• Dec
    9
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Book Launch: The King’s Harvest by Brian Lander

    Peter Green House, Rm Pavilion Room

    Professor Brian Lander (Assistant Professor of History and Environment and Society, Brown University) will be launching his book The King’s Harvest on December 9, 2021 at 4:00pm in the Pavilion Room at Peter Green House. The conversation will feature Professors Tamara Chin, Bathsheba Demuth and Graham Oliver, and light refreshments will be served from 5:00 to 5:30.

    This event is free and open to the public. No pre-registration is required.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Physical & Earth Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This talk is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.

    This presentation will discuss archaeological explorations of Indigenous-European interactions in the colonial Caribbean. Contemporary research, such as that at the site of LaSoye on the island of Dominica, interrogates the political, economic, and socioecological consequences of European settler colonialism on Indigenous communities and landscapes. This scholarship focuses on local materialities that reflect entanglement within the larger colonial structures, exploring themes of Indigenous resilience and agency in the face of encroaching European conquest.

    Diane Wallman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. Her research interests include historical archaeology, zooarchaeology, environmental archaeology, European colonialism, and Atlantic slavery.

    This webinar is part of the series New Directions in Caribbean Archaeology.

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Tyler Franconi, a Visiting Assistant Professor of Archaeology and the Ancient World, will discuss his research in an informal talk, The English Landscapes and Identities Project and the Changing Face of the English Landscape From 1500 BC to AD 1086.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

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  • Nov
    16
    Virtual
    12:05pm - 1:00pm

    Curatorial Accountability

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    Passcode: publichum

    How can curators use the content of the world around them to create a better one? Moving on from the assumed hierarchical reliance of curators on artists and artworks, Rob Blackson will explore the expanding limits of curatorial work when applied to social, cultural, and economic need. Through examples of past and current curatorial work, Blackson will discuss how such efforts foreground reciprocity and accountability to the needs of multiple publics.

    Robert Blackson is the co-director of curatorial programs and curator of citywide initiatives of Philadelphia Contemporary. From 2011 - 2021 he was the founding director of Temple Contemporary at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art and Architecture, USA. Prior to moving to Philadelphia from the UK in 2011, Blackson was curator of public programs at Nottingham Contemporary and curator of BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Newcastle/Gateshead. Temple Contemporary’s signature initiatives include Funeral for a Home (2013-2014), reForm with Pepón Osorio and the Fairhill community (2014-2015), Symphony for a Broken Orchestra (2016-2019), and 100 People Listening: A Shared Decade, 2021 - 2031. Rob’s curatorial purpose focusses on the ways in which programming of, by, and for a community leads to targeted impact. Over the past nine years, his work has illustrated a curatorial shift in the way programs can be crafted to build a healthy mutuality of institutional momentum and social purpose.

    Moderator: Susana Turbay

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Alex Marko and Miriam Rothenberg, Visiting Assistant Professors of Archaeology and the Ancient World, and Anna Soifer, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World will discuss findings from the course ARCH 1900: The Archaeology of College Hill in an informal talk.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This panel is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.

    This webinar is intended for anyone who has ever considered, or might consider, graduate school. It is free and open to all members of the public. We hope this can be an opportunity for curious individuals or all ages, all levels of experience (or inexperience), and all academic backgrounds to find out more about graduate school in archaeology.

    This is a step-by-step walk-through of the graduate application process by the faculty members who review applications for Brown University’s doctoral program in Archaeology and the Ancient World. These professors will tell you exactly what they look for in applications, how to write a personal statement, who to ask for letters of recommendation, what courses to take to prepare yourself for graduate school, and what jobs a graduate education in archaeology prepares you for. It’s a rare insider’s view of the process, and the best advice you can get about applying to grad school.

    For more on applying to our doctoral program, please see our FAQ’s at brown.edu/go/archFAQs.

    Registration for the webinar is free.

    Register in advance More Information Advising, Mentorship, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This panel is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.

    This webinar is intended for anyone who has ever considered, or might consider, graduate school. It is free and open to all members of the public. We hope this can be an opportunity for curious individuals or all ages, all levels of experience (or inexperience), and all academic backgrounds to find out more about graduate school in archaeology.

    This is an overview of the graduate application process by the faculty members who review applications for Brown University’s doctoral program in Archaeology and the Ancient World. These professors will tell you exactly what they look for in applications, how to write a personal statement, who to ask for letters of recommendation, what courses to take to prepare yourself for graduate school, and what jobs a graduate education in archaeology prepares you for. It’s a rare insider’s view of the process, and the best advice you can get about applying to grad school.

    For more on applying to our doctoral program, please see our FAQ’s at brown.edu/go/archFAQs.

    Registration for the webinar is free.

     

    Register in advance More Information Advising, Mentorship, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Advance registration is required, but this talk is free and open to the public.

    The overwhelming majority of scholarly specialists studying the pre-Columbian Caribbean are archaeologists. This has generated a century’s-worth of archaeological data, which the very few art historians working in this area can explore in their search for meaning, and the interiority of ancient Antillean lives.

    Lawrence Waldron, an assistant professor of art history at Queens College of the City University of New York. He received an M.F.A. in Illustration from School of Visual Arts in 1998 before going on to earn a Ph.D. in Art History from the CUNY Graduate School and University Center in 2010. His doctoral studies covered a range of pre-Columbian topics, with secondary concentrations in Non-Western and Latin American art. His dissertation focused on zoomorphic iconography in ancient Caribbean ceramics. Waldron has taught studio art and art history at the university level since the late 1990s. He has presented and published papers on the art and architecture of the pre-Columbian Americas, the Caribbean, Hindu and Buddhist Asia, and Islamic Africa. He is the author of Handbook of Ceramic Animal Symbols in the Ancient Lesser Antilles (2016) and Pre-Columbian Art of the Caribbean (2019).

    This webinar is part of the series New Directions in Caribbean Archaeology.

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  • Gnecco follows the so-called Inca trails through several countries examining why and when various sites were declared “World Heritage” and by whom, as well as the consequences of those declarations. Analyzing narratives, audiences, and stagings, he considers how local communities relate to the trails as heritage. He discusses how national and post-national conceptions of heritage can only be imposed by means of violence —symbolic and otherwise—. Adopting a postarchaeological approach, Gnecco attends to relationships between beings as opposed to things; to the effects of heritage declarations on people as well as to how those people relate to heritage sites and the discourses surrounding them; finally, he considers sites, museums, books, videos, and brochures as places of interaction where the materiality of the social and the political unfolds.

    Cristobal Gnecco is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Universidad del Cauca in Colombia. His research interests include the political economy of archaeology, discourses on the other, geopolitics of knowledge, and ethnographies of heritage.

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  • Oct
    26
    4:00pm

    Fieldwork Information Session

    Rhode Island Hall, Rm 108

    Joukowsky Institute faculty members Professor Candace Rice and Professor Felipe Rojas will provide tips and advice on projects, funding, and what to think about when choosing a project. Open to all interested students - you don’t have to be an archaeology concentrator, or even have taken an archaeology class!

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Yannis Hamilakis, a Joukowsky Family Professor of Archaeology and Professor of Modern Greek Studies at Brown University, and Raphael Greenberg, a Professor of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University, will discuss their forthcoming book, Archaeology, Nation, and Race: Confronting the Past, Decolonizing the Future in Greece and Israel in an informal talk.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences
  • In recognition of Indigenous People’s Day and International Archaeology Day, join Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology Director, Dr. Robert Preucel as he welcomes the Chongo Brothers: Diego and Mateo Romero (Cochiti Pueblo).

    This virtual program will include a screening and lively conversation of the Chongo Brothers production: The Search for the Anasazi. This film is a satirical take on archaeologist’s fascination with Pueblo culture and a Native commentary on archaeologist-Native relations. Diego and Mateo Romero are both acclaimed contemporary artists working in pottery and painting, respectively.

    More Information Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Cicek Beeby, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will discuss her research in an informal talk, Women’s Agency in the Iconography of Burial in Ancient Greece.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: BrownBag
    Please note that due to room capacity limitations, in-person seating is now full. Please tune in to this event via Zoom!

    Peter van Dommelen, Director of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, will discuss his research in an informal talk, Monuments of Change: Indigenous Resilience and Colonial Connections in Iron Age Sardinia.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2021/09/16/brown-bag-talks-for-fall-2021/

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  • Sep
    6

    https://events.brown.edu/event/122851-opening-convocation-at-400-pmedt

    More Information 
  • Alex Marko, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation, “The Archaeology of Roman Hourly Timekeeping”, in a public lecture via Zoom. All are welcome.

    Watch a recording of this event - Marko: The Archaeology of Roman Hourly Timekeeping

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  • Join JIAAW faculty, graduate students, and concentrators as we celebrate the achievements of our graduating students!

    Doctoral Degree
    Miriam Rothenberg

    Bachelor of Arts Degree
    Amanda Brynn (Summer 2021)
    Alex Dorosin
    Brandon Stubbs
    Sam Wertheimer (Fall 2021)
    Parker Zane

    Find out more about our graduating students in the 2021 JIAAW Graduation Program

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please register to attend.

    Keith Wilson, curator of ancient Chinese art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art, and Jeffrey Moser, assistant professor of East Asian art at Brown University, will discuss cast bronze musical instruments from early China. They will explore some of the challenges that Wilson faced in developing the exhibition Resound: Ancient Bells of China (Oct. 14, 2017–July 5, 2021), and discuss the strategies that he and his team adopted to give life to the fragile sounds and furtive musicality of these instruments. This event is free and open to the public. Please register to attend. Participants are encouraged to visit the online exhibit prior to the conversation.

    More Information Arts, Performance, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Faith, Spirituality, Worship, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Philosophy, Religious Studies
  • Apr
    12

    Sherds!
    Pottery has proven to be a critical archaeological resource due to its widespread use and accessibility throughout time. Sometimes archaeologists find whole pots during their excavations, but more often than not they encounter broken pieces called sherds. This exhibit looks at archaeologists’ experiences with sherds and what these seemingly insignificant pieces of pottery can tell us about the past.

    Curated by Jinette Jimenez ’21 for the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.

    Visit the exhibit at https://bit.ly/31U93Jh

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    Sandra Blakely, Chair and Associate Professor of Classics at Emory University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk, GIS, Games and Gephi: Modeling Maritime Mobility as a Complex Adaptive System in the Hellenistic Mediterranean.

    Social networks enabled through the mystery cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace offered a practical route to realizing the promise of the island’s mystery cult: safety in travel at sea. That safety emerged from the combination of social contracts, sacred authority, individual self-interest and local tradition. A complex adaptive systems model offers a framework for gauging the resilience of these interlocking factors over the centuries of the cult’s floruit. Our reconstruction of the island’s social networks and geospatial reach relies on the epigraphic record of the island and its rites. The limitations of that record mean that our reconstructions are necessarily tentative, and that the agency of individual participants remains opaque. We have, in response, developed an online, interactive 3-D serious game, Sailing with the Gods, as a route to generating data from real-time players in a simulated Hellenistic sea. These data hold the potential to nuance our understanding not only of the Samothracian network, but of the broader intersection between ritual practices and the the social contracts that facilitated mobility in the ancient Mediterranean.

    https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/samothraciannetworks/the-game/

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2020/12/09/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2021/

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Follow the link above to access the registration form.  Once you complete the registration form, you will receive the Zoom link.

    Please join the Department of French Studies for a talk by Daisy Delogu, University of Chicago, entitled “Sheep of Human Descent”: Sovereignty and Population in Late Medieval France. This event will take place on Tuesday, March 30th at 5:30 pm (EST).

    This paper will read Jean de Brie’s treatise on ovine husbandry as a mirror for princes, one that effects a powerful transposition of the figure of the good shepherd of John 10 from the theological to the secular realm by insisting that the king has a duty of care towards his “oeilles de l’umain lignaige”, for whom he is accountable to God. I will place this work in dialogue with the Préceptes cisterciens d’économie rurale and the poetry of Eustache Deschamps to suggest that the analogy of people to sheep, one which troubles the human-animal distinction upon which theories of subjectivity are founded, defines subjects as a kind of population, one to be managed with an eye towards optimizing resource extraction.

    Daisy Delogu is a Professor of French literature in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago. A specialist of late medieval French literature, much of Delogu’s work considers gender, questions of authorship, kingship, and allegory, and medieval French political thought. In addition to numerous other scholarly contributions to scholarship and to the field, Delogu has published influential works such as Allegorical Bodies: Power and Gender in Late Medieval France (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015), Theorizing the Ideal Sovereign: The Rise of the French Vernacular Royal Biography (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2008), and Alain Chartier c.1385-1430: Father of French Eloquence. (Daisy Delogu, Joan E. McRae, Emma Cayley, Eds. Leiden: Brill, 2015).

    This event is open to the public, but registration is required. Follow the link above to access the registration form. You can find additional information on the French Studies website. We hope to see you there!

     

    Event Poster

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    Amélie Allard, an Assistant Professor in Archaeology at Rhode Island College, will be discussing her research in an informal talk, Communities on the Move: Fur Traders and the Making of Place

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2020/12/09/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2021/

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    Kathleen Forste, a PhD candidate in Archaeology at Boston University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk, Cultivating the Hills and the Sands: An Archaeobotanical Investigation of Early Islamic Agriculture in the Southern Levant

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2020/12/09/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2021/

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    Amy Russell, an Assistant Professor of Classics at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk, Political Performance and Political Spectatorship in the Forum Romanum.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2020/12/09/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2021/

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    Elizabeth Clay, a doctoral student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania and Virginia and a Jean R. Perrette Fellow at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, will be discussing her research in an informal talk, A Marginal Colony?: Recovering the Nineteenth-Century Clove Industry in French Guiana.

    For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/2020/12/09/brown-bag-talks-for-spring-2021/

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities