Upcoming Events

  • As part of our Providence Research Sleep Interest Group (PSRIG) seminar series, we welcome you to our next seminar with our guest speaker Dr. Lisa Meltzer, Professor, Division of Pediatric Behavioral Health at National Jewish Health.

    Dr. Meltzer’s presentation is entitled: “Pediatric Sleep Health in Clinical and Community Populations”

    Abstract: Sleep health is a positive attribute that focuses on individual and population level sleep, not just sleep disorders. This presentation will conceptualize the domains of pediatric sleep health, and how these differ from adults. Research examples will be provided from studies of children with chronic illnesses and their parents, as well as community based interventions, including healthy school start times. The PSRIG seminar series has been hosted by Dr. Mary Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for over 25 years.

    PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research.

    This year, the series will be held virtually and involve a diverse lineup of speakers from various institutions both nationally and internationally. Seminars will be held at 12 p.m. on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected]

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Careers in science, engineering and medicine offer opportunities to advance knowledge, contribute to the well-being of communities, and support the security, prosperity and health of the United States. However, many women do not pursue or persist in these careers, or they don’t advance to leadership positions because they face barriers, including: implicit and explicit bias; sexual harassment; unequal access to funding and resources; and pay inequity, among others. 

    Brown University alumna Ashley Bear, senior program officer at The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, will join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on addressing the underrepresentation of women in STEM. 

    Bear is the study director of the 2020 report “Promising Practices for Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine.” The report looks at the underrepresentation of women in STEM and offers practices for addressing this issue.

    The event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute.

    More InformationRegistration InstructionsTo register, please complete the form below. The Zoom link will be emailed to you.  ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    21
    8:00am - 9:30am

    Neurology Grand Rounds

     

    Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Rhode Island Hospital designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    To request reasonable accommodation for a disability, please contact The Rhode Island Hospital CME office at (401) 444-4260.

    More Information neurology
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please email the MCBGP coordinator for access to this seminar.
    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available at 2:00 pm on 4/21/21.

     

    Zoom Link - Available on 4/21 at 2:00 pm

     

    PIETER KLEER

    Assistant Professor, Tilburg University

     

    SECRETARY AND ONLINE MATCHING PROBLEMS WITH MACHINE LEARNED ADVICE

    We study online selection problems in which the goal is to select a set of elements arriving online that maximize a given objective function. In our setting, we are given some (machine-learned) information regarding the optimal (offline) solution to the problem. Following a recent line of work, the goal is to incorporate this information in existing (constant-factor) approximation algorithms such that:

    1. One gets an improved approximation guarantee in case the machine-learned information is accurate; and
    2. One does not lose too much in the approximation guarantee of the original algorithm in case the information is highly inaccurate.

    In this talk, I will illustrate these concepts using the classical secretary problem, and discuss an extension to online bipartite matching.

    Joint work with Antonios Antoniadis, Themis Gouleakis, and Pavel Kolev. Appeared in NeurIPS 2020.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Pieter Kleer is an Assistant Professor at Tilburg University (The Netherlands) since April 1, 2021. He completed his Ph.D. at CWI (The Netherlands) supervised by Guido Schäfer, and after that was a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (Germany) hosted by Kurt Mehlhorn. His research interests include algorithmic game theory, online approximation algorithms and approximate uniform sampling of combinatorial objects. Earlier this year, he received de Gijs de Leve award for his PhD thesis, which is awarded once every three years by the Dutch OR society.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Professor Stephen Blacklow from the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School will present “Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction”.  This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Please join us Thursday, April 22, at 4 p.m. for a presentation by James McPartland, PhD.

    Dr. McPartland is associate professor of child psychiatry and psychology, director of undergraduate studies, director of the Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic and associate director of the Developmental Electrophysiology Lab at the Yale Child Study Center, and he is co-director of Team Science at the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation. Dr. McPartland’s lab investigates autism spectrum disorder from a clinical neuroscience perspective.

    Please see https://www.brown.edu/academics/public-health/events to register for this virtual event.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title: Next Generation Expansion Microscopy Towards Multiplexed Whole Organism Nanoscale Imaging 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    23
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Crucial role for CA2 inputs in the sequential organization of CA1 time cells supporting memory” featuring Chris MacDonald, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Abstract: A large body of work has shown that the hippocampus (HPC) is crucial for remembering event sequences in the context in which they were experienced. Consistent with this idea, the HPC contains time cells and place cells that together may provide a cellular basis for our ability to remember “when” and “where” past events occurred. Time and place cells share several commonalities regarding how each code for repeated experiences in spatially or temporally structured memory tasks. However, there is little known about the specific hippocampal subcircuits that generate temporal and spatial coding in support of hippocampal-dependent memories. In this talk, I will discuss recent work of mine investigating temporal and spatial coding within the dorsal hippocampal CA1 (dCA1) subregion of mice trained on a spatial working-memory task. Inhibiting dorsal hippocampal CA2 (dCA2) inputs into dCA1 disrupted the sequential organization of time cells during the memory retention period and the mouse’s subsequent memory-guided choice. Conversely, inhibiting dCA2 inputs into dCA1 had a marginal effect on the spatial organization of place cells and no effect on the mouse’s choice. Collectively, my work provides compelling evidence that spatial and temporal coding in dCA1 is largely segregated with respect to the dCA2–dCA1 circuit in support of spatial working memory and suggests that CA2 may play a critical role in representing the flow of time in memory within the hippocampal network.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    23
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:  

    Description: Taraz Lee (Assistant Professor, University of Michigan)

    Title: TBD

    Abstract:TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    26
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mark Sabbagh (Professor - Queens University Ontario)

    Title: TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Axonal dysfunction in prefrontal cortical circuits in models of ASD,” featuring John Huguenard, Ph.D., professor of neurology at Stanford University.

    Abstract

    Epilepsy and Autism Spectrum Disorders show very high comorbidity, with about a third of ASD patients experiencing epileptic seizures. What might be the common elements of circuit dysfunction that contribute to this? To begin to address this question, we have studied prefrontal cortical circuits, important nodes for executive function, in mouse ASD models. We find profound prefrontal cortical circuit hypofunction in offspring following Maternal Immune Activation. Using imaging, behavior, and electrophysiology, we demonstrate abnormal social behaviors, structural deficits in axons, especially axon initial segments, and decreased functional connectivity between deep layer prefrontal cortical neurons and their downstream targets. These studies show how chronic cortical axonal hypofunction in adulthood can result from acute maternal immune activation and point to a novel mechanism for altered executive function in ASD.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Lisa Scheunemann, Ph.D., an independent research fellow at Freie Universität in Berlin.

    Abstract

    A key function of the brain is to decide which information is relevant enough to be stored as a stable memory. Pathological perturbation of this filtering process can have catastrophic consequences for later decision making. The molecular and circuit mechanisms that gate memory formation by inhibiting the storage of irrelevant information remain yet largely elusive. I have recently identified a memory suppressor mechanism in the Drosophila (fruit fly) brain within a serotonergic circuit (specifically the SPN “Serotonergic Projection Neurons”) upstream of the fly’s memory center. This “memory checkpoint” sustains a default inhibition of memory consolidation for aversive associations controlled by phosphodiesterase (PDE)-mediated suppression of neuronal activity in the SPN. Strikingly, my studies revealed that the dedicated memory checkpoint is modulated by the mating state of female flies: memory suppression by PDE is constantly inhibiting aversive memory consolidation in virgin females and is only released after mating. This mating-dependent switch is mediated by the sex peptide, a sperm-bound peptide transferred to females during copulation. Such a mechanism could promote foraging behavior in virgin females by suppression of risk-related behavior while promoting it after mating to protect the offspring. Thus, I propose that this type of memory suppression represents an important intersection between behavioral- and memory-dependent plasticity to guarantee consolidation of relevant information and context-appropriate decision making.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    27
    Virtual
    1:00pm - 3:00pm

    CLPS PhD Defense: Daniel Ullman

    Speaker: Daniel Ullman , Brown University

    Title: Developing a Multi-Dimensional Model and Measure of Human-Robot Trust

    Advisor: Bertram F. Malle

    ~ link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • What is CRISPR? How does gene editing work? 

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about the future of gene editing in neuroscience with Kate O’Connor-Giles, Provost’s Associate Professor of Brain Science at Brown University. 

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

    More InformationRegistration InstructionsTo register, please complete the form below. The Zoom link will be emailed to you.  Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Assistant Professor Dionna Williams from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will present “But First You Must Cross the Blood Brain Barrier: Antiretroviral Therapy Access to the Brain”.  This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Apr
    30
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Apr
    30
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  “Identifying the functional and anatomical
    circuitry of Parkinson’s disease motor
    dysfunction for closed-loop deep brain
    stimulation

    Advisor:  Wael Asaad, MD PhD

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    30
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Cydney Dupree (Assistant Professor, Yale)

    Title:

    Abstract:

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    5
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    Academic May Grand Rounds

    Academic Grand Rounds*

    The 23rd Annual David H. Barlow Oration Academic Grand Rounds*

    PTSD, Resilience, and Everything in Between: Making Sense of Outcome Heterogeneity Following Potential Trauma

    George Bonanno, Ph.D.

    Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology

    Teachers College, Columbia University

    Wednesday, May 5, 2021 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    More Information 
  • May
    6
    Virtual
    9:30am - 4:00pm

    2021 Biology of Aging Colloquium

  • May
    7
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Psychosocial Issues that Arise in Caring for Gender Diverse Youth and Navigation of the Rhode Island Gender Care System

    Agnieszka Janicka, M.D.

    Director, Adult Gender and Sexuality Behavioral Health Program - Lifespan

    And

    Jason Rafferty, M.D., MPH, EdM

    Pediatrician and Child Psychiatrist

    Gender & Sexuality Clinic at Hasbro Adolescent Health Center - Department of Pediatrics at Thundermist Health Centers

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • May
    14
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • May
    21
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • May
    28
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Please join us for a half-day mini-symposium focused on chromatin and transcriptional mechanisms in human stem cell models of neurodevelopmental disease. 

    This symposium will feature the following speakers: 

    • Luis De la Torre-Ubieta, Ph.D., UCLA; Gene regulation in cortical development and neuropsychiatric disease
    • Stormy Chamberlain, Ph.D., UConn Health; Mechanisms of repression and therapeutic approaches for Angelman syndrome
    • Sofia Lizarraga, Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Counteracting epigenetic mechanisms in autism spectrum disorders
    • Genevieve Konopka, Ph.D., University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Cell-type specific transcriptional networks related to autism

    Moderated by Eric Morrow, M.D., Ph.D., Mencoff Family Associate Professor of Biology, Associate Professor of Neuroscience, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. 

    Free and open to the Brown and Lifespan communities. Please register below to attend. 

    More Information CTN