Faculty Trainers

  • Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

  • Carlos Aizenman

    Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    Our lab studies the development of neural circuits and the role the external environment plays in shaping these circuits. We use a combination of electrophysiology, molecular biology, behavior and imaging to address these questions.

  • Professor of Surgery (Trauma) (Research)

    Research

    My research centers on understanding the pathophysiological effects of shock/tissue injury/sepsis that lead to immune dysfunction and subsequent multiple organ failure in the critically ill trauma patient (through animal modeling and collaborative clinical studies). 

  • Gilad Barnea

    Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology, Visual Science, and Neuroscience, Professor of Neuroscience, NIH Graduate Partnership Program Director

    Research

    Our laboratory studies how the mammalian brain processes olfactory information and translates it into behavioral outputs.

  • Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Associate Director of the MD-PhD Program

    Research

    The Bartnikas lab explores the fundamental molecular, biochemical, genetic, and physiologic basis of metal homeostasis in the human body. Using multiple in vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, our laboratory investigates the mechanisms by which metals are acquired by the body, distributed to various tissues, and recycled or eliminated and how perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to human disease.

  • Associate Professor of Chemistry

    Research

    Our group is interested in questions that lie at the interface of chemistry, biology, and materials science. Research in the group includes glycochemistry and glycobiology; synthesis and application of novel polymers and nanomaterials; development of new sensors and diagnostic agents. Current foci include the glcyochemistry of the plant cell wall and the development of small molecules that interfere with bacterial cell wall dynamics and can serve as leads for new antibiotics.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

  • Wayne Bowen

    Upjohn Professor of Pharmacology, Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    We study sigma receptors, proteins that bind compounds with wide chemical diversity, including several classes of psychoactive drugs.  Sigma-1 receptors promote cell proliferation and survival, while sigma-2 receptors induce apoptotic cell death.  We are targeting sigma receptors for development of novel anti-cancer and neuroprotective agents.  We are elucidating signal transduction mechanisms mediating these cell viability changes and working with medicinal chemists to design and characterize selective sigma receptor ligands.

  • Gaurav Choudhary

    Associate Professor of Medicine

    Research

    The focus of our research is to evaluate the mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunction and cardiac dysfunction seen in pulmonary vascular diseases. The laboratory uses a variety of in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches utilizing the preclinical models of pulmonary hypertension and emphysema.

  • Karen Columbe

    Associate Professor of Engineering

    Research

    Our research mission is to re-engineer contractility in the heart using hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and working to develop mature engineered cardiac tissue that can integrate with the host heart through neovascularization and electromechanical coupling.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    My research combines expertise in cell biophysics and cancer biology for quantitative analysis of the molecular and mechanical profiles of cells in tumor and tissue microenvironments. Research goals include: (1) developing novel therapies for metastatic cancer, (2) improving stem cell homing to tissues, and (3) using mechanics to guide in the development of tissue substitutes.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

  • Suzanne De La Monte

    Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Professor of Neurosurgery

    Research

    We study the roles of brain insulin deficiency and insulin resistance in neurodegeneration. Three diseases of major interest to us are: Alzheimer's, alcoholic neurodegeneration, and fetal alcohol syndrome.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    Research in my laboratory focuses on the biochemical and biophysical underpinnings of the stress response and of DNA transactions essential for the maintenance of genomes and for controlling the flow of genetic information. Our approach combines biochemistry and biophysics with complementary structure determination methods (X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy) with the goal of elucidating the architecture, function, and regulation of protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. Our work has direct relevance for biofilm formation and the development of novel antibiotics as well as neurodevelopment, cancer and accelerated aging.

  • Professor of Chemistry

    Chemical biology, biophysics and their applications

    Research

    The research in my laboratory aims to understand the biological consequences of DNA damage. Using the tools of chemistry and biology we probe the effects of DNA modification at the molecular level.

  • Sylvia Kay Hassenfeld Professor of Pediatrics, Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Chair of Pediatrics

    Research

    Dr. Dennery’s laboratory research is focused understanding mechansisms of neonatal lung injury and repair.  She has defined the role of heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation in mediating cytoprotective responses in the lung and has also identified a role for HO in circadian regulation of injury and repair.  She is currently exploring how mitochondrial bioenergetics mediate responses to oxidative stress in the neonatal lung exposed to hyperoxia.  

  • Associate Professor of Medicine (Research)

    Research

    The goal of our research is to identify new targets for therapies aimed at eradicating drug resistant leukemic stem cells responsible for relapse.

  • Mencoff Family University Professor of Medical Science, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    Research

    We are focused on cell death pathways, tumor suppressor mechanisms, drug resistance within the tumor microenvironment, and translational drug development. Students are welcome to set up a time to discuss goals and research opportunities within the lab.

  • Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    My laboratory studies the structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of protein aggregates implicated in neurodegenerative disease. Using a combination of novel NMR spectroscopy approaches and atomistic simulation supplemented by biophysical and imaging methods, we determine high-resolution structures of these species and their toxic interactions with other macromolecules and membranes, as well as their interactions with potential therapeutic agents.

  • Associate Dean for Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in the Division of Biology and Medicine, Professor of Medicine

    Research

    My research focuses on characterizing intracellular signaling mechanisms which regulate endothelial cell functions and/or responses to environmental cues. Vascular injury has been implicated in the pathogenesis of disorders such as sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Identification of molecules key in regulating endothelial cell functions may lead to therapeutic strategies for controlling vascular tissue damage and enhancing repair.

  • Associate Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Pathobiology Graduate Program Co-Director

    Research

    I am interested in how the lung orchestrates the local, organismal, and systemic immune response, and we are studying this using an interdisciplinary approach. My laboratory has two main interrelated areas of focus: 1) Understanding host disease tolerance and the innate immune response to complex respiratory infections with viral pathogens and bacteria, and 2) Understanding how the immune system responds to two competing inflammatory insults or “immune triage”. 

  • Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    My laboratory studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of brain wiring during embryonic development. To this end we employ a variety of experimental approaches, including molecular biology, biochemistry, embryology, and mouse 
    genetics.

  • Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    My lab uses the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neural substrates of drug reward at the molecular and cellular level by mapping    areas in the fly brain that regulate alcohol reward, and uncovering genes and  pathways never-before implicated in memory of alcohol reward.

  • Stanley M. Aronson Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Chair of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    Research

    Dr. Kurtis’ lab focussed on discovering and developing novel therapeutic interventions for malaria and schistosomiasis- two of the leading killers of children on the planet. We currently are working on malaria and schistosomiasis vaccines, malaria therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and anti-malarial small molecule drugs.

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    The Lisi laboratory utilizes solution NMR methods along with techniques in biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology to interrogate changes in protein structure and conformational motions that underlie function. We are especially focused on enzyme complexes, aiming to understand how biological events such as protein-protein interaction or the binding of allosteric effectors and drug-like molecules modulate functionally relevant protein motions, intra- and intermolecular signaling, and/or catalytic reactivity.

  • Jeffrey Morgan

    Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Professor of Engineering

    Research

    The Morgan lab invented a new method to grow living cells in three dimensions (3D) and is using this technology to answer fundamental questions in high throughput phenotypic drug discovery, toxicity testing, drug transport and 3D tissue engineering. These areas are relevant to important medical needs including multi-drug resistance in cancer and the quest to find new and less toxic drugs while reducing the use of animals in research.

  • Alan Morrison

    Assistant Professor of Medicine

    Research

    My laboratory focuses on mechanisms of immune-mediate vascular remodeling by studying the macrophage-directed the biologic processes of arteriogenesis, atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic calcification, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The overarching goal of the research in my lab is to define macrophage-dependent signaling mechanisms that modulate these processes in order to identify novel targets for the development of new inhibitory strategies that might one day be used in the clinic.  My laboratory has a number of active studies defining novel macrophage-dependent signaling mechanisms that modulate these processes, using a diverse array of techniques in molecular biology, immunobiology, small animal genetics, and vascular biology.

  • Eric Morrow

    Mencoff Family Professor of Biology, Professor of Neuroscience, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

    Research

    The Morrow lab investigates the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying disorders of cognitive development, such as intellectual disability and autism. The long-term aim of this research is to establish a basic foundation for improved genetic diagnosis and treatment interventions designed to enhance cognitive and functional gains for patients. Because these disorders are highly genetic and in order to identify core molecular mechanisms, genome-wide "forward genetic" strategies to identify genetic mutations have been a principal focus. In complement to this, molecular and neurodevelopmental studies of identified pathways are underway in experimental systems in human and mouse tissues.

  • Charles C.J. Carpenter, MD Professor of Infectious Diseases, Professor of Medicine, Assistant Dean of Medicine, Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

    Research

    The Mylonakis lab developed new models to identify novel antimicrobials and study basic, evolutionarily conserved aspects of microbial virulence and host response. Also, established the cost-effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship and new diagnositics. His work identified new classes of antimicrobial compounds, new targets for antimicrobial therapy and a deeper understanding of host–pathogen interaction.   This diverse background includes areas such as molecular biology, immunology, biostatistics, decision-making analysis, risk assessment, outcomes research and cost-effectiveness studies. These investigations have identified novel virulence factors, cross kingdom pathogen-pathogen interactions, novel antimicrobial agents and evolutionarily conserved traits that are involved in host virulence and immune responses during infection.

  • Provost's Associate Professor, Associate Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    Our research focuses on understanding communication in neural circuits - the functionally connected neurons that give rise to thought and behavior. We are particularly interested in how neurons build appropriate synaptic connections and modulate their properties to incorporate new information. Altered synaptic development and plasticity are associated with a broad range of neurological disorders including developmental disorders such as autism; motor, cognitive and psychological impairments; and neurodegeneration. Thus, the identification and characterization of the molecules that regulate synapse formation and function is key to our understanding of normal neural function and our ability to treat a variety of neurological disorders.

  • Professor of Neuroscience

    Research

    The focus of my laboratory is in understanding signal transduction events using fluorescent microscopy in living cells. My lab is equipped with a state-of-the-art two-color TIRF microscope, which we will use to study UV-induced pigmentation in human skin and melanoma behavior. To visualize signal transduction events, we design and generate novel fluorescent probes using molecular biology techniques, which give us a unique angle in answering biologically relevant questions.

  • Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry, Professor of Chemistry

    Research

    My interests include: elucidation of signaling networks relevant to human disease and exploring perturbations in phosphorylation patterns induced by pharmacological agents. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis by mass spectrometry is a technique that allows efficient profiling of tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites over time from cells and tissues. Our laboratory employs this platform to map complex signaling networks in T cells to more holistically understand the structure of the T cell signaling pathway.

  • Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Research), Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (Research), Pathobiology Graduate Program Co-Director

    Research

    My laboratory focuses on understanding the growth and proliferation of liver progenitor cells. These cells are capable of restoring liver function upon transplantation to an injured liver. By studying these cells, we hope to gain insight into the mechanisms that promote or inhibit liver stem cell engraftment and expansion. This knowledge could lead to new methods to improve the clinical success of liver cell transplantation and provide insight into the development of liver cancer.

  • Associate Professor of Engineering

    Research

    Innovations in biomaterials research have critically improved treatment options for human injury and disease. My research focuses on identifying and developing biomaterials solutions for critical unmet clinical needs in the areas of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. In my lab, we apply concepts from polymer self-assembly, the study of molecular interactions, and cellular mechanobiology to create smart and informed biomaterials to address these biomedical challenges.

  • Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    Research

    My research is in the area of developmental reproductive toxicology. I employ approaches from pathology and molecular biology to investigate the fundamental mechanisms involved in testicular development and testicular toxicity of environmental chemicals and pharmaceutical compounds. Currently, I am studying the roles of retinoic acid in gonad development and the mechanisms by which phthalates alter fetal testis development.

  • Nikos Tapinos

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery (Research)

    Research

    In the Cancer Epigenetics and Plasticity Lab we employ multidisciplinary approaches and outside-the-box thinking to discover mechanisms that regulate plasticity, motility, genome organization and RNA epigenetics of human glioma stem cells. We are currently generating first-in-class therapeutics targeting non-coding RNAs and the RNA epitranscriptome of solid tumors.

  • Manning Assistant Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

  • GLF Translational Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Research

    Therapeutics for aging and neurodegeneration

  • Professor of Chemistry

    Chemical biology, biophysics and their applications

    Research

    Sulfur based redox signaling molecules such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), persulfides (RSSH), and polysulfides play regulatory roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our lab is interested in understanding their mechanism of actions. We are studying the chemistry and chemical biology of these sulfur species and developing novel chemical tools (donors, sensors, and scavengers) for these species. These chemicals may eventually become diagnostic or therapeutic agents.

  • Anatoly Zhitkovich

    Professor of Medical Science

    Research

    We study cellular stress responses that control activity of accurate and mutagenic DNA repair processes and cell fate decisions following DNA damage by carcinogenic chemicals and anticancer drugs.