Upcoming Events

  • Jan
    25
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am

    COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    The Computational Biology Core is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

    Join Zoom Meeting
    <a href=”https://brown.zoom.us/j/95250171953”>https://brown.zoom.us/j/95250171953</a>

    Meeting ID: 952 5017 1953
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    Meeting ID: 952 5017 1953
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    Meeting ID: 952 5017 1953

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  • Jan
    26
    8:00am - 9:30am

    Neurology Grand Rounds

     

    Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

     

    Rhode Island Hospital designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

     

    To request reasonable accommodation for a disability, please contact The Rhode Island Hospital CME office at (401) 444-4260.

    More Information neurology
  • Title:  The emergence and stability of working memory population representations

    Host:  Dr. Ahmed Abdelfattah

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  • Please join Brown University’s Contemplative Studies Initiative and the Carney Institute for Brain Science for the continuation of the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Lecture Series.  Dr. Julienne Bower, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry/Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA will speak on Mind-Body Interventions: Effects on Mental and Physical Health. The lecture and discussion will be held on January 27th from 7 - 8:30 pm, EST. This event is free and open to the public.
     
    This is a virtual event, so please register at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdOTM8GupqTpzJBCXOCbdzF_i8KJc1QtlOn4XJbwMKiEuoiVg/viewform in order to receive a Zoom link. You will also find an abstract of Dr. Bower’s lecture when you register.
     
     
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  • Jan
    28
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Carl Schoonover and Andrew Fink, postdoctoral fellows at Columbia University.

    The primary olfactory cortex has traditionally been hypothesized to establish the identity of odorants. Schoonover and Fink will discuss how their research has shown that after just a few weeks odor responses bear little resemblance to their original form, raising basic questions about the role of this brain region in olfactory perception.

    Abstract

    We have discovered that in the rodent primary olfactory cortex (piriform) the pattern of neural activity evoked by a smell changes with the passage of time. These changes, which unfold absent a task or learning paradigm, accumulate to such an extent that after just a few weeks odor responses bear little resemblance to their original form. The piriform has been traditionally hypothesized to establish the identity of odorants. Our observations have forced us to radically reconsider the role of this vast brain region in olfactory perception. We propose that the piriform operates instead as a flexible learning system, a ‘scratch pad’ that continually learns and continually overwrites itself. This poses the problem of how transient memory traces can subsequently be stored over long timescales.

    These results also raise the question of what the piriform learns. We have designed a behavioral assay that provides a sensitive readout of whether mice expect a given sensory event. Using this assay, we have demonstrated that mice learn the identity, order and precise timing of elements in a sequence of neutral odorants, A–>B, without reward or punishment. Simultaneous recordings in naïve primary olfactory cortex (piriform) show strong and distinct responses to both A and B. These diminish with experience in a manner that tracks these expectations: predictable cues, such as B in the A–>B sequence, evoke hardly any response in experienced animals. This does not reflect simple adaptation. When B is presented alone, it elicits robust activation. When B is omitted, and A is presented alone, piriform exhibits vigorous activity at the precise moment when the animal, expecting odor B, encounters nothing. Thus, when the external world conforms to expectation, piriform is relatively quiescent, but any departure from the expected results in vigorous activation. The biological learning mechanisms that generate this predictive activity, a feature more commonly encountered in higher order cortices, can be readily studied and probed in a circuit only two synapses from the sensory periphery.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    8
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Nicolas Fawzi, associate professor of molecular biology, cell biology and biotechnology.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    9

    What does love do to our brains? Why do we fall in love? Why do we stay in love, and what makes us fall out of love?

    Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and to mark the occasion, the Carney Institute is holding a conversation about how the brain is affected by love, featuring two Brown University scientists who study emotion and motivation.

    Debbie Yee, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral fellow in cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences investigating the neural and computational mechanisms of interactions between motivation/affective processes, cognitive control and value-based decision-making.

     

    Joey Heffner is a Ph.D. candidate in psychology investigating emotions. He received a graduate award in 2020 from the Carney Institute for a project to understand when and how emotions facilitate or impair social decision-making.

     

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration InstructionsPlease register to receive the Zoom link.  Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Translational Research Seminar Series

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    This month:

    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Feb
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    8
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Sonia Mayoral, Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Assistant Professor of Brain Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    12
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Judy Liu, Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, associate professor of neurology, associate professor of molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    10
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Ahmed Abdelfattah, Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Assistant Professor of Brain Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Over the last few decades, reinforcement learning and decision making have been the focus of an incredible wealth of research spanning a wide variety of fields including psychology, artificial intelligence, machine learning, operations research, control theory, animal and human neuroscience, economics and ethology. Key to many developments in the field has been interdisciplinary sharing of ideas and findings. The goal of the Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM) is to provide a platform for communication among all researchers interested in “learning and decision making over time to achieve a goal”. The meeting is characterized by the multidisciplinarity of the presenters and attendees, with cross-disciplinary conversations and teaching and learning being central objectives along with the dissemination of novel theoretical and experimental results. The main meeting will be single-track, consisting of a mixture of invited and contributed talks, tutorials, and poster sessions.

    Stay tuned for updates as the conference gets closer.

    Confirmed Speakers

    Josh Tenenbaum (MIT)
    Yunzhe Liu (UCL)
    Jill O’Reilly (Oxford)
    Nao Uchida (Harvard)
    Melissa Sharpe (UCLA)
    Alexandra Rosati (Michigan)
    Frederike Petzschner (Brown)
    Oriel Feldman-Hall (Brown)
    Scott Niekum (UT Austin)
    Satinder Singh Baveja (Michigan and DeepMind)
    Stephanie Tellex (Brown)
    Martha White (Alberta)
    Sonia Chernova (Georgia Tech)
    Jeannette Bohg (Stanford)
    Jakob Foerster (Facebook AI Research)

    RLDM2022 Organizers

    General Chairs

    Catherine Hartley
    Michael Littman

    Program Chairs

    Roshan Cools
    Peter Stone

    Local Chairs

    Michael Frank
    George Konidaris

    Executive Committee

    Yael Niv
    Peter Dayan
    Satinder Singh
    Rich Sutton
    Emma Brunskill
    Ross Otto

    More Information More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, BRAINSTORM, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research