Upcoming Events

  • Jan
    27
    12:00pm

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building
    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Andrew Lynn, Brown University.  Title: On the developmental relationship between visual processing and visual attention: Examining behavior and functional brain connectivity.  Abstract: Both visual function and visual attention improve dramatically across the first decade of life. However, the developmental relationship between these two related processes remains unclear. We aimed to test whether visual function development is a catalyst for visual attention development and whether this relationship may be driven by developmental change in functional brain connectivity (Amso & Scerif, 2015). Across multiple studies, we measured children’s contrast sensitivity and performance on a feature search and conjunction search task that manipulates feature integration demands within and across the dorsal & ventral visual pathways. In a separate group of children, we also measured the functional architecture of the dorsal and ventral visual streams during rest, using a Graph Theoretical Approach. We predicted that 1) developmental change in contrast sensitivity may influence feature search performance and 2) developmental change in feature integration may influence conjunction search performance and 3) functional integration between the dorsal and ventral visual streams would increase across childhood. We found that across childhood, higher contrast sensitivity was associated with faster feature search and that age mediated this relationship. We also found that developmental improvements in visual feature integration across the dorsal and ventral stream, but not within the ventral stream, were associated with slower conjunction visual search. Despite these behavioral findings, preliminary functional connectivity analyses suggest that functional integration between the dorsal and ventral stream is stable across childhood. We suggest that, while increases in visual contrast sensitivity may facilitate bottom-up visual attention across childhood, improvements in visual feature integration may influence selective attention development by increasing competition among targets and distractors, and increase visual search cost. Our functional connectivity results lead us to speculate that functional integration across the dorsal and ventral visual stream may be task-dependent.
    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    27

     

    Center for Translational Neuroscience Special Seminar 

     

    “Cell Types as Building Blocks of Neural Circuits”

     

    Joshua R. Sanes, Ph.D.

    Jeff C. Tarr Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology

    Paul J. Finnegan Family Director, Center for Brain Science

    Harvard University

     

    January 27, 2020 at 12:00 p.m.

    Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Sidney Frank Hall 220

     

    Host: Gregorio Valdez, Ph.D.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • LCDS Seminar

    Monday, January 27, 2019
    4:00pm
    Room 108, 170 Hope Street

    Stanislav Shvartsman , Princeton University and Flatiron Institute

    Title: Embryogenesis: a cascade of dynamical systems

    Abstract : I will present our work on the formulation, analysis, and experimental validation of mathematical models of embryogenesis. While the foundation of this research is based on models of isolated developmental events, the ultimate challenge is to formulate and understand dynamics encompassing multiple stages of development and multiple levels of regulation. These range from specific chemical reactions in single cells to coordinated dynamics of multiple cells during morphogenesis. Examples of our dynamical systems models of embryogenesis – from the events in the Drosophila egg to the early stages of gastrulation – will be presented. Each of these will demonstrate what had been learned from model analysis and model-driven experiments, and what further research directions are guided by these models.

  • Jan
    27
    4:00pm

    Neurophysiology of Behavior Seminar

    164 Angell Street

    “From Synchrotrons to Microwires – a broad view on sensory processing”

    Andreas Schaefer Ph.D.

    Group Leader at the Crick Institute in London

    Host: Alexander Fleischmann, Ph.D.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Science Center Logo
    Jan
    27

    Have you considered getting involved in RESEARCH during your time at Brown? Do you want to take courses that focus on learning real world skills while working on a research project?

    If so, you should consider taking a Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE)

    Dr. Mark Johnson, who is the Director for the CURE Course initiative will be at the Science Center on Monday 1/27 from 4:15 – 5 pm to talk to students about this initiative.

    How is this different from other research experiences?

    -Removes the pressure of finding and connecting with a professor ahead of time

    -You will gain research experience in a Brown semester course

    Skills:

    -Learn what it means to do research in a STEM field

    -Explore your interests and learn if research is right for you

    -Connect with mentors

    -Increase your chances of obtaining research opportunities in the future

    -Learn how to work with others

    -Present your findings at a poster fair

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Research
  • Jan
    28
    12:00pm

    EEB Tuesday Seminar

    Biomedical Center (BMC)

    Dr. Jenny Tung- Duke University

     

    Talk Title: “Social interactions in primate genomics, life history, and evolution”

  • Jan
    28
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Neurocritical Care M&M Conference- Shyam Rao, MD

    Rhode Island Hospital
    neurology
  • Jan
    28
    4:00pm

    EEG Core Initiative Seminar Series

    164 Angell Street

    EEG Core Initiative Seminar Series

    “Selective Modulation of Cortico-Cortical Connectivity in the Human Brain”

    Tommi Raij, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

    Many neurological and psychiatric symptoms arise from network-level derangements where the structural and/or functional connectivities between specific brain areas have been altered by the disease. Therefore, techniques that would allow selective up- or downregulation of specific connections between brain areas would be valuable. Here, we used MRI-navigated two-channel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a paired associative stimulation (PAS) paradigm to activate two cortical regions at different millisecond-level asynchronies. We hypothesized that this would selectively increase (long asynchronies) or decrease (short asynchronies) effective connectivity between the stimulated areas via spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). To observe the connectivity changes, we used short-latency (onset at 5 ms) TMS-evoked electroencephalography (EEG) evoked potentials with source analysis. The results supported the hypothesis, as effective connectivity between the stimulated cortical areas increased or decreased as a function of the TMS asynchrony in a manner consistent with STDP mechanisms. In conclusion, PAS allow non-invasive manipulation of brain interregional connectivity in humans, therefore laying the foundation for network-level multi-channel brain stimulation therapies.

    Coffee and cookies will be served. Please RSVP using the link below, as seating is limited. 

    Organized by the EEG Core Initiative, Brown University. Co-sponsored by the VA CfNN and the Carney Institute for Brain Science.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    29
    8:00am - 9:30am

    Neurology Grand Rounds

    Rhode Island Hospital

     

    Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Rhode Island Hospital designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    To request reasonable accommodation for a disability, please contact The Rhode Island Hospital CME office at (401) 444-4260.

    neurology
  • Jan
    29
    12:00pm

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Joanna Morris, Hampshire College & RISD.  Title: Is there a ‘moth’ in mother? How we read complex words (and those that are just pretending to be). Abstract: Skilled readers identify words with remarkable speed and accuracy, and fluent word identification is a prerequisite for comprehending sentences and longer texts. Although research on word reading has tended to focus on simple words, models of word recognition must nevertheless also be able to account for complex words with multiple parts or morphemes. One theory of word reading is that we break complex words into their component parts depending on whether the meaning of the whole word can be figured out from its components. For example, a ‘pay-ment’ is something (the ‘-ment’ part) that is paid ( the ‘pay-’ part); a ‘ship-ment’ is something that is shipped. However a ‘depart-ment’ is not something that departs! Thus ‘payment’ and ‘shipment’ are semantically transparent, while ‘department’ is semantically opaque. One model of word reading holds that only semantically transparent words are broken down. Other models claim that not only are all complex words —both transparent and opaque—decomposed, but so are words that are not even really complex but only appear to be, i.e. pseudo-complex words such as ‘mother’. My research examines the circumstances under which we break complex words into their component parts and in this talk I will address how this process may be instantiated in the brain.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Aging and Dementia Research Presentation

     Sponsored by: The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute

    In Association with:

    The Rhode Island Hospital Alzheimer’s Disease & Memory Disorders Center

     Mind-Body Interventions for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Geoffrey Tremont, PhD

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry

    Alpert Medical School of Brown University

    January 29, 2019

    1 to 2 PM

    Rhode Island Hospital

    Ambulatory Patient Center (APC) Building

    Leone Conference 1st floor, Room 133

    neurology, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    29
    3:00pm

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Speaker: Brian Nosek, University of Virginia. Title: What is replication? Abstract: Reproducibility is a core feature of accumulating scientific knowledge. If evidence for a claim cannot be obtained independently of its originator, then it loses credibility as a scientific claim. The concept of replication seems simple—repeat the study with the same methodology and see if the same result is observed. This conception of replication is intuitive, easy to apply and incorrect. The reality of replication is more central to advancing theory and evidence.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    30
    12:00pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Dagmar Sternad, Northeastern University.  Title: Stability, Variability and Predictability: Dynamic Primitives in the Control of Complex Actions.  Abstract: Everyday behavior is a complex flow of actions, combining rhythmic and discrete movement elements and flexibly interacting with objects in the environment. In contrast to real-life behavior, research in human motor control has studied isolated, highly controlled experimental tasks, resulting in focused models that may not scale up to actions with full complexity. The premise of our research is that complex functional behaviors should be understood as the manifestation of a hierarchy of dynamic primitives, robust modules that overcome delays and noise in the neuromotor system and thereby simplify control. Discrete and rhythmic movements are generated by fixed-point and limit-cycle dynamics, attractors that are stable in the face of perturbations and that grant predictability, required for fast and complex actions; impedance is necessary to enable physical interactions. To test this framework, our research pursues both analytic and synthetic approaches using a suite of interactive skills as testbeds: from throwing and bouncing a ball to a target, to transporting a cup of coffee and cracking a whip. Starting with a model of the task that is implemented in a virtual environment, mathematical analyses of the task’s solution space create hypotheses for the experimental studies. Key concepts in our analysis are stability, variability, and predictability. Results show that humans develop skill by: 1) finding error-tolerant strategies that permit variability, 2) exploiting solutions with dynamic stability, 3) optimizing predictability of object dynamics. Simulations based on dynamic primitives generate critical features of these experimental findings. This framework can guide our understanding of pathological behaviors in clinical populations.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics Presents Dr. Anita Crescenzi: Adaptation in Information S...
    Jan
    30
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Adaptation in Information Search and Decision-Making Under Time Pressure

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School)

    Adaptation in Information Search and Decision-Making Under Time Pressure

    Dr. Anita Crescenzi

     

    In this talk, Dr. Crescenzi will summarize several studies that have investigated the effects of time limits and time pressure on search and decision-making behaviors. Dr. Crescenzi found evidence of different types of adaptation under time pressure from analysis of traces of users’ interactions with search systems, participant’s perceptions of their process, and task outcomes. Under time pressure, people may exhibit signs of one or more types of adaptation: they may adapt the search process (e.g., decide not to search, search more shallowly), adjust the search outcome (e.g., look at fewer pages of information), or adjust the decision outcome (e.g., make a less specific recommendation). The context in which the search and decision-making takes place influences the types of adaptation that are observed and even possible. Dr. Crescenzi will finish the talk by applying the findings to a clinical decision-making context.

    BIO: Anita Crescenzi is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). Anita received her Ph.D. in Information and Library Science in 2019. Her research interests include interactive information retrieval, human-computer interaction, and decision-making. She seeks to 1) understand how people use search systems to seek information to use in support of their broader goals, 2) design and evaluate novel search interaction features to better support learning, problem-solving, and decision-making, and 3) develop better measures of search behavior and learning during search. She has published her research at SIGIR, CHIIR, ICTIR, and ASIST. She also has eight years of industry and medical library experience in user experience design, usability evaluation, user research, and applications development. As the head of the applications development group, she led the design, development, and evaluation of the UNC Health Sciences Library website with over 1 million annual visits serving more than 10,000 health affairs faculty, staff, and students; 5,000 residents and staff of UNC Hospitals; and 2,000 clinical preceptors.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Libraries, Research
  • Jan
    30
    4:00pm

    NSGP Seminar Series: Myriam Heiman, PhD; MIT

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Genome-wide in vivo CNS Screening Identifies Genes that Modify CNS Neuronal Survival and Mutant Huntingtin Toxicity

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jan
    31
    8:30am

    Carney Coffee Hour

    164 Angell Street

    Need a Friday morning pick me up? Or a place to have your Brain Science-related meeting? Join the Carney Institute on the fourth floor of 164 Angell Street for coffee after 8:30 a.m. every Friday.

  • Feb
    5
    12:00pm

    MCBGP Seminar: Lynne Maquat, Univ of Rochester

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay is Mis-regulated in Fragile X Syndrome

  • Feb
    7
    12:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street
  • Feb
    11

    Presentations: TBD

    PAARF is a forum allowing students, postdocs, and junior faculty to present data in a friendly atmosphere with a focus on discussing unpublished research in progress. The objective is to stimulate a grass-roots dialogue not only to troubleshoot data from a variety of perspectives, but also to stimulate collaborations. PAARF is usually held on the 2nd Tuesday of the month at the Laboratories for Molecular Medicine at 70 Ship Street in room 107. Refreshments are served at 5:30pm and the presentations begin at 6:00pm.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Feb
    14
    8:30am - 10:00am

    Carney Coffee Hour with Data Specialists

    164 Angell Street
    Do you have questions about data sharing, retention, curation, access, or management?
    As part of Love Data Week, please join the Carney Institute for a special Carney Coffee Hour and informal chat with data specialists from the Office of Research Integrity:
    Keri Godin, Senior Director of the Office of Research Integrity
    Andrew Creamer, Scientific Data Management Specialist
    Arielle Nitenson, Senior Research Data Manager
    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Libraries, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    14
    12:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street
  • Feb
    20
    12:00pm

    Biology of Aging Seminar Series - Joao Passos, PhD

    Biomedical Center (BMC)

    Speaker: Joao Passos, Mayo Clinic

    The Biology of Aging Seminar Series brings to Brown some of the most renown scientists in the Biology of Aging field. Seminars are held once per month during the academic year, at noon on the third Thursday each month.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering
  • Feb
    21
    12:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street
  • Aging and Dementia Research Presentation

     Sponsored by: The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute

    In Association with:

    The Rhode Island Hospital Alzheimer’s Disease & Memory Disorders Center

     “Disclosure of ApoE Genotype”

     Athene Lee, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

     February 26, 2020

    1 to 2 PM

    Rhode Island Hospital

    Ambulatory Patient Center (APC) Building

    Leone Conference Room 133

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, neurology, Research
  • Feb
    27
    12:00pm

    Carney Lunch Talk

    Sharpe Refectory

     

    Matthew Fuxjager, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Feb
    28
    12:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street
  • Mar
    6
    12:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street
  • Mar
    10

    Presentations: TBD

    PAARF is a forum allowing students, postdocs, and junior faculty to present data in a friendly atmosphere with a focus on discussing unpublished research in progress. The objective is to stimulate a grass-roots dialogue not only to troubleshoot data from a variety of perspectives, but also to stimulate collaborations. PAARF is usually held on the 2nd Tuesday of the month at the Laboratories for Molecular Medicine at 70 Ship Street in room 107. Refreshments are served at 5:30pm and the presentations begin at 6:00pm.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Mar
    13
    12:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street
  • Mar
    19
    12:00pm

    Biology of Aging Seminar Series

    Biomedical Center (BMC)

    Speaker: TBA

    The Biology of Aging Seminar Series brings to Brown some of the most renown scientists in the Biology of Aging field. Seminars are held once per month during the academic year, at noon on the third Thursday each month.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering