• Dec
    6
    9:00am - 4:30pm

    Exhibit: Acropolis Unbound

    Rhode Island Hall

    An art exhibition as part of the ARCH 2420 graduate seminar The Making of Modern Monuments: Race, Coloniality, and the Athenian Acropolis, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis

    30 November 2023 – 31 January 2024*

    Rhode Island Hall

    Curated by Yannis Hamilakis and the students in the ARCH 2420 graduate seminar

    Sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and the Department of Classics

     

    *Note: Brown University will be closed between December 23, 2023 and January 10, 2024.

     

    Opening Reception: 30 November 2023, 5.30 pm

     

    The Athenian Acropolis is an iconic world monument and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, at the centre of the western imagination and its ancestral myths; it is also one of the most visited archaeological sites in the world. While it is the relatively short, classical moment in the life of the Acropolis which is projected in national and western-Eurocentric discourses, the site has a long and fascinating history, starting with the Neolithic and the Bronze Age and continuing all the way to the present. What we see, visit and understand today as the Acropolis does not correspond to any specific pre-modern past but it is rather a product of western modernity. Yet, the processes of making the Acropolis a monument of modernity, and their articulation with race, nationhood, and coloniality, are not well understood. Further, the archaeological and architectural interventions that made the Acropolis a monument of (and to) modernity are interwoven with the modernist ways of seeing, and with the techniques and devices of visual representation, most notably photography. The Acropolis was and is both a site and a sight, and the two were and are co-produced.

    This exhibition invites us to reflect on the following questions:

    • How does modernity construct monuments and monumental landscapes, out of the multi-temporal remnants of various pasts? How do coloniality and race shape this process?
    • How do modernist sensorial regimes and technologies, and particularly technologies of vision, co-constitute such “significant” monuments?
    • How and why was the Athenian Acropolis purified from all remnants of “barbarity”, and what were the other Acropolises that were overshadowed or even erased?
    • How can we de-monumentalize the Acropolis, and other such monuments, through scholarship, art, and activism?

    The exhibition is one of the outcomes of the graduate seminar ARCH 2420 Making Modern Monuments: Race, Coloniality, and the Athenian Acropolis, taught by Professor Yannis Hamilakis in the autumn of 2023. The students who were part of this class were: Colby Case, Emily Cigarroa, Looghermine Claude, Grace Hermes, Max Meyer, Adrian Oteiza, Kaitlyn Torres. Their final projects are exhibited here. Their work is presented alongside the photographic work of the Thessaloniki-based, experimental photographer and archaeologist, Fotis Ifantidis.

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  • Dec
    6
    4:00pm - 6:00pm

    View the Vault: Joukowsky Institute’s Open Collection Hours

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm Outside room 008

    Daylight savings time got you down? Brighten up your evening with an enlightening tour of the archaeological collections in Rhode Island Hall!

    Come to the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology’s Open Collection Hours, and explore the Institute’s (hidden!) Collection of ancient ceramic vessels, lamps, figurines, lithics, sherds, and more. Expert docents will be on hand to answer questions.

    Free and open to the public!

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  • Dec
    7
    12:00pm - 12:50pm

    Brown Bag Series in Archaeology | Shanti Morell-Hart

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm 108

    Shanti Morell-Hart, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, will discuss her research in an informal talk titled, “Culinary Arts and Plant Sciences in the Ancient Maya Lowlands”. 

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit our blog: sites.brown.edu/archaeology/

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  • Dec
    7

    Rounding out this semester’s Indigenous Curators Series, the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology welcomes Shándíín Brown (Diné), Erin Genia (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate) and Tess Lukey (Aquinnah Wampanoag) as they participate in a panel discussion moderated by Kimberly Toney (Hassanamisco Band Nipmuc). They will each speak to their experience as Indigenous women living in the Southern New England region and working in non-Indigenous spaces as changemakers and trendsetters who are working to revolutionize and Indigenize the field. Learn about their curatorial philosophies, practices and work to impact and uplift Indigenous voices that have long been silenced or absent in museum work.

    Sháńdíín Brown is a scholar, creative, and citizen of the Navajo Nation from Arizona. She is the inaugural Henry Luce Curatorial Fellow for Native American Art at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Museum. Brown holds a BA in Anthropology and Native American Studies with a minor in Environmental Studies from Dartmouth College.

    Erin Genia is a tribal member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate. She is a multidisciplinary artist, educator and community organizer whose practice merges Dakota cultural imperatives, pure expression and material exploration with the conceptual. Erin has an MS in Art, Culture and Technology from MIT an MPA – Tribal Governance from The Evergreen State College.

    Tess Lukey is a curator, artist, and member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah). She is the inaugural Associate Curator of Native American Art for the Trustees of the Reservations. She received her MA in Native American Art History from UNM and a BFA in Art History and Ceramics from MassArt. She has co-curated shows Collecting Stories: The Invention of Folk Art (2021) and A Little Bit of the Southwest (2022) at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Lukey’s newest exhibition, Beauty and Usefulness (2023), at Fruitlands Museum, explores the intersection of function and aesthetics in both Native and non-Native art forms from the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Reception to begin the event.

    Free and open to the public. Supported by generous donors to Friends of the Haffenreffer Museum.

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  • Beginning of Reading Period (optional and at the discretion of the instructor).

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  • Dec
    13
    All Day

    Final Examination Period (inclusive of Sunday).

    > No location for this event

    Final Examination Period (inclusive of Sunday).

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  • Jan
    15
    All Day

    Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. No University exercises.

    > No location for this event

    Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. No University exercises.

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  • Jan
    24
    All Day

    Classes of the second semester begin.

    > No location for this event

    Classes of the second semester begin.

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  • Mar
    11
    6:00pm

    Nassos Papalexandrou (University of Texas at Austin)

    List Art Building, Rm 110

    Nassos Papalexandrou is Professor of Art History at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his PhD from Princeton University focusing on the ritual dimensions of Early Greek figurative art. Prior to teaching at The University of Texas at Austin, he taught at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and spent the 2001–02 academic year as a research fellow at the Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC. His first book, The Visual Poetics of Power: Warriors, Youths, and Tripods in Early Greece, was published in 2005. In 2021 he published a book titled Bronze Monsters and the Cultures of Wonder: Griffin Cauldrons in the Preclassical Mediterranean (University of Texas Press).

    RSVP is strongly encouraged, but not required.

    This lecture is a part of The History of Art & Architecture’s 23-24 Lecture Series: Light in Theory & Practice, which is a part of the Brown Arts IGNITE series.

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  • This lecture is co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World and the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America.

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