Past Events

  • Nov
    8
    2:00pm

    Social & Cognitive Science Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Sam McKenzie, NYU.  Title: Changes in lateral inhibition accompany hippocampal pattern separation.  Abstract: Most memory models assume that information is stored in the synaptic strength between neurons. To date, it has been difficult to record this synaptic coupling while monitoring the coding properties of neurons and the behavior of animals engaged in learning. One solution to this problem is to leverage correlations between neurons at fine time scales to infer causal relationships due to underlying anatomy. We developed a statistical algorithm to infer such synaptic connectivity between excitatory neurons and neighboring inhibitory cells, and tested the validity of an in vivo synapse detector by artificially stimulating presynaptic neurons and observing a postsynaptic response. We then sought to quantify changes in synaptic coupling strength across multiple time scales. At short time scales (10-1000 ms), we found that synapses often behave as bandpass filters, whose cut-off frequency varies orders of magnitudes across the recorded population. In other experiments, we found that optogenetic stimulation in CA1, but not CA3 or the dentate gyrus, caused a reorganization of hippocampal place fields and feedback inhibition. Synaptic coupling also changed on a moment-to-moment basis depending on an animal’s goals. These findings show that a potentially powerful synapse can be rendered ineffective due to ongoing activity within the network. Therefore, memory-related plasticity may depend not only on the strength of the EPSP, but also on probabilistic changes in the receptivity of the postsynaptic neuron upon the arrival of presynaptic input.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Cusin
    Nov
    8

    CAAS Rounds presents: Ketamine & Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression by Dr. Cristina Cusin, MD

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Nov
    8
    12:00pm

    DSCoV: Intro to GPU and CUDA

    164 Angell Street

    Data Science Computing and Visualization Workshop (DSCoV)

    Want to be a software master, start a tech company, or succeed in research? Ready to get your hands dirty and learn the data science and programming skills needed to solve real-world data science problems? Come to a DSCoV workshop! Open to all members of the Brown community, these lunch-hour workshops are led by Brown faculty, staff, and students.

    THIS WEEK’S TOPIC: Intro to GPU and CUDA
    INSTRUCTOR: Khemraj Shukla

    Registration is necessary; limited to 40 participants.

    Friday, November 8, 12:00 PM
    164 Angell Street, 4th
    Floor Innovation Space.
    Organized by Center for Computation and Visualization
    Sponsored by the Data
    ScienceInitiative
    Pizza and soda will be served.

  • Science Center logo
    Nov
    8
    11:00am - 5:00pm

    Cookies with SciToons

    Blue Room

    Stop by the Blue Room this Friday, November 8th, to learn more about SciToons and the videos we produce, and get a free cookie! Don’t forget to check out our newest video at youtube.com/scitoons!

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events
  • Nov
    8
    9:00am - 12:00pm

    CBC Fundamentals of R Workshop

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT)

    Please join the Computational Biology Core (CBC) as we host the Introduction to R Workshop. The CBC staff at Brown University will provide training and information on the basics of the R ecosystem. The goal is to ensure that participants have gained a basic, working knowledge of R.

     Please register at the link below.

    DATE:            Friday, November 8, 2019
    TIME:             9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
    LOCATION:   CIT SWIG Boardroom (Room 241)
                          115 Waterman Street, Providence, RI 02912

    BRING:          Laptop with wireless capabilities and plug.

    REGISTER:   https://forms.gle/Q8QexQYZMXnK3KtRA

     

    In this workshop you’ll learn:

    • Basics of R (objects, variables, data classes, vectors)
    • How to use and write R functions
    • How to import and export your data
    • How to install and load R and Bioconductor packages
    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Nov
    7
    5:00pm - 6:00pm

    Summer research! UTRA Info Session Thu, 11/7 in Sal 001

    Salomon Center for Teaching

    Spend your summer working closely with a Brown faculty member on a research or course development project in the humanities, arts, or sciences. Attend an information session to learn more about summer and fall semester Undergraduate Teaching and Research Awards (UTRA) – Thursday, November 7 at 5:00 P.M. in Salomon 001. To RSVP, please visit the UTRA website: http://brown.edu/utra .

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, dean of the college, Fellowshipsbrown.edu, Humanities, Research, Social Sciences, UTRA
  • Nov
    7

    Memory suppression and active forgetting.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    7
    12:00pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Perception & Action Seminar Series. Dr. David Rosenbaum, University of California, Riverside. Title: Should You Come to This Talk? Abstract: You are busy! You would have to stop whatever else you are doing to attend. You would have to come to the room where the talk will be held, find a seat and sit down. For as long as you continued to attend to what was being said (not necessarily the whole time), you would have to stop thinking about other things you care about, like the grant proposal you’re writing, the classes you’re involved with, your family’s welfare, etc. … The talk will be about choosing what to do and when to do it. The actions you choose reflect evaluations of costs and benefits of different kinds – physical, mental, and emotional. The presentation will focus on physical and mental costs and benefits. How can they possible be compared, for they are or seem to be of different kinds? In exploring this question, my colleagues and I have discovered a new phenomenon that we called procrastination, the tendency to rush to get things done as soon as possible, even at the expense of extra effort.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    7
    10:00am

    LingLangLunch

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Judith Kroll, UC Irvine. Title: The fate of the native language in second language learning: A new hyphothesis about bilingualism, mind and brain.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • S. Krishnan
    Nov
    6

    Deep Lens: A Multimedia Database System for Fast and Accurate Video Analytics

    Sanjay Krishnan, UChicago

     

    The increasing sophistication of computer vision algorithms enables new types of automated analysis visual data. The DeepLens project explores a future where the primary consumers of streaming video are not human viewers but analytics algorithms – accordingly revisiting storage, compression, and retrieval with this change in mind.

    This talk presents three projects: (dl-storage) a video storage engine optimized for algorithmic video retrieval, (dl-pipelines) a distributed stream processing engine optimized for visual payloads, (dl-mt) neural network training and evaluation in resource-constrained multi-tenant environments.

    In all three of these projects, a core theme is to take a classical database systems problem, such as data skipping or concurrency, and determine what changes under visual analytics workloads. This talk concludes by presenting applications of DeepLens to traffic analytics and robotic surgery, and performance results that demonstrate scaling to over 1000 hours of high definition video per computing node.

     

    Sanjay Krishnan is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Chicago. His research studies the intersection of machine learning and computer systems. Sanjay completed his PhD and Master’s Degree at the University of California, Berkeley in Computer Science in 2018.

    Sanjay’s work has received numerous awards including the 2016 SIGMOD Best Demonstration award, the 2015 IEEE GHTC Best Paper award, and the Sage Scholar award.

     

  • Nov
    6
    1:00pm - 1:45pm

    Faculty Applicant Talk

    Butler Campus

     

     Faculty Applicant Talk

    “Integrating microcircuit modeling & electrophysiology facilitates the discovery of biomarkers & circuit mechanisms in psychiatric disorders”

     Mohamed A. Sherif, MD, M.Sc.
    Staff Psychiatrist, VA Connecticut Healthcare
    Instructor, Dept. of Psychiatry, Yale University 

    Wednesday, November 6, 2019
    Butler Hospital ◊ Sawyer Bldg. Conference Room 202 ◊ 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm

    Summary: This talk will introduce in silico microcircuit neural modeling (MNM), and illustrate how we used MNM to investigate: (1) altered gamma oscillations as a biomarker for multi-target pharmacotherapy in a hippocampal computer model of psychosis pathophysiology; and (2) EEG biomarkers of ketamine’s antidepressant effect. Such an integrated approach allows us, as clinicians and researchers, to make mechanistic interpretations of the electrophysiological changes in psychiatric disorders.

  • Moore
    Nov
    6
    12:00pm

    MCBGP Seminar: Dr. Darcie Moore, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

     

    Hosted by Ashley Webb

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Academic Grand Rounds*

    The Annual Dr. Henrietta Leonard Visiting Professor Academic Grand Rounds*

    Adolescent Psychopathology and Competence Following Severe Early Deprivation

    Charles H. Zeanah, MD

    Mary Peters Sellars Polchow Chair in Psychiatry

    Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics

    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Tulane University

    Wednesday, November 6, 2019
     Butler Hospital ◊ Ray Hall Conference Center ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

  • Nov
    4
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    180 George Street

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, VNC), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar. Register Online .

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • Nov
    4
    12:00pm

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Laura Stricker, Brown University.   Title: Children’s Developing Understanding Creativity.   Abstract: A “standard definition” of creativity involves referencing novelty and usefulness (Runco & Jaeger, 2012). Numerous studies examine whether children engage in creative actions based on this definition. This work mostly involves children engaging in behaviors and adults judging it as creative or not. What is unclear from these studies is whether children themselves understand creativity in terms of this definition. We explored how 5- to 10-year-olds define and reflect on creative acts to examine the development of creativity and their own creative actions. Our intention with this investigation is to provide parents and practitioners with insights into children’s creative understanding which might aid in the encouragement of children’s creative development.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    1
    2:00pm

    Social & Cognitive Science Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Lauren DiNicola, Harvard University.  Title: Evidence that Parallel Distributed Networks Dissociate Episodic and Social Functions Within Individuals. Abstract: Association cortex is organized into large-scale, distributed networks. One such network, often called the default network, has been linked to diverse forms of internal mentation, opening debate about whether shared anatomy supports multiple forms of cognition or subtle distinctions in cortical organization have yet to be resolved. Using recently developed procedures for high-resolution analysis in twelve individuals, we probed whether multiple tasks from two domains - Episodic Projection and Theory of Mind (ToM) - rely upon the same or distinct networks. We found that Episodic Projection and ToM tasks activated distinct functional regions distributed throughout cortex, with adjacent regions in parietal, temporal, prefrontal and midline zones. Examining functional connectivity estimates of within-individual network organization revealed that these distinctions were well predicted by the hypothesis that the default network comprises two parallel interdigitated networks. One network, linked to the hippocampal formation, is preferentially engaged during Episodic Projection, including both remembering and imagining the future. A juxtaposed network, which includes the temporoparietal junction, is differentially engaged during multiple forms of ToM. This second network is interwoven with the first in multiple zones, making clear why it is difficult to fully resolve as distinct in group-averaged data. I will discuss how these results refine our understanding of the functional-anatomical organization of association cortex.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    1
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    i-BSHS Seminar Series: Kathleen Carroll

    121 South Main Street

     

    Please join us for a lecture by:

    Kathleen Carroll
    Albert E. Kent Professor of Psychiatry
    Director of Psychosocial Research Division of Addictions
    Principal Investigator, Psychotherapy Development Center for Drug Abuse
    Yale School of Medicine

    “Computer Based Training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: From Design to Dissemination”

    Kathleen Carroll, PhD, focuses her work on implementation of evidence-based treatments for substance use disorders, including opioid use disorder, and the development of technology-based interventions to improve engagement and adherence to buprenorphine treatment.
     
    Kathleen Carroll has had 35 years of continuous funding from NIH to support her research, including K05 (Senior Scientist) and MERIT (R37) awards. She is also Principal Investigator of the Center for Behavioral Therapies Development (NIDA P50 Center), now in its 25th year, and is co-PI, of the New England Consortium Node of NIDA’s Clinical Trial Network since 1999. The author of over 320 peer reviewed publications as well as numerous chapters and books. Her major contributions include (1) articulating the Stage Model of behavioral therapies development, (2) developing behavioral interventions to improve adherence and outcome for pharmacotherapies, and (3) establishing the efficacy, durability, and specificity of computer-assisted training in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT4CBT).
     
     
    The i-BSHS (Innovations in Behavioral and Social Health Sciences) lecture series fosters collaborative discussion on innovative behavioral and social science-based approaches to improving population health.
     
    Light refreshments will be provided, please feel free to bring your lunch as well.
    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Nov
    1
    12:00pm

    DSCoV: Cloud Computing with Google

    164 Angell Street

    Data Science Computing and Visualization Workshop (DSCoV)

    Want to be a software master, start a tech company, or succeed in research? Ready to get your hands dirty and learn the data science and programming skills needed to solve real-world data science problems? Come to a DSCoV workshop! Open to all members of the Brown community, these lunch-hour workshops are led by Brown faculty, staff, and students.

    THIS WEEK’S TOPIC: Cloud computing with Google Cloud Platform, interacting with and using the Compute Engine
    INSTRUCTOR: Isabel Restrepo

    Registration is necessary; limited to 40 participants.

    Friday, November 1, 12:00 PM
    164 Angell Street, 4th
    Floor Innovation Space.
    Organized by Center for Computation and Visualization
    Sponsored by the Data
    ScienceInitiative
    Pizza and soda will be served.

  • Oct
    31
    4:00pm

    NSGP Seminar Series: Byron Yu, PhD; Carnegie Mellon University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Brain-computer interfaces for basic science

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Oct
    30
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    33rd Annual Katz Lecture

    121 South Main Street

    Our featured speaker is Thomas O. Obisesan, MD, MPH.  Dr. Obisesan is a Professor of Medicine and Board-Certified Clinician, the Associate Vice President for Regulatory Research Compliance, Research Integrity Officer, and Designated Institutional Official at Howard University.  Dr. Obisesan is currently a member of several NIH study sections, and previously served as an editor of two peer reviewed journals. In recognition of his national repute, Dr. Obisesan twice received research leadership awards from the Alzheimer’s Association, and previously served on the Board of Directors of the National Caucus and Center on Black Aged, and St. Mary’s Court. Dr. Obisesan, is a member of the Steering Committee for the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI), Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium (ACTC), the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiatives and the ASPREE study.  Dr. Obisesan has excelled as a leader, teacher, clinician, community advocacy, and recognized nationally and internationally for his research.

    Dr. Obisesan’s presentation is entitled, “Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia  -  Role of Cardiovascular Disease Risk.”

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Center for Q& I, Q& I
  • Oct
    30
    4:00pm

    EEG Core Initiative Seminar Series

    164 Angell Street

    We are happy to announce a new speaker series organized by Brown’s new EEG core Initiative. This series is aimed at bringing the EEG research community together to learn and discuss the latest and greatest EEG methods and findings from leading experts within and outside of the Brown community. Our inaugural speaker will be Professor Matti Hamalainen from Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Title: EEG and MEG - The Non-Identical Twins

    Speaker: Matti Hamalainen, Ph.D., Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School

    Coffee and cookies will be served.

    Please RSVP using the link below, as seating is limited.

    https://tinyurl.com/eeg-core-seminar-10-30

    Please email [email protected] with any questions or concerns.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    30
    1:00pm - 2:00pm

    Aging & Dementia Research Lecture Series- “Cell Senescence in Aging & Dementia”

    RI Hospital, APC Building, Leone Conference Room

    Title: “Cell Senescence in Aging & Dementia”

    Speaker: John M Sedivy, PhD

    Professor, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Brown University

    Time: 1:00 PM -2:00 PM

    Location: RI Hospital

    Ambulatory Patient Center

    Leone Conference Room, Suite 133

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, neurology, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    30
    1:00pm

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Joshua Hartshorne, Boston College.  Title: Critical periods in language, cognitive development, and massive online experiments.  Abstract:Only a few years ago, it was widely accepted that cognitive abilities develop during childhood and adolescence, with cognitive decline beginning at around 20 years old for fluid intelligence and in the 40s for crystalized intelligence. The obvious outlier was language learning, which appeared to begin its decline in early childhood. All these claims have been challenged by a recent flurry of studies – both from my lab and others. In particular, the ability to collect large-scale datasets has brought into sharp relief patterns in the data that were previously indiscernible. The fluid/crystalized intelligence distinction has broken down: at almost any age between 20 and 60, some abilities are still developing, some are at their peak, and some are in decline (Hartshorne & Germine, 2015). Most surprisingly, evidence suggests that the ability to learn syntax is preserved until around 18 (Hartshorne, Tenenbaum, & Pinker, 2018). This has upended our understanding of language learning and its relationship to the rest of cognitive development. In this talk, I review recent published findings, present some more recent unpublished findings, and try to point a path forwards. I also discuss the prospects for massive online experiments not just for understanding cognitive development, but for understanding cognition in general.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Participants solve mentoring dilemmas and share strategies for success.
    Oct
    30
    12:00pm - 4:30pm

    Advance-CTR Mentoring Training

    121 South Main Street

    Join Advance-CTR for the next installment of our highly rated Mentoring Training Program on October 23 and 30 at the Brown University School of Public Health.

    This is part two of the two part session. You must attend both session in order to received the completion certificate. 

    Faculty who mentor junior investigators are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to grow as a research mentor and connect with colleagues.Participants will learn how to improve their relationships with mentees and become more effective mentors to junior investigators.

    This training will be facilitated by Suzanne Colby, PhD, and Michael Mello, MD, MPH, who are trained by the National Research Mentoring Network to facilitate this nationally recognized mentoring curriculum.

    This peer-driven program expands mentors’ knowledge through exposure to the experiences of all participants. Attendees will engage with as many mentoring experiences as they would typically handle in a decade.

    Faculty who mentor junior investigators who conduct clinical and translational research are encouraged to apply. Preference will be given to more senior mentors.

    Learn more about the program on AdvanceCTR.org , or click the link above to register.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Please join Brown Contemplative Studies for a lecture by Mark Deutsch entitled, Exploring Resonance, Harmonics and Vibrational Effects on Consciousness on October 30th, from noon - 1:30 pm in Orwig Music Building, Rm. 112. This event is free and open to the public. 

  • Thinakaran
    Oct
    30
    12:00pm

    MCBGP Seminar: Dr. Gopal Thinakaran, Univ. of Chicago

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    “The roles of the risk factor BIN1 in
    Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology”

    Hosted by: Alvin Huang, Ph.D.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Oct
    29
    4:00pm

    C. Malik Boykin, Brown University

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium Series.  Speaker: C. Malik Boykin, Brown University.  Title: Hierarchy preference and group status impact racial identities and intergroup attitudes.  Abstract: My research addresses dynamics between members of minority and majority groups. Historically, this conversation has focused on understanding attitudes of majority group members and their impact on minority group members. I incorporate this perspective, while seeking to expand our understanding of individual differences in the attitudes of minority group members. This talk highlights two interrelated aspects of my research program. First, I discuss individual differences in Black people’s preferences for group inequality and the impact of these preferences on racial identity attitudes. Next, I discuss how perceived threats to majority group members’ societal status can inform majority group member attitudes towards education institutions designed for the upward status mobility of Black people.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    28
    12:00pm

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Ben Pitt, UC, Berkeley.   Title: Spatial concepts of time and number: How culture shapes cognitive universals.   Abstract: People use space to conceptualize abstract domains like time and numbers. In Western cultures, both time and numbers are arranged in people’s minds along an imaginary horizontal line, from left to right, but in other cultures the directions of the mental timeline and mental number line are reversed. How does culture shape our abstract concepts? In this talk, I address this question with data from the lab and from the field. First, in a series of training studies, I show that the mental timeline and mental number line are selectively shaped by different aspects of experience, contra widespread claims to the contrary. Second, in a field study in an unindustrialized Amazonian culture, I show that for people without strong cultural conventions for arranging time and numbers in space (like reading text and doing math), mental mappings of time and number may be direction non-specific. These findings challenge alternative theories of cross-domain associations and support a novel account of how conceptual domains like time and number, universal fixtures of the natural world, are shaped by cultural experience.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    26
    7:00pm - 9:00pm

    Providence Medical Ochestra- Halloween Concert

    Sayles Hall, Brown University

    Halloween Concert

    October 26, 2019

    7-9 PM

    Sayles Hall, Brown University Campus

    Our first ever spooky spectacular!

    ​Tickets are free for students and $10 for non-students.

    For tickets, go to: www.provmedorchestra.com/

    Mussorgsky: Night on Bald Mountain

    Saint-Saens: Danse Macabre

    Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique, IV

    Humperdinck: Hexenritt from Hansel &

    Gretel

    Ives: The Unanswered Question

    Herrmann: Suite from Psycho

  • Oct
    25
    2:00pm

    Social & Cognitive Science Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series. Please note - there are 2 speakers for this event.  Speaker 1: Harrison Ritz, Brown University.  Title: Parametric control of distractor-oriented attention.  Speaker 2: Eunkyu Hwang, Brown University. Title: What does the retrosplenial cortex do? -Investigating the core function of the retrosplenial cortex.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences