Upcoming Events

  • Neurology/Emergency Medicine Grand Rounds:

    “Neuro-Ophthalmological Emergencies”

    Tatiana Bakaeva, MD, PHD Instructor of Surgery, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Neuro-Ophthalmologist, Rhode Island Hospital

     Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able

    to:

    • Review five clinical cases of neuro-ophthalmological emergencies
    • Recognize when to suspect and how to approach to the neuro-ophthalmological emergencies
    • Discuss pathophysiology and management of neuro-ophthalmological emergencies

     Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     Rhode Island Hospital designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     To request reasonable accommodation for a disability, please contact The Rhode Island Hospital CME office at (401) 444-4260.

    Neurology neurology
  • Title: “Asymmetric Stem Cell Division and Germline Immortality.”

     

    This event will require a password. If you are not part of the MCB Graduate Program and would like to participate, please contact the program coordinator for the password.

    Molecular Biology Cell Biology and Biochemistry (MCB) Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Oct
    28
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Athulya Aravind (Assistant Professor MIT)

    Title: Presupposition and accommodation in child language

    Abstract: Natural language affords us the means to communicate not only new information, but also information that we are already taking for granted, our presuppositions. The proper characterization of presupposition has been at the center of long-standing debate. On an influential view (Stalnaker 1970, 1974, Karttunen 1974), presuppositions reflect formal admittance conditions on utterances: an utterance of a sentence which presupposes p is admitted by a conversational context c only if p is already common ground in c. The theory distinguishes two modes of satisfying the formal requirement: (i) presuppositions may have common ground status prior to utterance, or (ii) they may achieve common ground status post-hoc, via accommodation, an adjustment of the common ground by cooperative listeners so as to meet the requirements of the uttered sentence. While intuitive and general, this two-pronged approach has been criticized on empirical and methodological grounds. There have been a number of alternative theories that reject the notion that presuppositions impose admittance conditions and take some form of accommodation as the basic way in which presuppositions relate to the context.

    This talk compares these two perspectives on presupposition in terms of their implications for language acquisition. In a series of behavioral experiments, we show that young children generate a default expectation that the presuppositions of an asserted sentence have common ground status prior to utterance, even in situations where accommodation is licensed. More tellingly, even when accommodation is the preferred option for adults, children adopt a different conversational stance. The observed two-step developmental trajectory, we argue, lends support to key tenets of the admittance theory, whose empirical validity may otherwise be masked due to the pragmatic sophistication of adult language users.

    Bio: I’m an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at MIT, where I co-direct the Language Acquisition Lab . Prior to this, I was a postdoctoral fellow at the Lab for Developmental Studies at Harvard. I received my PhD in Linguistics from MIT in 2018.

    The primary focus of my research is first language acquisition. In particular, I look at children’s developing understanding of what structures are licit in their language, how those structures are interpreted, and how they may be used in conversation. I also moonlight as a syntactician.

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual Event Code: jazlab
    Speaker: Mehrdad Jazayeri
    Title: A distal teacher for Bayesian sensorimotor learning in the frontal cortex
     
    Abstract:  A prominent theory in sensorimotor control posits that the brain relies on internal models to efficiently control behavior. A forward model predicts the sensory consequences of outflowing motor commands, while an inverse model selects the right commands to achieve the desired outcome. At the core of this theory is the idea that the forward model serves as a ‘distal teacher’ for the inverse model during learning. This has led to the prediction that the learning of the forward model should precede the learning of the inverse model. Although existing behavioral evidence indirectly supports this idea, a more definite answer requires direct examination of the associated learning process in the brain.

    Previously, we used a time interval reproduction task in monkeys to show how the structure and dynamics of neural activity across populations of neurons in the frontal cortex form a forward model of environmental statistics. We also characterized how the inverse model takes these statistics into account and enables animals to optimize their behavioral responses. However, since animals were already fully trained, we were unable to examine the interactions between the forward and inverse model during learning.

    To address this question, we recorded neural activity in the frontal cortex during a sensorimotor adaptation experiment that involved covertly-changing environmental statistics. When we induced adaptation, we observed rapid changes in neural activity in the frontal cortex which were fully consistent with the update of a forward model. Critically, these neural changes preceded by several minutes the behavioral changes during adaptation. That is, the inverse model responsible for adjusting the motor commands lagged behind the forward model. We further show that these findings can be recapitulated in a computational model explicitly built around the assumption that the forward model acts as a distal teacher for the inverse model. Together, these results provide compelling behavioral and neural evidence for an asymmetry in the learning rates of the forward and inverse model, and firmly establish the notion that prediction precedes control during learning.
    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual Event Code: 589879

    How glutamate-norepinephrine ‘hot spots’ allow emotional arousal to flexibly enhance processing of whatever has highest priority at that moment

    Neuroscience Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    30

    Growing Up in Neuroscience Webinar 2

    “Influences of Age and Culture on Memory”

    Angela Gutchess

    Brandeis University

    “Catecholamines in PET Aging Research”

    Anne Berry

    Brandeis University

    Register to attend the webinar. Zoom details will be sent after registration. 

     

    About Growing Up in Neuroscience Webinar Series

    Any early career researcher interested in aging neuroscience across a wide range of domains – including cognition, affect, memory, and everything in between – is invited to participate in Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience (GRAN). Our objective is to provide a setting in which junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience can learn about the latest developments (and people behind it). We have brought together world-class researchers across a wide range of career stages (from assistant to full professor) to present their work as well as share their unique experiences relating to how they became investigators (inspired by the Growing Up in Science series), in hopes of encouraging junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience.

    GRAN2020 will take place on via a Virtual and *Free* Webinar Series in Fall 2020. To receive the zoom invite and passcode for each session, you will need to register for each session. Each session will be 1.5 hours long, with each speaker presenting their research and participating in an ‘Ask Anything’ Q&A session at the end of each webinar.

    Abstracts

    Influences of Age and Culture on Memory (Angela Gutchess): In my talk, I will discuss research my lab has conducted investigating how aging and culture affect memory. I will focus on cross-cultural differences in memory, exploring how culture can act as a lens to shape information processing. This encompasses our work on how culture influences self-referencing effects, the use of categories in memory, and memory for specific visual details, and considers behavioral and neural measures as well as how these cultural differences could be impacted by aging.

    Catecholamines in PET Aging Research (Anne Berry): In my talk, I will discuss how PET imaging can be used in the field of cognitive aging research. I will highlight insights into the imaging of Alzheimer’s disease pathology has offered for interpreting age group differences in fMRI activation and cognitive performance. I will also discuss my recent PET research on age-related changes in the catecholaminergic system, which has focused on the unexpected finding that dopamine synthesis may be elevated in older adults relative to young. This surprising evidence for upregulation of dopamine synthesis in aging has led to a series of studies testing the extent to which neurochemical compensation successfully restores optimal performance.

    More > Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    30
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    Center for Computation and Visualization (CCV) Computing, HPC, Research
  • The Brown Postdoc Council is pleased to announce our second panelist for the Career Conversations series we initiated last month! Going forward, we will be holding this event on the last Friday of the month from 3-4PM (EST) via Zoom. To access these events, we will send out an RSVP prior to the event and once the form is completed, we will send registered attendees the zoom link.

    This month’s Career Conversation series will feature Dr. Chris Chatham on Friday October 30, 2020 from 3-4PM EST. The Career Conversation series is focused on inviting former Brown postdocs to allow for informal Q&A as well as networking opportunities for current Brown postdocs who may be interested in a similar career path. Dr. Chatham completed his postdoc in the Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences Department. He pursued an industry career with Pfizer from 2013-2016 where he designed cognitive, behavioral, and neuroscientific endpoints for early phase clinical trials. He then went on to work for Roche, where he is currently employed as a Group Leader in Clinical Computational Neuroscience. His research focuses on computational cognitive neuroscience and cognitive control to test the impact of novel compounds on cognition and the neural circuits supporting it.

    If you would like to attend this session, please RSVP using the link provided. The Zoom link will only be sent to attendees who complete the form. RSVP’s will be accepted until two days prior to the session, by the end of the day Weds 10/28.

    General Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    2
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Elisa Felsche (Postdoc University of Michigan)

    Title: Exploring the Evolution and Ontogeny of Imitation and Abstraction: A Hierarchical Bayesian Modelling Approach

    Abstract: Humans have an immense behavioural and cognitive repertoire that has been shaped by cumulative cultural evolution. In my PhD thesis I investigated two cognitive abilities that crucially enlarge the efficiency of skill and knowledge acquisition: 1) the capability for abstraction that enables powerful generalization of information to make wide ranging predictions in new situations and 2) the ability to imitate others which allows the quick and low-risk adoption of new behavioural strategies. Despite decades of accumulating data in both domains, it is still debated to what extent other species share these abilities and how they develop in humans. Solving these persisting disagreements requires an alteration of how data are generated and analysed.

     

    In my dissertation project, I introduced the approach of hierarchical Bayesian modelling to the field of comparative psychology to investigate abstract rule formation and action copying in capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees (only abstract rule formation) and children. In the first two studies participants had to use sampled evidence to infer abstract rules about the item distributions in containers and efficiently guide behaviour in novel test situations. In a third study, we investigated children’s and capuchin monkeys’ ability to integrate causal and social information when copying a goal-directed behaviour. Whereas children’s performance was mostly in line with the predictions of the computational models, showing that they are capable of abstraction and consider causal information when imitating, capuchin monkeys performed in all experiments at chance and chimpanzees showed some understanding of abstract rules.

    Bio: Elisa is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan also working in collaboration the Kibale Chimpanzee Project . She conducted her PhD work on social learning and abstract rule formation in different primate species at the University of St Andrews. She is interested in the evolution of primate cognition and behavior.

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Have you ever wondered when is the right time or how to close a study? Did you notice a new study closure form on our website, but need some guidance to fill it out? Are you questioning the data management and retention schedule involved with closing a study? This session will answer all these questions and more.

    Office of the Vice President for Research Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, IRB, ORI, OVPR, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    9
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Title: Uncovering the development of categories with Markov Chain Monte Carlo with children

    Abstract: Uncovering the representation of category structures and their underlying psychological spaces is crucial for understanding human learning. More importantly, charting these structures throughout development can give us important insight into how learning transforms these spaces and how changes are reflected in inference.

    While categorization has received much attention in cognitive and developmental science, experiments usually aim at uncovering the underlying representation indirectly, for example, by using measures such as similarity ratings or forced choices for particular category instances.

    In this talk, I will present an experimental paradigm, Markov chain Monte Carlo, with people (MCMCp) that directly targets these representations. This paradigm takes inspiration from a prominent statistical method and allows us to obtain samples from an arbitrary distribution. MCMCp allows experiments to flexibly explore the participants’ category representations without pre-specifying the test items. I will show how these types of experiments can be made into engaging and child-friendly tasks, and present preliminary results of an online experiment.

    Bio: I want to understand how the (human) mind represents the world and how this representation allows generalization and transfer. To analyze this I compare human learning and generalization with performance and dynamics of machine learning algorithms and computational models.

    My supervisor is Christopher Lucas . During my B.Sc. and M.Sc. I worked with Frank Jäkel at the University of Osnabrück , David Lagnado at UCL London and worked as a visiting Ph.D. student with Daphna Buchsbaum  at the University of Toronto.

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    10
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual Event Code: TBD

    Kaitlyn Hajdarovic

    Webb Lab

    Nick Skvir

    Neretti Lab

    Brown Center on the Biology of Aging
  • Nov
    11
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 2:00pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Andrés Buxó-Lugo (Postdoc, University of Maryland) 

    Bio: 

    I am currently a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Psychology department at the University of Maryland.

    Broadly speaking, I am interested in what speech and prosody — the rhythm, intonation, and intensity of speech — reveal about the cognitive mechanisms that underlie language production, comprehension, and acquisition. An ongoing goal of mine has been to develop computational models of language production and comprehension.

    My latest research focuses on how listeners integrate information from a variety of cues, and on how people learn to understand and produce constructions that are not already familiar to them (e.g., new uses of prosody, pronunciations that are not native to their language, etc.).

    Some of my past research has explored what durational changes reveal about the mechanisms that underlie language production, how communicative context affects how speakers use prosody, and how listeners use information from other levels of language to parse prosodic structure.

    Before arriving at Maryland, I was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department at the University of Rochester. I got my PhD in Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, working in collaboration with Dr. Duane Watson . Before that, I got my BA in Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I worked with Dr. Jennifer Arnold .

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • “Lighting up the brain using new molecular tools”

    Ahmed Abdelfattah, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (starting April 2021)

    Brown University

    Grab your lunch and join via Zoom (meeting details to follow)

    Please note, this meeting requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account.

     

    Abstract:

    Animal behavior is produced by patterns of neuronal activity that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Understanding how neural circuits mediate behavior thus requires high-speed recording from ensembles of neurons for long periods of time. In this talk I will describe different ways to record brain activity. Abdelfattah will specifically highlight how voltage imaging provides unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution of the brain’s electrical signaling at the cellular and circuit levels. Abdelfattah will describe his recent work to engineer genetically encoded voltage sensors that allow us to track membrane voltage from multiple neurons in behaving animals (1,2) and future challenges that we can address by engineering new molecular tools to monitor brain activity.

    • Abdelfattah, A. S. et al. Bright and photostable chemigenetic indicators for extended in vivo voltage imaging. Science.365, 699–704 (2019).
    • Abdelfattah, A. S. et al. A general approach to engineer positive-going eFRET voltage indicators. Nat. Commun.11, (2020).

     

     

    More > Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  •  

    Neuroscience Graduate Program 

    2020-2021 Bench to Bedside Seminar Series

     

    Save the Date!

     

    Alison Singer, M.B.A. 

    Co-Founder and President,

    Autism Science Foundation

     

    November 12, 2020 at 4:00pm

    via Zoom

     

    Organized by the Brown University Center for Translational Neuroscience

      

    Host: Eric M. Morrow, M.D., Ph.D.

    More > Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual
    12:00am

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Caren Walker (Assistant Professor University of California, San Diego)

    Title : Achieving Abstraction: The early appearance of Relational Reasoning

    Abstract: Children’s emerging ability to acquire and apply relational same-different concepts is often cited as a defining feature of human cognition, providing the foundation for abstract thought. Yet, young learners often struggle to ignore irrelevant surface features to attend to structural similarity instead. This has led to the widespread belief that children initially lack relational concepts, which only gradually develop over time. I will begin by reviewing work demonstrating early competence in relational reasoning and propose a novel theoretical approach that challenges the traditional view. Specifically, I will argue that young children have-and retain-genuine relational concepts from a young age, but tend to neglect abstract similarity due to a learned bias to attend to objects and their properties. This account predicts that differences in the structure of children’s environmental input should lead to differences in the type of hypotheses they privilege and apply. I will then present new empirical data in support of this alternative account, emphasizing (1) the robustness of early competence in relational reasoning, (2) the conditions under which older children privilege relational or object similarity, and (3) the causal role of contextual factors on abstract reasoning. Together, these studies provide evidence that the development of abstract thought may be far more malleable and context-sensitive than previously thought.

    Research Interests: My research explores how children learn and reason about the causal structure of the world. In particular, I am interested in how even very young learners are able to acquire abstract representations that extend beyond their observations, simply by thinking. How is “learning by thinking” possible? What does this phenomenon tell us about the nature of early mental representations and how they change? To begin to answer these questions, my work focuses on a suite of activities that impose top-down constraints on human inference (e.g., analogy, explanation, and engagement in imaginary worlds). I also explore the development of scientific thinking and reasoning, including children’s understanding of uncertainty. My approach is interdisciplinary, combining perspectives in psychology, philosophy, education, and computational theory.

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    18
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Youtao Lu (PhD student, Brown)

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Please join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) on November 18 for a special seminar on “Differential Resilience of Neurons and Networks with Similar Behavior to Perturbation,” featuring Eve Marder, Ph.D., university professor and Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Biology at Brandeis University.

    Abstract:

    Both computational and experimental results in single neurons and small networks demonstrate that very similar network function can result from quite disparate sets of neuronal and network parameters. Using the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system, we study the influence of these differences in underlying structure on differential resilience of individuals to a variety of environmental perturbations, including changes in temperature, pH, potassium concentration and neuromodulation. We show that neurons with many different kinds of ion channels can smoothly move through different mechanisms in generating their activity patterns, thus extending their dynamic range.

    More > Registration InstructionsTo register, please complete the form below. The Zoom link will be emailed to you. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on Alzheimer’s research at Brown University, featuring:

    • Stephen Salloway, Martin M. Zucker Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown, director of neurology and the Memory and Aging Program at Butler Hospital in Providence, RI
    • Ashley Webb, Richard and Edna Salomon Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    More > Registration InstructionsTo register, please complete the form below. The Zoom link will be emailed to you. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on how the brain gets things done, featuring David Badre, professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University. 

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Badre, a cognitive neuroscientist, discusses the neuroscience of cognitive control in his new book, On Task , which will be published in November, including the remarkable ways that our brains devise sophisticated actions to achieve our goals.

    More > Registration InstructionsTo register, please complete the form below. The Zoom link will be emailed to you. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    27
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Nicole Holliday (Assistant Professor UPenn)

     

    Bio: 

    I study sociolinguistics, specifically, how individuals interact with language to conceptualize and construct identity of both self and others. I’m especially interested in how individuals who cross traditionalracial/ethnic boundaries reflect multiple social identities through linguistic practices. Specifically, I examine the use of suprasegmental features that speakers may employ in the performance of their ethnic identities. The focus of my dissertation was intra- and interspeaker prosodic variation in the sociolinguistic behavior of American black/biracial young men.

    In April 2016, I defended my dissertation entitled “Intonational Variation, Linguistic Style, and the Black/Biracial Experience” at New York University. My dissertation chair was Renee Blake, and my committee consisted of Lisa Davidson, Greg Guy, John Singler, and Erik Thomas (NCSU). In 2016-2017, I was a Chau Mellon Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science at Pomona College. From 2017-2020, I was an Assistant Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science at Pomona College. Since July 2020, I have been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Yoolim Kim (Postdoc, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History)

    Bio: My research focuses on the psycholinguistic processing of writing systems, with specific interest in the Korean alphabet, Hangul. As a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, my work is on developing ways to quantify visual distinctiveness of characters within a graphic system.

    Cognitive Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    9
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual Event Code: TBD

    Jiwon Seo

    Sedivy

    Brett Baggett

    Koren

    Brown Center on the Biology of Aging
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual Event Code: TBD

    Corinne Hutfilz

    Tatar

    Jeremy Horrell

    Neretti

    Brown Center on the Biology of Aging
  • Apr
    13
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual Event Code: TBD

    Kelsey Babcock

    Webb

    Kimberly Abt

    Freiman

    Brown Center on the Biology of Aging