the conversation!

Archaeology DUG Reception in Honor of Thesis Presentations

Rhode Island Hall

The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group is hosting an informal reception to celebrate the seniors presenting their thesis research at 3:00. Anyone interested in archaeology and/or the ancient world, or who wants to support the presenters, is welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served! Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

Elizabeth Minor (Wellesley) and Carl Walsh (JIAAW) - Power and Sacrifice: Rethinking the Kerma State

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

From 2000-1550 BC, the region of Nubia in present day Sudan was controlled by the powerful, but little understood, Kerma state. This African kingdom, named after the monumental and royal site of Kerma, is famous for its theatrical and opulent funerary traditions which seemingly involving large-scale human sacrifices. However, little research has been done on interpreting the role of these unusual funerary traditions, and how they can inform us about the nature and ideology of the Kerma state. In this talk and discussion, Elizabeth Minor (Wellesley College) and Carl Walsh (Joukowsky Institute), put forward new interpretations and ideas regarding these enigmatic burial practices based on their recent research, moving to shed light on this mysterious African rival of ancient Egypt.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Stephen Houston (Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Stephen Houston (Anthropology, Brown University) and Sarah Newman (James Madison University) will be discussing their research in an informal talk titled "Arrival, Return: Movement and Founding Among the Maya". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

The Battle of Kadesh

Quiet Green (Front Green)

Students in ARCH 1630 Fighting Pharaohs: Ancient Egyptian Warfare will recreate an ancient Egyptian battle on Brown's Quiet Green.

For more information, watch the trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gupB3kdUHWk) and read the Providence Journal's front page article (http://www.providencejournal.com/news/20180422/chariots-swords-action).

Colloquium: Other Pasts: Comparing Landscapes, Monuments, and Memories Across the Mediterranean

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

The archaeological study of memory in the ancient Mediterranean has spread like a forest fire. Although several scholars are responsible for igniting the initial tinder, it would be hard to overstate the impact of Susan Alcock on the ways archaeologists approach the challenge of exploring how people imagined their own pasts in the ancient Mediterranean and neighboring regions. 15 years after the publication of her main book on the subject, Archaeologies of the Greek Past: Landscape, Monuments, and Memories (2002), the moment is ripe for an assessment of the field after the conflagration, as it were, as well as a discussion about new and promising directions in the archaeological study of ancient memory and forgetting. Rather than collecting ever more refined case studies, we invite scholars to engage in comparative analyses.

Speakers:
Susan Alcock, University of Michigan
Andrew Johnston, Yale University
Carolina López-Ruiz, The Ohio State University
Naoise Mac Sweeney, University of Leicester
Josephine Quinn, Worcester College, University of Oxford
Felipe Rojas, Brown University
Peter van Dommelen, Brown University


Find more at: www.brown.edu/go/otherpasts

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Katherine Brunson (JIAAW): Oracle Bone Divination

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Katherine Brunson, Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk titled, "Oracle Bone Divination and the Oracle Bone Database Project". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

CANCELLED -- Lecture by Matthew Barnes (Mystic Seaport) - Viking Ship Construction: Working on...

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

We regret that we must CANCEL Matthew Barnes's lecture, and apologize for any inconvenience.

 

Matthew Barnes is a 2010 graduate from the International Yacht Restoration School (IYRS) and is currently a boat builder and lead shipwright for the Mystic Seaport overseeing the 30 month restoration of the Mayflower II (in Mystic Seaport, Connecticut.) In the summer of 2016, Matthew spent 12 weeks apprenticing at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, Denmark assisting in the traditional reconstruction of the Gislinge Boat, a 30’ fishing boat from the Viking Age. During his trip, he also visited 7 countries in Europe and Scandinavia, following the path westward of the Norse people of the Viking Age including Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Amsterdam, Scotland, Norway, Sweden and England researching and documenting the effect this expansion had on wooden boatbuilding. In his lecture he will be discussing the traditional building methods used in the construction of a ship during the Viking Age. He will also be covering his findings of the Norse effect on wooden boat building in the North Atlantic and the World, which is still evident today over a 1000 years later. Visit his blog at http://www.americanshipwright.com.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Darcy Hackley (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Darcy Hackley, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Lecture by Jane Webster (Newcastle) - Materializing the Middle Passage

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Dr. Jane Webster is Senior Lecturer in Historical Archaeology and Head of Archaeology in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Newcastle University. She is a historical archaeologist whose research focuses on colonial material culture, from the early Roman Empire to the eighteenth century. She works mainly in two fields: Romano-British iconography and the archaeology of slavery (looking at the latter in both in the Roman period and between 1660 and 1807). Webster is currently writing a book called "Material Culture of the Middle Passage," looking at the social world of slave ships making the Atlantic sea crossing that took slaves to the New World during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Jiang Jianxin (Jingdezhen Institute of Archeology, China): Archaeological Discoveries from Jingdezhen

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

JIANG Jianxin is the director of the Jingdezhen Institute of Archeology, the director of the Chinese Ancient Ceramics Society, and president of Jingdezhen Tang Ying Institute. Since the 1980s, he has engaged in archaeological studies on Jingdezhen ancient ceramics remains and led multiple archeological excavations of kiln ruins from the Ming and Qing dynasties, including excavations of kiln factory ruins. He has authored more than twenty academic papers and is a chief editor for multiple archaeological journals and catalogues.

The lecture, "Archaeological Discoveries from Jingdezhen, Porcelain Kilns for China's Emperors," recognizes and appreciates the main characteristics and transformation in style of porcelains from the kiln of Guan Yao across different periods of the Ming Dynasty, highlighting the history and culture, ceramic technology, and art history. It also presents new explorations on Guan Yao porcelain from a variety of historical periods and perspectives, including: the beginning and ending years of the Ming Dynasty, the “blank period” of Guan Yao, Yong-Le Guan Yao porcelain and Zheng He’s Voyage porcelain, Xuan-De Guan Yao’s impact on Cheng-Hua Guan Yao and technological achievements, and others. Based on recent archaeological studies and excavation data, the history of the porcelain industry in Jingdezhen can be traced back to the middle and late Tang Dynasty. The Leping South Kiln surrounding Jingdezhen started producing celadon and ceramic whiteware, its high quality influenced by Yue kilns and Xing kilns. This laid the foundation of the early Jingdezhen porcelain industry and provided a technological foundation for the future success of a celadon production. New archeological findings at the Luomaqiao Yuan Ming Kiln Site also revealed important artifacts, such as many blue-white glazed porcelains from late Song and early Yuan Dynasty, blue-white porcelains and white porcelains from the Yuan Dynasty, and early-to-middle Ming Dynasty utensils with various styles, many methods of decoration, and a high technological level. According to the quality of the unearthed porcelains, the kiln site may have been an important fixed-point firing kiln site for the Yuan Dynasty Fuliang Porcelain Bureau.

Presented in Chinese with English translation

Archaeology DUG Meet and Greet

Rhode Island Hall

The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group is hosting an informal reception to welcome new Archaeology concentrators. All new and current Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and/or the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served! Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

Presentation of Dissertation Research by Ian Randall (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Ian Randall, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation, "Setting an Insular Table: Pottery, Identity, and Connectivity on Crete and Cyprus at the End of Antiquity," in a public lecture. All are welcome.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Linda Reynard (Harvard University)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Linda Reynard, a Research Associate and Lecturer in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk titled, "Inferring Diet and Migration from Isotopes in Bones". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Let's Talk about Death: A research poster session

Rhode Island Hall, Room 008

A research poster session by the students of ARCH 310, "Interactions with the Dead". Posters will be displayed on the lower level of Rhode Island Hall, outside the Seminar Room (RIH 008). Snacks will be provided. Everyone welcome (open to public)!

Lecture by Kieran O'Conor (National University of Ireland) - The Deserted Anglo-Norman Town and Castle of Rindoon Co. Roscommon

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

The deserted Anglo-Norman royal town and castle of Rindoon lies on a peninsula jutting out into Lough Ree – one of the great lakes of the Shannon River system that runs through central Ireland. It is regarded as one of the best examples of a deserted medieval town in the British Isles, as it only existed for just over a hundred years before its mainly English inhabitants deserted it in the early 14th century. This lecture, drawing on a recent multi-disciplinary study that included field survey, geophysics and an analysis of the surviving historical sources, will discuss each of the various elements that made up the town, particularly its multi-phase castle, and will argue that elements of what certain British archaeologists have called ‘an elite landscape’ occur at Rindoon.

This lecture is sponsored by the Brown University's Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, the Narragansett Society (the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America) and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. For more information, visit http://aianarragansett.org.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Miriam Rothenberg (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Miriam Rothenberg, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Presentation of Dissertation Research by Catherine Steidl (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Catherine Steidl, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation, "Community Formation in Iron Age Ionia: Experience and Practice in Comparative Perspective," in a public lecture. All are welcome.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Anita Casarotto (Leiden) - Settlement Patterns in Early Roman Colonial Landscapes

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Anita Casarotto, a PhD student in Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk titled, "A GIS Procedure to Study Settlement Patterns in Early Roman Colonial Landscapes". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series.

Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Professor Laurel Bestock provides an overview on how students can get involved in archaeological fieldwork this summer.  She will discuss how to find and choose a project and how to find funding, and then lead a more general discussion on what to expect on a fieldwork project and what kinds of preparation might be necessary.  Open to all interested students.

Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice

Friday, March 2, 2018 to Saturday, March 3, 2018
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World will host a workshop called State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice on March 2-3, 2018. The workshop will be the culmination of two years of discussion on this theme, but is also intended to raise new issues, ask new questions, and encourage ongoing dialogue.

Our gathering builds on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students. While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event will focus on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.

Within the context of archaeology, we conceive of social justice as pertaining to issues of privilege and opportunity that affect the makeup of scholars in the field, efforts among archaeologists to engage with the public and with broader social and political discussions, and the degree to which archaeological scholarship and pedagogy intersect with or impact these issues. It also refers to the asymmetries of power and structural inequalities in society at large. This choice of topic has been inspired by recent global social and political concerns, responses from universities and academia that seek to address issues of representation and access, and most importantly, grassroots movements for social justice.

This workshop thus seeks to engage primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018.

The Life and Legacy of John Wesley Gilbert

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Archaeology, Classics, and Social Justice:
The Life and Legacy of John Wesley Gilbert (1864-1923), African American Classicist and Archaeologist, Educator, and Advocate

A student-led symposium

 

More information at www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018.

Trials, Tragedy and Resilience: Montserrat Exhibit

Thursday, March 1, 2018 to Friday, June 1, 2018
Rhode Island Hall

"Trials, Tragedy & Resilience" is an exhibit recognizing and celebrating Montserrat’s rich cultural heritage on the 250th anniversary of the attempted St. Patrick’s Day slave uprising on 17 March 1768. The histories presented here commemorate the resilience that Montserratians have displayed over time in their responses to difficult conditions imposed by slavery, colonialism, resource scarcity, and catastrophic natural disasters. This international exhibit is running concurrently at the National Museum of Montserrat, Wayne State University (Detroit, Michigan), Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island), and Aarhus University (Denmark) and presents information collected during the Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat project (co-directed by Brown University Professor John F. Cherry), the Endangered Archives/ICT Project, and other initiatives led by the Montserrat National Trust.

Montserrat is a small island (102km2) and British Overseas Territory located in the Caribbean Lesser Antilles. First inhabited by Amerindian peoples around 4,000 years ago, Montserrat has been home to many different cultural groups over the course of its human history. Some of these groups freely migrated to Montserrat, while others, like enslaved Africans, were brought against their will during the plantation era. Lasting contributions from Amerindian, African, Irish, and British inhabitants survive in the surnames, place-names, food, architecture, flora, landscape, and material culture of the island.

Montserrat has been radically transformed in the past two decades by the Soufriere Hills volcano. Beginning in 1995, pyroclastic flows from the eruptions buried the former capital city of Plymouth, rendered the southern half of the island an inaccessible Exclusion Zone, displaced two-thirds of the population, and killed nineteen residents. The volcano is still active. Demonstrating Montserratian resilience in the face of disaster, the island has recently reconfigured its settlements and society to accommodate a new way of life in the island’s north.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Jamie Forde (John Carter Brown Library) - "Broken Flowers"

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Jamie Forde, a Consulting Scholar in the Penn Cultural Heritage Center at the University of Pennsylvania and current Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow at Brown University's John Carter Brown Library, will be discussing his research in an informal talk titled, " Broken Flowers: Sacralizing Domestic Space in a Colonial Mixtec Household". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Trowelblazers@Brown: Coffee/Tea/Cookies

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Our first event of the semester is an informal coffee/tea/cookie hour! It is open to everyone, and is intended to be an opportunity to get to know other people in the community and chat about possible goals and directions for the group. Please invite anyone you think might be interested in joining us!

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Lynnette Arnold (Anthropology) - "Imagining Family across Borders"

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Lynnette Arnold, a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk titled, "Imagining Family across Borders: Epistolary and Digital Communication in Migrant Families". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Emmanuel Botte (French National Centre for Scientific Research)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Emmanuel Botte, a researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research, will be discussing his research in an informal talk titled, "Fish & Ships: The Salted-Fish Industry in the Mediterranean During Antiquity". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

A discussion of current issues in archaeological theory, between Joukowsky Institute faculty members and Craig Cipolla (Royal Ontario Museum) and Oliver Harris (University of Leicester), authors of the recent book, "Archaeological Theory in the New Millennium: Introducing Current Perspectives."

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Cristiano Nicosia (University of Padua) - Soil Micromorphology

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Cristiano Nicosia, a researcher in the Department of Cultural Heritage at the University of Padua, will be discussing his research and new book "Archaeological Soil and Sediment Micromorphology" in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

What Can You Do with a Degree in Archaeology?

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Gina Borromeo (Curator of Ancient Art at the RISD Museum), Matt Glendinning (Head of School at Moses Brown School), and Bill Monroe (Senior Scholarly Resources Librarian, Humanities, at Brown University's Library) will discuss how their degrees in ancient art, early history, and archaeology led them to their current positions.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Marleen Termeer (Leiden University) - Coining Roman Rule?

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Marleen Termeer, a lecturer in Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology at Leiden University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

InfoSession: Excavate a Neolithic site in Greece this summer!

Rhode Island Hall, Room 109

Brown and Brown-RISD undergraduate students of all backgrounds can now be funded (through I-UTRA) to participate in the excavation of the Neolithic village of Koutroulou Magoula in Greece (c. 6000 BCE) and carry out their own inter-disciplinary research, under the supervision of a team of international leading specialists. The research will be conducted in the summer of 2018, as part of the Koutroulou Magoula Archaeology and Archaeological Ethnography Project, under the direction of Professor Yannis Hamilakis (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World).

Come to an information session on Friday 15 December, 4 pm (Rhode Island Hall, Common Room) to find out more!

Lindsey Mazurek (Bucknell University) - Experiments in Greekness

List Art Building, Room 110

Lindsey Mazurek is Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Bucknell University. She is an art historian and archaeologist of the Roman provinces, whose research applies Second Sophistic literature and religious studies to the study of Greek identity. Dr. Mazurek co-directs the Ostian Connectivity Project, a collaborative digital initiative to study social and migration histories of Rome's port in the imperial period.

Presentation of Dissertation Research by Pinar Durgun (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Pinar Durgun, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.

Eva Mol (Brown University) - License to Imagine: Representing a Roman Past

List Art Building, Room 110

Eva Mol is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. She is a Dutch Mediterranean archaeologist (PhD from Leiden University). Prior to coming to Brown University, she had been working as a postdoctoral researcher at the UChicago Classics Department on the project: ‘The materiality of ancient Mediterranean myth’. Her dissertation focused on the experience and use of Egyptian style and objects in the domestic contexts of Roman Pompeii.

Jenny Kreiger (Getty Foundation) - Painters and Social Networks in Catacombs

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Jenny Kreiger received her doctorate in classical art and archaeology from the University of Michigan in 2017. Her research focuses on late antique funerary laborers and the material evidence for their working practices, social relationships, and contributions to urban economies. Dr. Kreiger is now a Graduate Intern at the Getty Foundation where she administers grants related to art historical research and conservation.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Graham Oliver (Classics and History)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Graham Oliver, Professor of Classics and History at Brown University, will share his research in an informal talk titled, "Re-Thinking Things: Archaeological Theory, Words on Objects, and Mediation. Reflections from the Greek Inscriptions in the RISD Museum". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Archaeological Illustration Club

Rhode Island Hall

Archaeological Illustration Club, led by Brown faculty member Dr. Sophie Moore, meets every Wednesday afternoon from 3:30-5:00. This Wednesday, December 6th, come on up to the mezzanine in Rhode Island Hall (the third floor) and have some tea -- and do a bit of drawing. Meetings are informal, and all are welcome. No commitment, talent, skill, materials, experience, or aptitude necessary.

Maggie Popkin (Case Western): Urban Images in Glass from the Late Roman Empire

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Maggie Popkin, Robson Assistant Professor of Art History in the Department of Art History and Art at Case Western Reserve University, specializes in ancient Roman art and architecture. Her research interests include the relationship between architecture, spectacle, and ritual in the Roman world and the impact of visual culture on individual and social remembering in the classical world.  Her talk is titled, "Urban Images in Glass from the Late Roman Empire: The Souvenir Flasks of Puteoli and Baiae"

Change and Resilience: The Occupation of Mediterranean Islands in Late Antiquity

Friday, December 1, 2017 to Sunday, December 3, 2017
Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

The conference explores the transformation of Mediterranean islands with a primary focus on settlement patterns and the transformation of landscapes and mindscapes. The idea is to explore how the models of occupation of the islands changed from the Roman to the Medieval Period focusing in change and resilience, in innovation and tradition, in the creation of new settlements and the reoccupation of prehistoric sites.

Friday, December 1st 2017
Rhode Island Hall 108

4:30-6:00pm - David Abulafia (Cambridge University): "Early Medieval Maritime Linkages: The Mediterranean and the Oceans Compared"
Rhode Island Hall 108


Saturday, December 2nd, 2017
Rhode Island Hall 108

9:00-12:00pm - Session I: The Western and Central Mediterranean
2:00-4:00pm - Session II: The Eastern Mediterranean


Sunday, December 3rd, 2017
Rhode Island Hall 108

9:00-12:10 - Session III: Island Mindscapes


Full schedule is online at www.brown.edu/go/changeandresilience

Free and open to the public. No registration required.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Brian Lander (History) - Living with Wetlands

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Brian Lander, Assistant Professor of History and Fellow at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, will discuss his research in an informal talk titled, "Living with Wetlands in the Yangzi Valley". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Fake Fossils, Fake Bones, and a Dinosaur

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Why do people fake animal skeletons and their petrified remains? How are fake “natural specimens” similar to or different from fake “cultural artifacts”? Is there anything to be gained from sustained reflection about the physical traces of beings that never were? For centuries—if not millennia—people have forged the impressions left by the bodies of animals and the hardest of body parts. To what end? Felipe Rojas, Kate Brunson, and Irina Podgorny will discuss fake fossils and bones in three very short talks followed by a public discussion. 

Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Where can you do fieldwork this summer? How can you pay for it? How do you apply? What’s an UTRA grant? Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer? What courses should you take to prepare? Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator? What is fieldwork, anyway? And what about study abroad? Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Kaitlin McCormick (Anthropology, Brown University)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Kaitlin McCormick, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Museum Studies at Brown University's Department of Anthropology, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Lecture by Barbara Horejs (OREA of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) - New Models for the Neolithization Process in the Aegean and Western Anatolia

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Dr. Barbara Horejs is Director of the Institute for Oriental and European Archeology (OREA) at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna. Dr. Horejs specalizes in prehistoric archeology in south-eastern Europe, the Aegean, and Anatolia, excavations and studies on the Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Age, including the advanced civilizations of Late Bronze Age. She also has interests in the intersections of different cultural areas, knowledge transfer and communication networks and landscape archaeology and social developments in the context of their environment.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Katia Schörle (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Katia Schörle, a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and Assistant Editor of the Journal of Roman Archaeology, will be discussing her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series.

The Mummy: See the Movie...Then Think About It...

Salomon Center, Room 001

Start your celebration of Halloween with a free screening of the movie "The Mummy" (2017). See Tom Cruise and Russell Crowe battle an ancient princess (played by Sofia Boutella) awakened from a crypt -- on a giant screen, with surround sound! Followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie. And free popcorn! Free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

Lecture by Scott MacEachern (Bowdoin College): African Crossroads: The Rise of States around Lake Chad

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Scott MacEachern is Professor of Anthropology at Bowdoin College. He specializes in African archaeology and ethnoarchaeology; and his research involves the study of state formation and ethnicity in Iron Age Central Africa. He is the Director of DGB Archaeological Project, an archaeological research project in northern Cameroon. This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit https://aianarragansett.org.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Nicholas Laluk (Anthropology) - Ndee (Apache) Archaeology

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Nicholas Laluk, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Native American Studies at Brown University's Department of Anthropology, will present his research in an informal talk titled, "Ndee (Apache) Archaeology: Cultural Tenets as Best Practice". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Byron Hamann, Irina Podgorny, and Felipe Rojas - Fake New World: Skulls, Fossils, Frauds and the Archaeological Imagination

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Byron Hamann (The Ohio State University), Irina Podgorny (CONICET and Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library), and Felipe Rojas (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology) examine how archaeological artifacts rightly and wrongly labeled "fake" are part of the production of knowledge about the past in the Americas. Short presentations will be followed by open discussion.

Crypto-Colonialism & the Global South: A Conference in Honor of Michael Herzfeld

Rhode Island Hall Room 108

On October 19 & 20, 2017, the Program in Modern Greek Studies at Brown University is holding a conference in honor of the anthropologist Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University. Colleagues and friends representing an array of disciplines and research interests, anthropology, ethnography, semiotics, urban studies, nationalism, post colonialism, heritage studies, the politics of the past, will present work inspired by, or in dialogue with, Michael Herzfeld's influential research and contributions.

The full schedule can be found online at https://www.brown.edu/academics/modern-greek/news/2017-09/modern-greek-studies-colloquium-oct-19-2017

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Eva Mol (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University) ...

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Eva Mol, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk titled, "Making Myth Real: Objects in Herodotus’ Histories and Material Epistemology." Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Anthony Tuck (UMass at Amherst) - Palace Politics: The Evolution of Elite Domestic Architecture at Poggio Civitate

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Dr. Anthony Tuck is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He serves as Director of Excavations at Poggio Civitate (Murlo), an Etruscan site dating to the 8th to 6th centuries BCE. His research focuses on social, economic, and political development in early urban Italy.

Archaeology of College Hill Community Archaeology Day

Moses Brown School, 250 Lloyd Avenue (Excavation at the corner of Hope Street and Lloyd Avenue)

Community Archaeology Day and Brown University Family Weekend, II

Watch Brown undergraduates digging (yes, really digging!). This year, as part of ongoing work on Brown's campus and in the surrounding neighborhoods of College Hill, students will be excavating at the nearby Moses Brown school. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what we're up to or try your hand at digging. All are welcome!

Joukowsky Institute Open House: Archaeology in Action

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, 60 George Street

Community Archaeology Day and Brown University Family Weekend, I

Come visit the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World in Rhode Island Hall. See ancient coins, human and animal bones, precious metals, ceramics, and other artifacts. Tour one of the oldest buildings on Brown’s campus. And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Shiyanthi Thavapalan (Egyptology and Assyriology)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Shiyanthi Thavapalan, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, will present her research in an informal talk titled, "Counterfeiting Nature: Developments in Glass-Making and Glass-Working in the Late Bronze Age Near East." Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Information Session on Applying to Graduate School and Searching for Jobs in Archaeology

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider. View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://www.brown.edu/academics/archaeology/undergraduate/life-after-brown

First Trowelblazers@Brown Meeting

Rhode Island Hall, Room 109

We'd like to invite female identifying or presenting undergrads, grads, postdocs and professors to our first meeting, scheduled for Friday, September 29th at around 4:45 (following 'Field Dirt Part II'). In this gathering we'll discuss amongst each other whatever comes to mind - whether summer experiences, general concerns, things we're looking forward to this year or in the near future, any ideas we might have for events etc. Sponsored by the DigDUG (Archaeology and the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group) *If there are any considerable conflicts, do let us know and we’ll try to find a more accommodating time/date*

Field Dirt, Part II: More Insider Stories and Results from Brown's 2017 Archaeological Field Seasons

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Can't get enough Field Dirt? We can't either!  Brown University faculty members Katherine Brunson, Miguel Cau Ontiveros, Catalina Mas Florit, Sophie Moore, and Katia Schorle will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in China, Menorca, Turkey, and Croatia. Free and open to the public. All are welcome.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Itohan Osayimwese (HIAA)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Itohan Osayimwese, Assistant Professor in Brown University's History of Art and Architecture and current Joukowsky Institute Faculty Fellow, will present her research in an informal talk titled, "Translating 19th-Century German Ethnoarchaeology: Hermann Frobenius' 'African Building Types' and Other Essays". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology: Carl Walsh (JIAAW)

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Carl Walsh, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch. For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit http://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown's 2017 Archaeological Field Seasons

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Brown University’s Professors Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Itohan Osayimwese, Felipe Rojas, and Peter van Dommelen will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in France, Montserrat, Greece, Barbados, Turkey, and Italy. Free and open to the public. All are welcome.

Reuse Reconsidered Conference

Friday, September 15, 2017 to Monday, September 18, 2017
Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium, Room110

Reuse Reconsidered Conference, September 15-17, 2017, Granoff Center, 154 Angell Street, Providence, RI. Keynote on Friday, September 15, 5:30 p.m.:
Dr. Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Univ. of Pittsburg, "The Alchemy of Monuments:150 Years of Reuse in Dehli, India"
Reuse Reconsidered is a cross-disciplinary conference exploring the motivations behind the reuse of cultural heritage. It seeks to unite scholars, from graduate students to senior faculty members, that study a variety of time periods, cultures, and types of reuse. It will expand how we understand the phenomenon of cultural identity in relationship to the appropriation, memorialization, and reimaging of the past. Reuse Reconsidered is sponsored by The Brown Arts Initiative (BAI), Brown’s Department of the History of Art and Architecture and the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World. The conference, including the keynote presentation on Friday, September 15, at 5:30 pm, is free and open to the public.
For more information, including the conference program, visit www.reusereconsidered.com or email: reuse.reconsidered@gmail.com.

Welcome Back (to/from the Trenches) Reception

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, 60 George Street

The Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World invites you to a reception to celebrate the beginning of the school year.  Please join us in welcoming faculty and students to, and back to, Brown.

Event Highlights of 2017-2018

The Joukowsky Institute held more than 60 events over the course of the 2017-18 academic year, ranging from a viewing and discussion of the 2017 blockbuster ‘The Mummy’ to our 2018 State of the Field conference on archaeology and social justice. See some of the year’s highlights below!

September 2017

Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown's 2017 Archaeological Field Seasons
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Brown University’s Professors Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Itohan Osayimwese, Felipe Rojas, and Peter van Dommelen shared the latest news from their summer archaeological fieldwork in France, Montserrat, Greece, Barbados, Turkey, and Italy.

October 2017

The Mummy: See the Movie...Then Think About It...
Monday, October 30, 2017

Halloween started early with a free screening of the movie "The Mummy" (2017). Tom Cruise and Russell Crowe battled an ancient princess (played by Sofia Boutella) awakened from a crypt, followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie.

November 2017

Fake Fossils, Fake Bones, and a Dinosaur
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Why do people fake animal skeletons and their petrified remains? How are fake “natural specimens” similar to or different from fake “cultural artifacts”? Is there anything to be gained from sustained reflection about the physical traces of beings that never were? For centuries—if not millennia—people have forged the impressions left by the bodies of animals and the hardest of body parts. To what end? Felipe Rojas (JIAAW), Kate Brunson (JIAAW), and Irina Podgorny (CONICET and Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library) discussed fake fossils and bones in three very short talks followed by a public discussion.

Watch a video of the talk here: Fake Fossils, Fake Bones, and a Dinosaur

December 2017

Change and Resilience: The Occupation of Mediterranean Islands in Late Antiquity
Friday, December 1, 2017 to Sunday, December 3, 2017

This conference explored the transformation of Mediterranean islands with a primary focus on settlement patterns and the transformation of landscapes and mindscapes. Participants explored how the models of occupation of the islands changed from the Roman to the Medieval Period, focusing on change and resilience, innovation and tradition, the creation of new settlements, and the reoccupation of prehistoric sites.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/changeandresilience

Watch video from the conference here:

Keynote
Session 1 - The Western and Central Mediterranean
Session 2 - The Eastern Mediterranean
Session 3 - Island Mindscapes

February 2018

What Can You Do with a Degree in Archaeology?
Monday, February 5, 2018

Gina Borromeo (Curator of Ancient Art at the RISD Museum), Matt Glendinning (Head of School at Moses Brown School), and Bill Monroe (Senior Scholarly Resources Librarian, Humanities, at Brown University's Library) discussed how their degrees in ancient art, early history, and archaeology led them to their current positions and answered student questions about other career options.

March 2018

State of the Field 2018: Archaeology and Social Justice
Friday, March 2, 2018 to Saturday, March 3, 2018

This workshop built on a tradition of “State of the Field” workshops hosted by the Joukowsky Institute to reflect upon trends in archaeological work, each year focusing our discussion on issues impacting an area of particular interest to our faculty and students. While previous versions have dealt with a country or region of archaeological significance, this year’s event focused on archaeology’s relationship to ongoing movements for social justice.  This workshop engaged primarily with the role of archaeology in contemporary social justice movements, while insisting that discussions of diversity in the past can inform experience in the present.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/sotf2018

Watch video from the conference here:

Keynote Panel
Session 1 (Constructions of Blackness and Whiteness) and Session 2 (Diversity and Epistemic Justice)
Session 3 (Material Memory and the Archaeologies of Resistance) and Session 4 (Business as Usual? Engaging with Social Justice)

April 2018

Colloquium: Other Pasts: Comparing Landscapes, Monuments, and Memories Across the Mediterranean
Saturday, April 21, 2018

The archaeological study of memory in the ancient Mediterranean has spread like a forest fire. Although several scholars are responsible for igniting the initial tinder, it would be hard to overstate the impact of Susan Alcock on the ways archaeologists approach the challenge of exploring how people imagined their own pasts in the ancient Mediterranean and neighboring regions. Fifteen years after the publication of her main book on the subject, Archaeologies of the Greek Past: Landscape, Monuments, and Memories (2002), the moment was ripe for an assessment of the field after the conflagration, as it were, as well as a discussion about new and promising directions in the archaeological study of ancient memory and forgetting. Rather than collecting ever more refined case studies, scholars were invited to engage in comparative analyses.

Additional information is available at www.brown.edu/go/otherpasts

Watch video from the conference here:

Morning Session
Afternoon Session

May 2018

Learning to Look: An Exhibition of Archaeological Illustrations by the JIAAW Community
Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Archaeological illustration requires us to pay close attention to the material world. Learning to draw is tied up with learning to look and by extension, to see objects in more detail. This exhibition presents work produced by the Archaeological Illustration Club and members of the Joukowsky Institute community.

Fall Events and Exhibits Coming Soon

We will be adding events to our calendar in the coming months.  Our Brown Bag Series will resume in early September, and we will be scheduling talks, workshops, and conferences throughout the academic year -- including our next State of the Field workshop, to be held in Spring 2019.