Past Events

  • Sep
    20
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    Meet the Carney Student Artists Event

    164 Angell Street

     

    Please join us for a reception to celebrate with the student artists who have made brain-inspired artwork for our new home on the 4th floor of 164 Angell Street.

     

    Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Sep
    20
    12:00pm

    MPPB Seminar Series - Gwenaëlle Géléoc, Ph.D

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    19

    Speaker: Morgan Levine, Yale University

    The Biology of Aging Seminar Series brings to Brown some of the most renown scientists in the Biology of Aging field. Seminars are held once per month during the academic year, on the third Thursday each month in the Purple Palace (BioMed 202).

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering
  • Sep
    19
    4:00pm

    NSGP Seminar Series: Monica Dus, PhD; University of Michigan

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    High dietary sugar dulls sweet taste to promote eating and obesity

    Research
  • Sep
    19
    12:00pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker 1: Zhenyu Zhu, Brown University.  Title: The combination of heading specified by optic flow and target-egocentric direction during goal- oriented locomotion.  Speaker 2: Ivan Rodriguez, Brown University. Title: Automatic Video Monitoring of Honeybee Foraging Behavior using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • 2019-2020 Inaugural Seminar Series

    Center for Translational Neuroscience

     

    “Gene Therapy to Prolong Vision”

    Constance L. Cepko, Ph.D.

    Bullard Professor of Genetics and Neuroscience

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

    Co-Director, Leder Human Biology and Translational Medicine Program

    Harvard Medical School

     

     

    Light lunch and reception to follow.

    Host: Eric M. Morrow, M.D., Ph.D.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • Sep
    19
    9:00am - 10:00am

    Special Workshop for Faculty Entrepreneurs

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School)

    Don’t miss this special workshop for investigators who are interested in commercialization and entrepreneurship.

    Curtis Sprouse, president and CEO of the Institute for Biomedical Entrepreneurship (IBE), will discuss the program’s 5-day certificate program, which provides researchers in the life sciences with practical, hands-on knowledge and skills that help them evolve their innovations from lab to market.

    At the conclusion of the workshop, attendees will be invited to apply for an upcoming certificate program. Attendee sponsorship is contingent upon available funding.

    Investigators who have completed the certificate program will also be in attendance to answer questions and discuss their experience.

    Who Should Attend this Workshop:

    Early-career investigators, physician scientists, and other clinical and translational researchers at Brown, URI, and the affiliated hospitals in Rhode Island who are interested in entrepreneurship are encouraged to attend this workshop.

     Workshop is free but registration is required. 

    This event is sponsored by the Division of Biology and Medicine with funding provided through the NIH DRIVEN award. NIH Grant Number: 1UT2GM130176-02

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Training, Professional Development
  • Sep
    18
    3:00pm

    Friedman Family Fund Colloquium

    Metcalf Research Building

    Speaker: Dr. Michelle “Mikki” Hebl, Rice University. Title: How Subtle Biases Can Profoundly Influence our Workplaces.  Introduction: In this talk, Dr. Hebl will provide an overview of her 20-year research career examining issues related to diversity and discrimination in the workplace. She will discuss the ways in which powerful people “gatekeep” or prevent others from reaching their full workplace potential. Her work specifically focuses on subtle (as opposed to more overt) forms of discrimination, and her talk will focus on many gender- and race-related research findings. She will close with suggestions for how we can individually and organizationally remediate biases and enhance our diversity-related efforts.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Abstract: Before learning robots can be deployed in the real world, it is critical that probabilistic guarantees can be made about the safety and performance of such systems. In recent years, so-called “high-confidence” reinforcement learning algorithms have enjoyed success in application areas with high-quality models and plentiful data, but robotics remains a challenging domain for scaling up such approaches. Furthermore, very little work has been done on the even more difficult problem of safe imitation learning, in which the demonstrator’s reward function is not known. This talk focuses on new developments in three key areas for scaling safe learning to robotics: (1) a theory of safe imitation learning; (2) scalable inverse reinforcement learning in the absence of models; (3) efficient policy evaluation. The proposed algorithms offer a blend of safety and practicality, making a significant step towards high-confidence robot learning with modest amounts of real-world data.

    Scott Niekum is an Assistant Professor and the director of the Personal Autonomous Robotics Lab (PeARL) in the Department of Computer Science at UT Austin. He is also a core faculty member in the interdepartmental robotics group at UT. Prior to joining UT Austin, Scott was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute and received his Ph.D. from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research interests include imitation learning, reinforcement learning, and robotic manipulation. Scott is a recipient of the 2018 NSF CAREER Award.

    Host: George Konidaris/HCRI

  • Sep
    18
    1:00pm

    LingLangLunch

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Stefan Kaufmann, University of Connecticut Title: How fake is fake Past? 

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • You’re invited to join for an informal conversation with Jackie over coffee about her career path from earning a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences, being a AAAS STP Fellow, to working as the Chief of Staff in the Office of the Director, National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke.

     

    Event sponsored by: The Robert J. & Nancy D. Carney Institute for Brain ScienceThe Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies , and The Graduate School .

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Government, Public & International Affairs, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Sep
    17
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Center for Gerontology Brown Bag

    121 South Main Street

    Special presentation by Kristen Dams-O’Connor, PhD, Associate Professor, Departments of Rehabilitation and Human Performance and Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Director, Brain Injury Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Raj Kumar, PhD, Post-doctoral Fellow, Brain Injury Research Center.

    The title of their presentation is “Traumatic Brain Injury as Chronic Health Condition”.

    It is estimated that nearly 10 million Americans are living with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). It has long been assumed that TBI is a discrete event with a finite recovery period, but mounting evidence suggests that the recovery course and long-term outcome trajectories following TBI are in fact quite heterogeneous. Many people achieve a certain level of recovery and remain stable for many years following their injuries, and a few continue to improve for many years. However, about 30% of individuals with TBI experience functional decline that continues for years after injury. Survivors commonly report injury-related chronic cognitive impairments, mood deficits, headaches, and seizures. Additionally, research has highlighted high rates of comorbid physical and mental health conditions among long-term survivors with TBI. This session will discuss the converging evidence that has led to the conceptualization of TBI as a chronic health condition, and also discuss active and future research in this burgeoning area.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Q& I
  • Sep
    17
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Panel

    164 Angell Street

     

    Please join us for a panel on the AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowships . Applications are due November 1, 2019, so join us for a timely panel where three former fellows share about their application, interview, and fellowship experiences. 

    Panelists:

    Amy Carroll, Ph.D., Director of Research Development, Office of Research Development

    Chloe Poston, Ph.D., Associate Director, The Leadership Alliance

    Jackie Ward, Ph.D., Chief of Staff, Office of the Director, NINDS

    Please RSVP for an accurate headcount for pizza. 

    This event is sponsored by the Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Institute for Brain Science , the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies , and the Graduate School .

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Government, Public & International Affairs, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Training, Professional Development
  • Matthew Fisher
    Sep
    16
    4:00pm

    Colloquium - Matthew Fisher (KITP)

    Barus and Holley

    Quantum Processing in the Brain?

    Building a laboratory quantum computer is now a billion dollar enterprise. But might we, ourselves, be quantum computers? While maintaining quantum coherence on macroscopic time scales is exceedingly unlikely in the warm wet brain, there is one exception: Nuclear spins. My strategy is one of reverse engineering, seeking to identify the biochemical substrate and mechanisms that could host such putative nuclear spin quantum processing. Remarkably, a specific neural qubit and a unique collection of ions, molecules and enzymes can be identified, illuminating an apparently single path towards quantum processing in the brain.

  • Sep
    16
    12:00pm

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Welcome and Data Blitz

    Speakers:
    Meghan Gallo - Effects of early life adversity on motivational vigor in female mice
    Deon Benton - What’s core-knowledge systems got to do with it: the case for domain-general associative learning in infants
    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    13
    1:00pm

    Social Cognitive Science Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building
    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Art Aron, Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University, and Institute of Personality and Social Research, University of California, Berkeley Title: The Self-Expansion Model: Implications of Recent Research for Close Relationships and Intergroup Relations.
    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    12
    4:00pm

    NSGP Seminar Series: Rene Hen, PhD; Columbia University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Hippocampal neurogenesis: impact on cognition and mood

    Research
  • Sep
    12
    12:00pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Robert Raushenberger, Exponent, Phoenix, AZ.  Title: Non-academic careers for psychologists

     

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Please join the COBRE Center for Computational Biology of Human Disease, the Center for Computational Molecular Biology, and the Data Science Initiative for the COBRE CBHD Seminar.

    Nicola Neretti, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry at Brown University, and is one of the COBRE Center for Computational Biology of Human Disease’s success stories.  He graduated from the COBRE program by receiving peer-reviewed funding and he has been promoted to Associate Professor.  

    Dr. Neretti will present his talk entitled “Genomic and Epigenomic Instability in Cellular Senescence and Aging”.

    PLEASE NOTE: You will need to swipe your Brown ID before pressing the 3rd-floor button in the elevator to gain access to the third floor of 164 Angell Street. Any Brown ID should work during business hours.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Richter
    Sep
    11

    The Fragile X Syndrome

    Hosted by: Dr Justin Fallon

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Sep
    11
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Bradley Hospital

    “Is the Next School Shooter Sitting Before Me?”

    Critical Issues in Threat Assessment in Children & Adolescents

    Deborah M. Weisbrot, M.D., DFAACAP

    Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Stony Brook Medicine

    Consulting Psychiatrist, Western Suffolk BOCES Schools

    Wednesday, September 11, 2019
    Bradley Hospital ◊ Pine Room ◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:

    Identify the essential aspects of threat assessment in children and adolescents; Identify critical warning behaviors and psychological patterns which need to be considered in threat assessment; and Discuss the complexities and challenges involved in the threat assessment process.

    Disclosure: Dr. Weisbrot has no financial relationship to disclose.

    This presentation will be teleconferenced from the Pine Room at Bradley Hospital to APC-969 and Coro West, Suite 204, Conference Room 2.186

    This activity is not supported by a commercial entity.

  • Presentations:

    • Meng Feng
    • Mukulika Ray

    PAARF is a forum allowing students, postdocs, and junior faculty to present data in a friendly atmosphere with a focus on discussing unpublished research in progress. The objective is to stimulate a grass-roots dialogue not only to troubleshoot data from a variety of perspectives, but also to stimulate collaborations. PAARF is usually held on the 2nd Tuesday of the month at the Laboratories for Molecular Medicine at 70 Ship Street in room 107. Refreshments are served at 5:30pm and the presentations begin at 6:00pm.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Sep
    6
    1:00pm

    Hackathon on Opioid Overdose Prevention

    Rhode Island College

    The COBRE on Opioids and Overdose will host this inaugural hackathon event to help find solutions or “hacks” to address the opioid overdose crisis in Rhode Island and beyond. Students, professionals, and community members are all welcome to compete for cash prizes of $5,000 for the first place team, $3,000 for the second place team, and $2,000 for the third place team.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Sep
    5
    4:00pm

    NSGP Seminar Series - Paschalis Kratsios, PhD; University of Chicago

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Establishment and Maintenance of Motor Neuron Identity: Lessons from C. elegans and Mice

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Sep
    4
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Butler Campus

    Novel Approaches in Brain Stimulation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Noah S. Philip, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Director, Psychiatric Neuromodulation

    Lead, Affective & Cognitive Health, Center for Neurorestoration and Neurotechnology

    Providence VA Medical Center

    Wednesday, September 4, 2019
    Butler Hospital ◊ Ray Hall Conference Center ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:

    Describe neural networks involved in posttraumatic stress disorder and depression;

    Describe the use of theta burst stimulation for posttraumatic stress disorder; and

    Describe the potential use of transcranial direct current stimulation for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Disclosure: Noah S. Philip, MD has no financial relationships to disclose.

    This activity is not supported by a commercial entity.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Aug
    22
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Center for Gerontology Brown Bag

    121 South Main Street

    Our presenter is Emily Rehmet ’20, ScB Cognitive Neuroscience, AB Public Policy.  The title of her presentation is “Pharmaceutical Evergreening Practices Applied to Antipsychotics Increase Medicaid Expenditures.”  All are welcome.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Center for Q& I
  • Flyer

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Aug
    5
    8:00am

    Transporters in Drug Discovery Workshop at URI

    University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI)

    The 6th Annual Transporters in Drug Discovery and Development: Driving Knowledge from Laboratory to Label Workshop will take place August 5-6, 2019 at the University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI). This year I am excited to announce that we are sponsored by many companies including BiolVT, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Blueprint Medicines, Biotranex, Genentech, Incyte, Lonza, Novabiosis, Xenotech, Solvo, and Vertex. Seating is limited for this in-demand program. Register today! Please share with anyone that you think may be interested. To register, please visit our conference website at https://web.uri.edu/cehp/transporters/ If you have any questions about the course, please do not hesitate to contact the conference coordinator, MJ Kanaczet, at [email protected] or (401) 874.5552.

  • Aug
    1
    5:00pm - 7:00pm

    BioCON Industry Seminar Series

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School)

    BioCON Industry Seminar Series

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Jess Cardin, PhD Associate Professor Department of Neuroscience Yale University School of Medicine Abstract: The brain receives a continuously evolving torrent of inputs from the surrounding sensory environment. Cognitive demands likewise change rapidly during learning and task performance. Rather than use inefficient dedicated neural circuits to process each distinct regime of input, the cerebral cortex is inherently flexible and adapts on a millisecond timescale to changes in environmental context and behavioral requirements. Our goal is to identify the cellular- and circuit-level mechanisms of this flexible function in the cortex and to examine the developmental processes that give rise to neural circuits that permit such flexibility. In recent work using in vivo imaging and electrophysiology, we have identified key roles for dendrite-targeting GABAergic interneurons in the development and mature flexible function of cortical circuits. We find that GABAergic inhibition of interneurons is an important element of state-dependent cortical function. New multimodal imaging approaches provide further insight into the interactions between local and long-range cortical interactions.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research