• Discussions of migration in circles as diverse as liberal humanitarianism and right-wing ethno-nationalism have shared a common framing of migration as a “crisis” that is symptomatic of a deeper series of problems whose “root causes” need to be identified and addressed. Recent scholarship has emphasized the diversity of forces that engender human mobility and attended to the lived experiences of migrants, but scholars have continued to see large scale migration as a relatively recent phenomenon. Where we have referenced deeper histories, it has all too often come in the form of appeals to the universality of human mobility (e.g., “Everyone is a migrant;” “All Americans are immigrants.”) that elide histories of settler colonialism and enslavement and devote too little attention to how specific regimes of migration and settlement have been produced. Anthropological archaeologists are well positioned to reorient scholarship on the history of migration and settlement due to our subfield’s temporal and geographic reach.

    This workshop brings together a group of scholars who are doing this work, for a conversation that will consider the constitutive relationships between settlement and migration, trace the development of hegemonic regimes of mobility, and draw on the past to envision alternative futures.

    Schedule:

    9:30AM - 10:45AM — Settlement and Subjectivity in Assyria and South Asia

    10:45AM - 12:00PM — Settlement and Racial Dialectics in the Colonial Americas

    1:30PM - 2:45PM — Black Migration and Mobility in the Atlantic and the United States

    2:45PM - 4:00PM — Mobility and Resilience in Native North America

    4:00PM - 5:00PM — Commentary and Discussion 

    Speakers: 

    Anna Agbe-Davies (UNC Chapel Hill)
    Yannis Hamilakis (Brown)
    Michelle Lelievre (William and Mary)
    Yoli Ngandali (University of Washington)
    Matthew Reilly (City College)
    Melissa Rosenzweig (Northwestern)
    Mudit Trivedi (Stanford)
    Parker VanValkenburgh (Brown)
    Terence Weik (University of South Carolina)

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  • Daniel Everton, a Master’s student in Brown University’s Public Humanities program and the winner of the Archaeological Institute of America’s 2022 Elizabeth Bartman Museum Internship, will discuss his research in an informal talk entitled, “Re-imagining the Predynastic Man Exhibit at Museo Egizio”.

    Everton’s work focuses on repatriation, decolonization, and collections management. He has worked with art museums, library archives, and the National Park Service in the Greater Southcoast Area of Massachusetts. His interests include, but are not limited to, the history of craft and trade in textiles, gender and sexuality, and effects of colonization. His internship with the Museo Egizio in Turin, Italy provides foundational research for his thesis about the care and ethics of managing Ancient Egyptian collections and their exhibition, as well as offering opportunities to learn digital humanities applications in the museum world.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit our blog: https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2022/10/03/brownbags-fall22

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Registration required

    In 2018, the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology at Brown University received the Engaging the Americas grant from the Mellon Foundation “to support improving physical and intellectual stewardship” of the Museum’s “Native American and Indigenous collections and further their integration in the Brown curriculum.” Much of this ongoing work has focused on re-inventorying, cataloging, photographing, and rehousing the extensive lithic assemblages in our archaeological collection. In this presentation, Dr. Jessica Nelson, Curatorial Assistant on the Engaging the Americas grant, will share highlights of the project with an emphasis on the New England assemblages in our collection.

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  • Amanda Gaggioli, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Brown University’s Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, will discuss her research in an informal talk entitled, “Decolonialism, and Mediterranean Archaeology: The Case for the Aegean Prehistory/History Divide”.

    Gaggioli recently completed her Ph.D. in Classics and Archaeology from Stanford University with a dissertation titled “Earthquakes and the Structuring of Greco-Roman Society: The Longue Durée of Human-geological Environment Relationships at Helike, Greece.” Her research includes interdisciplinary approaches that combine ancient textual, archaeological, and natural scientific approaches to past human-geological environmental relationships, in particular earthquakes and associated seismic phenomena, in the eastern Mediterranean. She has conducted fieldwork in Cyprus, Turkey, and Greece, spanning the third millennium BCE to fifth century CE, that aims at understanding how people impacted and responded to environmental conditions and change.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit our blog:
    https://blogs.brown.edu/archa…/2022/10/03/brownbags-fall22

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  • See ancient coins from Greece and Rome up close! Touch human and animal bones! Examine and draw Persian and Roman ceramics, prehistoric tools, precious metals, and other artifacts from thousands of years ago – coached by experts! And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

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  • Come be part of an active archaeological excavation! Students will be digging on the grounds of Moses Brown School (next to Brown’s athletic center), uncovering the foundations of a 19th century home and processing artifacts from that household. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what artifacts students are discovering or even try your hand at digging.

    Moses Brown School (Excavation at the corner of Hope St and Lloyd Ave)

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  • Joukowsky Institute faculty member Professor Felipe Rojas – accompanied by recent alums and current students – will provide tips and advice on projects, funding, and what to think about when choosing a project. Open to all interested students - you don’t have to be an archaeology concentrator, or even have taken an archaeology class!

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  • Christina Hodge, Associate Director of Brown University’s Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, will discuss her research in an informal talk.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit our blog:
    https://blogs.brown.edu/archa…/2022/10/03/brownbags-fall22

    More Information Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Social Sciences
  • This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Dietrich Neumann, Director of the JNBC, will speak about the past and future of Public Humanities and the transformative power of public art.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

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