Faculty Trainers

  • Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    The Abdelfattah lab invents molecular tools to study how the brain works. Our research combines fluorescence imaging, protein engineering, electrophysiology, and advanced genetic approaches to visualize the structure and function of the nervous system.

  • Carlos Aizenman

    Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    Our lab studies the development of neural circuits and the role the external environment plays in shaping these circuits. We use a combination of electrophysiology, molecular biology, behavior and imaging to address these questions.

  • Professor of Surgery (Trauma) (Research)

    Research

    Dr. Ayala's research interests include the assessment of the differential/pre-dispositional effectors of immune cell function that alter the host response to sepsis (both in the mature adult and/or neonate); the role of programmed cell death/apoptosis and/or the impact of select checkpoint proteins have on immune dysfunction observed following hemorrhage and/or sepsis; as well as selective examination of these processes/factors contributions to the development of acute lung injury resultant from shock and/or septic insults.

  • Gilad Barnea

    Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology, Visual Science, and Neuroscience, Professor of Neuroscience, NIH Graduate Partnership Program Director

    Research

    Our laboratory studies how the mammalian brain processes olfactory information and translates it into behavioral outputs.

  • Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Associate Director of the MD-PhD Program

    Research

    The Bartnikas lab explores the fundamental molecular, biochemical, genetic, and physiologic basis of metal homeostasis in the human body. Using multiple in vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, our laboratory investigates the mechanisms by which metals are acquired by the body, distributed to various tissues, and recycled or eliminated and how perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to human disease.

  • Associate Professor of Chemistry

    Research

    Our group is interested in questions that lie at the interface of chemistry, biology, and materials science. Research in the group includes glycochemistry and glycobiology; synthesis and application of novel polymers and nanomaterials; development of new sensors and diagnostic agents. Current foci include the glcyochemistry of the plant cell wall and the development of small molecules that interfere with bacterial cell wall dynamics and can serve as leads for new antibiotics.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

    Research

    We study the responses of microbial communities and isolated microbes to external stressors such as antimicrobial agents. This work is particularly pressing because unlike at any other time in human history, we are currently exposed to a wide array of natural and artificial antimicrobial agents in the form of antibiotics, chemical disinfectants, and chemotherapeutic agents among others. Our goals are to improve the efficiency of current antibiotics while protecting the beneficial bacteria that are part of our microbiome.

  • Gaurav Choudhary

    Associate Professor of Medicine

    Research

    The focus of our research is to evaluate the mechanisms underlying vascular, cardiac, and skeletal muscle dysfunction seen in pulmonary vascular diseases. The laboratory uses a variety of in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches utilizing the preclinical models of pulmonary hypertension and emphysema.

  • Karen Columbe

    Associate Professor of Engineering

    Research

    Our research mission is to re-engineer contractility in the heart using hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and working to develop mature engineered cardiac tissue that can integrate with the host heart through neovascularization and electromechanical coupling.

  • Associate Professor of Medical Science, Associate Professor of Engineering, Associate Professor of Orthopaedics

    Research

    The Darling Lab conducts research across diverse fields of cell mechanics, mesenchymal stem cell biology, and musculoskeletal tissue regeneration. Recent projects include identification and enrichment of stem cells by mechanophenotype using biochemical proxies or label-free microfluidic devices, measurement of microenvironmental forces in cell-dense tissues, and development of cell-mimicking materials for drug delivery. 

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    My research combines expertise in cell biophysics and cancer biology for quantitative analysis of the molecular and mechanical profiles of cells in tumor and tissue microenvironments. Research goals include: (1) developing novel therapies for metastatic cancer, (2) improving stem cell homing to tissues, and (3) using mechanics to guide in the development of tissue substitutes.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

    Research

    My research program is focused on understanding how the trypanosomatid parasites undergo morphogenesis, the process they employ to shape their cells and transmit shape during cell division. This is an important question for two reasons: 1. Trypanosomatids have evolved unique approaches for fundamental cellular processes such as morphogenesis; identifying the molecular mechanisms will provide a better understanding of evolutionary niches, such as parasitism, that arise through diversification of cellular pathways in manners that would be extremely difficult to predict; 2. These pathways represent unique and essential aspects of trypanosomatid biology that could be exploited to develop treatments for a range of neglected tropical diseases that cause significant human suffering in developing countries.
     

  • Suzanne De La Monte

    Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Professor of Neurosurgery

    Research

    We study the roles of brain insulin deficiency and insulin resistance in neurodegeneration. Three diseases of major interest to us are: Alzheimer's, alcoholic neurodegeneration, and fetal alcohol syndrome.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    Research in the Deaconescu lab is centered on bacterial mechanisms involved in responses to stress signals, particularly DNA damage. We utilize a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods coupled with structural analyses by X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy. Our work is relevant to pathogen-host interactions and the development of antibiotic resistance.

  • Professor of Chemistry

    Chemical biology, biophysics and their applications

    Research

    Research in the Delaney Laboratory probes the chemistry and biology of DNA damage repair. We are particularly interested in understanding how packaging of DNA into chromatin influences repair and use biochemical, biophysical, and cell based techniques to elucidate the mechanisms by which cells modulate the critical process of repair.  

  • Sylvia Kay Hassenfeld Professor of Pediatrics, Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Chair of Pediatrics

    Research

    The Dennery lab is investigating the metabolic determinants leading to neonatal lung injury. Premature infants often require ventilatory support for their survival postnatally.  This leads to chronic lung injury characterized by alveolar and vascular simplification and abnormal lung function into adulthood. The laboratory is investigating the role of impaired glycolysis and senescence in the lung cells as well as exploring therapeutic interventions to mitigate lung injury.

  • Associate Professor of Medicine (Research)

    Research

    The goal of our research is to identify new targets for therapies aimed at eradicating drug resistant leukemic stem cells responsible for relapse.

  • Mencoff Family University Professor of Medical Science, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    Research

    Our long-standing interest in the El-Deiry Lab has been on unraveling the cell death pathways induced by the p53 tumor suppressor and the TRAIL innate immune system, mechanisms of drug resistance including under hypoxia, and on developing novel therapeutics for cancer. Our group uses a range of techniques from cell biology, molecular biology, omics, co-culture and in vivo models, transgenic and patient-derived organoids, and clinical samples in our basic and translational research. We collaborate with other labs at Brown, Lifespan and industry and are using innovative research technologies, and clinical datasets to study the impact of therapeutics on the tumor microenvironment and drug resistance in various cancer types. 

  • Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to see disordered protein structure, motions, and interactions with atomic resolution. We seek to understand how low complexity domains mediate phase separation contributing to membraneless organelle formation as well as some cancers, how disease mutations cause ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, and how post-translational modifications alter interactions and may serve as a switch to prevent disease.

  • Associate Dean for Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in the Division of Biology and Medicine, Professor of Medicine

    Research

    My research focuses on characterizing intracellular signaling mechanisms which regulate endothelial cell functions and/or responses to environmental cues. Vascular injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of disorders such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Identification of molecules key in regulating endothelial cell functions may lead to therapeutic strategies for controlling vascular tissue damage and enhancing repair.

  • Associate Professor of Neuroscience, Chair of Brown University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, Associate Professor of Engineering

  • Associate Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Pathobiology Graduate Program Co-Director

    Research

    The overarching goal of the Jamieson lab is to discover mechanisms of host disease tolerance. This is the concept that in order to survive an infection the host must not only control the infection, but mitigate the impact and potential damage to essential organs. We use models of cutaneous injury and respiratory infections to discover host directed therapeutics for complex and deadly diseases. 

  • Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    In the Jaworski lab, we primarily study molecular mechanisms of neural circuit assembly during embryonic development. This research can advance our understanding of neurodevelopmental disease etiology and inform therapeutic approaches for the repair of damaged neuronal connections after physical injury or onset of neurodegenerative disease. More recently, we have also begun to study how neuronal connectivity is eroded in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic targets for this devastating disease.

  • Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    The Kaun Lab is interested in understanding the genetic, molecular and neural mechanisms underlying reward. We investigate how memories for appetitive stimuli are encoded in the brain and how drugs of abuse affect the molecular pathways in these circuits to result in aberrant motivational response. We combine genetics, behavior, in vivoimaging in behaving animals, molecular biology and biochemistry to address this. Find out more at kaunlab.com.

  • Stanley M. Aronson Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Chair of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    Research

    Dr. Kurtis’ lab focussed on discovering and developing novel therapeutic interventions for malaria and schistosomiasis- two of the leading killers of children on the planet. We currently are working on malaria and schistosomiasis vaccines, malaria therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and anti-malarial small molecule drugs.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    The Lisi laboratory studies the chemistry and biology of enzymes in order to understand how these complex biomolecules function in disease. The lab uses biophysical and biochemical tools to generate molecular level fingerprints of enzyme structures and characterize picosecond-to-second dynamics that propagate mechanistically important biological signals.

  • Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biotechnology

  • Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Professor of Engineering

    Research

    Dr. Mathiowitz directs an interdisciplinary laboratory that focuses on developing smart delivery systems based on bioadhesive polymers, which enhance the non- specific interaction with intestinal mucosa and allow oral delivery of proteins. In addition the lab work on developing long-acting delivery of  antiviral drugs and magnetic pills for home therapy.

  • Jeffrey Morgan

    Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Professor of Engineering

    Research

    The Morgan lab invented a new method to grow living cells in three dimensions (3D) and is using this technology to answer fundamental questions in high throughput phenotypic drug discovery, toxicity testing, drug transport and 3D tissue engineering. These areas are relevant to important medical needs including multi-drug resistance in cancer and the quest to find new and less toxic drugs while reducing the use of animals in research.

  • Alan Morrison

    Assistant Professor of Medicine

    Research

    My laboratory focuses on mechanisms of immune-mediate vascular remodeling by studying the macrophage-directed the biologic processes of arteriogenesis, atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic calcification, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The overarching goal of the research in my lab is to define macrophage-dependent signaling mechanisms that modulate these processes in order to identify novel targets for the development of new inhibitory strategies that might one day be used in the clinic.  My laboratory has a number of active studies defining novel macrophage-dependent signaling mechanisms that modulate these processes, using a diverse array of techniques in molecular biology, immunobiology, small animal genetics, and vascular biology.

  • Eric Morrow

    Mencoff Family Professor of Biology, Professor of Neuroscience, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

    Research

    The Morrow lab investigates the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying disorders of cognitive development, such as intellectual disability and autism. The long-term aim of this research is to establish a basic foundation for improved genetic diagnosis and treatment interventions designed to enhance cognitive and functional gains for patients. Because these disorders are highly genetic and in order to identify core molecular mechanisms, genome-wide "forward genetic" strategies to identify genetic mutations have been a principal focus. In complement to this, molecular and neurodevelopmental studies of identified pathways are underway in experimental systems in human and mouse tissues.

  • Charles C.J. Carpenter, MD Professor of Infectious Diseases, Professor of Medicine, Assistant Dean of Medicine, Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

    Research

    The Mylonakis lab developed new models to identify novel antimicrobials and study basic, evolutionarily conserved aspects of microbial virulence and host response. Also, established the cost-effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship and new diagnositics. His work identified new classes of antimicrobial compounds, new targets for antimicrobial therapy and a deeper understanding of host–pathogen interaction.   This diverse background includes areas such as molecular biology, immunology, biostatistics, decision-making analysis, risk assessment, outcomes research and cost-effectiveness studies. These investigations have identified novel virulence factors, cross kingdom pathogen-pathogen interactions, novel antimicrobial agents and evolutionarily conserved traits that are involved in host virulence and immune responses during infection.

  • Provost's Associate Professor, Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    The O’Connor-Giles lab is interested in communication in the nervous system. We focus on three areas (1) understanding synapse structure-function relationships; (2) identifying and characterizing new, conserved synaptic genes; and (3) defining chromatin regulatory mechanisms governing the coordinated regulation of synaptic gene expression. In parallel, we develop CRISPR gene editing approaches to further in vivo study of the nervous system.

  • Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    The focus of my laboratory is in understanding signal transduction events using fluorescent microscopy in living cells. My lab is equipped with a state-of-the-art two-color TIRF microscope, which we will use to study UV-induced pigmentation in human skin and melanoma behavior. To visualize signal transduction events, we design and generate novel fluorescent probes using molecular biology techniques, which give us a unique angle in answering biologically relevant questions.

  • Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry, Professor of Chemistry

    Research

    My interests include: elucidation of signaling networks relevant to human disease and exploring perturbations in phosphorylation patterns induced by pharmacological agents. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis by mass spectrometry is a technique that allows efficient profiling of tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites over time from cells and tissues. Our laboratory employs this platform to map complex signaling networks in T cells to more holistically understand the structure of the T cell signaling pathway.

  • Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Research), Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (Research), Pathobiology Graduate Program Co-Director

    Research

    My laboratory focuses on understanding the growth and proliferation of liver progenitor cells. These cells are capable of restoring liver function upon transplantation to an injured liver. By studying these cells, we hope to gain insight into the mechanisms that promote or inhibit liver stem cell engraftment and expansion. This knowledge could lead to new methods to improve the clinical success of liver cell transplantation and provide insight into the development of liver cancer.

  • Associate Professor of Engineering

    Research

    The Shukla Lab develops nano- to macroscale biomaterials for applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. They have a major focus on developing new treatments for bacterial and fungal infections using targeted and responsive materials.

  • Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    Research

    The Spade lab studies mechanisms of male reproductive toxicity. We are interested how phthalates, which are widespread environmental chemicals used in the manufacture of plastics, medical devices, and in the formulation of some drugs, impair the development of the testis, causing short- and long-term adverse effects on male reproductive health. We are also interested in how sperm RNAs reflect exposure to environmental chemicals and pharmaceuticals that cause reproductive toxicity, and whether this translates to impaired fertility.

  • Nikos Tapinos

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery (Research)

    Research

    In the Cancer Epigenetics and Plasticity Lab we employ multidisciplinary approaches and outside-the-box thinking to discover mechanisms that regulate plasticity, motility, genome organization and RNA epigenetics of human glioma stem cells. We are currently generating first-in-class therapeutics targeting non-coding RNAs and the RNA epitranscriptome of solid tumors.

  • Manning Assistant Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

    Research

    Disruption of interactions between host immune system and resident microbiota can have profound consequences for host health. Vaishnava Lab's research focuses on understanding the complex and dynamic nature of host-microbe interaction at the intestinal mucosal surface. We use unique in-vivo tools such as germ-free mouse models in combination with a broad array of genetic, cell biological, and biochemical approaches to explore the interactions between intestinal bacteria and our immune system.

  • GLF Translational Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    The Valdez laboratory examines the function of candidate molecular pathways in preventing and repairing damages that accrue at synapses during aging and progression of diseases. To this end, we study the impact of modulating signaling pathways in cultured cells and rodents using cutting-edge techniques and tools.

  • Professor of Chemistry

    Chemical biology, biophysics and their applications

    Research

    We are interested in developing chemical tools for the regulation of signaling molecules (such as nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfane sulfurs, etc.) in redox biology. These tools include donors, prodrugs, scavengers, and imaging sensors. They are potential diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents.

  • Anatoly Zhitkovich

    Professor of Medical Science

    Research

    Our research is focused on the determination of mechanisms of formation and repair of DNA damage and its role in mutagenic and cell death outcomes in response to carcinogens and anticancer drugs. We are also interested in understanding the impact of nongenotoxic stress signaling in cells (hypoxia and heat shock responses, for example) on the ability of cells to cope with DNA damage.