Past Events

  • Jun
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: 202156

    “Neuroethics-Informed Neurotechnology Development: Emerging Principles, Priorities and Opportunities”

    Michael Young, M.D., M.Phil.

    Clinical Fellow in Neurorecovery
    Massachusetts General Hospital & Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
    MGH Neurology, Center for Neurotechnology and Neurorecovery

    Visiting Fellow, Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University

    VA RR&D Center for Neurorestoration



    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 916 0100 5045
    Passcode: 830598

    Join the Moore Lab for a talk featuring Alexandra T. Keinath, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher with the Brandon Lab at the Douglas Research Institute /McGill.

    Abstract

    Extensive research has revealed that the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex maintain a rich representation of space through the coordinated activity of place cells, grid cells, and other spatial cell types. Frequently described as a ‘cognitive map’ or a ‘hippocampal map’, these maps are thought to support episodic memory through their instantiation and retrieval. Though often a useful and intuitive metaphor, a map typically evokes a static representation of the external world. However, the world itself, and our experience of it, are intrinsically dynamic. Thus in order to make the most of their maps, a navigator must be able to adapt to, incorporate, and overcome these dynamics. Here I describe three projects where we address how hippocampal and entorhinal representations do just that. In the first project, I describe how boundaries dynamically anchor entorhinal grid cells and human spatial memory alike when the shape of a familiar environment is changed. In the second project, I describe how the hippocampus maintains a representation of the recent past even in the absence of disambiguating sensory and explicit task demands, a representation which causally depends on intrinsic hippocampal circuitry. In the third project, I describe how the hippocampus preserves a stable representation of context despite ongoing representational changes across a timescale of weeks. Together, these projects highlight the dynamic and adaptive nature of our hippocampal and entorhinal representations, and set the stage for future work building on these techniques and paradigms.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    15

    This K99/R00 grant writing workshop is jointly organized by the Brown Postdoc Council and the Office of University Postdoctoral Affairs (OUPA). This workshop is intended for all postdocs at Brown who are interested in learning about grantsmanship and in particular applying for the K99 grant.

    Session 1: Preparing a competitive application
    Audra Van Wart (OUPA)

    Session 2: Tips and tricks from funded Brown applicants
    Javier Lopez-Sato (Neuroscience)
    Leila Rieder (Emory University)

    Session 3: The grant review process with K99 reviewers
    Kareen Coulombe (Engineering)
    Damaris Rohsenow (Behavioral and Social Sciences)

    RSVP at the link below:
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSesEU2WAqkBls8HaD8hC_WZw7WKulH-u2hbRUjZJaKE5KisBg/viewform

    For more on future events by the Brown Postdoc Council, please join our listserv: https://listserv.brown.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=BROWNPOSTDOC&A=1

    We are also on facebook (@BrownPostdocCouncil) and twitter (@BrownPostdoc).

    Brown Postdoc Council is also recruiting new members! Any interested postdocs can reach out to the current co-president of the Council, [email protected]

    More Information 
  • Jun
    14
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - File Transfer Basics

    An overview of methods for moving files onto and off of Oscar. Topics covered include: Linux command line tools for file transfer (scp, rsync, sftp), GUI-based file transfer applications, mounting Oscar’s filesystem using CIFS, and using Globus on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: No passcode or registration necessary.

    Neurosurgery Grand Rounds

    Virtual Global Neurosurgery Panel Discussion

    This event will highlight the work of neurosurgeons who have incorporated international work into their practice. Attendings, residents, medical students and other Brown Neurosurgery affiliates can learn about how one may navigate such spaces in which we do not always have direct training.

    Download the event flyer for the speaker lineup.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jun
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Research
  • Join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) on June 10 for a seminar featuring Adam Calhoun, Ph.D., postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University.

    Abstract

    Animals produce behavior by responding to a mixture of cues that arise both externally (sensory) and internally (neural dynamics and states). These cues are continuously produced and can be combined in different ways depending on the needs of the animal. However, the integration of these external and internal cues remains difficult to understand in natural behaviors. To address this gap, Calhoun has developed an unsupervised method to identify internal states from behavioral data, and he has applied it to the study of a dynamic social interaction. During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males pattern their songs using cues from their partner. This sensory-driven behavior dynamically modulates courtship directed at their partner. Calhoun uses his unsupervised method to identify how the animal integrates sensory information into distinct underlying states. He then uses this to identify the role of courtship neurons in either integrating incoming information or directing the production of the song, roles that were previously hidden. Additionally, Calhoun shows how song is produced by a diverse range of visual cues whose importance changes depending on behavioral context, and he identifies the visual neurons that send this information from the eye into the brain. Calhoun’s results reveal how animals compose behavior from previously unidentified internal states, a necessary step for quantitative descriptions of animal behavior that link environmental cues, internal needs, neuronal activity and motor outputs.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Please join us for a half-day mini-symposium focused on chromatin and transcriptional mechanisms in human stem cell models of neurodevelopmental disease. 

    This symposium will feature the following speakers: 

    • Luis De la Torre-Ubieta, Ph.D., UCLA; Gene regulation in cortical development and neuropsychiatric disease
    • Stormy Chamberlain, Ph.D., UConn Health; Mechanisms of repression and therapeutic approaches for Angelman syndrome
    • Sofia Lizarraga, Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Counteracting epigenetic mechanisms in autism spectrum disorders
    • Genevieve Konopka, Ph.D., University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; Cell-type specific transcriptional networks related to autism

    Moderated by Eric Morrow, M.D., Ph.D., Mencoff Family Associate Professor of Biology, Associate Professor of Neuroscience, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. 

    Free and open to the Brown and Lifespan communities. Please register below to attend. 

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. CTN
  • Jun
    10

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    June

    Details: June 10, 2021 at 12 p.m. ET.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Jun
    9

    Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior in Early Childhood: Clinical Presentation and Assessment
    John Boekamp, Ph.D.
    Clinical Associate Professor, DPHB
    Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Clinical Director - Pediatric Partial Hospital Program at Bradley Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • MCB Graduate Student Ph.D. Thesis Defense

    Diego Jaime

    Functional and Structural Studies of the MuSK-BMP Pathway

    Advisor: Justin Fallon, Ph.D.

    Tuesday, June 8, 2021

    1:00 PM

    More Information 
  • Jun
    7
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, VNC), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Jun
    4
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Speaker: Sebastian Musslick, Ph.D. student, Princeton University

    Title: On the Rational Bounds of Human Cognition

    Abstract: Humans are remarkably limited in the number of tasks they can execute simultaneously. This limitation is not only apparent in daily life, it is also a universal assumption of most theories of human cognition. Yet, a rationale for why the human brain is subject to this constraint remains elusive. In this talk, I will draw on insights from neuroscience, psychology and machine learning to suggest that limitations in the brain’s ability to multitask result from a fundamental computational dilemma in neural architectures. Through graph-theoretic analysis, neural network simulation and behavioral experimentation, I will demonstrate that neural systems face a tradeoff between learning efficiency (promoted through the shared use of neural representations across tasks) and multitasking capability (achieved through the separation of neural representations between tasks). Theoretical analyses show that it can be optimal for a neural system to prioritize efficient learning of single tasks at the expense of its ability to execute them simultaneously, across a broad range of conditions. These results suggest that our inability to multitask reflects a rational solution to a fundamental computational dilemma faced by neural architectures. I will demonstrate that this tradeoff can explain a variety of behavioral and neural phenomena related to human multitasking and conclude by outlining consequential computational dilemmas that may help explain other, seemingly irrational constraints on human cognition.

    More Information CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Research
  • Whiteout: How Racial Capitalism Changed the Color of Heroin in America
    Helena Hansen, M.D., Ph.D.
    Professor and Chair of Research Theme in Translational Social Science and Health Equity
    Associate Director of the Center for Social Medicine at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    28
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • passcode:123456
    Designing Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still reserved for experts, and the existing design paradigm follows a data-driven approach: domain experts start with a hypothetical model, verify the model on the task-specific dataset to acquire performance metrics, then revise the model based on prior experiences in hoping to improve the model in the next loop. This thesis seeks to build an intelligent agent to substitute domain experts in this design process. I start with formalizing the current design process as a computational model, upon which I further investigate issues from the algorithmic efficiency and system utilization to build a system that algorithm and system can synergistically together to achieve the target. Specifically, I have proposed a new black box solver, Latent Action Monte Carlo Tree Search (LA-MCTS), to address the sample efficiency, and built a deep learning framework to expand the design space far beyond the GPU DRAM. LA-MCTS won 3rd in the black-box optimization challenge at NeurIPS-2020 among 68 global participating teams, including companies and institutions such as NVIDIA, Huawei, Oxford, IBM, and Innovatrics. Our agent also successfully designs several SoTA neural networks for the image recognition, detection, neural style transfer, and image generation. Collectively, these results provide a partial path toward AI democratization, by building a practical MCTS based AI agent that efficiently designs complex AI without experts for a variety of tasks in a reasonable amount of time.
    Host: Professor Rodrigo Fonseca
    More Information 
  • May
    27
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Seminar on Clinical Trials

    The Center for Long-Term Care Quality & Innovation (Q&I) is pleased to announce the Joint Seminar Series on Clinical Trials in Aging.
    Title: “Strategies to Improve Nursing Home COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake”
    Featuring: Sarah Berry, MD, MPH
    Harvard Medical School & Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research
     
    Nursing homes residents represent about 1% of the US population but, at the height of the pandemic, contributed about 5% of cases and nearly 40% of deaths. Residents and staff were prioritized for vaccination, but staff uptake, in particular, has remained low.

    Dr. Berry will present on strategies to improve COVID-19 vaccine uptake, including data from IMPACT Collaboratory observational studies and a pragmatic trial.
    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 984 9348 3988
    Passcode: 338168

    Please join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a special seminar featuring Kanaka Rajan, Ph.D., assistant professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

    Brown authentication is required.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Please join the Center for Translational Neuroscience for a special seminar featuring Yong-Hiu Jiang, MD PhD, Chief of Medical Genetics at the Yale School of Medicine. 

    Dr. Jiang is a physician scientist active both in basic research and clinical practice. His research interests are to 1) uncover the genetic and epigenetic bases of neurodevelopmental disorders or rare diseases with neurodevelopmental defects; 2) model genetic diseases using human patients derived cellular models and genetic mutant mice; 3) understand the circuit and molecular mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorder; 4) develop novel molecular and epigenetic targeted therapies for genetic and epigenetic diseases. His clinical expertise is on clinical and biochemical genetics of rare and undiagnosed diseases in children and adults. This seminar will be focused on modeling SHANK gene mutations, implicated in autism spectrum disorder and other neuropsychiatric conditions. 

    Organized by the Center for Translational Neuroscience, and hosted by Eric Morrow, MD, PhD, Mencoff Family Associate Professor of Biology, Associate Professor of Neuroscience, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior. 

    Please join the seminar using the link above. 

    Contact [email protected] with any questions. 

    More Information CTN
  • Join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) on May 25 for a seminar on “Extracting structure from high-dimensional neural data,” featuring Carsen Stringer, computational neuroscientist and group leader at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campus.

    Stringer completed her postdoctoral work with Marius Pachitariu and Karel Svoboda at Janelia, and her Ph.D. work with Kenneth D. Harris and Matteo Carandini at University College London. She develops tools for understanding high-dimensional visual computations and neural representations of behavior.

    Abstract

    Large-scale neural recordings contain high-dimensional structure that cannot be easily captured by existing data visualization methods. We therefore developed an embedding algorithm called Rastermap, which captures highly nonlinear relationships between neurons, and provides useful visualizations by assigning each neuron to a location in the embedding space. Compared to standard algorithms such as t-SNE and UMAP, Rastermap finds finer and higher dimensional patterns of neural variability, as measured by quantitative benchmarks. We applied Rastermap to a variety of datasets, including spontaneous neural activity, neural activity during a virtual reality task, widefield neural imaging data during a 2AFC task, artificial neural activity from a bipedal robot simulation, and neural responses to visual textures. We additionally found that texture identity could be decoded from these neural responses, but that the neural representations of visual texture differed from artificial neural network representations.

    More Information CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Seungwon (Sebastian) Choi, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School.

    Abstract

    Each day we experience myriad somatosensory stimuli: hugs from loved ones, warm showers, a mosquito bite, and sore muscles after a workout. These tactile, thermal, itch, and nociceptive signals are detected by peripheral sensory neuron terminals distributed throughout our body, propagated into the spinal cord, and then transmitted to the brain through ascending spinal pathways. Primary sensory neurons that detect a wide range of somatosensory stimuli have been identified and characterized. In contrast, very little is known about how peripheral signals are integrated and processed within the spinal cord and conveyed to the brain to generate somatosensory perception and behavioral responses. We tackled this question by developing new mouse genetic tools to define projection neuron (PN) subsets of the anterolateral pathway, a major ascending spinal cord pathway, and combining these new tools with advanced anatomical, physiological, and behavioral approaches. We found that Gpr83+ PNs, a newly identified subset of spinal cord output neurons, and Tacr1+ PNs are largely non-overlapping populations that innervate distinct sets of subnuclei within the lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBNL) of the pons in a zonally segregated manner. In addition, Gpr83+ PNs are highly sensitive to cutaneous mechanical stimuli, receive strong synaptic inputs from primary mechanosensory neurons, and convey tactile information bilaterally to the PBNL in a non-topographically organized manner. Remarkably, Gpr83+ mechanosensory limb of the anterolateral pathway controls behaviors associated with different hedonic values (appetitive or aversive) in a scalable manner. This is the first study to identify a dedicated spinal cord output pathway that conveys affective touch signals to the brain and to define parallel ascending circuit modules that cooperate to convey tactile, thermal and noxious cutaneous signals from the spinal cord to the brain. This study has also revealed exciting new therapeutic opportunities for developing treatments for neurological disorders associated with pain and affective touch.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    21
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the dissertation defense of Kira DiClemente on May 20, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. EST.

    “Mental health experiences of women exposed to war and violence in Africa: a community-based approach”

    Despite sharing a culture of resilience and strong community, African women exposed to war and violence carry a high burden of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Using a community-based approach, this dissertation examines the social context of the mental health experiences of African women exposed to war and violence. In partnership with members of the African refugee community in Providence, Rhode Island, Aims 1 and 2 of this research investigate key influences on women’s mental health, including exposure to traumatic events, sociocultural norms, and intimate partner relationships. Aim 3 presents an empirical investigation of these topics among women who remain in post-conflict settings. These findings offer novel and community-driven perspectives on intervention opportunities to address the mental health needs of this population.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, International, Global Engagement, Research, Social Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: The Zoom link will become available at 4:00 pm on 5/19/21.

    Zoom Link - Available on 5/19 at 4:00 pm

     

    ROBERTA DE VITO

    Assistant Professor of Data Science and Biostatistics

     

    MULTI-STUDY FACTOR ANALYSIS IN GENOMIC AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL DATA

    Biostatistics and computational biology are increasingly facing the urgent challenge of efficiently dealing with a large amount of experimental data. In particular, high-throughput assays are transforming the study of biology, as they generate a rich, complex, and diverse collection of high-dimensional data sets. Through compelling statistical analysis, these large data sets lead to discoveries, advances, and knowledge that were never accessible before, via compelling statistical analysis. Building such systematic knowledge is a cumulative process which requires analyses that integrate multiple sources, studies, and technologies. The increased availability of ensembles of studies on related clinical populations, technologies, and genomic features poses four categories of important multi-study statistical questions: 1) To what extent is biological signal reproducibly shared across different studies? 2) How can this global signal be extracted? 3) How can we detect and quantify local signals that may be masked by strong global signals? 4) How do these global and local signals manifest differently in different data types?

    We will answer these four questions by introducing a novel class of methodologies for the joint analysis of different studies. The goal is to separately identify and estimate 1) common factors reproduced across multiple studies, and 2) study-specific factors. We present different medical and biological applications. In all the cases, we clarify the benefits of a joint analysis compared to the standard methods.

    Our method could accelerate the pace at which we can combine unsupervised analysis across different studies, and understand the cross-study reproducibility of signal in multivariate data.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.
    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 974 5891 3319
    Passcode: 319728

    Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Reorganization of cortical representations during tactile learning,” featuring Andrew Hires, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of Southern California.

    Abstract

    Reorganization of cortical representations during tactile learning neural representations of the external world are built from patterns of sensory input. In the cortex, these representations can be surprisingly dynamic, shifting over time and across learning. We investigated this reorganization using volumetric two-photon imaging of primary somatosensory cortex in mice learning to discriminate orientation of simple shapes with their whiskers. I will present how the representations of shape are distributed across cortical layers, how they are assembled from sensory input features, and how training increases the importance of task-relevant sensory features, specifically enhancing discrimination of trained examples. These results suggest mechanisms by which cortical reorganization allows flexible improvement in task performance while maintaining perceptual stability.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join us next for our last PSRIG seminar of this 2020-2021 academic year! We are very excited to welcome Dr. Michael Smith, Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology & Nursing, and Director of Behavioral Medicine at John Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Smith’s presentation is entitled: “Insomnia, sleep loss and hyperalgesia: new finding on the role of inflammation”

    Abstract

    This talk will present new data linking slow wave sleep loss to inflammation and pain sensitivity and highlight the possibility that positive affect may buffer this effect. Clinical data describing the insomnia short sleeper phenotype in women with temporomandibular joint disorder will also be discussed.

    About PSRIG Seminar Series

    If you would like to be added to the Providence Sleep Research Interest Group (PSRIG) mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected]

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    14
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • This month’s Translational Research Seminar “Updates About and Opportunities from the COBRE Center for Central Nervous System Function” presented by Jerome Sanes, PhD Professor of Neuroscience, Director of MRI Facility. Register now.

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Register now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available at 4:00 PM on 12 May 2021.

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    Zoom Link - Available on 5/12 at 4:00 pm

     

    BRENDA RUBENSTEIN

    Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of Chemistry

     

    PREDICTING VIABILITY: HOW PROTEIN FOLDING, BINDING, AND DYNAMICS CORRELATE WITH FITNESS

    Please see the abstract PDF (linked on the left).

    More Information 
  • Psychosocial Issues that Arise in Caring for Gender Diverse Youth and Navigation of the Rhode Island Gender Care System

    Agnieszka Janicka, M.D.

    Director, Adult Gender and Sexuality Behavioral Health Program - Lifespan

    And

    Jason Rafferty, M.D., MPH, EdM

    Pediatrician and Child Psychiatrist

    Gender & Sexuality Clinic at Hasbro Adolescent Health Center - Department of Pediatrics at Thundermist Health Centers

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • May
    7
    Virtual
    3:30pm - 4:30pm

    ICoN T32 Training Program Open House

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please note, Brown authentication is required to attend this event. 

    The Interdisciplinary Training in Computational, Cognitive, and Systems Neuroscience (ICoN) is a pre-doctoral program in computational cognitive neuroscience. Funds from this program will support the training of advanced pre-doctoral candidates who are capable of applying a combination of empirical and theoretical approaches that decisively addresses their scientific questions about the mind and brain. 

    On May 7 at 3:30 p.m., join the PIs and current students to learn about the ICoN training program and how to apply to join the next cohort of students.  

    Applications for this year’s program are due May 21, 2021. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • May
    7
    Virtual
    1:30pm - 4:30pm

    Research Computing Bootcamp: Day 5

    Join us for week-long series of interactive tutorials presented by CCV staff members. Today’s tutorials include:

    • Working with MPI (1:30 - 3:00)
    • Debugging and Performance Profiling (3:00 - 4:30)

    For a complete list of topics, along with a schedule, visit the Bootcamp website.

    Zoom links for each tutorial will be sent out via email the day before it is scheduled to occur to those who register. You must register for a session to receive its link.

    Register More Information Research
  • May
    7
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CANCELED: CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please register at the link above to receive Zoom access information

    Join representatives from the Engaged Scholarship and Broader Impacts Working Group for a 45 minute session on Library Resources for Proposal Preparation, hosted by the Brown University Library.

    This event is the third of three in a new Spring 2021 series:

    Square One: Integrating Broader Impacts into Project Proposals at Brown

    Events exploring how to develop grant proposals for high-quality Engaged Scholarship and Broader Impacts (ES/BI) work, with a focus on structuring project evaluation components and leveraging Brown Library offerings.

    More Information 
  • May
    6
    Virtual
    9:30am - 4:00pm

    Research Computing Bootcamp: Day 4

    Join us for week-long series of interactive tutorials presented by CCV staff members. Today’s tutorials include:

    • Foundations for Bioinformatics Data Analyses (9:30 - 11:00)
    • Basic Bioinformatics Workflows on Oscar: BioFlows (11:00 - 12:00)
    • Annotation Resources for Downstream Analyses Using Bioconductor (1:30 - 3:00)
    • Bioinformatics Q&A Session (3:00 - 4:00)

    For a complete list of topics, along with a schedule, visit the Bootcamp website.

    Zoom links for each tutorial will be sent out via email the day before it is scheduled to occur to those who register. You must register for a session to receive its link.

    Register More Information Research
  • May
    6
    Virtual
    9:30am - 4:00pm

    2021 Biology of Aging Colloquium

    REGISTER HERE

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • May
    5
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    Academic May Grand Rounds

    Academic Grand Rounds*

    The 23rd Annual David H. Barlow Oration Academic Grand Rounds*

    PTSD, Resilience, and Everything in Between: Making Sense of Outcome Heterogeneity Following Potential Trauma

    George Bonanno, Ph.D.

    Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology

    Teachers College, Columbia University

    Wednesday, May 5, 2021 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    More Information 
  • May
    5
    Virtual
    9:30am - 4:30pm

    Research Computing Bootcamp: Day 3

    Join us for week-long series of interactive tutorials presented by CCV staff members. Today’s tutorials will be split into four tracks that will run concurrently:

    1. Programming in MATLAB
      • Using MATLAB on Oscar (9:30 - 11:00)
      • MATLAB: Programming Basics (11:00 - 12:30)
      • MATLAB: Improving Performance (1:30 - 3:00)
      • MATLAB: Tools for Parallel Computing (3:00 - 4:30)
    2. Programming in Python
      • Using Jupyter Notebooks (9:30 - 10:00)
      • Python Programming Basics (10:00 - 12:00)
      • Data Wrangling in Python (1:30 - 3:00)
      • Using Python on Oscar (3:15 - 4:30)
    3. Programming in R
      • A Gentle Introduction to R Programming (9:30 - 12:00)
      • R/TidyVerse Essentials (1:30 - 2:30)
      • Essentials of GGplotting with R (2:45 - 3:45)
      • Using R on Oscar (4:00 - 4:30)
    4. Programming in Julia
      • Introduction to Julia (9:30 - 11:30)

    For a complete list of topics, along with a schedule, visit the Bootcamp website.

    Zoom links for each tutorial will be sent out via email the day before it is scheduled to occur to those who register. You must register for a session to receive its link.

    Register More Information Research
  • May
    4
    Virtual
    9:30am - 4:30pm

    Research Computing Bootcamp: Day 2

    Join us for week-long series of interactive tutorials presented by CCV staff members. Today’s tutorials include:

    • Version Control with Git (9:30 - 11:00)
    • Building Software on Oscar (11:00 - 12:30)
    • Slurm for Beginners (1:30 - 3:00)
    • Advanced Slurm (3:00 - 4:30)

    For a complete list of topics, along with a schedule, visit the Bootcamp website.

    Zoom links for each tutorial will be sent out via email the day before it is scheduled to occur to those who register. You must register for a session to receive its link.

    Register More Information Research
  • May
    3
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    CLPS PhD Defense: Emily Levin

    Speaker: Emily Levin, Brown University

    Title: Role of Predicted Utility and Gating on Working Memory Fidelity

    Advisor: David Badre

    ~ link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    3
    Virtual
    9:30am - 4:30pm

    Research Computing Bootcamp: Day 1

    Join us for week-long series of interactive tutorials presented by CCV staff members. Today’s tutorials include:

    • Getting Started on Oscar  (9:30 - 11:00)
    • Working on the Command Line (11:00 - 12:30)
    • Basic Bash (1:30 - 3:00)
    • File Transfer Basics (3:00 - 4:30)

    For a complete list of topics, along with a schedule, visit the Bootcamp website.

    Zoom links for each tutorial will be sent out via email the day before it is scheduled to occur to those who register. You must register for a session to receive its link.

    Register More Information Research
  • Apr
    30
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Cydney Dupree (Assistant Professor, Yale)

    Title: Crossing Status Divides: Stereotypes, Strategies, and Solutions.

    Abstract: Intergroup interactions can be difficult, particularly those that occur between members of traditionally high-status and low-status groups. Well-intentioned majorities (i.e., White liberals) may find themselves unintentionally contributing to this problem by engaging in well-meaning, but ultimately patronizing, verbal behavior. Racial minorities who are more supportive of inequality (i.e., Black or Latinx conservatives) may give themselves a leg up by reversing stereotypes through speech. In this talk, I present a series of studies that examine how White Americans and racial minorities reverse negative stereotypes via language—potentially impacting who gets along and who gets ahead in an increasingly diverse world.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • In this talk, Professor Savova will position the latest developments in clinical Natural Language Processing (NLP) in the context of the explosive achievements in the broader NLP field. How can clinical NLP advance in the era of data hungry methods? Does it matter how the personally identifiable information is obliterated in clinical text? Prof. Savova will demonstrate how the latest methods are applied to core tasks – information extraction and temporal relation extraction – through some of the translational science initiatives in her lab (Deep Phenotyping for Oncology/DeepPhe, Temporal Histories of Your Medical Events/THYME).

    About the speaker:

    Professor Savova’s research focuses on higher level semantic and discourse processing of the clinical narrative employing machine learning methods and the creation of computable gold standards. This has resulted in over 150+ publications and the creation of pioneering tools and structures that adhere to and progress the development of national and international standards within clinical informatics and Natural Language Processing (NLP). It has also resulted in a pioneering open source scalable NLP platform for information extraction from the clinical narrative - clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES (ctakes.apache.org). Under her leadership, cTAKES started as a local research project derivative in 2006 with a team of three and has grown into a top-level project within the most respected open source organization – the Apache Software Foundation – with contributors from at least 3 continents. The significance of her work to biomedicine is exemplified by translational science projects such as Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2), Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN), Electronic Medical Record and Genomics (eMERGE), Strategic Health Advanced Research Project (SHARP), NCI’s Informatics Technologies for Cancer Research (ITCR) through Deep Phenotyping for Cancer platform (DeepPhe).

    I2S2 covers the breadth of topics in effectively using data and technology to advance biomedical discovery and healthcare delivery. Each learning activity (seminar, journal club, workshop, or tutorial) features methods, applications, or resources that are aligned with components of a learning health system. This series is a joint initiative between the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics, Brown Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Implementation Science Core, Rhode Island Quality Institute, and Advance Clinical and Translational Research (Advance-CTR).

    Register now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Apr
    30
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  “Identifying the functional and anatomical
    circuitry of Parkinson’s disease motor
    dysfunction for closed-loop deep brain
    stimulation

    Advisor:  Wael Asaad, MD PhD

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    30
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Our featured speakers are:  James Rudolph, MD, SM
                                                 Professor, Medicine
                                                 Professor, Health Services Policy & Practice
                                                 and
                                                 Miranda Olson, MSc
                                                 Project Analyst
    Their presentation is entitled, “Rocking around the nursing home: Implementation of personalized music.
    Delivery of personalized music to nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) requires implementing a complex intervention in a unique care delivery system. Using a guiding conceptual framework, our speakers will describe variation in facility implementation via a composite adherence score.
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Assistant Professor Dionna Williams from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will present “Cannabidiol as a Modulator of Chronic Inflammation during HIV Infection”.  This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for seminar passcode

    Title:  Neurobiology of sexually dimorphic social behavior

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    28
    Virtual
    9:00am - 1:00pm

    The Ecosystem of NIH K Awards

    Apply now for this complimentary, virtual workshop led by M.S. (Peg) AtKisson, PhD, which will cover the ins and outs of preparing competitive NIH R and K grant applications. Participation in the Day 1 session (Structuring NIH Proposals) is required for anyone who plans to attend Day 2 (K awards).

    A successful award is the product of the overall ecosystem of the Candidate, the Mentor, and the Environment. In this session, we examine the elements of a successful K Award application and project, showing how the review criteria play out across the application. We also show how the Specific Aims and Research Strategy differ in a K vs R application, and we end discussing the K-to-R transition, and how to design your K Award project from the beginning with that transition in mind.

    Application, Eligibility, & Deadlines

    Interested participants must complete a brief application form to be considered. All investigators from Brown, URI, Boston University, and the affiliated hospital systems (Care New England, Lifespan, VA Providence Healthcare System, and Boston Medical Center) are eligible to apply. Early-career investigators are highly encouraged. Selected participants are expected to attend the entire session(s) for which they registered as space is limited and registration is competitive.

    Apply by Friday, April 9, 2021 by 5 p.m. ET. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance on or before Friday, April 16, 2021.

    About the Instructor

    M.S. (Peg) AtKisson, PhD, trained in neuroscience, but has focused on grant proposals since 2001. She started the research development group at Tufts University, working on large proposals and supporting individual investigators for 8 years and over $140,000,000 of successes across many federal and foundation funders. She joined Grant Writers’ Seminars and Workshops in 2008, as an associate member, presenting training across the country. In 2017 she left to found ATG to create new approaches to grantsmanship training in addition to support for faculty research and leadership development. She still considers herself a neuroscientist first, and she still writes grant proposals.

    Register now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • What is CRISPR? How does gene editing work? 

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about the future of gene editing in neuroscience with Kate O’Connor-Giles, Provost’s Associate Professor of Brain Science at Brown University. 

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    27
    Virtual
    1:00pm - 3:00pm

    CLPS PhD Defense: Daniel Ullman

    Speaker: Daniel Ullman , Brown University

    Title: Developing a Multi-Dimensional Model and Measure of Human-Robot Trust

    Advisor: Bertram F. Malle

    ~ link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    27
    Virtual
    9:00am - 1:00pm

    Structuring NIH Proposals

    Apply now for this complimentary, virtual workshop led by M.S. (Peg) AtKisson, PhD, which will cover the ins and outs of preparing competitive NIH R and K grant applications. Participation in the Day 1 session (Structuring NIH Proposals) is required for anyone who plans to attend Day 2 (K awards).

    This session starts out with the Specific Aims page with hands-on work before we actually pull apart the structure. The next half of the session focuses on Significance, Innovation, and Approach, with some hands-on work as well. We touch on important issues of Rigor and Reproducibility, sex as a biological variable, and how the Human Subjects sections are now scored under Approach.

    Application, Eligibility, & Deadlines

    Interested participants must complete a brief application form to be considered. All investigators from Brown, URI, Boston University, and the affiliated hospital systems (Care New England, Lifespan, VA Providence Healthcare System, and Boston Medical Center) are eligible to apply. Early-career investigators are highly encouraged. Selected participants are expected to attend the entire session(s) for which they registered as space is limited and registration is competitive.

    Apply by Friday, April 9, 2021 by 5 p.m. ET. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance on or before Friday, April 16, 2021

    About the Instructor:

    M.S. (Peg) AtKisson, PhD, trained in neuroscience, but has focused on grant proposals since 2001. She started the research development group at Tufts University, working on large proposals and supporting individual investigators for 8 years and over $140,000,000 of successes across many federal and foundation funders. She joined Grant Writers’ Seminars and Workshops in 2008, as an associate member, presenting training across the country. In 2017 she left to found ATG to create new approaches to grantsmanship training in addition to support for faculty research and leadership development. She still considers herself a neuroscientist first, and she still writes grant proposals.

    Register now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Apr
    27

    Sponsored by Advance-CTR, Providence/Boston Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), the Brown BioMed Office of Faculty Administration, and the Brown School of Public Health

    Apply now for this complimentary, virtual workshop led by M.S. (Peg) AtKisson, PhD, which will cover the ins and outs of preparing competitive NIH R and K grant applications.

    Day 1 (April 27): Structuring NIH Proposals — A Short Course

    Day 2 (April 28): The Ecosystem of NIH K Awards (participation in Day 1 is required for anyone registering for Day 2)

    MORE INFORMATION AND APPLICATION AVAILABLE HERE

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode 736547

    Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Axonal dysfunction in prefrontal cortical circuits in models of ASD,” featuring John Huguenard, Ph.D., professor of neurology at Stanford University.

    Abstract

    Epilepsy and Autism Spectrum Disorders show very high comorbidity, with about a third of ASD patients experiencing epileptic seizures. What might be the common elements of circuit dysfunction that contribute to this? To begin to address this question, we have studied prefrontal cortical circuits, important nodes for executive function, in mouse ASD models. We find profound prefrontal cortical circuit hypofunction in offspring following Maternal Immune Activation. Using imaging, behavior, and electrophysiology, we demonstrate abnormal social behaviors, structural deficits in axons, especially axon initial segments, and decreased functional connectivity between deep layer prefrontal cortical neurons and their downstream targets. These studies show how chronic cortical axonal hypofunction in adulthood can result from acute maternal immune activation and point to a novel mechanism for altered executive function in ASD.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Lisa Scheunemann, Ph.D., an independent research fellow at Freie Universität in Berlin.

    Abstract

    A key function of the brain is to decide which information is relevant enough to be stored as a stable memory. Pathological perturbation of this filtering process can have catastrophic consequences for later decision making. The molecular and circuit mechanisms that gate memory formation by inhibiting the storage of irrelevant information remain yet largely elusive. I have recently identified a memory suppressor mechanism in the Drosophila (fruit fly) brain within a serotonergic circuit (specifically the SPN “Serotonergic Projection Neurons”) upstream of the fly’s memory center. This “memory checkpoint” sustains a default inhibition of memory consolidation for aversive associations controlled by phosphodiesterase (PDE)-mediated suppression of neuronal activity in the SPN. Strikingly, my studies revealed that the dedicated memory checkpoint is modulated by the mating state of female flies: memory suppression by PDE is constantly inhibiting aversive memory consolidation in virgin females and is only released after mating. This mating-dependent switch is mediated by the sex peptide, a sperm-bound peptide transferred to females during copulation. Such a mechanism could promote foraging behavior in virgin females by suppression of risk-related behavior while promoting it after mating to protect the offspring. Thus, I propose that this type of memory suppression represents an important intersection between behavioral- and memory-dependent plasticity to guarantee consolidation of relevant information and context-appropriate decision making.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    26
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Basic Bash

    This workshop will cover basic shell scripting in Bash: variables, loops, pipes and more so participants can learn to automate work with Bash. We will assume participants have some familiarity with the linux command line.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Apr
    26
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mark Sabbagh (Professor - Queens University Ontario)                    Title: How do children change their minds (about minds)?
    Abstract: During the preschool years, children change the way they talk about mental states and the way they use other’s mental states to explain and predict behavior. These changes are especially striking for representational, epistemic mental states like knowledge and belief. With a few notable exceptions, these changes happen on a relatively stereotyped timetable, thereby suggesting a strong role for unfolding neuromaturational changes. I will begin my talk by reviewing some older work from our lab that’s focused on characterizing neurodevelopmental factors that may contribute to these changes, including brain electrophysiological work that has provided evidence suggesting a critical role for the maturation of the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, and a role for dopaminergic functioning. I will also talk about some ongoing attempts to get further converging evidence in support of these claims. In the second part of my talk I will discuss a model of development whereby we suggest that these neurobiological factors are critical because they promote children’s general capacity for updating their representations of the world based on experiences. We propose that this general capacity for representational updating can operate on multiple time scales from updating a model of a particular local situation, to updating conceptual, theoretical understandings of the world. I will describe the beginnings of our work that tries to connect these updating processes to conceptual changes in mental state understanding.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    23
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:  Taraz Lee (Assistant Professor, University of Michigan)

    Title: Motivation-cognition interactions and their effect on skilled action

    Abstract:  Most day-to-day activities clearly benefit from goal-directed cognitive control and enhanced motivation. However, many people have the intuition that exerting too much control over our actions can be harmful, especially when under pressure to perform. How does enhanced motivation affect cognitive control processes? How do these processes in turn affect skilled motor performance? What are the mechanisms by which enhanced motivation both supports and potentially hampers the activity of neural systems needed for successful performance? These questions are explored in a variety of studies using functional neuroimaging, non-invasive brain stimulation, behavioral studies, and computational modeling.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Crucial role for CA2 inputs in the sequential organization of CA1 time cells supporting memory” featuring Chris MacDonald, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Abstract: A large body of work has shown that the hippocampus (HPC) is crucial for remembering event sequences in the context in which they were experienced. Consistent with this idea, the HPC contains time cells and place cells that together may provide a cellular basis for our ability to remember “when” and “where” past events occurred. Time and place cells share several commonalities regarding how each code for repeated experiences in spatially or temporally structured memory tasks. However, there is little known about the specific hippocampal subcircuits that generate temporal and spatial coding in support of hippocampal-dependent memories. In this talk, I will discuss recent work of mine investigating temporal and spatial coding within the dorsal hippocampal CA1 (dCA1) subregion of mice trained on a spatial working-memory task. Inhibiting dorsal hippocampal CA2 (dCA2) inputs into dCA1 disrupted the sequential organization of time cells during the memory retention period and the mouse’s subsequent memory-guided choice. Conversely, inhibiting dCA2 inputs into dCA1 had a marginal effect on the spatial organization of place cells and no effect on the mouse’s choice. Collectively, my work provides compelling evidence that spatial and temporal coding in dCA1 is largely segregated with respect to the dCA2–dCA1 circuit in support of spatial working memory and suggests that CA2 may play a critical role in representing the flow of time in memory within the hippocampal network.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    23
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title: Next Generation Expansion Microscopy Towards Multiplexed Whole Organism Nanoscale Imaging 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Professor Stephen Blacklow from the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School will present “Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction”.  This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available at 2:00 pm on 4/21/21.

     

    Zoom Link - Available on 4/21 at 2:00 pm

     

    PIETER KLEER

    Assistant Professor, Tilburg University

     

    SECRETARY AND ONLINE MATCHING PROBLEMS WITH MACHINE LEARNED ADVICE

    We study online selection problems in which the goal is to select a set of elements arriving online that maximize a given objective function. In our setting, we are given some (machine-learned) information regarding the optimal (offline) solution to the problem. Following a recent line of work, the goal is to incorporate this information in existing (constant-factor) approximation algorithms such that:

    1. One gets an improved approximation guarantee in case the machine-learned information is accurate; and
    2. One does not lose too much in the approximation guarantee of the original algorithm in case the information is highly inaccurate.

    In this talk, I will illustrate these concepts using the classical secretary problem, and discuss an extension to online bipartite matching.

    Joint work with Antonios Antoniadis, Themis Gouleakis, and Pavel Kolev. Appeared in NeurIPS 2020.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Pieter Kleer is an Assistant Professor at Tilburg University (The Netherlands) since April 1, 2021. He completed his Ph.D. at CWI (The Netherlands) supervised by Guido Schäfer, and after that was a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (Germany) hosted by Kurt Mehlhorn. His research interests include algorithmic game theory, online approximation algorithms and approximate uniform sampling of combinatorial objects. Earlier this year, he received de Gijs de Leve award for his PhD thesis, which is awarded once every three years by the Dutch OR society.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please email the MCBGP coordinator for access to this seminar.
    More Information 
  • Careers in science, engineering and medicine offer opportunities to advance knowledge, contribute to the well-being of communities, and support the security, prosperity and health of the United States. However, many women do not pursue or persist in these careers, or they don’t advance to leadership positions because they face barriers, including: implicit and explicit bias; sexual harassment; unequal access to funding and resources; and pay inequity, among others. 

    Brown University alumna Ashley Bear, senior program officer at The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, will join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on addressing the underrepresentation of women in STEM. 

    Bear is the study director of the 2020 report “Promising Practices for Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine.” The report looks at the underrepresentation of women in STEM and offers practices for addressing this issue.

    The event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • As part of our Providence Research Sleep Interest Group (PSRIG) seminar series, we welcome you to our next seminar with our guest speaker Dr. Lisa Meltzer, Professor, Division of Pediatric Behavioral Health at National Jewish Health.

    Dr. Meltzer’s presentation is entitled: “Pediatric Sleep Health in Clinical and Community Populations”

    Abstract: Sleep health is a positive attribute that focuses on individual and population level sleep, not just sleep disorders. This presentation will conceptualize the domains of pediatric sleep health, and how these differ from adults. Research examples will be provided from studies of children with chronic illnesses and their parents, as well as community based interventions, including healthy school start times. The PSRIG seminar series has been hosted by Dr. Mary Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for over 25 years.

    PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research.

    This year, the series will be held virtually and involve a diverse lineup of speakers from various institutions both nationally and internationally. Seminars will be held at 12 p.m. on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected]

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “The assay of spatial cognition in rodent models of pediatric encephalopathy,” featuring Jeremy Barry, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Vermont.

    Abstract:

    Brain circuits that underpin spatial processing, incorporating the hippocampus and several cortical and subcortical structures, wire together at key stages of early development. Our goal is to understand how genetic or acquired encephalopathic insults to the developing spatial circuit lead to corresponding deficits in navigation, and the encoding or recall of spatial information. Rodent models of both Early-Life Seizure (ELS) and the Pten knockout model of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) exhibit morphological and electrophysiological changes within the hippocampal circuit that correlate with spatial deficit. The extent to which these changes alter hippocampal throughput, the temporal coordination of CA1 pyramidal cell action potentials, and coherent communication with the neocortex, may serve as potential biomarkers of cognitive outcome and suggest novel treatment avenues. Finally, we will discuss the use and possible caveats of optogenetic pacing of the septo-hippocampal circuit to offset learning and memory deficits caused by encephalopathic temporal discoordination.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • The CAAS Rounds Committee presents: “Addressing Disparities in Substance Use Disorder Treatment for Black Adults” with Dr. Angela Haeny

    More Information 
  • Apr
    16
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Title:  Wiring the eye to brain for binocular vision: lessons from the albino visual system

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    15
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception and Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Laura Thomas (Associate Professor- North Dakota State University)

    Title: Active thought: Interplays between action, perception, and cognition.

    Abstract: I will describe recent research examining the surprising ways in which the actions we perform shape our thought processes, reflecting the sensitivity of perception and cognition to behavioral contexts. Incorporating approaches from both vision science and grounded cognition, I present evidence that experience-driven plasticity tunes visual cognition to facilitate action, leading vision to prioritize action-relevant information both when observers act alone and with a partner. Additional evidence from my lab shows that actions performed in a social context can influence how we perceive those around us. Taken together, these findings contradict purely modular theories of vision and suggest that body-based contexts inform visual processing.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • President’s Assistant Professor Derrick Ong from the National University of Singapore will present “Novel mechanisms of brain stem cell proliferation in the normal brain and brain tumors”. This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available at 4:00 pm on 4/14/21.

     

    Zoom Link - Available on 4/14 at 4:00 pm

     

    TINA ELIASSI-RAD

    Professor of Computer Science, Northeastern University

    GEOMETRIC AND TOPOLOGICAL GRAPH ANALYSIS FOR MACHINE LEARNING APPLICATIONS

    This talk has two parts: (1) geometric analysis for graph embedding and (2) topological analysis for graph distances. First, graph embedding seeks to build an accurate low-dimensional representation of a graph. This low-dimensional representation is then used for various downstream tasks such as link prediction. One popular approach is Laplacian Eigenmaps, which constructs a graph embedding based on the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix of a graph. The intuition behind it, and many other embedding techniques, is that the embedding of a graph must respect node similarity: similar nodes must have embeddings that are close to one another. We dispose of this distance-minimization assumption. In its place, we use the Laplacian matrix to find an embedding with geometric properties (instead of spectral ones) by leveraging the simplex geometry of the graph. We introduce Geometric Laplacian Eigenmap Embedding (or GLEE for short) and demonstrate that it outperforms various other techniques (including Laplacian Eigenmaps) in the tasks of graph reconstruction and link prediction. This work is joint with Leo Torres and Kevin Chan, and was published in the Journal of Complex Networks in March 2020 (http://eliassi.org/papers/torres_jcn2020.pdf). Second, measuring graph distance is a fundamental task in graph mining. For graph distance, determining the structural dissimilarity between networks is an ill-defined problem, as there is no canonical way to compare two networks. Indeed, many of the existing approaches for network comparison differ in their heuristics, efficiency, interpretability, and theoretical soundness. Thus, having a notion of distance that is built on theoretically robust first principles and that is interpretable with respect to features ubiquitous in complex networks would allow for a meaningful comparison between different networks. We rely on the theory of the length spectrum function from algebraic topology, and its relationship to the non-backtracking cycles of a graph, in order to introduce the Non-Backtracking Spectral Distance (NBD) for measuring the distance between undirected, unweighted graphs. NBD is interpretable in terms of features of complex networks such as presence of hubs and triangles. We showcase the ability of NBD to discriminate between networks in both real and synthetic data sets. This work is joint with Leo Torres and Pablo Suarez-Serrato and was published in the Journal of Applied Network Science in June 2019 (http://eliassi.org/papers/appliednetsci19_nbd.pdf).

    BIOGRAPHY

    Tina Eliassi-Rad is a Professor of Computer Science at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. She is also a core faculty member at Northeastern’s Network Science Institute. Prior to joining Northeastern, Tina was an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Rutgers University; and before that, she was a Member of Technical Staff and Principal Investigator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Tina earned her Ph.D. in Computer Sciences (with a minor in Mathematical Statistics) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research is at the intersection of data mining, machine learning, and network science. She has over 100 peer-reviewed publications (including a few best papers and best paper runner-up awardees), and has given over 200 invited talks and 14 tutorials. Tina’s work has been applied to personalized search on the World-Wide Web, statistical indices of large-scale scientific simulation data, fraud detection, mobile ad targeting, cyber situational awareness, and ethics in machine learning. Her algorithms have been incorporated into systems used by the government and industry (e.g., IBM System G Graph Analytics) as well as open-source software (e.g., Stanford Network Analysis Project). In 2017, Tina served as the program co-chair for the ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (a.k.a. KDD, which is the premier conference on data mining) and as the program co-chair for the International Conference on Network Science (a.k.a. NetSci, which is the premier conference on network science). In 2020, she served as the program co-chair for the International Conference on Computational Social Science (a.k.a. IC2S2, which is the premier conference on computational social science). Tina received an Outstanding Mentor Award from the Office of Science at the US Department of Energy in 2010; became a Fellow of the ISI Foundation in Turin Italy in 2019, and was named one of the 100 Brilliant Women in AI Ethics for 2021. She joined the Inaugural External Faculty at the Vermont Complex Systems Center in 2021.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Please join us on April 14th for a seminar series presentation by Stephen Schueller, PhD: “Advancing Evidentiary Standards in Digital Mental Health”. There are, by some estimates, more than 10,000 mental health apps available on the various app stores. The vast majority of apps, however, have no evidence for effectiveness, making it difficult for users to understand what might work for them. Dr. Schueller will talk about the promise and perils of mental health apps, provide an overview of One Mind PsyberGuide, a project that identifies and evaluates mental health apps, and discuss the need for advancing evidentiary standards in digital mental health to help increase consumer confidence and guide implementation. Although mental health apps offer the promising potential to extend care and increase the standard of care, fulfilling this promise will require thoughtful consideration of identifying quality tools and how such tools fit into various systems to deliver such resources.

    Stephen Schueller, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychological Science and Informatics at the University of California, Irvine. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and completed his clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. As a clinical psychologist and mental health service researcher his work broadly looks creating more scalable mental health resources that make treatment more available and accessible, especially with technology. This includes the development, evaluation, and implementation of web- and mobile-based interventions. He also serves as the Executive Director of One Mind PsyberGuide, a project the aims to empower consumers to make informed choices around digital mental health products.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Humanities, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    14
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Youtao Lu (PhD student, Brown)

    Title: Bear the bare bear: is there a difference between homophones and homonyms in spoken word recognition?

    Abstract: Visual word recognition studies have been debating whether (non-homographic) homophones and homonyms show similar or different effects in processing, and whether a single mechanism, either interactions between representations at different levels (e.g. Pexman & Lupker, 1999) or competition between individual representations at the same level (e.g. Rodd, et al., 2002) can explain both effects conveniently. In this study, we present the results of a set of auditory lexical decision tasks, which show that the answer depends on what information is being processed, and to what extent. The results also suggest that representations of different kinds might not be governed by the same mechanism.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds*
    In a Relationship: Partnerships in Science and Practice Toward Preventing Adolescent Dating Violence
    Christie J. Rizzo, PhD
    Associate Professor
    Northeastern University
    Bouvé College of Health Sciences
    Department of Applied Psychology
    Wednesday, April 14, 2021 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Join Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97274984078
    Meeting ID: 972 7498 4078

    More Information 
  • Apr
    13
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: TBD

    Kelsey Babcock

    Webb

    Kimberly Abt

    Freiman

    More Information 
  • Apr
    12
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Version Control with Git

    A practical introduction to version control for software management using Git. Topics covered include: creating a repository, checking the status of a repository, committing changes, viewing changes, reverting to older versions of files, and setting up a remote repository.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Deep learning is profoundly reshaping the research directions of entire scientific communities across mathematics, computer science, and statistics, as well as the physical, biological and medical sciences . Yet, despite their indisputable success, deep neural networks are known to be universally unstable. That is, small changes in the input that are almost undetectable produce significant changes in the output. This happens in applications such as image recognition and classification, speech and audio recognition, automatic diagnosis in medicine, image reconstruction and medical imaging as well as inverse problems in general. This phenomenon is now very well documented and yields non-human-like behaviour of neural networks in the cases where they replace humans, and unexpected and unreliable behaviour where they replace standard algorithms in the sciences.

    The many examples produced over the last years demonstrate the intricacy of this complex problem and the questions of safety and security of deep learning become crucial. Moreover, the ubiquitous phenomenon of instability combined with the lack of interpretability of deep neural networks makes the reproducibility of scientific results based on deep learning at stake.

    For these reasons, the development of mathematical foundations aimed at improving the safety and security of deep learning is of key importance. The goal of this workshop is to bring together experts from mathematics, computer science, and statistics in order to accelerate the exploration of breakthroughs and of emerging mathematical ideas in this area.

    More Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering
  • Apr
    9
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Babak Hemmatian (PhD student, Brown)

    Title: Taking the High Road: a Big Data Investigation of Natural Discourse in the Emerging Consensus about Marijuana Legalization

    Abstract: Over the past dozen years, marijuana legalization has defied increasing polarization in society at large and transformed from a hotly contested issue within the US into one that enjoys a broad consensus. Support has risen from 32% in 2008 to 67% in 2019 (Pew Research Center, 2019). This period coincides with the rise of social media. Research on online discourse has mainly examined the impact of generalized statements (e.g., arguments based on moral values) on mass attitude change. But my research shows that narratives about personal experiences and stances were the main drivers of discourse on marijuana legalization, often at the expense of more generalizable topics of discourse. To support this conclusion, I present analyses based on the largest corpus of marijuana legalization discussions, extracted from Reddit (~3M documents). We applied neural networks to classify comments by expressed attitude and whether they included arguments. We then used geolocation inference to distinguish U.S. discourse from international chatter and to separate pre- and post-legalization content given marijuana’s uneven status across the U.S. during the timeframe (2008-2019). Combining topic modeling with hierarchical clustering, we distinguished the themes that best explain changes in societal attitudes, showing the growing dominance of personal narratives in argumentative and non-argumentative discourse. I will finish by discussing related strands of research that identify the linguistic structure of narratives and arguments at the clause level, use neural networks to identify the same properties in the corpus, and test the ability of text-generating algorithms to produce coherent narratives and arguments.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    9
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title: “Insights for Rett Syndrome from the study of genetic modifiers in Mecp2 mice”

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    8
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: For passcode, please contact [email protected]

    Thursday, April 8, 1:00 PM

    Veronica Galvan

    Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies

    Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology

    University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

    San Antonio, TX

     

    “Title TBA”

     

    https://www.galvanlab.org

    More Information 
  • Apr
    8
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Yaoda Xu (Senior Research Scientist- Yale University)

    Title: Understanding visual representations in the human occipito-temporal and posterior parietal cortices and convolutional neural networks

    Abstract: In recent studies we showed that non-spatial visual information, including the contents of visual working memory, may be directly represented in the human posterior parietal cortex (PPC). While PPC visual representations exhibit representational diversity and tolerance to image transformations as those in the human occipito-temporal cortex (OTC), they are at the same time more resilient to distraction and under greater attentional control than those in OTC. This suggests the existence of two complementary visual processing systems in the human brain, with OTC participating in the largely invariant aspect of visual processing and PPC participating in the adaptive aspect of visual processing. Together, they provide us with both a stable representation of the visual environment and allow us to flexibly and efficiently interact with the external world. Using neuroscience approaches, I also examined the nature of visual representations in convolutional neural networks (CNNs). I found some similarities as well as large differences between the human OTC and CNNs. Thus despite CNNs’ impressive ability to successfully classify visual objects, there exists some fundamental differences in how visual information is represented in the human OTC and CNNs.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    April

    Details: April 8, 2021 at 12 p.m. ET.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available at 4:00 pm on 4/07/21.

     

    MATTHEW HAHN

    Distinguished Professor, Departments of Biology and Computer Science,

    Director, Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, University of Indiana

     

    THE EVOLUTION OF MAMMALIAN MUTATION RATES

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Matthew W. Hahn earned his B.S. degree from Cornell University and obtained his Ph.D. from Duke University under the mentorship of Mark Rausher. He was an NSF postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Davis with Charles Langley and John Gillespie. He is a Distinguished Professor of Biology and Computer Science at Indiana University, where he has held a faculty position since 2005. He currently directs IU’s Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics.

    His research focuses on how evolution has shaped organismal and genomic diversity, and how adaptation is achieved using multiple different types of molecular changes. His lab couples empirical studies of genome sequences with the development of mathematical theory, new statistical models, and the implementation of open-source software. His work introduced the first methods for quantifying and understanding gene gain and loss among species, applying them to primates to understand the differences between humans and our closest relatives. More recent methods developed by his lab have uncovered both the genes and the traits shared between species due to hybridization.

    He has published over 150 scientific articles and two books, which have collectively been cited more than 22,000 times. His research program has been supported by the U.S. NSF and NIH, as well as by the Australian Research Council. He has been the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, a fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Margaret Dayhoff Award from the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution, the Stebbins Medal from the International Association for Plant Taxonomy, and the Bicentennial Medal from Indiana University. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    7
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Lauren Franklin (PhD student, Brown)

    Title:
    Toddlers show adult-like sensitivity to consonants and vowels in early word representations

    Abstract:  In the second year of life, babies start rapidly learning words in their native language. Underlying this phenomenon are the phonological representations of these newly familiar words—because toddlers are in the earliest stages of word learning, they may not have developed detailed representations of their words. Previous work has suggested that toddlers, like adults, are sensitive to mispronunciations of consonants in familiar words (Swingley & Aslin, 2002; White & Morgan, 2008), but studies exploring vowel mispronunciations have yielded mixed results. However, Mani and colleagues (Mani & Plunkett, 2007; Mani, Coleman & Plunkett, 2008) found that toddlers are similarly sensitive to mispronunciations of vowels in early words. In this talk, I will present a study in which toddlers’ sensitivity to vowel and consonant mispronunciations is tested using eye tracking and compare these findings to an adult study using the same paradigm. Our study replicates and extends previous work by testing toddlers with a larger set of stimuli than Mani and colleagues using novel distractors as in White and Morgan.
    Our results show that toddlers demonstrate less sensitivity to mispronunciations of vowels than coda consonants, just like adults. However, time course analyses suggest that toddlers are (like adults) still sensitive to vowel mispronunciations: looking to the target image was delayed, if not diminished. Nevertheless, time course trajectories for vowel and coda consonant mispronunciations were strikingly different. As with adults, vowel mispronunciations do not inhibit lexical access to the same extent as consonants. In both consonant and vowel experiments, toddlers show comparable patterns to adults tested in a similar paradigm. These results provide evidence that toddlers not only have adult-like, detailed phonological representations of familiar words, but they also demonstrate adult-like flexibility during word recognition.
    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please email the MCBGP coordinator for access to this seminar.
    More Information 
  • Apr
    3
    Virtual
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Neuro DUG Imposter Syndrome Panel

    Hear from a panel of professors, postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, and undergraduate students about the issue of Imposter Syndrome in neuroscience. We will discuss how aspects of identity and background can impact our sense of belonging in the neuroscience field, and our panelists will share their experiences on navigating Imposter Syndrome in their own careers. We hope to see you there!

    More Information Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities, Training, Professional Development
  • The CAAS Rounds committee presents Hyeouk Chris Hahm, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Boston University School of Social Work 

    More Information 
  • Desiree Byrd, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Associate Professor, Department of Psychology

    Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

    Institutions, antiracism, and brain health equity: Is neuropsychology ready?

    Antiracist action is required for authentic, socially just neuropsychological practice. This talk will utilize the historical intersection of racism and cognitive assessment as a lens through which a critique of present-day neuropsychological training, research and clinical care can be completed. Together with examples from research in neuroHIV and dementia, this body of knowledge will be used to demonstrate how the reorientation of training and practice towards professional racial reconciliation can lead to equitable advances in neuropsychological science and service delivery.

    Zoom Link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/99822010940?pwd=VGNhVEswT2o1N0g4Sjdyb0xmeUgwUT09

    Meeting ID: 998 2201 0940

    Passcode: 813665

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Center for Biomedical Engineering and Carney Institute for Brain Science present a Joint Biomedical Engineering and Brain Science Seminar

    Healing the Brain Using Focused Ultrasound
    by Kullervo Hynynen, Ph.D.
    Vice President for Research, Sunnybrook Research Institute
    Dept. of Medical Biophysics
    University of Toronto

    Abstract: When combined with imaging-guidance focused ultrasound (FUS) provides means for localized delivery of mechanical energy deep into tissues. This focal energy deposition can modify tissue function via thermal or mechanical interactions with the tissue. MRI-guided hemi-spherical phased array technology with CT based beam modulation has made FUS treatments of brain through intact skull possible in the clinical setting. Thermal ablation of a target in a thalamus has been shown to be effective in the treatment of essential tremor and is now FDA approved. The impact of an ultrasound exposure can be potentiated by intravascular microbubbles that can enhance blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability for a wide variety of molecules, particles and even cells. The ability to modulate the BBB has been shown to be effective in animal models with initial patient trials showing clinical feasibility. In this talk, the progress in utilizing ultrasound phased array technology for brain treatments will be reviewed and its further potential discussed. 

    Hosted by Profs. Arto Nurmikko and Leigh Hochberg

    More Information 
  • Apr
    1
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception and Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Edward Vogel (Professor- University of Chicago)

    Title: The impact of distraction on working memory

    Abstract: Working memory is a capacity limited neural system that temporarily maintains information in an active state to support cognitive performance. Humans vary substantially in this ability and these individual differences are stable over time and are predictive of many high level functions such as academic performance and abstract reasoning. Because working memory can represent only a small amount of information at once, attentional mechanisms play a critical role in regulating the flow of information in this system by selectively representing task relevant information and disregarding irrelevant distracting information. Here, I will argue that these mechanisms for dealing with distraction are fundamental to understanding the operation of this memory system and that they are what primarily drive the differences between individuals in working memory ability. Drawing from a variety of behavioral and EEG approaches, my work provides evidence that the efficacy of deploying attentional control over time may provide a common thread linking working memory to other intelligent behaviors.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available on March 31 at 4:00 pm.

     

    MADZA FARIAS-VIRGENS

    Ph.D. Candidate, Molecular Celluar and Integrative Physiology, UCLA

    Visiting with the Huerta-Sanchez Lab, CCMB, Brown University

     

    NEUROGENETIC AND EVOLUTIONARY PROCESSES IN BENGALESE FINCH SONG: PARALLELS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STUDY OF HUMAN SPEECH

    The ability to learn how to produce sounds, in addition to associating innate sounds with external events or objects, enables speech and language acquisition in humans. Despite being quite rare or rudimentary among mammals, vocal production learning is very prominent in three bird groups: songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds. In this work, we identify genes and biological pathways of importance for functional aspects of vocal production learning in the Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica), a domesticated songbird commonly found in pet shops, but also a popular animal model in the study of learned vocal behaviors. The Bengalese finch has a remarkably complex song, in which transitions between vocal units are not fixed, introducing variability in song sequencing. This vocal complexity evolved during its domestication from the white-backed munia, a wild songbird easily found throughout East Asia. We use whole-genome sequencing data and analytical tools from population genomics to assess the contributions of selection processes (such as female choice for more complex songs) and demographic events (such as the major population bottleneck during domestication) in shaping the Bengalese finch’s genetic variation. Using genome-wide Fst scans, we identify several differentiated genomic regions between domesticated and wild songbirds, with the sex chromosome Z showing the greater proportion of highly differentiated genes. We also find that, as many domesticated animals, Bengalese finches are overall less genetically diverse than their wild ancestors, as shown by reduced average heterozygosity per sampled individual. However, genome-wide Tajimas’D scans show that genetic diversity in munias deviates less from expected across the genome, while diversity deviates more from the expected in Bengalese finches, with long stretches of the genome showing either considerable loss or gain of variability. Interestingly, domesticated and wild songbirds differ in multiple components of the dopamine system, a biopathway fundamental to vocal learning. Our results serve to guide further comparative efforts toward identifying convergent patterns of evolutionary change leading to vocal learning in our own species.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Madza is conducting a collaborative project between the Okanoya lab at RIKEN Brain Science Institute/University of Tokyo, the Huerta-Sanchez lab at Brown University, and the Xiao lab at IBP-UCLA. Her research investigates the evolutionary forces and neurogenetic mechanisms underlying changes in vocal behavior between Bengalese finches and their ancestral species, white-backed munias.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Harold Schlosberg Colloquium

    Speaker: Anna Papafragou

    Title: Event representations in language and cognition

    Abstract: Humans are surprisingly adept at interpreting what is happening around them, even from a single glance. Beginning at infancy, we are able to recognize dynamic events, the roles that various objects and entities play in these events and the temporal and causal components that make up events. Furthermore, we use language to describe our dynamic experiences in ways that reflect our underlying event understanding. Despite the central role of events in human cognition and language, the study of events within cognitive science has until recently remained fragmented. In this talk, I combine psycholinguistic, developmental and cross-linguistic approaches to address a series of key questions about the nature of events: What is the form of conceptual event representations? How do such representations make contact with language in both novice (child) and experienced (adult) communicators? Does cross-linguistic variation in how events are encoded affect the way we think about events in the world? Our findings show that abstract properties of event structure underlie both the conceptual and the linguistic encoding of event structure. Furthermore, the way learners acquire event language supports the presence of deep homologies between linguistic and non-linguistic event architecture. Finally, children and adults from different linguistic communities represent and remember events in similar ways, despite cross-linguistic variation in how events are encoded. Together, these results highlight novel connections between abstract event structure in language and cognition and bear on broad theories about how thought is related to language.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/99793754023

    Meeting ID: 997 9375 4023
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    Meeting ID: 997 9375 4023

    “Tau Imaging in Alzheimer’s Disease Clinical Trials”

    Adam Fleisher, MD, MAS

    Clinical Lead, Eli Lilly & Company

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  • Mar
    31
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jeremy Kuhn (Research Scientist- Institut Jean Nicod (CNRS), Ecole Normale Supérieure)

    Title: Negative concord in spoken and sign language

    Abstract: NPIs appear (roughly) in downward entailing environments. Why? Perhaps because in these environments, widening the domain strengthens the utterance; perhaps because exhaustifying alternatives doesn’t result in contradiction; perhaps because one scopal ordering entails the other. All these explanations turn out to pick out (roughly) the same contexts. Negative concord items appear in a smaller set of contexts: roughly, those that are anti-additive or anti-veridical, as in (1). Why? Here, semantic explanations are scarcer. But here’s one semantic property that these environments have: they prevent discourse referents from being introduced, as seen in (2). (1) Non ho visto nessuno. (Italian)
    not have seen nobody
    ‘I didn’t see anybody.’

    (2) I didn’t see a student in the room. ?? He was studying hard.

    In this talk, I propose that this is, in fact, the explanatory property of NC items. NC items are indefinites that flag the fact (in their lexical semantics) that they will fail to introduce a discourse referent. After spelling this out using dynamic semantics, I show that it has number of advantages: (1) It correctly predicts that NC items must appear under a local anti-veridical operator. (2) If the presupposition that the DR set is empty is made at-issue, we predict negative uses of NC items: exactly what’s attested in fragment answers and non-strict concord languages. (3) It perfectly unites negative concord with recent analyses of other concord phenomena (e.g. distributive concord).

    In the second part of the talk, I turn to typological data from sign languages. Sign languages, like spoken languages, show semantic variation, but, surprisingly, this variation populates a specific corner of the full typological landscape. When we focus on manual signs, sign languages tend to have distributive concord, but tend not to have negative concord. I explain these typological facts as the reflection of an abstract, iconic bias. Under the working theory, distributive concord and negative concord can be explained in relation to the discourse referents they make available. The use of space in sign language also invites iconic inferences about the referents introduced in discourse. I show that these iconic inferences coincide with the meaning of distributive concord but contradict the meaning of negative concord. The sign language typology is thus explained based on what is easy and hard to represent in space.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • As part of their educational outreach efforts to universities, AMGEN scientists will present a series of lectures in workshops that will cover all aspects of the drug discovery process from A to Z.

    Learn More More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • The Technology and Structural Inequality speaker series will focus on the impact of technology on marginalized communities. The series will bring together leading academics and activists whose work is influencing how we think about and how we fight against the harms that technology is causing. The speakers will examine how technology is being used to increase the surveillance and policing of marginalized communities and how many of these technologies are inherently biased and discriminatory.

    Please join us for a roundtable discussion on bias and discrimination in AI on March 31, 2021 at 11 a.m. This discussion will feature:

    • Rediet Abebe, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley and a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows
    • Mutale Nkonde, founding CEO of AI For the People (AFP), Practitioner Fellow at the Digital Civil Society Lab at Stanford, and an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center of Internet and Society at Harvard University
    • Meredith Broussard, Associate Professor of Journalism, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University

    Moderated by Seny Kamara, Associate Professor of Computer Science at Brown University and Chief Scientist at Aroki Systems.

    Free and open to the public. Please register to attend.

    Presented by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) in partnership with the Department of Computer Science’s Computing for the People Project.

    Speaker Bios:

    Rediet Abebe is an assistant professor of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley and a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. Abebe holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Cornell University and graduate degrees in mathematics from Harvard University and the University of Cambridge. Her research is in artificial intelligence and algorithms, with a focus on equity and justice concerns. Abebe co-founded and co-organizes Mechanism Design for Social Good (MD4SG) – a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary initiative. Her dissertation received the 2020 ACM SIGKDD Dissertation Award and an honorable mention for the ACM SIGEcom Dissertation Award for offering the foundations of this emerging research area. Abebe’s work has informed policy and practice at the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Ethiopian Ministry of Education. She has been honored in the MIT Technology Reviews’ 35 Innovators Under 35 and the Bloomberg 50 list as a one to watch. Abebe also co-founded Black in AI, a non-profit organization tackling equity issues in AI. Her research is influenced by her upbringing in her hometown of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Mutale Nkonde is the founder of AI For the People (AFP), a nonprofit communications firm.. AFP’s mission is to produce content that empowers general audiences to combat racial bias in tech. Prior to starting AI for the People, Nkonde worked in AI Governance. During that time, she was part of the team that introduced the Algorithmic Accountability Act, the DEEP FAKES Accountability Act, and the No Biometric Barriers to Housing Act to the US House of Representatives. In 2021 Nkonde was the lead author of Disinformation Creep: ADOS and the Weaponization of Breaking News, Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review, which kicked off her work in mis and disinformation. AI for the People recently co-produced a film with Amnesty International to support the ban the scan campaign a global push to ban facial recognition.

    Meredith Broussard is an associate professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and the author of the award-winning book Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. Her research focuses on artificial intelligence in investigative reporting, with a particular interest in using data analysis for social good. She is an affiliate faculty member at the Moore Sloan Data Science Environment at the NYU Center for Data Science, a 2019 Reynolds Journalism Institute Fellow, and her work has been supported by the Institute of Museum & Library Services as well as the Tow Center at Columbia Journalism School. A former features editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer, she has also worked as a software developer at AT&T Bell Labs and the MIT Media Lab. Her features and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, Vox, and other outlets. Follow her on Twitter @merbroussard or contact her via meredithbroussard.com.

    More Information 
  • Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Anita Devineni, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University.

    Abstract: The brain must integrate sensory cues from the world with internal information about an animal’s state to generate flexible behavioral responses. My work investigates how this occurs in the taste system of the fruit fly Drosophila. First, I will discuss the neural mechanisms by which a single taste cue can elicit opposing behaviors depending on hunger state, enabling an animal to adapt to changing internal needs. Second, I will describe novel temporal dynamics in the taste system that influence synaptic plasticity during learning, enabling experience-dependent flexibility. Finally, I will discuss preliminary data and future plans to investigate the broader repertoire of behaviors influenced by taste, how they are generated by neural circuits, and how they are modulated by internal states.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    26
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mingyu Song (PhD student , Princeton)

    Title: Using Recurrent Neural Networks to Understand Human Reward Learning

    Abstract: Computational models are greatly useful in cognitive science in revealing the mechanisms of learning and decision making. However, it is hard to know whether all meaningful variance in behavior has been account for by the best-fit model selected through model comparison. In this work, we propose to use recurrent neural networks (RNNs) to assess the limits of predictability afforded by a model of behavior, and reveal what (if anything) is missing in the cognitive models. We apply this approach in a complex reward-learning task with a large choice space and rich individual variability. The RNN models outperform the best known cognitive model through the entire learning phase. By analyzing and comparing model predictions, we show that the RNN models are more accurate at capturing the temporal dependency between subsequent choices, and better at identifying the subspace in the space of choices where participants behavior is more likely to reside. The RNNs can also capture individual differences across participants by utilizing an embedding. The usefulness of this approach suggests promising applications of using RNNs to predict human behavior in complex cognitive tasks, in order to reveal cognitive mechanisms and their variability.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • The CAAS Rounds Committee presents: “Characteristics of Young Adults Who Co-use Alcohol and Opioids” with Dr. Ryan Carpenter

    More Information 
  • Dr. Ryan Carpenter presents, “Prescribed opioid use in daily life: Negative mood, craving, and chronic pain”

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  • Mar
    26
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Mind Brain Research Day

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science and the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior for the 23rd Annual Mind Brain Research Day. Dr. Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D. will give the keynote address, entitled “Deciphering the Dynamics of the Unconscious Brain Under General Anesthesia”

    About Dr. Brown

    Dr. Emery Brown is the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School; an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital; and the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience at MIT. Dr. Brown is an anesthesiologist-statistician whose research is defining the neuroscience of how anesthetics produce general anesthesia. He also develops statistical methods for neuroscience data analysis. Dr. Brown has received the American Society of Anesthesiologists Excellence in Research Award and the Dickson Prize in Science, the Swartz Prize for Computational and Theoretical Neuroscience, and a Doctor of Science Honoris Causa from the University of Southern California. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Inventors. Dr. Brown is a member of the U. S. National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering.

    Abstract

    General anesthesia is a drug-induced, reversible condition comprised of five behavioral states: unconsciousness, amnesia (loss of memory), antinociception (loss of pain sensation), akinesia (immobility), and hemodynamic stability with control of the stress response. Our work shows that a primary mechanism through which anesthetics create these altered states of arousal is by initiating and maintaining highly structured oscillations. These oscillations impair communication among brain regions. We illustrate this effect by presenting findings from our human studies of general anesthesia using high-density EEG recordings and intracranial recordings. These studies have allowed us to give a detailed characterization of the neurophysiology of loss and recovery of consciousness due to propofol. We show how these dynamics change systematically with different anesthetic classes and with age. As a consequence, we have developed a principled, neuroscience-based paradigm for using the EEG to monitor the brain states of patients receiving general anesthesia. We demonstrate that the state of general anesthesia can be rapidly reversed by activating specific brain circuits. Finally, we demonstrate that the state of general anesthesia can be controlled using closed loop feedback control systems. The success of our research has depended critically on tight coupling of experiments, signal processing research and mathematical modeling.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions:  

    Title:  Explorations of brain dynamics in reptilian sleep and cuttlefish camouflage  

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  • Mar
    24
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Nikole Giovannone (PhD student, UConn)

    Title: Individual differences in acoustic-phonetic and lexical contributions to speech perception

    Abstract: Listeners make use of many cues, including acoustic-phonetic information and lexical knowledge, in order to guide speech perception. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that individual differences in the usage of these cues may be linked to receptive language ability. In this talk, I will present two recent studies from our lab that assessed the relationship between receptive language ability and the relative use of acoustic-phonetic and lexical cues for speech perception. In Study 1, we found that individuals with weaker receptive language ability demonstrated increased reliance on lexical information for speech perception compared to those with stronger receptive language ability. This relationship may reflect differences in how acoustic and lexical cues are weighted during phonetic categorization. In Study 2, we investigated whether the increased lexical reliance observed in Study 1 is the consequence of the specific stimulus distribution used, in which acoustic-phonetic information is the more informative cue for phonetic categorization than lexical context. When the stimulus distribution was altered such that lexical context was the more informative cue for phonetic categorization, individuals with weaker receptive language abilities still demonstrated increased reliance on lexical cues relative to individuals with stronger receptive language abilities. These results suggest that listeners with weaker receptive language abilities down-weight acoustic-phonetic cues and rely more heavily on lexical knowledge during everyday speech perception.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Wei Hu
    Princeton University
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Abstract: Despite the phenomenal empirical successes of deep learning in many application domains, its underlying mathematical mechanisms remain poorly understood. Mysteriously, deep neural networks in practice can often fit training data almost perfectly and generalize remarkably well to unseen test data, despite highly non-convex optimization landscapes and significant over-parameterization. A solid theory not only can help us understand such mysteries, but also will be the key to improving the practice of deep learning and making it more principled, reliable, and easy-to-use.
    In this talk, I will present our recent progress on building the theoretical foundations of deep learning, by opening the black box of the interactions among data, model architecture, and training algorithm. First, I will show that gradient descent on deep linear neural networks induces an implicit bias towards low-rank solutions, which leads to an improved method for the classical low-rank matrix completion problem. Next, turning to nonlinear deep neural networks, I will talk about a line of studies on wide neural networks, where by drawing a connection to the neural tangent kernels, we can answer various questions such as how training loss is minimized, why trained network can generalize well, and why certain component in the network architecture is useful; we also use theoretical insights to design a new simple and effective method for training on noisily labeled datasets. In closing, I will discuss key questions going forward towards building practically relevant theoretical foundations of modern machine learning.
     
    Bio: Wei Hu is a PhD candidate in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University, advised by Sanjeev Arora. Previously, he obtained his B.E. in Computer Science from Tsinghua University. He has also spent time as a research intern at research labs of Google and Microsoft. His current research interest is broadly in the theoretical foundations of modern machine learning. In particular, his main focus is on obtaining solid theoretical understanding of deep learning, as well as using theoretical insights to design practical and principled machine learning methods. He is a recipient of the Siebel Scholarship Class of 2021.
    Host: Eli Upfal
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  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation with Brown University alumni Josh Cohen and Justin Klee about their journey from a dorm room to the development of a potential treatment for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and ALS.

    Cohen and Klee are the founders of Amylyx, a Cambridge-based pharmaceutical company dedicated to the development of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. 

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    22
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Building Software on Oscar

    Learn how to build and install software packages on Oscar. Topics covered include: make, cmake, compiler options on Oscar, pip, building python packages from source, and python virtual environments.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Mar
    22
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Tamar Kushnir, Associate Professor, Cornell

    Title: “Learning levels of explanation for human action”

    Abstract: Our ordinary intuitions about human behavior include the idea that single actions can have multiple plausible explanations, and multiple motivations. Why I sit down to a holiday meal with family, for example, could be because of hunger, because like especially like the food being served, because I like spending time with my family, or something to do with the holiday itself. But what is my true motivation? Often this latter question brings into focus a tension between two “levels” of explanation: on one hand, we have subjective, personal reasons for acting in certain ways, and on the other hand, we have interpersonal, or social reasons. In this talk I’ll discuss a series of studies showing how children learn which explanations are most likely, the role that trade-offs between personal and social motives plays in social evaluation, and how we as teachers contribute to creating explanatory biases that follow us from childhood to adult life.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sarah Dean
    UC Berkeley
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Title: Reliable Machine Learning in Feedback Systems
    Abstract: Machine learning techniques have been successful for processing complex information, and thus they have the potential to play an important role in data-driven decision-making and control. However, ensuring the reliability of these methods in feedback systems remains a challenge, since classic statistical and algorithmic guarantees do not always hold.

    In this talk, I will provide rigorous guarantees of safety and discovery in dynamical settings relevant to robotics and recommendation systems. I take a perspective based on reachability, to specify which parts of the state space the system avoids (safety) or can be driven to (discovery). For data-driven control, we show finite-sample performance and safety guarantees which highlight relevant properties of the system to be controlled. For recommendation systems, we introduce a novel metric of discovery and show that it can be efficiently computed. In closing, I discuss how the reachability perspective can be used to design social-digital systems with a variety of important values in mind.
    Bio: Sarah is a PhD candidate in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley, advised by Ben Recht. She received her MS in EECS from Berkeley and BSE in Electrical Engineering and Math from the University of Pennsylvania. Sarah is interested in the interplay between optimization, machine learning, and dynamics in real-world systems. Her research focuses on developing principled data-driven methods for control and decision-making, inspired by applications in robotics, recommendation systems, and developmental economics. She is a co-founder of a transdisciplinary student group, Graduates for Engaged and Extended Scholarship in computing and Engineering, and the recipient of a Berkeley Fellowship and a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.
    Host: Karianne Bergen
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  • Mindfulness-based treatments are emerging as additional intervention options for individuals struggling with various psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder and addiction. In addition, with the day-to-day stress of the COVID-19 pandemic, people are looking for a way to cope with anxiety and grief, and mindful practices may be particularly relevant for this challenging time.

    This event will bring together researchers and health professionals who have extensive experience with mindfulness in research and in clinical settings. The panel will explore the underlying brain mechanisms supporting mindfulness, current research practices, as well as existing and potential future clinical applications of mindfulness techniques. In addition, the conversation will highlight experiences of both mindfulness teachers and practitioners, one of whom will describe their own interest in, and experience with, one form of mindfulness practice.

    Join us for a panel-style discussion followed by a question and answer session. The event will take place on Zoom Webinars.

    Please register to attend. Zoom details will be sent after registration.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    19
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Felipe De Brigard (Associate Professor, Duke)

    Title: Moral memories and the self

    Abstract: It is commonly held that autobiographical memory structures our personal identity through time, and that it provides the foundation of our enduring self. Recently, however, a number of studies have shown that the continuity of our moral traits and the systematicity of our moral decision-making may be more important to our judgments of self and personhood than the continuity of our autobiographical memories. What is unclear, though, is how autobiographical memory and moral decision-making interact. In this talk I will explore this issue, and will present some results that speak to the way in which people remember personal events involving moral decision-making, and how they help to shape our self-identity.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please note this talk is for faculty only. A Zoom link will be sent to registrants prior to the talk.

    Please note the following talk is only available to faculty members.

     

    SEAN MONAGHAN, MD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Surgery, Brown University

     

    Lots of Data from Really Sick Patients: What to Do?

    The generation of genomic data is exceeding the generation of data from other sources such as YouTube and Twitter. When the genomic data comes from a patient or multiple patients with similar diseases how do we utilize it to inform clinical practice? When this data comes from very sick patients, can we use it to better care? How can we manage all this data as it relates to patients when we are trained to use very specific tests. This talk will highlight some data from critically ill patients with COVID and how we use that data in patient care. We will also discuss other data management techniques and why they may not be applicable in the real-world scenario of COVID-19. It is hoped that there will be a robust discussion of other techniques from other disciplines.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Sean F. Monaghan, MD, FACS, is an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Brown University and a member of the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care and the Division of Surgical Research. His research attempts to understand the biology of RNA splicing in critically ill trauma and surgical patients using Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) as a model disease. He uses both human samples and animal models as well as large data sets (GTEx) with computation and molecular biology techniques in his research. His research hopes to translate RNA sequencing technology for use by clinicians in the intensive care unit. Dr. Monaghan has been supported by the American College of Surgeons C. James Carrico Faculty Research Fellowship and the National Institutes of Health as a Pilot Project and the Principal Investigator for Project 5 of the CardioPulmonary Vascular Biology Center of Biomedical Research Excellence.

     

    (F4F) Faculty for Faculty Research Talks

    DSI Faculty for Faculty Research Talks are an opportunity for faculty to share current data science-related research activities with other faculty colleagues in an informal environment. The talks are presented at a very general level, to stimulate discussion and interdisciplinary interchange of ideas.

    Our goal is to provide a networking venue that promotes research collaborations between faculty across all disciplines; awareness of the breadth of data science-related research at Brown; and a forum for faculty to share their expertise with one another. Participation will be limited to faculty members.

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  • Mar
    19
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Marisa Carrasco ( Julius Silver Professor- NYU)

    Title: Attention shapes perception

    Abstract: Visual attention is essential for visual perception. Spatial attention allows us to grant priority in processing and selectively process information at a given location. In this talk, I will present: (1) psychophysical experiments investigating how endogenous (voluntary) and exogenous (involuntary) covert attention improve contrast sensitivity at attended locations while differentially affecting spatial frequency; (2) neuroimaging (fMRI) experiments differentiating effects of endogenous and exogenous attention on occipital cortex; (3) a neurostimulation experiment establishing that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on occipital cortex extinguishes the effects of exogenous attention. Together these studies reveal how endogenous and exogenous attention shape perception by altering the processing of basic visual dimensions.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception and Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Evangelos Christou (Professor- University of Florida)


    Title: TBD

    Abstract: TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    BME Seminar: Lei Tian, Boston University

    Center for Biomedical Engineering Seminar

    Title: Towards Wearable Large-Scale Neural Recording by Computational Miniature Mesoscope

    Abstract: Large-scale fluorescence imaging is indispensable to biology and neuroscience. The need for imaging in freely behaving animals further drives the development in miniaturized microscopes (miniscopes). However, conventional microscopes / miniscopes are inherently constrained by their limited space-bandwidth product, shallow depth-of-field, and the inability to resolve 3D distributed emitters. In this talk, I will present Computational Miniature Mesoscope (CM2) that overcomes these bottlenecks and enables single-shot 3D imaging across an 8 × 7-mm2 field-of-view and 2.5-mm depth-of-field, achieving 7-µm lateral resolution. Notably, the CM2 has a compact lightweight design that integrates a microlens array for imaging and an LED array for excitation in a single platform. Its imaging capability is enabled by computational imaging that uses algorithms to augment optics. CM2 may open up new exciting opportunities in a wide range of large-scale in vivo 3D neural recording and biomedical applications.

    Bio: Lei Tian is an Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering department and leads the Computational Imaging Systems lab (http://sites.bu.edu/tianlab/) at Boston University. He received his Ph.D. (2013) and M.S. (2010) from MIT. He was a postdoctoral associate in the EECS department at University of California, Berkeley 2013-2016. His research focuses on computational microscopy, neurophotonics, imaging in complex media, and machine learning for biomedical microscopy.
    Dr. Tian’s awards include NSF CAREER award, the 2018 Boston University Dean’s Catalyst Award, the 2018 SPIE Fumio Okano Best 3D Paper Prize, the 2014 OSA Imaging Systems and Applications Best Paper Award, and the 2011 OSA Emil Wolf Outstanding Student Paper Prize.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 935 8312 0922
    Passcode: series

    CLPS - Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium Series

    Speaker: Jim Sidanius

    Title: The Interactive Dynamics of Sexism and Racism and the Theory of Gendered Prejudice

    Abstract: Using evolutionary psychology and social dominance theory as theoretical frameworks, we argue that outgroup prejudice and discrimination are essentially gendered phenomena. Among other things this implies that: a) males will tend to display higher levels of xenophobia, social predation, and social dominance than will females, everything else being equal, b) outgroup males rather than outgroup females, will tend to be the primary targets of outgroup discrimination and aggression, and c) the motives for outgroup discrimination will be are somewhat different for ingroup males and females. We suggest that while outgroup discrimination will be proximally driven by some combination of aggression and social dominance among ingroup males, Among females outgroup discrimination will be proximally driven by fear, especially fear of sexual coercion at the hands of outgroup males.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • VA RR&D Center for Neurorestoration and Neurotechnology Quarterly Seminar Series

    “Improving reliability of BCI Control Using Neural Plasticity”

    Karunesh Ganguly, M.D., Ph.D.

    Associate Professor, Neurology

     University of California San Francisco

    Weill Institute of Neurosciences

     

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • The next Providence Sleep Research Interest Group (PSRIG) seminar will feature Adriane Soehner, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    Soehner’s presentation is entitled: “Sleep, neurodevelopment, and vulnerability to mood disorders in adolescence.”

    Abstract

    Soehner’s research uses a developmental affective neuroscience approach to investigate the role of sleep-circadian processes in the onset, course, and treatment of mood disorders.

    About PSRIG Seminar Series

    The PSRIG Seminar Series has been hosted by Professor Mary Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for more than 25 years. PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research.

    If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected].

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • This workshop will cover basic performance optimization techniques using parallel computing techniques in MATLAB, including: parallel for-loops (parfor), single program multiple data (spmd), and distributed arrays. We assume that participants have a relatively advanced knowlege of the MATLAB programming language and have written at least one scientific computing application.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Mar
    15
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Melissa Kibbe (Boston University)

    Title: Object representations from the concrete to the abstract: Insights from prelinguistic infants

    Abstract: The question of how we form mental representations of objects is one of the most fundamental in cognitive science. In this talk, I will present research from my lab investigating this question in prelinguistic infants. I will show that, even with limited conceptual and linguistic knowledge and limited working memory capacity, infants’ representations of objects are fundamentally abstract, yielding new insights into the basic structure of object representations in cognition.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    12
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    CLPS - Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Robb Rutledge (Assistant Professor, Yale University)

    Title: A Computational and Neural Model for Mood Dynamics

    Abstract: The happiness of individuals is an important metric for societies, but we know little about how daily life events are aggregated into subjective feelings. We have shown that happiness depends on the history of rewards and expectations, a result we have now replicated in thousands of individuals using smartphone-based data collection and quantified in relation to major depression. Using fMRI, we show how happiness relates to neural activity in the ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. With data collected in the lab and with our new smartphone app The Happiness Project, we are using computational models to show precisely how feelings vary across individuals in relation to a variety of factors including intrinsic rewards, future prospects, and reinforcement learning.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • The CAAS Rounds Committee presents: “Prenatal Substance Use and Maternal and Infant Health” with Dr. Laura Stroud

    More Information 
  • Mar
    12
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 907489

    Title:  Computational principles underlying the learning of sensorimotor repertoires

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  • Mar
    11

    Thursday, March 11, 1:00 PM

    Susana Gonzalo-Hervas, PhD

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    St Louis University School of Medicine

    St Louis, MO

     

    “The danger of self-DNA accumulation in the cytoplasm during aging”

     

    https://biochem.slu.edu/faculty/gonzalo/

    More Information 
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ramesh Balasubramaniam (Professor - UC Merced)

    Title: Music, movement, and the human brain

    Abstract: Musical performance involves moving various segments of the body in a systematic and meaningful way with respect to the environment. Studying how these movements are organized involves a good understanding of sensory processes, cognitive skills and motor control. In this talk, I will specifically focus on the perception and production of rhythm in musical contexts. From studying the timing aspect of these behaviors, we can understand 1) how the brain organizes sequential movements 2) how rhythmic structure might be represented, and 3) how complex sequences are learned. I will bring together evidence from neurophysiological and behavioral data in presenting a coherent view of the neural representation of timing in skilled performance. And finally, I will discuss what the role of the motor system might be during passive listening.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • CLPS - Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium Series
    Speaker: Dan Jurafsky (Stanford University)
    Title: “Does This Vehicle Belong to You?”: Extracting Social Meaning from Language by Computer
    Abstract: Police body-worn cameras have the potential to play an important role in understanding and improving police-community relations. In this talk I describe a series of studies conducted by our large interdisciplinary team at Stanford that use speech and natural language processing on body-camera recordings to model the interactions between police officers and community members in traffic stops. We draw on linguistic models of dialogue structure and of interpersonal relations like respect to automatically quantify aspects of the interaction from the text and audio. I describe the differences we find in the language directed toward black versus white community members, and offer suggestions for how these findings can be used to help improve the relations between police officers and the communities they serve. I’ll also cover a number of our results on computational analysis of social meaning, like measuring historical societal biases, or detecting framing, agenda-setting and political polarization in the media. Together, these studies highlight how computational linguistics can help us interpret latent social content behind the words we use.
    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium Series

    Speaker: Dan Jurafsky

    Title: “Does This Vehicle Belong to You?”: Extracting Social Meaning from Language by Computer

    Abstract:  Police body-worn cameras have the potential to play an important role in understanding and improving police-community relations. In this talk I describe a series of studies conducted by our large interdisciplinary team at Stanford that use speech and natural language processing on body-camera recordings to model the interactions between police officers and community members in traffic stops. We draw on linguistic models of dialogue structure and of interpersonal relations like respect to automatically quantify aspects of the interaction from the text and audio. I describe the differences we find in the language directed toward black versus white community members, and offer suggestions for how these findings can be used to help improve the relations between police officers and the communities they serve. I’ll also cover a number of our results on computational analysis of social meaning, like measuring historical societal biases, or detecting framing, agenda-setting and political polarization in the media. Together, these studies highlight how computational linguistics can help us interpret latent social content behind the words we use.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Sameer ud Dowla Khan (Associate Professor - Reed College)

    Title: TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    10
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

    Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms Linking Childhood Adversity with Psychopathology Across the Life-Course
    Katie McLaughlin, PhD
    John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences
    Harvard University
    Department of Psychology
    Wednesday, March 10, 2021 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/Child-Adolescent-2021

    Join Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/96911234364
    Meeting ID: 969 1123 4364
    Password: dphb

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: TBD

    Corinne Hutfilz

    Tatar

    Jeremy Horrell

    Neretti

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  • Please join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) on March 8 for a special seminar on “Untangling brain-wide current flow using neural network models,” featuring Kanaka Rajan, assistant professor of neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Friedman Brain Institute.

    Abstract:

    The Rajan Lab designs neural network models constrained by experimental data, and reverse engineers them to figure out how brain circuits function in health and disease. Recently, we have been developing a powerful new theory-based framework for “in-vivo tract tracing” from multi-regional neural activity collected experimentally.

    We call this framework CURrent-Based Decomposition (CURBD). CURBD employs recurrent neural networks (RNNs) directly constrained, from the outset, by time series measurements acquired experimentally, such as Ca2+ imaging or electrophysiological data. Once trained, these data-constrained RNNs let us infer matrices quantifying the interactions between all pairs of modeled units. Such model-derived “directed interaction matrices” can then be used to separately compute excitatory and inhibitory input currents that drive a given neuron from all other neurons. Therefore different current sources can be de-mixed – either within the same region or from other regions, potentially brain-wide – which collectively give rise to the population dynamics observed experimentally. Source de-mixed currents obtained through CURBD allow an unprecedented view into multi-region mechanisms inaccessible from measurements alone.

    We have applied this method successfully to several types of neural data from our experimental collaborators, e.g., zebrafish (Deisseroth lab, Stanford), mice (Harvey lab, Harvard), monkeys (Rudebeck lab, Sinai), and humans (Rutishauser lab, Cedars Sinai), where we have discovered both directed interactions brain wide and inter-area currents during different types of behaviors. With this powerful framework based on data-constrained multi-region RNNs and CURrent Based Decomposition (CURBD), we ask if there are conserved multi-region mechanisms across different species, as well as identify key divergences.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    8
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Using Matlab on Oscar

    An introduction to using Matlab on Oscar. Topics covered include: working with Matlab interactively on Oscar, using the Matlab GUI, and using Matlab in batch jobs.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Mar
    8
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Gabor Brody, Postdoctoral Researcher, Brown University

    Title: Discourse referents in infancy

    Abstract: How do young infants construe discrete entities from continuous perceptual input? The consensus view in developmental psychology identifies two types of relevant cognitive mechanisms. First there are perceptual processes that create spatiotemporally bound object representations. Second, there are conceptual/linguistic processes that describe these entities under kind description (car, duck, etc.).In this talk, I will show that this view is empirically inadequate: conceptual descriptions do not not always describe spatiotemporally bound object representations. I will argue instead that infants bind these descriptions to entities represented in the communicative context. To adopt terminology from linguistics, infants represent and reason over discourse referents: entities that are under discussion.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Fritz Lekschas
    Harvard University
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Abstract: Visually exploring data is a powerful approach to discover, understand, and interpret novel or not-well defined patterns. It allows us to gain insights and generate hypotheses for subsequent analyses. However, visual exploration can become challenging when the patterns of interest are sparsely-distributed, several orders of magnitude smaller than the entire dataset, or detected with high uncertainty.

    In this talk, I will present new visualization systems and interaction techniques for efficiently browsing, comparing, and finding patterns in the context of genomic, geospatial, and time-series data. Specifically, I will describe a web platform for browsing multi-modal and multi-scale datasets, as well as their guided navigation. I will present a generalized framework and toolkit for interactively arranging, grouping, and aggregating thousands of pattern instances. And I will demonstrate how interactive visual machine learning can enhance our ability to find patterns effectively. In combining visualization and human-centered machine-learning, these systems ensure that human-in-the-loop data analysis remains feasible with increasingly-large and complex scientific datasets.
    Bio: Fritz Lekschas is a Ph.D. candidate in computer science at Harvard University, where he is advised by Hanspeter Pfister. His research focuses on the development of scalable visual exploration systems for analyzing patterns in biomedical data. Prior to his doctoral program, Fritz visited Harvard Medical School as a post-graduate research fellow to work with Nils Gehlenborg and Peter J. Park on ontology-guided exploration of biological data repositories. He earned his bachelor’s and master of science degrees in bioinformatics from the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. Fritz’s work has been recognized with several awards, including a Siebel Scholars Award, the Best Paper Award from EuroVis 2020, and a Best Paper Honorable Mention from IEEE InfoVis 2020.
    Host: David Laidlaw
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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: 794589

    Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Neural correlates of perception in the mouse visual system,” featuring Lindsey Glickfeld, associate professor of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine. 

    Abstract:

    The visual system transforms sensory inputs into representations used for perception, planning and behavior. Our goal is to understand the circuit and synaptic mechanisms that support these transformations in the early stages of cortical processing. We are addressing this question in the mouse in order to take advantage of its genetic and experimental accessibility. The mouse is also a good behavioral subject, allowing us to combine careful manipulations and measurements of the animal’s perceptual state with large-scale neural recordings across diverse cortical areas. Together with computational modeling, this approach will ultimately allow us to understand how specific circuits in the visual system support perception and behavior.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    5
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Kimberly Chiew (Assistant Professor, University of Denver)

    Title: How Affect and Motivation Guide Adaptive Cognition

    Abstract: Motivational influences can critically shape task performance and memory formation. Often, motivation-related changes in cognitive performance can be understood as occurring in the service of adaptive human behavior. However, the factors that modulate effects of motivation on performance outcomes, as well as how modulations across different cognitive domains potentially interact, is not yet well understood. In the present talk, I discuss recent research that examines how factors including timing, valence, and individual differences can influence motivated cognition outcomes across domains including cognitive control, emotion regulation, memory encoding, and information seeking. Given evidence for mesolimbic dopamine as a candidate neuromodulator by which motivation can influence cognition, I will discuss implications for biological mechanisms underlying our behavioral observations as well as directions for future work investigating interactions between motivated control and memory processes.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • The CAAS Rounds Committee welcomes Dr. Margarita Alegria, Chief of the Disparities Research Unit, Mass General 

    More Information 
  • Vaggos Chatziafratis
    Google Research NY
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Title: From Darwin to Deep Learning: A tale of Algorithms, Optimization and Chaos
    Abstract: In this talk, we shed new light on two basic questions in machine learning using ideas from approximation algorithms, optimization and dynamical systems.

    The first question concerns a popular tool in unsupervised learning that partitions a dataset in a hierarchical manner, called Hierarchical Clustering. Despite its long history and plethora of heuristics, a principled framework for understanding its optimization properties had been missing. Our work takes a formal approach and puts Hierarchical Clustering on a firm theoretical grounding, highlighting new connections to convex optimization and graph algorithms.


    The second question concerns the benefits of depth in neural networks. A crucial element in the success of deep learning is the deployment of progressively deeper networks, but is there a mathematical explanation behind this phenomenon? Introducing new ideas from discrete dynamical systems, we present depth vs width tradeoffs, showing that for certain tasks, depth can be exponentially more important than width.

    Bio: Vaggos Chatziafratis’ primary interests are in Algorithms and Machine Learning Theory. He is currently a Visiting Faculty Researcher at Google Research in New York, hosted by Mohammad Mahdian and Vahab Mirrokni, where he is part of the Algorithms and Graph Mining teams. Prior to that, he received his Ph.D. in Computer Science at Stanford, where he was part of the Theory group, advised by Tim Roughgarden and co-advised by Moses Charikar. His PhD thesis was on algorithms and their limitations for Hierarchical Clustering. Prior to Stanford, he received a Diploma in EECS from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece.
    Host: Daniel Ritchie
    More Information 
  • Mar
    5
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please register to receive attendee link.

    The CRISPR Revolution: The Power & Promise of Gene Editing

    Please join us on Thursday, March 4, 2021, at 4 p.m. for the Inaugural Lemley Family Leadership Lecture Series, “The CRISPR Revolution: The Power & Promise of Gene Editing,” featuring Jennifer A. Doudna, Ph.D., Li Ka Shing Chancellor’s Chair and Professor, Department of Chemistry, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Co-recipient of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The introduction and moderated discussion will be with President Christina H. Paxson.

    The Lemley Family Leadership Lecture Series invites exceptional leaders who are preeminent in their field to campus to engage and inspire the University community.

    Established in 2020 through a generous gift made by Wayne C. Lemley ’80 Ph.D., the series features highly accomplished scholars, thought leaders, policymakers and practitioners who will inform, challenge and educate — advancing Brown’s commitment to promoting a vibrant intellectual environment.

    Registration is required. Closed captioning will be provided. To request additional accommodations or assistance for this event, please contact the University Event & Conference Services Office at [email protected].  A link to join the event will be in your confirmation email.

    Register More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    4
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Brian Rogers (Professor- Pembroke College, Oxford)

    Title: The Perception of the “3-D” World: Conceptions and Misconceptions

    Abstract: Traditionally, “3-D” perception has been considered to be a special problem for the visual system. The cause of the problem has often been attributed to the fact that the retina is essentially a 2-D surface and hence there is an infinite number of real world scenes - “equivalent configurations” - that could create the same image on that surface. This is a misleading conception. I also want to argue that many of the ways in which we study “3-D” perception, including the use of line stimuli and random dot stereograms with a limited visual extent, have hindered our understanding of how we perceive the natural world. Moreover, the phrase “3-D perception” itself suggests that we start with something called “2-D perception” - a flat world(?) - prior to adding the third dimension. As terrestrial creatures, we have evolved in a three-dimensional world consisting of a ground plane surface together with objects and structures that rest on or grow out of that surface and this is likely to be reflected in the mechanisms we use to extract information about the world.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    4
    Virtual
    12:00pm

    Algorithms and Uncertainty

    Sahil Singla
    Princeton University/Institute for Advanced Study
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
     
    Abstract: Modern algorithms have to regularly deal with uncertain inputs. This uncertainty can take many forms, e.g., in online advertisement future users are unknown (the input arrives online), in spectrum-auctions bidder valuations are unknown (the users are strategic), and in oil-drilling the amount of oil is unknown (the input is stochastic). Traditionally, there has not been significant overlap in the study of these different forms of uncertainty. I believe that studying these uncertainties together gives us a lot more power. In this talk, I will give an overview of my research in “Algorithms and Uncertainty” where I am able to successfully use these relationships.

    Studying these different forms of uncertainty together allows us to find interconnections and build unifying techniques. As an example, I will talk about my progress on long-standing combinatorial auctions problems that deal with strategic inputs, by using techniques which were originally developed for online inputs. Moreover, a combined study of uncertainty helps us find richer cross-cutting models. For example, several important online problems do not admit good algorithms in the classical worst-case models. I will talk about how to give a “beyond the worst-case” analysis for such problems and obtain more nuanced performance guarantees, by using models/techniques arising in other forms of uncertainty.
    Bio: Sahil Singla is a Research Instructor (postdoc) jointly between Princeton University and Institute for Advanced Study. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, where he was advised by Anupam Gupta and Manuel Blum. His research is in Algorithms and Uncertainty where the goal is to design optimal algorithms for uncertain inputs by studying different forms of uncertainty together. Sahil has served on the program committees of the conferences SODA, ICALP, EC, and ESA. His research has been invited for talks at Highlights Beyond EC, at China Theory Week, and at Highlights of Algorithms. He recently contributed a chapter to the book “Beyond the Worst-Case Analysis of Algorithms”.
    Host: Philip Klein
    More Information 
  • Center for Biomedical Engineering Seminar

    Title: Chemically Fueled Assembly of Colloids and Protein Hydrogels Inspired by Out of Equilibrium Biological Processes

    Abstract: Biological processes occur far from equilibrium through the continual supply and dissipation of energy in the form of heat and chemical energy (e.g. ATP, GTP). For instance, tubulin proteins form microtubules that exhibit continuous out of equilibrium growth and collapse to facilitate nutrient transport and cell division. This process is referred to as dissipative assembly because it is facilitated by continuous influx and dissipative of chemical energy, which is distinct from conventional self assembly. In this seminar I will discuss work in our lab investigating two chemically fueled dissipative assembly systems. The first part of the seminar will discuss chemically fueled assembly of micron scale colloids, where a carbodiimide molecule temporarily converts carboxylic acid surface ligands to hydrophobic esters, which transiently assembles the colloids. Experiments and colloidal interaction modeling find that a delicate balance of steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions mediate dissipative colloid assembly. Selective screening of hydrophobic interactions with surfactants emphasizes their critical role in dissipative assembly and enables overcoming kinetic traps. The second particle of the seminar will discuss redox reaction fueled assembly of self-annihilating protein hydrogels. A protein containing many cysteine groups is chemically oxidized with an excess of a weak reducing agent present to form transient protein hydrogels that autonomously collapse after hours. We investigate the role of protein unfolding, solvent accessibility of cysteine groups, and protein-protein interactions on the hydrogel formation kinetics and demonstrate self-annihilating hydrogels with unique functions for controlled molecular release, such as burst and staged release of molecules.

    Bio: Prof. Taylor J. Woehl obtained his B.S. in Ceramic Engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of California, Davis in 2013. He was an Assistant Research Scientist at Ames DOE Laboratory from 2013-2014, followed by an NRC postdoctoral fellowship from 2014-2016 in the Material Measurement Lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Prof. Woehl joined the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at University of Maryland, College Park in 2016 as an assistant professor with affiliate appointments in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. He leads the Nanoscale Assembly and Electron Microscopy Lab, which focuses on topics including nanochemistry of nanocrystal formation, chemical reaction driven self-assembly of colloids, colloidal electrokinetics, and protein aggregation.

    More Information 
  • Mar
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Meredith Tamminga (Associate Professor - UPenn)
    Title: Interspeaker covariation in sound changes: A hierarchical clustering approach
    Abstract: Philadelphia English exhibits a number of well-studied vowel changes that take place gradually over the course of the 20th century. Labov, Rosenfelder & Fruehwald (2013) show that some of these changes continue in a single direction throughout this time period, while others appear to reverse direction around the middle of the century. In this talk I discuss what we can learn about these different change outcomes by investigating covariation relationships between the changing vowels across individuals. I first present recent work using pairwise correlations to show that a) the reversing changes are correlated while the continuing changes are not (Tamminga 2019), and b) the interspeaker covariation between the reversing changes is present from the beginning of our data, predating the onset of reversal (Tamminga forthcoming). I then discuss work in progress (with Dr. Lacey Wade) that uses hierarchical clustering to investigate change covariation across multiple vowels simultaneously. I focus on two questions: what new information we can gain from this kind of approach that is not available when each change is treated separately, and how might that new information contribute to our understanding of change over time?
    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Shahin Jabbari
    Harvard University
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Abstract: AI systems and algorithms affect and improve our lives on a daily basis. Recently, there has been a large body of empirical evidence for the negative consequences of such systems on our society. In this talk, I discuss two categories of these negative impacts. In the first part, I focus on AI systems whose decisions directly impact humans (e.g., in settings such as hiring and lending). I show how to mathematically quantify bias and discrimination in these settings, as well as how to build algorithmic frameworks that provably mitigate such undesirable consequences. In the second part, I focus on the indirect impacts of AI systems on humans. In particular, I study the interactions between AI systems and show how tools from game theory can be used to design systems that lead to socially desirable outcomes.
    Bio: Shahin Jabbari is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Research on Computation and Society (CRCS) in the school of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University hosted by Milind Tambe. Shahin’s research interests span across many areas including machine learning, game theory, crowd-sourcing, and multi-agent systems. His research mainly focuses on understanding and mitigating the negative impacts of algorithmic decision-making and artificial intelligence on society. Shahin completed his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 2019 where he was advised by Michael Kearns. He is the recipient of the Best Paper Awards from the 11th Conference on Decision and Game Theory for Security, as well as the 35th Annual German Conference on Artificial Intelligence.
    Host: Amy Greenwald
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  • Mar
    3
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    DPHB March Grand Rounds

    Academic Grand Rounds*

    Toward Empirical Classification of Psychopathology

    Robert F. Krueger, PhD

    Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Psychology

    University of Minnesota – Twin Cities Campus

    Wednesday, March 3, 2021 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-Series-2021

     

    Join Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/95254348427

    Meeting ID: 952 5434 8427

    Password: dphb

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  • Mar
    1
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Advanced Slurm

    This workshop is for people who are already familiar with Slurm, but would like to use Slurm’s more powerful features. Topics covered include: dependencies for conditional execution of jobs, job arrays for parameter sweeps, dealing with hundreds or thousands of small tasks, how to limit the number of jobs running at once, and how to cancel multiple jobs.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Research
  • Mar
    1
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Sophie Bridgers, Postdoc, MIT

    Title: Social Reasoning in Action: Social-Cognitive Mechanisms Supporting Prosocial Decisions in Early Childhood

    Abstract: Each human being has their own thoughts, desires, and physical capabilities, which enables productive cooperation and collaboration integral to our species’ success. Yet, these differences also pose inferential challenges for figuring out how best to help others. What supports our ability to coordinate our individual differences to help and cooperate with one another effectively? In my dissertation, I present three sets of studies that demonstrate and interrogate how children figure out how to help others. I argue that intuitive theories – naïve understandings about how the world works and how other people act – are at the foundation of how children make prosocial decisions and take action appropriately given the context. In Study 1, toddlers use their causal knowledge to figure out why someone failed and how they should respond; in Study 2, 3-year-olds use others’ physical constraints to infer what goals others need help achieving; and in Study 3, 5- to 7-year-olds reason about others’ expected costs and rewards to make utility-maximizing decisions about what to teach and what to let learners discover. We formalize the teaching decision using a computational model, providing further insight into the details of the cognitive mechanisms that support children’s early teaching behavior. These early-emerging capacities to reason about other minds (i.e., what others know or want) and the utility of their goal-directed actions (i.e., what goals are rewarding for others to achieve and costly to achieve on their own) provide the foundations for large-scale cooperation and curation of cultural knowledge across generations that is characteristic of human societies.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Zhuoran Yang
    Princeton University
    Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Abstract: Coupled with powerful function approximators such as deep neural networks, reinforcement learning (RL) achieves tremendous empirical successes. However, its theoretical
    understandings lag behind. In particular, it remains unclear how to provably attain the optimal
    policy with a finite regret or sample complexity. In this talk, we will present the two sides of the
    same coin, which demonstrates an intriguing duality between optimism and pessimism.
    - In the online setting, we aim to learn the optimal policy by actively interacting with an environment. To strike a balance between exploration and exploitation, we propose an optimistic least-squares value iteration algorithm, which achieves a |sqrt regret in the presence of linear, kernel, and neural function approximators.
    - In the offline setting, we aim to learn the optimal policy based on a dataset collected a priori.
    Due to a lack of active interactions with the environment, we suffer from the insufficient coverage of the dataset. To maximally exploit the dataset, we propose a pessimistic least-squares value iteration algorithm, which achieves a minimax-optimal sample complexity.
    Bio: Zhuoran Yang is a final-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Operations Research and
    Financial Engineering at Princeton University, advised by Professor Jianqing Fan and Professor Han Liu. Before attending Princeton, He obtained a Bachelor of Mathematics degree from Tsinghua University. His research interests lie in the interface between machine learning, statistics, and optimization. The primary goal of his research is to design a new generation of machine learning algorithms for large-scale and multi-agent decision-making problems, with both statistical and computational guarantees. Besides, he is also interested in the application of learning-based decision-making algorithms to real-world problems that arise in robotics, personalized medicine, and computational social science.
    Host: Roberta De Vito
    More Information 
  • Feb
    26
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ida Momennejad (Senior Reinforcement Learning Researcher, Microsoft)

    Title: Navigation Turing Test: Toward Human-like RL

    Abstract:TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    26
    Virtual
    12:00pm

    Science Friday

    Are you interested in discussing ways to improve STEM education at Brown? Science Friday is a vibrant learning community, where STEM instructors and staff members share ideas, experiences, and challenges related to STEM education. Please join us for one of our upcoming sessions! Register here for this session.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    26
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Pawel Romanczuk (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin)

    Title: Collective Information Processing - Interplay of self-organization and function in collective (biological) systems.

    Abstract: Animal groups or cellular ensembles represent fascinating examples of self-organized biological systems. In contrast to non-living physical systems, self-organized biological collectives are the result of long-term evolutionary adaptations to a specific ecological niche, where collective behavior provides evolutionary benefits to individual agents. However, collective behavior is also always subject to constraints set by the interaction mechanisms and corresponding self-organized dynamical structure. My general research interest is to explore this interplay between self-organization and function in collective behavior in a variety of model systems ranging from cellular aggregates, via insect swarms to fish schools. Classical models of collective behavior often take a “bird’s-eye perspective,” assuming that individuals have access to social information that is not directly available, e.g. the behavior of individuals outside of their field of view. Despite the initial success of those models, it becomes more and more apparent that we needs to incorporate the perception of individuals, i.e., how internal and external information are acquired and processed, to obtain a deeper understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying emergent collective behaviors as well as their functional implications. In this context, I will discuss two examples of our past research: 1) Attention trade-offs in flocking in complex environments under sensory/cognitive constraints. 2) A minimal purely vision-based model of collective movement

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 763919

    Sparse and plastic: information coding in the mushroom body calyx of Drosophila

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Reusing knowledge allows intelligent systems to learn solutions to complex tasks quicker by avoiding re-learning the components of the solution from scratch. Recent advances in reinforcement-learning research have demonstrated that deep learning algorithms can solve complex tasks. However, achieving knowledge reuse characteristic of human behaviour has been elusive. Humans are adept at flexibly transferring knowledge between different tasks, whereas established reinforcement-learning algorithms are much more limited. Reusing knowledge in reinforcement-learning algorithms is a central, yet not well understood challenge. This dissertation addresses the question of which models allow an intelligent system to reuse knowledge and provides a partial solution. Viewing knowledge representations through the lens of representation learning, we show that models that are predictive of future reward outcomes implicitly encode reusable knowledge. Through a sequence of theoretical and empirical results, this dissertation discusses different state representations and presents connections to model-based reinforcement learning, model-free reinforcement learning, and successor features. Furthermore, different transfer-learning experiments are presented, demonstrating that representations that are predictive of future reward outcomes generalize across different tasks. Lastly, we introduce a clustering algorithm to learn representations that are predictive of future reward sequences for tasks with continuous state spaces. We demonstrate under which assumptions this clustering algorithm converges to an accurate model. Furthermore, on a visual control task, we demonstrate that this learned model generalizes across different tasks and can be used to accelerate learning. These results suggest that learning a model detailed enough to predict future reward outcomes prevents overfitting to one task and allows an agent to accelerate learning across previously unseen tasks.

    Host: Professor Michael Littman

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available at 4pm on 2/24/21. This talk will be recorded.

     

    ROBERT GHRIST

    Professor, Departments of Mathematics and Electrical Systems/Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

     

    OPINION DYNAMICS ON SHEAVES

    There is a long history of networked dynamical systems that models the spread of opinions over social networks, with the graph Laplacian playing a lead role. One of the difficulties in modeling opinion dynamics is the presence of polarization: not everyone comes to a consensus. This talk will describe work joint with Jakob Hansen [OSU] introducing a new model for opinion dynamics using sheaves of vector spaces over social networks. The graph Laplacian is enriched to a Hodge Laplacian, and the resulting dynamics on *discourse sheaves* can lead to some very interesting and perhaps more realistic outcomes.

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Robert Ghrist is the Andrea Mitchell PIK Professor of Mathematics and Electrical & Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. After earning a BS in Mechanical Engineering (University of Toledo, 1991), and the MS and Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics (Cornell University, 1994, 1995), he held positions in Mathematics departments at the University of Texas (Austin), Georgia Tech, and the University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign). He has been at Penn since 2008.

    Ghrist is a recognized leader in the field of Applied Algebraic Topology, with publications detailing topological methods for sensor networks, robotics, signal processing, data analysis, optimization, and more. He is the author of a leading textbook on the subject (Elementary Applied Topology, 2014), and has managed numerous large DoD grants from AFOSR, ASDRE, DARPA, and ONR.

    His research has been recognized with the NSF CAREER, NSF PECASE, SciAm50, and Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellow awards. Ghrist has been an invited speaker at two International Congresses of Mathematicians: once (Madrid 2006) for research and once (Seoul, 2014) for education. Ghrist is a dedicated expositor and communicator of Mathematics, with teaching awards that include the MAA James Crawford Prize, Penn’s Lindback Award, and the S. Reid Warren Award in Engineering at Penn. Ghrist is the author, designer, and animator of popular YouTube video texts (featuring the Calculus BLUE Project), as well as an online course on Coursera, featured in the New York Times, BoingBoing, and Gizmodo.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Join us for “Planning your Postdoc: A Professional Development Workshop” on Wednesday, February 24th, 3pm- 5pm via Zoom. Hosted by the Office of University Postdoctoral Affairs, Office of Corporate & Foundation Relations, and the Office of Research Development, workshop sessions will include:

    I. Strategies for a Productive Postdoc
    II. Grantsmanship for Postdocs: A high-level overview of grants & fellowships and how to get them
    III. Breakout sessions by discipline

    Speakers will include:
    • Audra Van Wart, PhD, Associate Dean for Training & Program Development, Director, Office of University Postdoctoral Affairs
    • David Loerke, MA, Associate Director, CFR
    • Alison Buckser, MPH, Associate Director, CFR
    • Rebecca Rex, MA, Associate Director, CFR
    • Rebekah McKinney, MEd, Associate Director, CFR
    • Sasha Dolgicer, MA, Director, CFR
    • Edel Minogue, PhD, Associate Director, ORD
    • Amy Carroll, PhD, Director, ORD
    • Kate Duggan, MEd, Research Development Specialist, ORD
    • Betsy Stubblefield Loucks, ScM, MBA, Research Partnerships Manager, ORD + BTI
    Registration by February 19th is required!
    Register here! More Information Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Feb
    24

    Speaker: Judith Fan

    Title: Cognitive tools for making the invisible visible

    Abstract: How does the human mind transform a cascade of sensory information into meaningful knowledge? Traditional approaches focus on how people process the data provided to them by the world, yet this approach leaves aside some of the most powerful tools humans have to actively reformat their experiences, including the use of physical media to externalize their thoughts by drawing or writing. My lab aims to “reverse engineer” the core mechanisms by which employing such cognitive tools enable people to learn and communicate more effectively. Our recent work focuses on sketching, one of our most basic and versatile tools, because it also represents a key challenge for understanding how multiple cognitive systems interact to support complex, natural behaviors. This talk will highlight our recent progress, as well as open research questions in this domain.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Coming soon.

    Rapid advances in robotic technologies in the military, medicine, education, and even private homes demand a careful examination of the potentially transformative impact of robotics on society. The transformation could be positive: providing access to services previously unattainable to many individuals; raising productivity; and enhancing safety and quality of life. But the transformation could also be negative: restricting access to services to only those who can afford or operate new technology; replacing whole segments of the human workforce, and endangering people’s psychological safety through deceptive attachments to robot partners. This symposium will bring together scholars and practitioners from multiple disciplines to examine the difficult questions: What are our obligations to shape this transformation to be positive? How can we contribute to such a positive shaping? And what legal and ethical norms may have to be established to foster a harmonious growth toward a future society with robots?

    Register for the event at: https://accelevents.com/e/SIRoS

    SIRoS registration link More Information computer science, robotics
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Judith Degen (Associate Professor - Stanford)

    Title: Towards a unifying computational account of reference production and comprehension

    Abstract: Psycholinguistics is replete with puzzling empirical patterns of reference production and comprehension, many of them seemingly at odds with each other. In comprehension, much work has focused on listeners’ propensity to derive so-called “contrastive inferences:” anticipatory inferences from the observation of a modifier in a partial utterance like “Click on the big” to the conclusion that the intended target must be a member of a contrast pair of objects of the same type in the visual context. This has been taken as evidence for listeners’ sophisticated and rapid pragmatic reasoning about speakers’ adherence to the Gricean Quantity-2 maxim, to be no more informative than necessary. But contrastive inferences are sensitive to a number of factors, including adjective type (contrastive inferences sometimes arise for relative, but not absolute adjectives; sometimes the opposite pattern holds) and feature diagnosticity (contrastive inferences are more likely for color-diagnostic objects like bananas, but not for non-color-diagnostic ones like cups).

    In production, the focus has been on so-called “overinformative” referring expressions, which appear to violate the Quantity-2 maxim: speakers routinely produce modifiers that aren’t strictly speaking necessary for the purpose of uniquely establishing reference. But like contrastive inferences, overmodification is modulated by many factors. These include adjective type (more overmodification with color than size or material adjectives), scene variation (more overmodification in the context of more variable visual displays), property typicality (more overmodification in reference to objects with more atypical properties), object type (more overmodification with clothes than fruit), and language (more overmodification in English than Spanish).

    In this talk, I propose that the tension between the systematic apparent violations of Quantity-2 in production and the sophisticated (albeit fragile) reasoning that assumes adherence to Quantity-2 in comprehension can be resolved by modeling the link between production and comprehension of referring expressions in a principled way within the Rational Speech Act framework, which treats language use as iterated probabilistic reasoning. I further show that many of the previously observed empirical patterns straightforwardly fall out of the account.”

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This link will become available at 10:00 am on 2/24. This talk will be recorded.

     

    PONTUS SKUGLAND

    Group Leader, Ancient Genomics Laboratory, Crick Institute

    TRACKING THE GENOMIC HISTORY OF DOGS AND HUMANS

    Dogs were the first domestic animal, but little is known about their population history and to what extent it was linked to humans. I will discuss recent evidence from ancient dog genomes of limited gene flow from wolves since domestication, but substantial dog-to-wolf gene flow. By 11,000 years ago, at least five 5 major ancestry lineages had already diversified, demonstrating a deep genetic history of dogs during the Paleolithic. Co-analysis with human genomes reveals aspects of dog population history that mirror humans, including Levant-related ancestry in Africa and early agricultural Europe. Other aspects differ, including the impacts of steppe pastoralist expansions in West- and East Eurasia, and a complete turnover of Neolithic European dog ancestry. 

     

    BIOGRAPHY

    Pontus Skoglund is the group leader of the Francis Crick Institute’s Ancient Genomics laboratory. Originally from Sweden, he obtained his Ph.D. in evolutionary genetics from Uppsala University in 2013 and thereafter did his postdoctoral research in David Reich’s laboratory at Harvard Medical School’s Department of Genetics.

    His past research has focused on propelling the field of ancient DNA into the genomic era, revealing population migrations as catalyzers for the transition from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to agriculture in Europe, Africa, and Southeast Asia. He has also studied gene flow between archaic-and-modern humans, early human evolution in Africa, the peopling of the Americas, and the origin of domestic dogs.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    23
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Neil Lewis Jr (Assistant Professor, Cornell University & Weill Cornell Medicine)

    Title:  Looking Back to Move Forward: Long-term Effects of Segregation on Perception, Action, and Cognition

    Abstract: The United States has long been, and continues to be, a highly segregated society. When societies separate groups of people in the ways that we do in the U.S., that separation has not only economic, political, and sociological consequences, it also affects the psychology of the people in those societies due to social cognitive processes. In this talk, I will share recent findings from my program of research that has been using the United States as a context to examine how patterns of segregation and other forms of social stratification seep into the mind and affect how people perceive and make meaning of the world around them. I will also discuss the consequences of those meaning-making processes for people’s judgments, motivations, and decisions, particularly in the domains of education, health, and environmental sustainability. I will conclude with implications of this research for psychological theories, and the practical application of those theories.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    23

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about COVID-19’s effects on the brain, featuring Dr. Karen Furie, a professor of clinical neuroscience at Brown University, chair of the Department of Neurology and a neurologist at Rhode Island Hospital. 

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 164719

    Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Allan-Hermann Pool, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at the California Institute of Technology. 

    Abstract: Animal behavior is governed by innate and hardwired biological drives. Allan-Hermann Pool will describe a single cell RNA-sequence based stimulus-to-cell-type mapping approach for scalable mapping of these drive states to the underlying neural circuitry. He will also outline how this information can be used to functionally reprogram circuits governing innate motivations.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    22
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Dorsa Amir, Postdoc,  Boston College

    Title: The Development of Decision-Making Across Diverse Cultural Contexts

    Abstract: The human behavioral repertoire is uniquely diverse, with an unmatched flexibility that has allowed our species to flourish in every ecology on the planet. Despite its importance, the roots of this behavioral diversity — and how it manifests across development and contexts — remain largely unexplored. I argue that a full account of human behavior requires a cross-cultural, developmental approach that systematically examines how environmental variability shapes behavioral processes. In this talk, I use the development of decision-making across diverse contexts as a window into the relationship between the socioecological environment and behavior. First, I present the results of a cross-cultural investigation of risk and time preferences among children in India, Argentina, the United States, and the Ecuadorian Amazon, suggesting that market integration and related socioecological shifts lead to the development of more risk-seeking and future-oriented preferences. Second, I present the early results of a six-culture investigation into the ontogeny of social preferences — namely, trustworthiness, forgiveness, and fairness. Taken together, these studies help elucidate the developmental origins of behavioral diversity across cultural contexts, and underscore the utility of interdisciplinary research for explaining human behavior.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please register using the link in the text below to receive the Zoom link prior to the talk.

     PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS TALK IS FOR FACULTY ONLY.



    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIocO-rrDgpHdzxRKvkqbRYLqK_i10i787E

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

     

    RITAMBHARA SINGH

    Assistant Professor, Computer Science; Faculty, CCMB, Brown University

     

    TOWARDS DATA INTEGRATION IN GENOMICS USING MACHINE LEARNING

    Our current understanding of how genes are regulated is akin to solving a jigsaw puzzle. Many factors governing gene expression have been identified and researchers have collected a wide variety of related datasets. However, how these “parts” are pieced together to function as a whole remains unclear. In this talk, I will be discussing our research to develop and apply state-of-the-art machine learning methods to genomics datasets to attempt to put together the pieces from the data. I will discuss our work using deep learning architecture that captures the data’s underlying structure to integrate datasets and connect them to gene expression via the prediction task. We also interpret the prediction results and tie them back to contributing factors to develop potential hypotheses related to gene regulation. I will then move from bulk data to the single-cell data domain discussing methods to perform unsupervised integration of different types of single-cell experiments. This talk aims to highlight our research direction’s potential to reveal the important gene regulatory mechanisms in characterizing diseases from the collected data.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Ritambhara Singh is an Assistant Professor of the Computer Science department and a faculty member of the Center for Computational Molecular Biology at Brown University. Her research lab works at the intersection of machine learning and biology. Prior to joining Brown, Singh was a post-doctoral researcher in the Noble Lab at the University of Washington. She completed her Ph.D. in 2018 from the University of Virginia with Dr. Yanjun Qi as her advisor. Her research has involved developing machine learning algorithms for the analysis of biological data as well as applying deep learning models to novel biological applications.

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Fair February

    This is an opportunity for faculty to share current data science-related research activities with other faculty colleagues in an informal and interdisciplinary environment. More about this series on our websiteThis event is organized by Professor Meenakshi Narain, DSI Advisory Board Co-chair.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom Registration Required

    I2S2 Seminar

    D2R and EHRs: A success Story from an Academic Healthcare Setting

     

    Featuring Dr. Fizza Gillani, PhD, CPEHR

    Picture of Dr. Fizza Gillani, Associate Professor of Medicine (Research), Warren Alpert Medical S...Picture of Dr. Fizza Gillani, Associate Professor of Medicine (Research), Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University;Informatics Director for HIV/AIDS Program, Providence-Boston Center for AIDS Research, and the Ryan White Program; and Senior Research Scientist at Lifespan.

    HIV Care Continuum requires a multidisciplinary approach to achieve clinical outcomes that help control HIV disease progression. To track these outcomes, we need a robust informatics system with a clearly defined Data to Research and Reporting (D2R) approach to make use of different Electronic Health Records (EHRs). The Ryan White-funded Miriam Hospital Immunology Center (MIC) is part of an academic medical system with more than 15,000 employees, 4 hospitals, and a well-established Information System department. To support the MIC HIV program, a robust HIV-specific Immunology Center Database (ICDB) was created in 2003. The ICDB system is an example of how carefully planned data systems built around existing health IT infrastructure provide evidence of best practices, measure performance as feedback for healthcare systems, and advance us closer to realizing the vision of a learning health system. ICDB in its current format is centered on the system-wide electronic health record and technology platforms, supporting reporting and research requirements determined by the federal Ryan White program, different funding mechanisms, and local governments.

    This presentation will demonstrate how carefully integrated information systems can achieve the goals of tracking progress of healthcare outcomes, properly initiating quality initiatives, generating performance measures, supporting accurate government reporting, and expediting research initiatives.

     

     

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    19
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Feb
    18
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Roland Fleming (Associate Professor - Giessen University)

    Title: Learning to See Stuff

    Abstract: Under typical viewing conditions, humans effortlessly recognize materials and infer their properties at a glance. Without touching materials, we can usually tell what they would feel like, and we enjoy vivid visual intuitions about how they are likely to respond if we interact with them. These achievements are impressive because the retinal image of a material results from extremely complex physical processes (e.g. sub-surface light transport; visco-elastic fluid flow). Due to their extreme diversity, mutability and complexity, materials represent a particularly challenging class of visual stimuli, so understanding how we recognize materials, estimate their properties, predict their behaviour, and interact with them could give us more general insights into visual processing. What is ‘material appearance’, and how do we measure it and model it? How are material properties estimated and represented? Discussing these questions causes us to scrutinize the basic assumptions of ‘inverse optics’ that prevail in theories of human vision, and leads us to suggest that unsupervised learning may explain aspects of how the brain infers and represents material properties. Consistent with this idea, I will present some recent work in which we show that an unsupervised network trained on images of surfaces spontaneously learns to disentangle reflectance, lighting and shape. More importantly, we find that the network not only predicts the broad successes of human gloss perception, but also the specific pattern of errors that humans exhibit on an image-by-image basis. These findings should hopefully be of interest to psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers and AI / machine learning researchers.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Link will be available beginning at 4:00pm on Wednesday, 17 February.
     
     
    KELLEY HARRIS

    Assistant Professor, Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington-Seattle

    A WILD-DERIVED MUTATOR ALLELE DRIVES MUTATION SPECTRUM DIFFERENCES AMONG COMMON LABORATORY MOUSE STRAINS

    Although eukaryotic genomes are safeguarded by hundreds of DNA replication and repair genes, it has proven difficult to study the functional consequences of variation within the sequences of these genes. Some large-effect DNA repair gene variants are known to cause heritable cancer syndromes and accelerate somatic mutagenesis, but it is not known whether such variants might cause germline mutation rates to vary within populations. We performed a QTL scan for germline mutator alleles in a uniquely powerful vertebrate system: a panel of 98 recombinant mouse strains that have each been inbred in captivity for up to 45 years, accumulating many generations’ worth of de novo mutations on known genetic backgrounds. The scan identified a locus that strongly affects the rate of C>A germline mutation accumulation, specifically in the sequence contexts CA>AA and CT>TT. We identify candidate causal variation in the gene Mutyh, which causes a human cancer syndrome associated with a similar mutational signature. This Mutyh variation also segregates in wild populations of Mus musculus domesticus, where it may be shaping the accumulation of natural genetic variation.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Kelley Harris is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. 

    She uses population genetic theory and high-throughput biological sequence analysis to study recent evolutionary history in humans and other species. One of her primary research interests is the evolution of mutagenesis; she wants to understand the forces that control DNA replication fidelity, the mutational breakdown of established traits, and the ultimate origin of new traits. Her lab will work to decipher how variations are genetically and environmentally determined and what evolutionary pressures (such as cancer, congenital disease, or life history) might be driving mutagenesis to change.

    She is also broadly interested in the impact of demography, inbreeding, and hybridization on the dynamics of natural selection, particularly in the wake of gene flow between humans, Neanderthals, and other extinct hominids. Harris has developed a variety of computational methods for inferring population bottlenecks, divergence times, and admixture events at high resolution, and has written about the impact of Neanderthal interbreeding on the fitness of archaic and modern humans. Her group will continue developing new statistical models that refine our understanding of how genomes and populations evolve, using methods derived from coalescent theory to visualize and extract the information contained in huge databases of whole genomes.

    She accepts graduate students through UW’s Genome Sciences Ph.D. program and is looking for motivated postdoctoral fellowship candidates with experience in bioinformatics and/or population genetics.

     

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone, and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing, and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

     

    Data Wednesdays

    The Data Science Initiative joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    17
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Kathleen Hall (Associate Professor - University of British Columbia)
    Title: Testing “Message-Oriented” Phonology in the Signed Modality

    Abstract: In this talk, I will explain the general principles of “Message-Oriented” phonology (MOP), in which language is situated as part of a communication system, and phonology arises at least in part due to pressures to communicate meaningful units both accurately and cost-effectively. I will consider the various predictions such an approach makes for phonological structures, and then show how those predictions can be usefully tested by comparing spoken to signed languages. In the course of that discussion, I will introduce some of the specific tools we have been developing at UBC to help facilitate such testing.
    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join us for this 3-part series exploring qualitative methods around the topics of design thinking, rapid ethnography, and concept mapping.

    Wednesday, February 17, 2021

    The Power of Designing with Patients

    Aaron J. Horowitz
    Co-Founder & CEO
    Sproutel

    Aaron is a maker; from sculptures to business, he is fascinated with the process of taking an idea from concept to reality. His experience growing up with human growth hormone deficiency inspired a desire to bring empathy, design, and a patient-centered mindset to healthcare. He is the co-founder and CEO of Sproutel, a research and development workshop focused on creating play-based healthcare innovations. Sproutel is best known for their work collaborating with Aflac to create My Special Aflac Duck, a robotic companion for children with cancer!

    Register now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • The February Providence Sleep Research Interest Group Seminar will feature Dr. Ruth Benca, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine. Dr. Benca’s presentation is entitled “Sleep and Psychiatry.”

    Abstract:

    In this presentation, I will review relationships between sleep and rhythms disturbances and psychiatric disorders, including local sleep EEG changes in psychiatric disorders. The effects of treating these disturbances on psychiatric outcomes will also be discussed.

    About the seminar series:

    The PSRIG seminar series has been hosted by Dr. Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for over 25 years. PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research. If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected].

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    12
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Emily Levin (PhD student at Brown)

    Title: Predicted utility influences fidelity of WM representations

    Abstract: Working memory (WM) is a capacity-limited system that requires control processes to manage what information enters memory (“input gating”) and to select what information guides a response (“output gating”). Gating mechanisms are important because they mediate the balance between the predicted utility of an item and our limited memory capacity. For example, input gating proactively updates information to memory that has been deemed 100% relevant to the task (high predicted utility) and filters information that is irrelevant. Conversely, output gating manages the contents of VWM when relevance is known only after encoding. That is, when items must be remembered even though their relevance is uncertain. The present experiments investigated 1) how priority impacts precision of information independent of load in behavior, and 2) how predicted utility influences the fidelity of WM representations in the brain. For the first experiment, we had participants perform a WM gating task and measured the effects of input gating vs. output gating on precision. For the second experiment, participants performed the WM gating task in the fMRI scanner across two sessions. We used a Bayesian approach to compute the full probability distribution of the stimuli given the BOLD data during input gating events. This approach allowed us to reconstruct the orientations that participants saw in the scanner and estimate both the precision and accuracy of remembered orientations. We observed higher fidelity for items input gated with 100% certainty relative to 50% certainty and 0% certainty. These results suggest that the precision of information held in VWM tracks predicted utility.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom Registration Required

    Highlights from the Advance-CTR Informatics Core: REDCap and N3C

     

    Dr. Karen Crowley, Manager of Health Data Science, Advance-CTR Informatics Core and the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics, will provide an overview of the services and resources available through the Informatics Core with a special focus on our unique implementation of REDCap, a secure web application for building and managing online surveys and databases. She will also highlight N3C, the National COVID Cohort Collaborative, how Advance-CTR is participating and the plan to support researchers who wish to access this unique dataset.

     

    Dr. Karen M. Crowley is Manager of Health Data Science for the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics (BCBI) and the Advance-CTR Biomedical Informatics, Bioinformatics, and Cyberinfrastructure Enhancement (BIBCE) Core. Dr. Crowley holds a Master of Science degree in Organizational Behavior and is a formally trained biomedical informatician with a PhD from the University of Utah. With experience in both industry and academia, Dr. Crowley has a special interest in applying her expertise in healthcare data, computing, and technology as well as organization dynamics and processes in support of the Learning Health System.

     

    The Informatics and Implementation Science Learning Series (I2S2) covers the breadth of topics in effectively using data and technology to advance biomedical discovery and healthcare delivery. Each learning activity (seminar, journal club, workshop, or tutorial) features methods, applications, or resources that are aligned with components of a learning health system. This series is a joint initiative between the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics, Brown Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Implementation Science Core, Rhode Island Quality Institute, and Advance Clinical and Translational Research (Advance-CTR).

    Part of Love Data Week, February 8-12, 2021: Data: Delivering a Better Future More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    12
    Virtual
    12:00pm

    Science Friday

    Are you interested in discussing ways to improve STEM education at Brown? Science Friday is a vibrant learning community, where STEM instructors and staff members share ideas, experiences, and challenges related to STEM education. Please join us for one of our upcoming sessions! Register here for this session.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    12
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 451768

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science in conjunction with Love Data Week for a Carney Methods Meetup, an informal gathering focused on methods for brain science, on Thursday, February 11, at 3 p.m.

    This event will be moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience, and feature Samuel Watson, director of graduate studies for the Data Science Initiative.

    Please note, this workshop requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account.

    Notes from previous Meetups are available online.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Feb
    11
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:00pm

    Research Misconduct

    Research Integrity in the Era of COVID-19
    The COVID-19 pandemic presents unique challenges related to research integrity and heightened pressures that could lead to questionable research practices. This session will examine trends in COVID-19 related research in the current research environment and ways to mitigate risk of research misconduct.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, IRB, ORI, OVPR, Research
  • Feb
    11
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: For passcode, contact [email protected]

    Thursday, Feb. 11, 1:00 PM

    Joseph A. Baur, PhD

    Department of Physiology

    Perelman School of Medicine

    University of Pennsylvania

    Philadelphia, PA

     

    “Manipulating NAD+ metabolism in mammalian tissues and mitochondria”

     

    Nature. 2020 Dec;588(7836):174-179. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2741-7.

     

    https://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p8216891

    More Information 
  • Feb
    11
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: TBD

    Title: TBD

    Abstract:TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    11

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    February

    Details: February 11, 2021 at 12 p.m. ET.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Kate Duggan, Research Development Specialist in OVPR, to learn strategies for researchers to find and evaluate funding opportunities, with a focus on the grants.gov and SPIN databases. Learn where grant opportunities are listed, tips for refining your searches, how to pinpoint the opportunities that are most relevant to you, and how to assess whether they are a good fit.

    Learn More More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Humanities, IRB, Libraries, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, ORI, OVPR, RCR, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: friedman

    Speaker: Steven Roberts

    Title: Racism: A Developmental Story


    Abstract: Racism – often conceptualized as disliking or mistreating others because of their race – is a system of advantage based on race. In this talk, I will share my personal and professional experiences within this system, and highlight how the two have developed hand in hand. Specifically, I will address racism in our categories, churches, relationships, and science. In doing so, I will aim to make three broader points. First, racism shapes our lives in ways that are often unappreciated and unrecognized. Second, racism shapes our lives from childhood well into adulthood and beyond. Third, our own experiences with racism (and race) inform who and what we study. I will conclude, as a human and as a psychologist, with recommendations for an anti-racist future.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join us on Wednesday, February 10th for a seminar series presentation, “Clinical Data Science: The Here and Now to Infinity and Beyond,” with Kristina Steinberg, MD, MMCi. From quality measures to predictive modeling, data science methods and techniques are helping to transform the US healthcare system. As a physician data scientist, Dr. Steinberg relies on her clinical knowledge when working with big data to unearth the stories and trends that lead to improved outcomes. In this presentation, Dr Steinberg will review topics and trends in data science that are currently being used with big healthcare data and explore the emerging topics and trends.

    Dr. Steinberg is a physician data scientist solving complex problems in the healthcare industry. Dr. Steinberg trained at top tier medical institutions, including Duke University, Yale University, & University of Texas Southwestern.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jed Pizarro-Guevara (Postdoc, UMass Amherst)

    Title: Processing (a)symmetries in relative clauses: Tagalog as a case study
    Abstract: One of the core findings in relative clause (RC) processing research is that RCs with object gaps (ORCs; The reporter that the senator attacked…) are more difficult to process than RCs with subject gaps (SRCs; The reporter that attacked the senator…). This asymmetry holds robustly across typologically different languages using a variety of behavioral and neural measures. There are two related strands of research in RC-processing: one strand focuses on when this asymmetry holds and proposes various ways to account for it; and the other focuses on when this asymmetry breaks down. In this talk, I use Tagalog as a case-study to examine if and when this asymmetry holds. I ask whether ORCs are harder to process than SRCs in a language that has both head-initial and head-final RCs; and if so, whether other factors (e.g., this RC/head word order flexibility or the pronominality of the co-argument) can affect the asymmetry. Across three picture-selection experiments, I show that Tagalog exhibits the classic asymmetry and that this can be attenuated/neutralized by (i) the referential status of the co-argument, and (ii) the relative order of the head and the RC. I also show that these results cannot be accounted for by any single class of proposal. I argue that we should view the asymmetry as a composite phenomenon and treat the various classes of proposals as different sources of information that we as comprehenders must then coordinate when we’re processing RCs.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    10
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: dphb

    Integrating Science and Practice in the Treatment of Youth Anxiety and OCD – A Brief History of PARC
    Jennifer Freeman, Ph.D.
    Professor (Research)
    Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Director of Research and Training
    Pediatric Anxiety Research Center

    and 


    Abbe Marrs Garcia, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor (Clinical), DPHB
    Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Clinical Director
    Pediatric Anxiety Research Center at Bradley Hospital

    More Information 
  • Feb
    9
    Virtual
    4:00pm

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Contact [email protected] for passcode

    Jiwon Seo

    Sedivy

    Brett Baggett

    Koren

    More Information 
  • Collaborating across the globe is more critical to scientific progress than ever, and also easier than ever thanks to online tools. Join Torrey Truszkowski and Juliane Blyth from the Office of Research Integrity for a discussion about how to protect your data and ideas when shared internationally. We will also discuss how research data can range from non-restricted to highly restricted within the context of U.S. export control regulation, and what to look out for to ensure you and your collaborators do not run afoul of University policies and federal regulations.

    Learn More More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Humanities, IRB, Libraries, ORI, OVPR, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Feb
    9
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    Extending Evidence to a Target Population

    Researchers are often interested in extending (generalizing or transporting) findings to a target population of substantive interest. Examples include estimating how effective a treatment is or how well a prediction model performs when applied to a different population then was used for original treatment effect estimation or prediction model development. In this talk, I give a high level overview of evidence extension and provide an example of estimating how a lung cancer risk prediction model performs when deployed in a more racially diverse population than was used to develop the model.

    Learn More More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Are you curious about how Data Use Agreements (DUAs) are being used to facilitate research on today’s hot topics? Jen Welch will discuss DUAs Brown has signed for data related to research on topics such as COVID-19, the opioid crisis, and racial disparities.

    Learn More More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, IRB, ORI, OVPR, Research
  • Sheila Vandal, IRB Manager, will introduce you to IRB Authorization Agreements (IAAs) for collaborative research. She will walk you through the steps of establishing a reliance agreement from determining engagement to navigating the submission process. You’ll leave with strategies for quicker turnaround times and realistic expectations for your study’s pending partnerships.

    Learn More More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, IRB, ORI, OVPR, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Join Mark Dieterich, Director of IT Security, Linnea Wolfe, Assistant CIO of Infrastructure and Research Computing, and Mete Tunca, CIS’ Assistant Director of Research Services for an overview of CIS’ security and contract review processes that ensure appropriate protections are in place and requirements are met. The session will include a look at Brown’s data risk classification system and time for your questions.

     Register now for this event.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    8
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Melissa Koenig (University of Minnesota)

    Title: A Framework for Testimonial Learning: Judgments of Epistemic and Moral Agency

    Abstract: Children’s testimonial learning involves an increasingly sophisticated conception of human agency. Children’s interpretation of human error – and perhaps anomalous behavior of all kinds – instigates a form of inferential reasoning aimed at identifying the intentions of agents. Likewise, children’s interpretation of interpersonal actions depends on discerning the harmful or helpful intentions of agents. In this talk, I’ll argue that children’s testimonial learning is governed by (1) epistemic norms, taking a critical view of the evidence and the reliability of sources; and by (2) interpersonal norms, taking a cooperative view of another person and her acts of communication. Children’s testimonial reasoning involves treating people as agents who do things intentionally and who can be held accountable for these actions.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: 718382

    Join the Moore Lab for a seminar on beta burst dynamics in cortico-subcortical circuits, featuring Darcy A. Diesburg, a graduate student at the University of Iowa.

    Abstract: Dominant neuroanatomical models theorize that movement regulation is implemented via loop-like cortico-subcortical networks, prominently featuring the subthalamic nucleus (STN), thalamus, and sensorimotor cortices (M1). Inhibitory commands across these networks are purportedly sent via transient, burst-like signals in the β frequency (15-29Hz). However, human depth-recording studies are typically limited to one recording site. Therefore, there is currently a lack of direct evidence for this model in humans.

    In this seminar, I will focus on a recent study in which we performed simultaneous multi-site depth-recordings from M1 and either STN or thalamus in humans that performed the stop-signal task. In line with their purported function as inhibitory signals, subcortical β-bursts were increased on successful stop-trials. In line with the proposed network-wide effects, these subcortical bursts were then rapidly followed by increased β-bursting in M1. Moreover, between-site comparisons (including in a patient with simultaneous recordings from all three sites) showed that β-bursts in STN precede thalamic β-bursts, confirming another core prediction of existing models of inhibitory motor control.

    Together, these findings provide the first empirical evidence for the role of β-bursts in conveying inhibitory commands along long-proposed cortico-subcortical networks underlying movement regulation in humans. Looking forward from these findings, I will then discuss planned studies that aim to further parse the role of β-bursts during movement regulation and explain how the study of these signals provides promising avenues of research for studying inhibitory control more broadly.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    5
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Natalia Vélez (Postdoc at Harvard)


    Title: Cognitive foundations of collaboration

    Abstract: By collaborating with others, humans can achieve goals that are beyond the reach of a single person; no one can play a symphony, build a city, or carry a couch down a flight of stairs entirely on their own. How do humans combine their limited knowledge and capabilities into something greater than the sum of its parts? My work explores this question at two levels of analysis. First, my work seeks to understand how individuals navigate collaborations. I will present a series of studies that examine how preschool-aged children and adults make inferences about others from sparse data, and how adults combine their own incomplete knowledge with imperfect yet complementary advice from others. Second, my work examines how division of labor across communities contributes to the success of collaborations. I will present results from a recent study that leverages a large, naturalistic dataset to examine how division of labor within communities supports innovation.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    5
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Feb
    4
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: TBD

    Title: TBD

    Abstract: TBD

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Professor Malú Gámez Tansey from the University of Florida will present “Targeting Chronic Neuroinflammation to Reduce Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease”. This lecture is part of the 2021 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Feb
    4

    Center for Biomedical Engineering Seminar

    Title: Using Advanced Non-Invasive Imaging Techniques to Interpret Brain Structure and Function

    Abstract: Severe vascular diseases, like stroke, lead to devastating, life-altering neural effects and frequently can result to loss of life. In critical stroke cases, neuroimaging is required to classify the stroke type and bleeding location to quickly determine the most effective treatment. Currently, functional MRI is the gold standard of hemodynamic imaging for investigating brain activity through changes in the blood flow. Despite significant progress made in disease awareness, detection, and treatment, there are limits in our fundamental understanding of vasculature dysfunction and brain abnormalities due to disease burden making this a vital area for exploration.

    In this talk, I will share how ultrahigh field (UHF) MRI techniques have improved the detection of human disease and tissue damage by overcoming the challenges of UHF MRI. Advances in the development of radiofrequency (RF) instrumentation and RF safety assessments has resulted in the visualization of the human brain anatomy up to 100 micrometers. I will discuss how designing a 3D printed phantom contributed to improving RF instrumentation. I will emphasize the importance in using technology to study neural impairments and its associated biomarkers. I will discuss how near infrared light can be used to study and quantify physiological mechanisms that indicate cerebral health. I will conclude why using multi-modal hemodynamic and neural imaging can advance the management of vascular diseases with neural effects and neural disorders.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 592808

    Title:  TBA

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 916 7207 6837

     “Gut Dysbiosis and the “Micro-Gut-Brain Axis” among Elders with Alzheimer’s Disease”

    John P. Haran, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor Dept. of Emergency Medicine

    Dept. of Microbiology and Physiological Systems

    Clinical Director of the Center for Microbiome Research

    University of Massachusetts Medical School

    Time:
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT
    Sponsor:
    The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute In Association with: The Rhode Island Hospital Alzheimer’s Disease & Memory Disorders Center
     

    February 3, 2021

    1 to 1:30 PM

     

    via Zoom  

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/91672076837

     

    Meeting ID: 916 7207 6837

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, neurology, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Dr Yoolim Kim (Postdoc, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History)

    Title: Is the mental representation of a bi-scriptal language enriched by multiple orthographic inputs?

    Abstract: Numerous studies have been devoted to understanding the precise nature of lexical representations in the mental lexicon, but primarily through the lens of English or other languages with Latinate-based writing systems (Rumelhart & McClelland, 1982; MarslenWilson, Tyler, Waksler, & Older, 1994). There has also been increasing theoretical interest in understanding exactly how information of multiple orthographic inputs is encoded, but the literature remains limited to bilinguals of languages with completely different orthographies (e.g., Hoshino & Kroll, 2008, for Japanese-English; Marian & Spivy, 2003, for RussianEnglish; Bowers, Mimouni, & Arguin, 2000, for Arabic-French). It may be the case that orthographic representations reflect critical aspects of writing systems, and that for bi-scriptal lexicons, orthographic representations are enriched by the contributions of multiple scripts. One of the few opportunities to explore the representations of different writing systems belonging to the same language is Korean.

    Korean can be transcribed in two different scripts, one alphabetic (Hangul) and one logographic (Hanja). How does the mental lexicon represent the contributions of both scripts? Hangul’s highly transparent one-to-one relationship between spellings and sounds means that there are many cases where homophones in the spoken language remain homophones (and also homographs) in Hangul, but are disambiguated through Hanja. We thus tested whether native speakers encoded the semantic contributions of the different Hanja characters sharing the same homographic form in Hangul in their mental representation of Sino-Korean. Is processing modulated by the number of available Hanja meanings per Hangul homograph, that is, the size of the semantic cohort? In two crossmodal lexical decision tasks with semantic priming, participants were presented with auditory primes that were either syllables (Experiment 1) or full Sino-Korean words (Experiment 2), followed by visual Sino-Korean full word targets. In Experiment 1, we observed significantly faster reaction times for targets preceded by primes with larger semantic cohorts, than those with fewer, while in Experiment 2, reaction times were not significantly modulated by the size of the semantic cohort. I discuss these findings in relation to the structure of the mental lexicon for bi-scriptal languages and the representation of semantic cohorts across different scripts.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    3
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    DPHB Grand Rounds

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: dphb

    Academic Grand Rounds*
    The Mythology of Racial Progress
    Jennifer Richeson, Ph.D.
    Philip R. Allen Professor of Psychology
    Faculty Fellow, Institution for Social and Policy Studies
    Yale University

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    1
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Slurm for Beginners

    A primer on submitting jobs to the job scheduler on Oscar. Some basic familiarity with Unix/Linux systems is assumed. Topics covered include: an overview of the use of Slurm for resource allocation, submitting jobs to Slurm, and using Bash scripts to configure and submit jobs to Slurm.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Feb
    1
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Meltem Yucel (University of Virginia)

    Title: “No fair!”: An investigation of children’s moral development

    Abstract: Young children robustly distinguish between moral norms and conventional norms (Smetana, 1984; Yucel & Vaish, 2020). In existing developmental research, fairness norms are by definition considered part of the moral domain. Yet an understanding of fairness emerges late in development and is culturally variable, raising the possibility that fairness may not fall squarely in the moral domain. In a series of studies, I examine whether children see fairness as a moral or conventional norm.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    29
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Megan deBettencourt (Postdoc at Chicago)

    Title: Dynamics of attention and memory

    Abstract: We rely on attention at almost every moment of every day. Yet, we lose focus constantly, and even brief lapses can have serious consequences. How can we characterize these moment-to-moment fluctuations in attention? To address this challenge, I will present novel behavioral and neuroimaging approaches for tracking attention dynamics and detecting inattentive moments. I will then provide evidence that we can use brain imaging to not only describe changes in attention over time, but also to predict and prevent attention lapses with real-time interventions. Finally, I will demonstrate that attention fluctuations affect other aspects of cognition, including memory. In particular, I will demonstrate that a person’s attentional state predicts what they encode, maintain, and recall. My research leverages real-time fluctuations of brain function and behavior to characterize cognitive dynamics and improve attentional and cognitive abilities. This approach offers a powerful framework for understanding how attentional and cognitive processes interact and change over time.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • How do innovators bring their ideas to life? 

    Join the Carney Institute for a conversation with William Martin, Ph.D. ’95, Global Therapeutic Area Head of Neuroscience at the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. Martin will discuss the practical challenges of bringing great scientific ideas to real-world solutions.

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    29
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom Link is for BOTH talks. Link will be available beginning at 11:30AM on Friday, January 29.

    Fair February: Data Science for Social Good

    Fair February is a three-week symposium organized by Brown’s Data Science Initiative. Each week of this symposium concentrates on a theme. The purpose of this symposium is to let young researchers of various disciplines interested in any of our themes, meet each other, and know about each other’s work and research.

    WEEK ONE: COMPUTATION AND HEALTH

     

    FOCUSED QUERY EXPANSION WITH ENTITY CORES FOR PATIENT-CENTRIC HEALTH SEARCH

    Erisa Terolli, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Max Plank Institute

    This talk is scheduled for 11:30am.

     

     
    TOPOLOGICAL AND GEOMETRIC METHODS FOR COVID-19 TRACKING

    Ignacio Segovia-Dominguez, Postdoctoral Research Associate and ConTex Fellow, University of Texas-Dallas

    This talk is scheduled for 12:10pm. 

     

    For more information, please contact Shahrzad Haddadan. To see more of Fair February’s events and speakers, visit our main event page.

    This series is organized by Shahrzad Haddadan, Marie Schenk, and Cristina Menghini. Sponsored by the Data Science Initiative.

    See the full schedule here.

     

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 687439

    Title:  Understanding Cortical Development and Disease: From Embryos to Brain Organoids

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jan
    28
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: :Emily Cooper (Assistant Professor - UC Berkeley)

    Title: Perceptual Science for Augmented Reality

    Abstract: Recent years have seen impressive advances in near-eye display systems for augmented reality. In these systems, digital content is merged with the user’s view of the physical world. There are, however, unique perceptual challenges associated with designing a display system that can seamlessly blend the real and the virtual. By understanding and modeling the relevant principles that underlie our visual perception, I will show how we can address some of these challenges.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    28
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    BME Seminar: Vivek A. Kumar, NJIT

    Center for Biomedical Engineering Seminar

    Title: SAPH Design for Biomaterial Drug Engineering

    Abstract: Self-assembling peptide hydrogels (SAPH) are a class of injectable scaffolds that present a paradigm in drug development and biomaterials. Facile self-assembly of monomeric/ multi-meric constituents result in high epitope presentation of biological signals. Persistent signaling, in situbolus delivery and demonstrable modification to actuate specific biological responses allow development of novel classes of biomaterials that behave as scaffolds and drugs. This presentation will describe a few examples of novel peptide-biomaterial drugs that are capable of site-specific delivery to tissue, potentiating numerous tissue remodeling responses in the dental and craniofacial space (dental pulp regeneration/ revascularization, drug delivery for TMJ regeneration, pulp cell trans-differentiation, IGF driven diabetic fracture healing, COVID therapeutics). A focus is also made to describe entrepreneurship and innovation helping bridge the gap between academia, industry and clinical medicine.

    Bio: Vivek Kumar received his bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in 2006, and doctorate degree in biomedical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2011. He did post-doctoral work at BIDMC, Harvard Medical School, and Rice University. He has honed his expertise is in the area of tissue engineering, drug development and delivery, and specific research interests are in the area of inflammation modulation and angiogenesis, especially in understanding the role of small growth factor or cytokine mimics’ ability to signal biological processes. He is the co-author of over 40 peer-reviewed journal articles, over 4 dozen abstracts, an inventor on a dozen patents/applications, and serial entrepreneur (3 startups to-date).
    Vivek currently serves at the New Jersey Institute of Technology as an Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering, and at the Rutgers School of Dental Medicine. Vivek teaches Biomaterials and Biomedical Translation and Entrepreneurship. As a pre-health advisor and a member of the BME Faculty search committee, University IP committee, and endowed fellow of the Albert Dorman Honors College, Vivek strives to encourage research involvement with undergraduates, graduates and post-doctoral scientists. Research in the KumarLab (kumarlab.njit.edu) aims at translating technologies in startups (NangioTx.com / SAPHTx.com) towards treating a wide array of pathologies. To this end, Vivek is a frequent member of SBIR/STTR and NIH study sections, and serves as a reviewer for over a dozen peer-reviewed journals. 

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom link is for BOTH talks and will be available beginning at 4:00pm on Wednesday, January 27

    Fair February: Data Science for Social Good

    Fair February is a three-week symposium organized by Brown’s Data Science Initiative. Each week of this symposium concentrates on a theme. The purpose of this symposium is to let young researchers of various disciplines interested in any of our themes, to meet each other, and know about each other’s work and research.

    WEEK ONE: COMPUTATION AND HEALTH
    KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Elizabeth Chen, Interim Director, BCBI, Brown University

     

    Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

    Over the last five decades, artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine and health care has evolved along with advancements in data, technology, and computation. AI offers the potential to achieve the “quintuple aim” of enhancing patient and provider experiences, reducing costs, improving population health, and addressing equity and inclusion. However, there are a range of challenges in transforming electronic health data into clinically-actionable knowledge and implementing evidence-based innovations into practice. This keynote will begin with a history of AI in medicine followed by an overview of challenges and opportunities presented in the National Academy of Medicine’s 2019 special publication on “AI in Healthcare: The Hope, The Hype, The Promise, The Peril.” The talk will end with a discussion of the role of AI in local and national initiatives focused on COVID-19.

    Biography

    Elizabeth Chen, Ph.D., FACMI, is Interim Director of the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics (BCBI), Associate Professor of Medical Science, Associate Professor of Health Services, Policy & Practice, Director of the Advance-CTR Biomedical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Enhancement Core, and Faculty Scholar in the Hassenfeld Child Health Innovation Institute at Brown University. Within BCBI, Dr. Chen leads the Clinical Informatics Innovation and Implementation (CI3) Laboratory that is focused on leveraging Electronic Health Record (EHR) technology and data to improve healthcare delivery and biomedical discovery. Her current research projects involve the use of data, technology, and computational approaches for improving mental health (mental health informatics) and child health (pediatric informatics). Dr. Chen received a BS in Computer Science from Tufts University and Ph.D. in Biomedical Informatics from Columbia University. Prior to joining Brown University in July 2015, she held appointments at Columbia University, Partners HealthCare/Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, and the University of Vermont. Dr. Chen is currently Chair of the Biomedical Informatics, Library and Data Sciences (BILDS) Review Committee for the National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Associate Editor for Methods of Information in Medicine, and Editorial Board Member for the Journal of Biomedical Informatics.

     
    YOUNG RESEARCH SPEAKER: Ruotao Zhang, Ph.D. Candidate, Biostatistics, Brown University

     

    Identifying Subgroups with Differential Prediction Accuracy

    When reporting a prediction model’s performance, it is a standard practice only to report a measure of overall performance, i.e., how well the model predicts for the whole population it is evaluated on. However, it is also important for many applications to consider whether there is some sub-population that the model is more (less) effective at predicting, driving up (lowering) the overall prediction accuracy. In this talk, we discuss a tree-based algorithm for identifying subgroups with differential prediction accuracy. The algorithm is general in that it can accommodate any measure of model performance and any prediction model. We apply it to both simulated data and the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) data. For the latter, we use non-imaging covariates (e.g., gender, age, race, smoking status) as inputs and identify subgroups with differential prediction performance under a previously developed lung cancer prediction model PLCOm2012. 

    Biography

    Ruotao is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biostatistics under the supervision of Dr. Steingrimsson and Dr. Gatsonis. Before coming to the US, he worked as a data scientist at China Resources. Ruotao obtained an MSc in Applied Statistics from the University of Oxford, and a BSc in Mathematics from Imperial College London. His research interests mainly include statistical analysis of machine learning and deep learning models with applications to biomedical data.

     

    For more information, please contact Shahrzad Haddadan. To see more of Fair February’s events and speakers, visit our main event page

    This series is organized by Shahrzad Haddadan, Marie Schenk, and Cristina Menghini. Sponsored by the Data Science Initiative.

    More Information 
  • Speaker: Rachel Weissler

    Title: Toward A Cognitive Model of African American English: Sociolinguistic knowledge and its influence on processing

    Abstract: African American English (AAE) is the most well-studied minoritized variety of English in the U.S., yet there is still so much we do not know about cognitive processing of the variety. Understanding the mechanisms of AAE cognition is critical to building models of language that include how multiple linguistic systems live in the brain. Additionally, this understanding is crucial in our current sociopolitical climate in the United States in which linguistic prejudice and discrimination continues to persist (Craft, Wright, Weissler, & Queen 2020). This talk will focus on neurolinguistic research and emotional prosody behavioral research, which work in parallel in the construction of a cognitive model of AAE. The EEG studies show that AAE is processed differently than Standardized American English (SdAE), because it shows that predictions are conditioned by the identity of the speaker. The emotional prosody research shows that emotional prosody does influence race judgements, and still, there are some discrepancies between behavioral judgements and written responses from participants. Taken together, these studies indicate that language variety impacts processing, but also raises questions about the role of the participant and leveraging linguistic knowledge during processing. This work contributes to further understanding of how social information and stereotypes interface with cognitive processing within a multidialectal frame.

    Website: https://sites.google.com/view/rachel-elizabeth-weissler

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: 377316

    How Brain Banks Enable Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases: An Opportunity for Brown

    Ivana Delalle, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School

    Director of Neuropathology Service, Lifespan

    Jean Paul G. Vonsattel, M.D.

    Professor of Pathology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center

    Director of the New York Brain Bank

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    27
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Nicole Holliday (UPenn)

    Title: Kamala Harris and the Construction of Complex Ethnolinguistic Political Identity

    Abstract: Over the past 50 years, sociolinguistic studies on black Americans have expanded in both theoretical and technical scope, and newer research has moved beyond seeing speakers, especially black speakers, as a monolithic sociolinguistic community (Wolfram 2007, Blake 2014). Yet there remains a dearth of critical work on complex identities existing within black American communities as well as how these identities are reflected and perceived in linguistic practice. At the same time, linguists have begun to take greater interest in the ways in which public figures, such as politicians, may illuminate the wider social meaning of specific linguistic variables. In this talk, I will present results from analyses of multiple aspects of ethnolinguistic variation in the speech of Vice President Kamala Harris during the 2019-2020 Democratic Party Primary debates. Together, these results show how VP Harris expertly employs both enregistered and subtle linguistic variables, including aspects of African American Language morphosyntax, vowels, and intonational phonology in the construction and performance of a highly specific sociolinguistic identity that reflects her unique positions politically, socially, and racially. The results of this study expand our knowledge about how the complexities of speaker identity are reflected in sociolinguistic variation, as well as press on the boundaries of what we know about how speakers in the public sphere use variation to reflect both who they are and who we want them to be.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 399912

    Join the Carney Institute for its first Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Sergey Stavisky, postdoctoral research fellow in the Neurosurgery Department of Stanford University. 

    Stavisky will discuss “Intracortical brain-computer interfaces: from fundamental science and engineering to restoring speech, reach and grasp.” 

    Abstract: Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are poised to profoundly transform human neuroscience and health by treating devastating – and currently incurable – nervous system injuries and diseases with precise, circuit-level measurements and interventions. BCIs can potentially restore the ability to speak, move, remember, and more. However, going from proof-of-concept studies in animal models to repairing or replacing patients’ damaged abilities requires a platform for understanding human-specific neural functions and designing, testing, and refining therapies in people. My strategy for accomplishing this is to develop advanced intracortical BCIs to restore reach & grasp movement and speech for people with paralysis. Motor BCI clinical trials can help individuals with severe speech and motor impairment in the near-term, and in doing so, validate the safety of new human-use devices capable of reading from and writing to thousands of neurons. These clinical trials also provide direct access to human neural circuits for gaining a deeper neuroscientific understanding of how the brain generates movements, which I believe will ultimately lead to better BCI therapies.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    25
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, VNC), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register for Workshop More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Jan
    22
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Entrepreneurship Open House

    Do you want to learn more about entrepreneurship at Brown and how you can be involved this semester? Join the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship for the virtual open house to discover courses, venture support programs, global initiatives and events we offer. You will meet Nelson Center staff, entrepreneurship faculty, student group leaders, and mentors like our Peer-Entrepreneurs-In-Residence (PEIRs) and our new Entrepreneurs-In-Residence (EIRs).

    • Interested in solving climate change? Meet Professor Alice Nichols who is teaching the brand new Eco-Entrepreneurship Course.
    • Meet our 2021 Entrepreneurs-In-Residence (to be announced)!
    • Learn about entrepreneurship clubs & organizations you can join this semester.

    Register here to attend. Instructions for joining will be sent via email. 

    More Information Advising, Mentorship, Entrepreneurship, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • The CAAS Rounds committee presents: “How Alcohol Expectancies Shape Experience and Are Shaped by Experience” with Dr. Hayley Treloar Padovano 

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom Registration Required

    I2S2 Seminar: Computational Modeling for D&I -An Overview with Examples from the Field featuring Bo Kim, PhD.

    Dissemination and implementation (D&I) research focuses on strategies that are used to distribute and promote the uptake of evidence-based practices in health care settings. These settings are often complex systems that have multiple dependencies, competitions, relationships, and other interactions between their components and/or with their environments. To study these complexities, D&I researchers have begun to turn to computational modeling. This seminar session will discuss the relevance of computational modeling to D&I, and share examples of how computational modeling is being used by D&I studies (e.g., to enhance stakeholder engagement, to guide resource allocation). This session will additionally highlight several issues for consideration when using computational modeling to examine D&I, and propose future directions in which computational modeling can contribute to D&I research. As data-driven approaches to enhancing care remain central to learning health systems, this session will aim to serve as a forum on how D&I can harness computational modeling to support those systems’ implementation and sustained delivery of evidence-based practices.

    Headshot of Dr. Kim

     

    Dr. Kim is a mental health services researcher at the VA Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research (CHOIR), and an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS). With an academic background in systems science and engineering, her research interests are in applying multidisciplinary methodologies toward studying the quality and implementation of mental health services.

     

    I2S2 covers the breadth of topics in effectively using data and technology to advance biomedical discovery and healthcare delivery. Each learning activity (seminar, journal club, workshop, or tutorial) features methods, applications, or resources that are aligned with components of a learning health system. This series is a joint initiative between the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics, Brown Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Implementation Science Core, Rhode Island Quality Institute, and Advance Clinical and Translational Research (Advance-CTR).

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    22
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 089708

    Title: The evolutionary origins of cortical cell


    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jan
    21

    Are you a student interested in pursuing a Certificate in Entrepreneurship? Drop in to learn more about the course requirements and curriculum for this exciting new opportunity offered by the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship.

    Register here to attend.

    More Information Advising, Mentorship, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Entrepreneurship, Teaching & Learning
  • The first Providence Sleep Research Interest Group (PSRIG) seminar of 2021 will feature Sarah Honaker, Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine and director of behavioral sleep medicine at Riley Hospital for Children.

    Abstract: Children from racial/ethnic minority and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), yet less likely to receive timely detection and treatment. This talk will present research on strategies to promote detection of pediatric OSA in disadvantaged families through engagement of primary care providers, childcare providers, and parents.

    The PSRIG seminar series has been hosted by Dr. Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for over 25 years. PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research.

    If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected].

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: CCBS

    Join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) for a seminar on “Practical sample-efficient Bayesian inference for models with and without likelihoods.” This event will feature Luigi Acerbi, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Helsinki.

    Abstract:
    Bayesian inference in applied fields of science and engineering can be challenging because in the best-case scenario the likelihood is a black-box (e.g., mildly-to-very expensive, no gradients) and more often than not it is not even available, with the researcher being only able to simulate data from the model. In this talk, I review a recent sample-efficient framework for approximate Bayesian inference, Variational Bayesian Monte Carlo (VBMC), which uses only a limited number of potentially noisy log-likelihood evaluations. VBMC produces both a nonparametric approximation of the posterior distribution and an approximate lower bound of the model evidence, useful for model selection. VBMC combines well with a technique we (re)introduced, inverse binomial sampling (IBS), that obtains unbiased and normally-distributed estimates of the log-likelihood via simulation. VBMC has been tested on many real problems (up to 10 dimensions) from computational and cognitive neuroscience, with and without likelihoods. Our method performed consistently well in reconstructing the ground-truth posterior and model evidence with a limited budget of evaluations, showing promise as a general tool for black-box, sample-efficient approximate inference — with exciting potential extensions to more complex cases.

    Links:

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • The CAAS Rounds Committee presents: “Potential Benefits and Bias in Using Machine Learning to Predict Opioid Overdose in the ED” with Dr. Benjamin Cook.

    More Information 
  • Jan
    15
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Even before COVID-19 struck, adolescents were coping with a variety of mental health challenges. Clinical psychologist Carol Landau will discuss her new book, Mood Prep 101, which helps parents teach kids the problem-solving and self-efficacy skills they will need in college. It also helps them discern when professional help may be needed for an adolescents’ anxiety and depression. This talk is perfect for parents of teens going through the college application process or entering school in the spring semester!

    Join us for a conversation with Dr. Landau followed by questions and answers. Katherine Sharkey, MD, PhD, assistant dean for women in medicine and associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior, will lead the discussion.

    The Brown Bookstore is offering 10% off the book and copies signed by the author are available.

    About Carol Landau, PhD

    Carol Landau, PhD, is a clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and the Department of Medicine at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where she has taught seminars on family dynamics, development, depression, and anxiety. She maintains an independent practice in consultation and specializes in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. She blogs for PsychologyToday.com.

    Mood Prep 101: A Parent’s Guide to Preventing Anxiety and Depression in College-Bound Teens More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • The Data Science Initiative will be holding an information session for undergraduates interested in the DSI UG Certificate in Data Fluency.

    For more information and courses, please visit the University Bulletin

     

    This virtual event will take place January 14, 2021 at 3:00 PM during the University’s Quiet Period.

    More Information 
  • Jan
    14
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Drew Lindsey - Postdoctoral Research Fellow - Brown

    Title: Optimizing recurrent neural circuits to understand intelligence

    Abstract: Despite incredible advances in artificial vision over the past decade, there is no system that can compete with the robustness and versatility of human vision. In this talk, I will offer evidence that the dynamic routines of neural circuits in visual cortex represent a partial solution to these challenges for artificial vision. I will begin by introducing a model of neural circuits in visual cortex that explains visual illusions, and can be optimized to solve difficult visual tasks that artificial vision struggles to learn. This model succeeds by discovering routines for incremental grouping that resemble those of human observers, despite receiving no explicit supervision to do so. Next, I will show that these task-optimized neural circuit models better explain stimulus-evoked responses of visual cortex than standard computational models, and can generate hypotheses for open questions in vision science. These two lines of research demonstrate that (i) brain science can help identify and resolve challenges for artificial intelligence, and (ii) better models of artificial intelligence can help us understand the brain. I will finish by describing ongoing work in which I extend these principles to new domains of biological and artificial intelligence.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    14

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    January

    • Sean Monaghan, MD: “Deep RNA Sequencing and Critical Care: Early Steps to Commercialization”
    • Jonghwan Lee, PhD: “Minimally-Invasive Retinal Prosthesis to Restore Vision in Blindness: Preclinical Study”

    Details: January 14, 2021 at 12 p.m. ET

    Seminar Series More Information Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Jim Padbury, Ed Hawrot & Audra Van Wart for “The Role of the Scientist in Society”

    OVERVIEW
    This course is designed to fulfill the NIH requirements for training in the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR), and is coordinated by the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (OGPS) in the Division of Biology and Medicine at Brown. The Research Integrity Series for Faculty consists of core [*REQUIRED] and elective modules, with content and discussion topics aimed at more experienced scholars in the biomedical and clinical sciences.

    REQUIREMENTS
    Faculty must complete a minimum of 8 hours of in-person core and elective content in order to receive RCR certification. Faculty who began training in this course last year and have yet to complete their 8 hours may continue with this year’s series. Faculty registered this course may apply up to 1 hr of in-person external RCR training (for example, a departmental workshop, class, or seminar relating to a topic covered in this class). Attendees must provide OGPS with verification of attendance for tracking purposes.

    More Information Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Jan
    13
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 976 8474 3319

    Goal-Directed Behavior and the Adolescent Brain
    Leah Somerville, Ph.D.
    Professor of Psychology and Center for Brain Sciences
    Harvard University

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 308862

     

    Neuroscience Graduate Program

    2020-2021 Bench to Bedside Seminar Series

     

    “Primary CNS Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Associated with a Demyelinating Lesion: A Case Study”

     

    Ivana Delalle, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pathology

    Director, Neuropathology

    Lifespan Academic Medical Center

     

    Jonathan F. Cahill, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

     

    Colin Kanach, M.D.

    Neuropathology Fellow

    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

     

    Brandon James, M.D.

    Vascular Neurology Fellow

    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital

     

    January 7, 2021 at 4:00pm

    Zoom link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/91071893026?pwd=NXhTaWhFZlJJQUp5YVFvZzF6UGNudz09

    Passcode: 308862

     

    Organized by the Brown University Center for Translational Neuroscience 

    Host: Eric M. Morrow, M.D., Ph.D.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom link will be sent upon registration.

    Please join us on January 6th for a seminar series presentation by Talie Massachi, “Affect in Social Media Messaging”. Messaging is a common mode of communication, with conversations written informally between individuals. Interpreting emotional affect from messaging data can lead to a powerful form of reflection or act as support for clinical therapy. This talk will first present Sochiatrist, a pseudo-anonymizing data extractor for social messaging data. Initial analysis from an experimental study shows that extracted private messaging data may be a promising data source for automated affect detection. Next, this talk will analyze various modifications to VADER (a common tool used to measure affect in text), proposing several simple modifications to VADER that may be able to improve VADER’s predictive power. Finally, this talk will introduce Chime, an experimental restrictive social network designed to test structures of social support built over social media by encouraging mood sharing between users.

    Talie Massachi is a second year computer science PhD student in the Brown University Human Computer Interaction Lab, advised by Professor Jeff Huang. Her work focuses on improving the availability of mental health resources available to the general public. Before joining Brown, she worked as a software engineer at Constructor.io, and as a research assistant at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies working on the Cicero system. She graduated from Brandeis University in 2018, with a degree in computer science and psychology.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Jan
    6
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    DPHB January Grand Rounds

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 935 0448 4641

    Novel Methods and Technologies to Predict Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors
    Michael Armey, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor (Research), Department of Psychosocial Research
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Associate Director, Consortium for Research Innovation in Suicide Prevention (CRISP)

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Dec
    18
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 2:00pm

    CLPS Ph.D. Defence: Shiying Yang

    Speaker: Shiying Yang, Brown University

    Title: The Structure of the Lexicon and Phonotactic Information

    Advisor: Uriel Cohen Priva

    ~ link information to the meeting sent toCLPS all ~

    If you are not part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator with at least a 24 hour notice.

    More Information Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Please contact [email protected] for Zoom link.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 342137

    Advisor: Dr. Gilad Barnea

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dec
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 885637

    Join the Moore Lab for a talk on the “The missed logic of neurovascular coupling across cortical layers,” featuring Prakash Kara, professor at the University of Minnesota. 

    Abstract:

    The brain has a mechanism for increasing blood flow locally to regions with increased neural activity. This increase in blood flow generates signals that can be measured when using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the precise spatial scale over which neural and vascular signals are correlated is largely unknown. This is of particular importance in the neocortex where lateral and laminar circuits are distinctly organized within and across mammalian species. While previous work has focused on molecular mechanisms of signaling between neurons and blood vessels, the extent to which blood vessels are locally ‘tuned’ for different categories of sensory stimuli was not examined until a recent study from my laboratory1. We have been using two-photon2 and three-photon3,4 imaging in mice5 and cats1 to measure sensory-evoked responses of individual blood vessels (dilation, blood velocity) while imaging neural activity in the surrounding tissue using fluorescent glutamate and calcium sensors. More recently, in collaboration with another lab at the University of Minnesota, we also added high-resolution fMRI (9.4 Tesla, 250 μm isotropic resolution) to directly compare the selectivity of hemodynamic signals obtained with single-voxel fMRI and single-vessel optical techniques across cortical layers. In my talk at Brown University, I will present multi-photon and fMRI data which begin to address the neural correlates of hemodynamic responses and the spatial limits of neurovascular coupling in the neocortex. More details on our research is available at karalab.org.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 163324
    From connectome to function: connectivity features underlying neuronal population
    dynamics in the nematode C. elegans
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Please contact [email protected] for Zoom link.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: 438591

    Join the Moore Lab for a talk on “Sensorimotor strategies and neuronal computations for shape recognition in mice,” featuring Chris Rodgers, Ph.D., Columbia University.

    Abstract:

    We can identify objects by exploring them with our eyes or fingertips. Mice similarly explore objects with their whiskers, but the underlying behavioral strategies and neuronal computations remain unknown. I developed a shape discrimination task that challenged head-fixed mice to discriminate concave from convex shapes. Mice did this by comparing sensory information across multiple whiskers. To determine how the brain implements this comparison operation, I recorded populations of neurons in the barrel cortex, which processes whisker input. In a surprising violation of the classic topographic map of barrel cortex, neurons were re-tuned to respond more to behaviorally relevant whiskers, in accordance with the comparison operation that drove the mouse’s choice. In sum, this approach revealed how neurons participated in an quantitatively defined algorithm for shape discrimination. This technique could be used to understand other behaviors in diverse organisms. In future work, I will ask how distributed sensorimotor processing enables freely moving mice to use body motion to efficiently explore their world.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 533703

    “How distributed and how focal are cognitive and pathological processes in the human brain?”

    Sydney Cash, M.D, Ph.D.

    Co-Director, Center for Neurotechnology & Neurorecovery, Epileptologist, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital

    Associate Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Password: CCBS

    Join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) for a seminar on “Neural reinforcement: re-entering and refining neural dynamics leading to desirable outcomes.” This event will feature Vivek Athalye, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University.

    Abstract:
    How do organisms learn to do again, on-demand, a behavior that led to a desirable outcome? Dopamine-dependent cortico-striatal plasticity provides a framework for learning behavior’s value, but it is less clear how it enables the brain to re-enter desired behaviors and refine them over time. Reinforcing behavior is achieved by re-entering and refining the neural patterns that produce it. We review studies using brain-machine interfaces which reveal that reinforcing cortical population activity requires cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Then, we propose a formal framework for how reinforcement in cortico-basal ganglia circuits acts on the neural dynamics of cortical populations. We propose two parallel mechanisms: i) fast reinforcement which selects the inputs that permit the re-entrance of the particular cortical population dynamics which naturally produced the desired behavior, and ii) slower reinforcement which leads to refinement of cortical population dynamics and more reliable production of neural trajectories driving skillful behavior on-demand.
    More Information CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Dec
    15

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Joey Heffner (Grad student at Brown)


    Title: Reverse engineering emotions during social interactions

    Abstract: How do emotional experiences guide socially adaptive behavior? Popular theories argue that emotions are linked to action tendencies, where emotions (e.g., anger) cause specific behaviors, such as punishing others. Other theories focus on characterizing how external rewards generate specific emotional experiences, which in turn, motivate actions. We leverage a new methodology to precisely characterize the role of emotions during social learning and decision-making. First, by using a machine learning approach, we test the anger-punishment link to interrogate which emotional responses drive decisions to punish. Results reveal that rather than anger, emotional states such as disappointment, are far more representative for motivating punitive choices. Second, we test how variation in emotion representations motivate prosocial choices. We demonstrate how individual differences in the cognitive structure of emotion predict decisions to donate to children in need, controlling for emotional experiences themselves. Together, these results challenge standard decision-making models and offer new understanding about the role of emotions in social choices.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  •  

    Join us for the Providence Sleep Research Interest Group Seminar, featuring Dr. Allison Harvey, professor of clinical psychology at the University of California Berkeley. Dr. Harvey’s presentation is entitled: “The Transdiagnostic Sleep and Circadian Intervention: Modifying the Impact of Eveningness Chronotype in Adolescence on Sleep, Circadian, and Risk Outcomes.”

    Abstract:

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage. There is evidence that the onset of puberty triggers a general preference for eveningness. Evening chronotype (‘night-owls’) adolescents follow a delayed sleep-wake schedule, increasing mental and/or physical activity later in the day, compared to morning chronotypes (‘larks’). The evening preference has been identified as a contributing factor for poorer health across multiple domains (emotional, cognitive, behavioral, social, physical). A ‘treatment experiment’ will be described in which a psychosocial intervention (Transdiagnostic Sleep and Circadian Intervention; TranS-C-Youth) was administered to test the hypothesis that reducing eveningness will improve sleep and circadian functioning and reduce risk. Several “next steps” will also be highlighted. –

    About the seminar series:

    The PSRIG seminar series has been hosted by Dr. Mary Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for over 25 years. PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research.

    This year, the series will be held virtually and involve a diverse lineup of speakers from various institutions both nationally and internationally. Seminars will be held at 12 p.m. on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected].

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • How do our brains turn thoughts into action, and how does this shape our everyday lives?

    Join the Carney Institute for a conversation with David Badre, professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University, about the neuroscience of cognitive control. Badre is the author of the newly published book, On Task, where he offers a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the unique ability of the human brain to execute sophisticated actions to achieve goals.

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Watch previous conversations on the Carney Institute website.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Desmond Upton Patton, PhD
    Associate Professor of Social Work; Associate Dean of Curriculum Innovation and Academic Affairs
    Columbia University School of Social Work

    Desmond Upton Patton’s research uses qualitative and computational data collection methods to examine the relationship between youth and gang violence and social media; how and why violence, grief, and identity are expressed on social media; and the real-world impact these expressions have on well-being for low-income youth of color. He studies the ways in which gang-involved youth conceptualize threats on social media, and the extent to which social media shapes and facilitates youth and gang violence.

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series is sponsored by The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and the Brown School of Public Health to examine health inequity and to outline steps toward a more equitable and just health care system.

    The series is supported by The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care. This lecture was established in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by a gift from his wife, Ruth N. Levinger, on behalf of the Levinger family. The Levingers’ daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen ’59, MD were instrumental in Mrs. Levinger’s decision to make this gift.

    Continuing Medical Education Credit

    This live activity is approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

    Physicians: To be eligible to claim CME credit, please register for this event at cme-learning.brown.edu

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. decodingdisparities
  • Dec
    14
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Basic Bash

    This workshop will cover basic shell scripting in Bash: variables, loops, pipes and more so participants can learn to automate work with Bash. We will assume participants have some familiarity with the linux command line.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Registration: Google Forms

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 643252

    “Interrogation of Neurobiological Responses to DietChoice”

     Advisor: Dr. Michael Krashes

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dec
    11
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    CLPS Ph.D. Defence: Brittany Baxter

    Speaker: Brittany Baxter, Brown University

    Title: Are you ‘shore’ it looks farther away: Does the energetic cost of walking on sand influence perceived spatial layout or what the layout affords for action?

    Advisor: Bill Warren

    ~ link information to the meeting sent toCLPS all ~

    If you are not part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator with at least a 24 hour notice.

    More Information Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Dec
    10

    “Neurocognitive Bases of Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease”

    Hwamee Oh

    Brown University

    “Neuroimaging of Financial Decision Making in Older Age”

    Duke Han

    University of Southern California

    Register to attend the webinar. Zoom details will be sent after registration.

     

    About Growing Up in Neuroscience Webinar Series

    Any early-career researcher interested in aging neuroscience across a wide range of domains – including cognition, affect, memory, and everything in between – is invited to participate in Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience (GRAN). Our objective is to provide a setting in which junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience can learn about the latest developments (and the people behind it). We have brought together world-class researchers across a wide range of career stages (from assistant to full professor) to present their work, as well as share their unique experiences relating to how they became investigators (inspired by the Growing Up in Science series), in hopes of encouraging junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience.

    GRAN2020 will take place on via a virtual and free Webinar Series in Fall 2020. To receive the zoom invite and passcode for each session, you will need to register for each session. Each session will be 1.5 hours long, with each speaker presenting their research and participating in a Q&A session at the end of each webinar.

    Abstracts

    Neurocognitive Bases of Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease (Hwamee Oh): Although cognitively normal, older adults undergo a wide range of abnormal neural changes that are not clinically evident. One of these abnormal neural changes is an accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ), a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Approximately 20-50% of cognitively normal older adults were shown to harbor a high level of Aβ deposition, which is now called “preclinical Alzheimer’s disease”. Because Aβ deposition is a disease-related process and a large proportion of cognitively normal older adults presents with Aβ pathology, it is important to disentangle changes associated with normal aging and pathological aging in order to better understand each neurocognitive trajectory. More importantly, brain systems supporting memory highly overlap with where β-amyloid plaques are accumulated. It remains, however, unclear how Aβ pathology contributes to memory dysfunction. I will present the data that show differential changes in neural substrates and cognition due to normal aging and Aβ-related pathological aging, with a particular emphasis on the visual memory system, among asymptomatic older adults. I will also discuss the application of these findings in developing better behavioral and neuroimaging measurements that help early detection, prevention, and treatment monitoring of Alzheimer’s disease among preclinical and clinical populations.

    Neuroimaging of Financial Decision Making in Older Age (Duke Han): Older adults hold over a third of the nation’s wealth, yet a portion of older adults tragically become victims of scam and fraud, often resulting in a devasting impact to independence and wellbeing. The reasons for why some older adults show declines in financial decision making and increased vulnerability to financial exploitation while others do not remain elusive. The work of our team and others have linked lower financial decision making in older age with important health outcomes such as cognitive impairment and eventual Alzheimer’s Disease. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms which contribute to impaired financial decision making and financial vulnerability in older age is therefore a significant public health concern. This presentation will discuss the rationale for neuroimaging as a tool for studying financial decision making and vulnerability to scam and fraud in older age. Findings from our work using multimodal neuroimaging approaches (MRI macrostructure, microstructure, and functional connectivity) will be presented, and public policy implications will be discussed.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Dec
    10

    Advance-CTR Pilot Project awardee, Dr. Tao, and Mentored Research Scholar, Dr. Samuels, share their research:

    • Jun Tao, PhD: “Using Big Data to Determine Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Uptake and Persistence in Southern New England
    • Elizabeth Samuels, MD: “Identifying Opioid Overdose Hotspots for Prevention and Treatment Resource Deployment

    Register now!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Dec
    9
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    MPPB Career Panel

    Please join us for a career panel featuring MPP alumni Diana Borgas, PhD’14 and Hawasatu Dumbuya, PhD’17.  

    Click here to register and receive the Zoom link.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Title: Constructing 4D molecular roadmaps of cell fate decisions

    This event will require a password. If you are not part of the MCB Graduate Program and would like to participate, please contact the program coordinator for the password.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Dec
    9
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: dphb

    The Diagnosis and Treatment of Tourette Syndrome

    Barbara J. Coffey, MD, MS

    Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    University of Miami

    Miller School of Medicine Wednesday, December 9, 2020 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/Child-Adolescent-2021

    Join December 9, 2020 Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/99914605173
    Meeting ID: 999 1460 5173

    Password: dphb

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    7
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Version Control with Git

    A practical introduction to version control for software management using Git. Topics covered include: creating a repository, checking the status of a repository, committing changes, viewing changes, reverting to older versions of files, and setting up a remote repository.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Registration: Google Forms

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Dec
    4

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Jacob Feldman (Professor Rutgers University - New Brunswick)

    Title: Complexity and information in category and feature learning

    Abstract: In this talk I will present two interrelated projects on category and feature learning, one on the role of complexity in the way we learning categories, and the other on the role of information measures in the way we learn the features that underlie categories. Conceptual complexity is known to impair concept learning, implying a kind of simplicity bias in the way we induce categories from examples. But past studies of complexity have been limited to discrete complexity measures, while the role of complexity in the general case—probabilistically defined categories in continuous feature spaces—is comparatively unexplored. I will discuss a series of experiments in which subjects were presented with probabilistic categories of various levels of intrinsic complexity. As with categories based on discrete features, subjects show a dramatic fall-off in performance with more complex category structures. But what is the right way to measure “complexity?” A comparison of measures suggests that a simple information-theoretic measure of category complexity best fits the data. In the second part of the talk I will discuss how category learning can influence the choice of underlying perceptual features. Category learning is known to induce “categorical perception” effects, in which discrimination performance along category-relevant or informative features measurably improves. But what is the right way to measure “informativeness?” A comparison of measures suggests again that a simple information-theoretic measure—the mutual information between the feature and the category variables—best fits the data. This finding suggests a “rational” basis for categorical perception, in which the precision of perceptual discrimination is tuned to the statistical structure of the environment

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Dec
    4

    Growing Up in Neuroscience Webinar Series

    “Emotion Regulation and Aging: What I used to think, what I think now, and why”

    Derek Isaacowitz

    Northeastern University

    “How Older Adults Remember Emotional Events”

    Elizabeth Kensinger

    Boston College

    Register to attend the webinar. Zoom details will be sent after registration.

    About Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience

    Any early-career researcher interested in aging neuroscience across a wide range of domains – including cognition, affect, memory, and everything in between – is invited to participate in Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience (GRAN). Our objective is to provide a setting in which junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience can learn about the latest developments (and the people behind it). We have brought together world-class researchers across a wide range of career stages (from assistant to full professor) to present their work, as well as share their unique experiences relating to how they became investigators (inspired by the Growing Up in Science series), in hopes of encouraging junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience.

    GRAN2020 will take place via a virtual and free webinar series in Fall 2020. To receive the zoom invite and passcode for each session, you will need to register for each session. Each session will be 1.5 hours long, with each speaker presenting their research and participating in a Q&A session at the end of each webinar.

    Abstracts

    “Emotion Regulation and Aging: What I used to think, what I think now, and why” (Derek Isaacowitz):

    For basically my whole career, I have been interested in trying to understand the mechanisms underlying older adults’ generally positive affective experience. Based on socioemotional selectivity theory, I spent a number of years investigating age-related positivity effects in attention, and whether these may play a role in older adults’ affective success. This then led to a wider investigation of emotion regulation strategies, including attentional deployment, that may vary by age. While our early work supported the age differences narrative, and sometimes the “older people are better” narrative, our more recent work has found much more similarity than differences among age groups in emotion regulation behavior, both in the lab and in everyday life. I will consider the implications of these findings for my own research trajectory as well as for the field in general.

    “How Older Adults Remember Emotional Events” (Elizabeth Kensinger):

    In this talk, I will first describe some similarities in the ways that young and older adults remember emotional events. In particular, across the adult lifespan individuals show emotional memory enhancements and also emotional memory trade-offs. I will then shift to focusing on ways in which age seems to affect the way that emotional experiences are remembered. In particular, older adults often appear to remember negative events less vividly, and with an increased focus on the silver linings. The negativity of emotional events also can fade over time for older adults. I will briefly describe how an expanded model of emotional memory that incorporates the role of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may elucidate these age-related differences.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 377385
    Neural mechanisms of human episodic memory formation
    Host: Dr. Wael Asaad
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 505338

     

    Center for Translational Neuroscience Special Seminar

     

    “Modeling late-onset neurodegenerative disorders with patient-derived neurons generated by neuronal reprogramming”

     

    Andrew S. Yoo, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Developmental Biology

    Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

     

    December 3, 2020 at 1:00 p.m.

     

    Zoom link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97382218771?pwd=OWQ5OURXS0ZrKzVnWVluZW5kZ3AwZz09

    Passcode: 505338

     

    Host: Ashley E. Webb, Ph.D.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Dec
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Speaker:Jacob Feldman (Professor Rutgers University - New Brunswick)

    Title: Complexity and information in category and feature learning

    Abstract: In this talk I will present two interrelated projects on category and feature learning, one on the role of complexity in the way we learning categories, and the other on the role of information measures in the way we learn the features that underlie categories. Conceptual complexity is known to impair concept learning, implying a kind of simplicity bias in the way we induce categories from examples. But past studies of complexity have been limited to discrete complexity measures, while the role of complexity in the general case—probabilistically defined categories in continuous feature spaces—is comparatively unexplored. I will discuss a series of experiments in which subjects were presented with probabilistic categories of various levels of intrinsic complexity. As with categories based on discrete features, subjects show a dramatic fall-off in performance with more complex category structures. But what is the right way to measure “complexity?” A comparison of measures suggests that a simple information-theoretic measure of category complexity best fits the data. In the second part of the talk I will discuss how category learning can influence the choice of underlying perceptual features. Category learning is known to induce “categorical perception” effects, in which discrimination performance along category-relevant or informative features measurably improves. But what is the right way to measure “informativeness?” A comparison of measures suggests again that a simple information-theoretic measure—the mutual information between the feature and the category variables—best fits the data. This finding suggests a “rational” basis for categorical perception, in which the precision of perceptual discrimination is tuned to the statistical structure of the environment

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • “Geometry of Object Representation in Visual Hierarchies”

    Haim Sompolinsky, Ph.D.
    The Hebrew University  

    Abstract: Neurons in object representations in top stages of the visual hierarchy exhibit high selectivity to object identity as well as to identity-preserving variables, including location, orientation and scale. suggesting that changes in the object representations from low to high processing stages are related to changes in the geometry of object manifolds. Each manifold consists of the set of population responses to stimuli belonging to the same object.

    In my talk, I will present recent work that elucidates the relation between manifold geometry and object-identity computations. I will discuss two kinds of computations. The first is object classification. I will describe new measures of manifold radius and dimensions that predict the ability to support object classification (Chung et al., PRX, 2018). Based on these measures, we characterize the changes in manifold geometry as signals propagate across layers of Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNNs). Recordings from neurons in various stages of the visual systems, have been similarly analyzed, allowing us to test the correspondence between DCNNs and the visual hierarchy in the visual cortex.

    In a recent unpublished work with Ben Sorscher (Stanford), we have studied the ability to learn new objects and object categories from just a few examples (the few shot learning problem). We show that feature layers in DCNNs exhibit a remarkable ability in few shot learning of new categories. To explain this performance, we develop a new theory of the geometry of concept formation, that delineates the salient geometric features that underlie rapid concept formation in artificial and brain sensory hierarchies.

    More Information CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • BRENDEN LAKE

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and Data Science, NYU

    LEARNING THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHILD

    Young children have meaningful expectations about the world around them. What is the origin of this early knowledge? How much can be explained through generic learning mechanisms applied to sensory data, and how much requires more substantive innate inductive biases? Addressing this fundamental question in its full generality is infeasible, but we can hope to make real progress in more narrowly defined domains, such as the development of high-level visual categories, thanks to new datasets and progress in deep learning. We train large-scale neural networks through the eyes of a single developing child, using longitudinal baby headcam videos (Sullivan et al., 2020, PsyArxiv). Our results show how high-level visual representations emerge from a subset of one baby’s experience, through only self-supervised learning.

     
    Biography

    Brenden builds computational models of everyday cognitive abilities, focusing on problems that are easier for people than they are for machines. The human mind is the best-known solution to a diverse array of difficult computational problems: learning new concepts, learning new tasks, understanding scenes, learning a language, asking questions, forming explanations, amongst many others. Machines also struggle to simulate other facets of human intelligence, including creativity, curiosity, self-assessment, and commonsense reasoning.

    In this broad space of computational challenges, Brenden’s work has addressed a range of questions: How do people learn a new concept from just one or a few examples? How do people act creatively when designing new concepts? How do people learn qualitatively different forms of structure? How do people ask questions when searching for information?

    By studying these distinctively human endeavors, there is potential to advance both cognitive science and machine learning. In cognitive science, building a computational model is a test of understanding; if people outperform all existing algorithms on certain types of problems, we have more to understand about how people solve them. In machine learning, these cognitive abilities are both important open problems as well as opportunities to reverse engineer human solutions. By studying human solutions to difficult computational problems, Brenden aims to better understand humans and to build machines that learn in more powerful and more human-like ways.

     

    Follow Brenden on Twitter: @LakeBrenden

     

    DSI & CCMB Data Wednesday Seminar Series

    The Data Science Initiative (DSI) joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Please check our events page for more information on these and other events of interest.

    More Information 
  • Regina Binda is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

    Topic: Aging & Dementia Research Presentation
    Time: Dec 2, 2020 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

    Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/94840086825

    Meeting ID: 948 4008 6825
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    Meeting ID: 948 4008 6825

     

    Aging and Dementia Research Presentation

     Sponsored by: The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute

    In Association with:

    The Rhode Island Hospital Alzheimer’s Disease & Memory Disorders Center

     “Pupil Measurement as a Novel,

    Non-Invasive Biomarker of Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease”

     Laura Korthauer, PhD

    Assistant Professor

    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

     December 2, 2020

    1 to 2 PM

    Via Zoom

    More Information 
  • Dec
    2
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Misha Oraa Ali (PhD student, Brown)

    Title: (When) do children learn the distributivity of “each”?

    Abstract: Since Inhelder and Piaget (1964), many studies show children making non-adult-like ‘quantifier spreading errors’ in understanding expressions like, “Each girl rode an elephant”. Young children often face difficulties binding the appropriate quantifier to the right noun. Since Brooks and Braine (1996), a parallel literature investigates children’s resolution of scope ambiguities: Does “each girl rode an elephant” mean one elephant, or one-per-girl? Both literatures presuppose that children know the logical words (“each”, “a”), and struggle with their composition. But children’s non-adult-like behavior is unsurprising if they just don’t know what “each” means. Additionally, many of these studies, which assume that children can indeed comprehend “each”, claim to be investigating children’s acquisition of distributivity (that the predicate applies to each individual member of the set) and universality (that the predicate applies to all members contained in a set, without exception) in their comprehension of quantifiers like “all”, “every”, and “each”. However, the question of when children actually acquire distributivity in their compositional toolkits also remains open. Understanding how children learn the meanings of function words like “each”, “every” and “all” will give us important insights into the compositional machinery underlying many aspects of cognition. These words have abstract logical meanings that children cannot learn by reference to anything in the world, the way they might learn words like “tiger” or “rutabaga”. My project aims to evaluate children’s understanding of the universal quantifiers “all”, “every” and “each” in English. While these words have similar, abstract meanings, they also differ in subtle ways. How do children acquire an understanding of these subtle differences in meanings, and at what age?

    Bio: Hi! I’m currently a PhD student in the Brown Language and Thought Lab, where I do research with Roman Feiman

    I was a research assistant at the Harvard Lab for Developmental Studies, working with Elizabeth Spelke and Rhea Howard. Before that, I was a research support associate in the LanguageLab (TedLab) with Edward A Gibson and Paula Rubio-Fernandez at the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. I have also been involved with Project Prakash, an initiative from the Sinha Lab for Vision Research at MIT.

    I received my Bachelor’s degree in May 2017 from Mount Holyoke College, with a major in Neuroscience and Behaviour and a special minor in Graphic Narrative and Visual Storytelling. In college, I did my thesis research with Mara Breen where I used ERP to study auditory imagery and implicit prosody - specifically, by investigating the effects of rhythm and metrical structure on poetry during silent reading.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    2
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: dphb

    Psychological and Developmental Impact of Trauma, Violence, and Racism: From Research to Service and Advocacy

    Maureen Allwood, Ph.D.
    Professor, Department of Psychology
    John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    City University of New York

    Wednesday, December 2, 2020 ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-Series-2021

    Join December 2, 2020 Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97760079559

    Meeting ID: 977 6007 9559

    Password: dphb

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Dec
    1
    Virtual
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Lecture by Dr. Eric Garland, Ph.D.,LCSW

    Please join the Brown Contemplative Studies Initiative and the Center for Mindfulness for a lecture by Dr. Eric Garland, Ph.D., LCSW on “Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement Heals Opioid Misuse and Chronic Pain by Restructuring Reward:  From Hedonic Pleasure to Self-Transcendent Meaning” on December 1st from 4 - 5:30 pm EST.  This event is free and open to the public.  However, you must register with [email protected] to receive the Zoom link. 

    Dr. Eric Garland, PhD, LCSW is Distinguished Endowed Chair in Research, Professor and Associate Dean for Research in the University of Utah College of Social Work, and Director of the Center on Mindfulness and Integrative Health Intervention Development (C-MIIND). Dr. Garland is the developer of an innovative mindfulness-based therapy founded on insights derived from cognitive, affective, and neurobiological science, called Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE). As Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator, Dr. Garland has over 175 scientific publications and has received more than $50 million in research grants from the NIH, DOD, and PCORI to conduct translational research on biopsychosocial mechanisms implicated in addiction, emotion dysregulation, and chronic pain, including randomized controlled trials of MORE and other mindfulness-based interventions as treatments for opioid misuse and addiction. To complement his expertise in clinical research, Dr. Garland is a licensed psychotherapist with more than 15 years of clinical experience providing mind-body therapies for persons suffering from addictive behaviors, psychological disorders, and chronic pain. In 2019, he was appointed by NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins to the NIH HEAL Multi-disciplinary Working Group comprised of national experts on pain and addiction research to help guide the $1.1 billion HEAL initiative aimed at using science to halt the opioid crisis.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Dec
    1
    Virtual
    12:00pm

    EEB Tuesday Seminar Series

    Dr. Sabrina Burmeister- University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

     

    Talk Title: Frognition: Poison Frogs and the Ecology of Spatial Memory

    More Information 
  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation focused on Alzheimer’s research at Brown University, featuring:

    • Stephen Salloway, Martin M. Zucker Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown, director of neurology and the Memory and Aging Program at Butler Hospital in Providence, RI
    • Ashley Webb, Richard and Edna Salomon Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    23
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Advanced Slurm

    This workshop is for people who are already familiar with Slurm, but would like to use Slurm’s more powerful features. Topics covered include: dependencies for conditional execution of jobs, job arrays for parameter sweeps, dealing with hundreds or thousands of small tasks, how to limit the number of jobs running at once, and how to cancel multiple jobs.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Registration: Google Forms

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Nov
    23
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Angeline Tsui (Postdoc Stanford University)

    Title: Language development of bilingual infants

    Abstract: Many children in the US and around the world are growing up as bilinguals: Nearly 22% of children in the US are learning two or more than two languages at home. The prevalence of bilingualism calls for research investigating the foundations of successful early bilingual language development. My research program answers this call by investigating how bilingual infants handle the demands of learning two languages and in what ways bilinguals differ from monolinguals in their language development. In my talk, I will present evidence that learners can use subtle cues to overcome the challenges of learning two languages in a bilingual environment. On the other hand, most of the time, bilingual infants do not differ from monolingual infants in their word learning, cognitive development and preferences for infant-directed speech. Together, these findings suggest that early bilingualism does not hinder children’s language development relative to their monolingual counterparts. Finally, I will discuss my current and future work extending this research program to real-world educational and clinical applications through the use of collaborative methods and large-scale data collection.

    Bio:  I am a postdoctoral scholar working with Michael C. Frank at Stanford University. My primary research focuses on bilingual infant word learning. I study (i) how young bilingual learners handle the demands of learning two languages in their environments and (ii) whether bilinguals and monolinguals differ in language development and what may drive the difference. More recently, I have focused on the use of large-scale, multi-site studies to examine whether key infancy research findings can be generalized to different populations. I also have a strong interest in advancing infancy research through open science and best research practices (e.g., appropriate use of statistical methods in data analysis).

    My secondary research interest is related to young children’s future-oriented behavior. In particular, I am interested in investigating what motivates children to save for their future and how to foster their saving behavior.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    20
    Virtual
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    MCBGP Data Club: Reilly/D’Ordine

    This event will require a password. If you are not part of the MCB Graduate Program and would like to participate, please contact the program coordinator for the password.

    Shanelle Reilly
    (Brossay Lab)

    “The characterization of MCMV specific Qa-1 restricted CD8 + T cells.”

    _______________________

    Alexandra D’Ordine
    ((Sedivy/Jogl Labs))


    “Developing small molecule inhibitors of the LINE-1 retrotransposon endonuclease domain to target age-associated disease.”

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    20
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Tomer Ullman (Assistant Professor Harvard)

    Title: Models of Core Knowledge (Physics, Really)

    Abstract: Even young children seem to have an early understanding of the world around them, and the people in it. Before children can reliably say “ball”, “wall”, or “Saul”, they expect balls to not go through walls, and for Saul to go right for a ball (if there’s no wall). What is the formal conceptual structure underlying this commonsense reasoning about objects and agents? I will raise several possibilities for models underlying core intuitive physics as a way of talking about models of core knowledge and intuitive theories more generally. In particular, I will present some recent ML work trying to capture early expectations about object solidly, cohesion, and permanence, that relies on a rough-derendering approach

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Emerging areas such as virtual reality and machine learning present new opportunities and challenges for the research of data visualization. To these, we propose to follow user-centric approaches to understand users and then to develop computational approaches to further model and predict users’ behavior. In this talk, I will first introduce three completed studies where we assessed users’ cognition and perception and one study where we modeled human perception of visualization. I will then introduce detailed plans for two proposed projects; they aim to advance computational approaches to describe, quantify, and model users’ behavior centered around data visualization. The first project will apply machine learning to precisely model and predict human perception of correlation in scatterplots. I will present the background, the preliminary dataset, a data collection plan, and a list of plausible machine learning techniques. The outcome of this project would be a set of practices and observations that could automate visualization evaluation and modeling approaches. The second project will develop informative performance metrics based on users’ movements in a virtual reality environment and then use information theory to evaluate these metrics. I will present the datasets we intend to use, the example metrics proposed, and the evaluation plan. The outcome of this project would be a set of metrics that could facilitate future empirical studies in virtual reality. We anticipate that the end results of this thesis will improve user performance and enhance user experience in virtual reality and machine learning; and, in turn, new techniques and methods from virtual reality and machine learning will also cope with the user-centric computational approaches to data visualization.
    Host: Professor David H. Laidlaw
    More Information 
  • PLEASE NOTE THIS TALK IS FOR FACULTY ONLY.  

     

    THIS TALK HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO BEGIN AT 1:00 PM.

     

    BRENDA RUBENSTEIN

    Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Brown University

    LEARNING QUANTUM MECHANICS: HOW MACHINE LEARNING IS (AND IS NOT) TRANSFORMING THE PRACTICE OF QUANTUM MECHANICS

    Much of our ability to understand the quantum world, including how to design new materials, synthesize new molecules, and study puzzling emergent quantum phases, rests upon our ability to accurately solve the Schrodinger Equation. While the recipe for solving the Schrodinger Equation has been known for over a century, the cost of finding its exact solutions scales exponentially with system size, a fact which has frustrated the progress of quantum chemistry and physics for decades. The rise of data science, however, presents new and exciting opportunities for potentially accelerating the solution of the Schrodinger Equation - or foregoing its solution whatsoever by directly predicting quantum properties. In this talk, I will describe how machine learning is and isn’t transforming our ability to model quantum phenomena drawing upon examples from my own group’s research and the wider literature.

     
    Biography:

    Dr. Brenda Rubenstein is currently the Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Brown University. While the focus of her work is on developing new electronic structure methods, she is also deeply engaged in rethinking computing architectures. Prior to arriving at Brown, she was a Lawrence Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She received her Sc.B.s in Chemical Physics and Applied Mathematics at Brown University, her M.Phil. in Computational Chemistry while a Churchill Scholar at the University of Cambridge, and her Ph.D. in Chemical Physics at Columbia University. Ask her about basketball - you may be surprised!

     

    Faculty for Faculty Research Talks

    This is an opportunity for faculty to share current data science-related research activities with other faculty colleagues in an informal and interdisciplinary environment. More about this series on our website.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Nov
    20
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Nov
    19
    Virtual
    5:00pm - 7:00pm

    Annual CS Research Open House

    Welcome to the 5th Annual CS Research Open House, hosted by the MURAs!

    This is a great way to get to know more about research in the department, no matter what year, concentration, or classes you’re in. Lots of groups are recruiting new researchers to join their team - this is the perfect opportunity to start thinking about research for next semester!

    This year, the event will be held remotely. There will be brief introductions from each group (recorded) followed by a breakout room Q&A (not recorded) that participants can enter and leave freely.

    As always, reach out to us at [email protected] if you have any questions!

    RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/4834613723278028

    Participating Research Groups: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1i_ybxAEO6M_otXPd-TCn-KEJNTgQscx_IL8XxNqkbNE/preview

    Host: Meta Undergraduate Research Assistants (MURAs)

    More Information 
  • Carney Methods Meetups: Beyond the Brady Bunch Meeting

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a Carney Methods Meetups, an informal gathering focused on methods for brain science, on Thursday, November 19, at 2 p.m.

    Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience, David Sheinberg, professor of neuroscience, and Andrew Creamer, scientific data management specialist in the Brown Library, will lead an open discussion of tools and tricks to enhance virtual meetings for brainstorming, collaborative manuscript editing, poster presentation, social events, and others. Some tools like OBS studio and spatial.chat will be briefly demonstrated, and we invite further ideas from the community.

    Please note, this workshop requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account. Click to learn more.

    Notes from previous Meetups are available online.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Nov
    19
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  

    Speaker:Zhiyan Wang (CLPS Grad Student at Watanabe Lab)

    Title: Visual perceptual learning of faces- a study with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Patients


    Abstract: Visual perceptual learning (VPL) is defined as a long-term performance change on a visual task as a result of visual experiences(Watanabe & Sasaki, 2015). The majority of previous VPL researches have focused onlower-level visual features using artificial visual stimuli. However, themechanisms of VPL on natural stimuli remains elusive. Moreover, VPL has been studied as an intervention for patients with visual deficits that originated from lower-level visual areas (Polat et al., 2004) (e.g. amblyopia, glaucoma). There is a limited number of studies that explore the effect of VPL on patients whose deficits originated from high-level visual areas. In this talk, I will present a study that investigates VPL of faces with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) patients. BDD patients are characterized by distressing preoccupation with slight defects in appearances. First, I will describe the behavioral changes for the BDD patients after VPL of faces. Second, I will discuss the neural mechanisms underlying the changes in association with VPL of faces. Our study demonstrates the effect of VPL on natural stimuli and explores the effect of VPL on patient populations with deficits from high-level visual areas.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 847067

    “Mechanisms of neuronal wiring”

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  • Please join Carney’s Center for Computational Brain Science (CCBS) on November 18 for a special seminar on “Differential Resilience of Neurons and Networks with Similar Behavior to Perturbation,” featuring Eve Marder, Ph.D., university professor and Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Biology at Brandeis University.

    Please note, you must be logged into Zoom through your Brown account to join this event. 

    Abstract:

    Both computational and experimental results in single neurons and small networks demonstrate that very similar network function can result from quite disparate sets of neuronal and network parameters. Using the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system, we study the influence of these differences in underlying structure on differential resilience of individuals to a variety of environmental perturbations, including changes in temperature, pH, potassium concentration and neuromodulation. We show that neurons with many different kinds of ion channels can smoothly move through different mechanisms in generating their activity patterns, thus extending their dynamic range.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • NANDITA GARUD

    Assistant Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCLA

    RAPID ADAPTATION IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: LESSONS FROM DROSOPHILA AND THE HUMAN MICROBIOME

    The availability of whole-genome data from natural populations has challenged many long-standing assumptions about molecular evolution. For example, it has long been assumed that natural selection is typically slow and infrequent. Using whole-genome data from both Drosophila and the human microbiome, I found evidence that rapid adaptation is much more pervasive than previously thought. In my talk, I will first describe a method I developed to detect soft sweeps, a signature of rapid adaptation, and its application to Drosophila and other, non-model organism data. Next, I will show that selective sweeps of genes and SNPs in bacteria in the human microbiome are common on 6-month time scales and that these sweeps likely originate in adaptive introgression from other species and strains in the microbiome. This suggests that complex ecological communities can play an important role in shaping evolution on short time scales. In sum, I will describe how we can leverage whole-genome data and novel statistics for uncovering the mode and tempo of adaptation in natural populations.

    DSI & CCMB Data Wednesday Seminar Series

    The Data Science Initiative (DSI) joins the Center for Computational and Molecular Biology (CCMB) every Wednesday afternoon, 4 – 5 pm during the academic year to present lecturers in various mathematical and statistical fields worldwide, as well as local researchers on Brown’s campus. The aim is to provide students, staff, faculty, and visitors with an introduction to current research topics in the fields of data science, mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Please check our events page for more information on these and other events of interest.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    18
    Virtual
    1:00pm - 3:00pm

    Biology of Aging Seminar: Malene Hansen

    Dr. Hansen is a Professor in the Program for Development, Aging and Regeneration at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), a non-profit research institute located in San Diego, CA, where she studies molecular mechanisms of aging with a focus on the cellular recycling process called autophagy. She obtained a Master of Science in biochemistry in 1998, and a doctorate in molecular biology in 2001, both from Copenhagen University, Denmark. Dr. Hansen subsequently carried out postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Professor Cynthia Kenyon, Ph.D., at the University of California, San Francisco, a world leader in the genetics of aging. She started her laboratory at SBP in the fall of 2007, and currently serves as Associate Dean of Student Affairs in SBP’s accredited graduate program, and as Faculty Advisor on Postdoctoral Training for SBP’s ∼150 postdoctoral scholars. In recognition of her mentoring efforts, Dr. Hansen has received the 2017 Mentor Award from the USA National Postdoctoral Association.
    The event will require a password. If you are not affiliated with the Center on the Biology of Aging  and would like to participate, please contact the program coordinator for the password.
    More Information 
  • In this lecture, I show how considering the intersection of collaborative and social scenarios with other domains of computing can reveal end-user needs and result in innovative technical systems. I give examples of this approach from my work in gesture interaction, information retrieval, and accessibility, focusing particularly on the topics of creating more efficient and expressive augmentative and alternative communication technologies and of making social media more accessible to screen reader users. I close by identifying future opportunities for creating inclusive, accessible collaborative and social technologies.
     
    Meredith Ringel Morris is a Sr. Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and Research Area Manager for Interaction, Accessibility, and Mixed Reality. She founded Microsoft Research’s Ability research group and is a member of the lab’s Leadership Team. She is also an Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and in The Information School. Dr. Morris is an expert in Human-Computer Interaction; in 2020, she was inducted into the ACM SIGCHI Academy in recognition of her research in collaborative and social computing. Her research on collaboration and social technologies has contributed new systems, methods, and insights to diverse areas of computing including gesture interaction, information retrieval, and accessibility. Dr. Morris earned her Sc.B. in Computer Science from Brown University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University.
    Hosts: Professors Jeff Huang/Andy van Dam
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  • “A dedicated brainstem circuit underlies REM sleep control—implication for Synucleinopathies”

    Jimmy Fraigne, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor, Department of Cell and Systems Biology

    University of Toronto

    Abstract:

    A specific brainstem circuit controls REM sleep. Degeneration of this circuit underlies REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is characterized by excessive movement that often result in patient injuries. However, the most alarming aspect of RBD is that 80-90% of patients eventually develop a synucleinopathy like Parkinson’s disease or dementia with Lewy bodies.

    About the PSRIG seminar series:

    The PSRIG seminar series has been hosted by Dr. Mary Carskadon and her lab at Brown University for over 25 years. PSRIG has historically served as a venue for the local sleep research and sleep medicine community, and for trainees, to learn about current basic and clinical sleep research.

    This year, the series will be held virtually and involve a diverse lineup of speakers from various institutions both nationally and internationally. Seminars will be held at 12 p.m. on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. If you would like to be added to the PSRIG mailing list, please email Patricia Wong at [email protected].

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Audrey Tyrka, MD, PhD
    Co-Director, STAR Initiative: Stress, Trauma, and Resilience
    Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School
    Directory, Laboratory for Clinical and Translational Neuroscience at Butler Hospital

    Dr. Tyrka’s research program is focused on the biological mechanisms of risk resulting from early stress and trauma in maltreated children and adults with a history of childhood adversity. She has made important contributions to understanding the metabolic, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms of risk.

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series

    The Decoding Disparities Lecture Series is sponsored by The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and the Brown School of Public Health to examine health inequity and to outline steps toward a more equitable and just health care system.

    The series is supported by The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care. This lecture was established in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by a gift from his wife, Ruth N. Levinger, on behalf of the Levinger family. The Levingers’ daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen ’59, MD were instrumental in Mrs. Levinger’s decision to make this gift.

    Continuing Medical Education Credit

    This live activity is approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

    Physicians: To be eligible to claim CME credit, please register for this event at cme-learning.brown.edu

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. decodingdisparities
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, VNC), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Registration: Google Forms

    More Information Computing, HPC, Research
  • Large-scale non-linear least squares (NLLS) optimization problems lie at the core of many graphics, vision, and imaging applications. The mathematical descriptions of these objective functions are extremely concise, but, in order to use them in interactive applications, solvers are often implemented by hand in tedious and error-prone processes (in particular on GPUs). High-level libraries exist but are orders of magnitude slower than specialized optimized implementations. Even competing handwritten implementations can vary in performance by multiple orders of magnitude, depending on the problem. A survey of existing work reveals that the key for high performance is a problem-specific schedule that enables efficient usage of the underlying hardware.

    Cleanly separating the energy formulation and organization of computation from implementation details of NLLS using a domain-specific language (DSL) enables generation of high performance massively parallel solvers from high-level specifications.

    I introduce Thallo, a DSL for large-scale non-linear least squares optimization problems. I observed various code reorganizations performed by implementers of high-performance solvers in the literature, and then define a set of basic operations that span these scheduling choices, thereby defining a large scheduling space. Users can either specify code transformations in a scheduling co-language or use an autoscheduler. Thallo takes as input a compact, shader-like representation of an energy function and a (potentially auto-generated) schedule, translating the combination into high-performance GPU solvers.

    Since Thallo can generate solvers from a large scheduling space, it can handle a large set of large-scale non-linear and non-smooth problems with various degrees of non-locality and compute-to-memory ratios, including diverse applications such as as-rigid-as-possible mesh deformation, bundle adjustment, face tracking, and spatially-varying Poisson deconvolution. By abstracting schedules from the energy formulation, and using a domain-specific compiler, we outperform the fastest state-of-the-art high-level system, the Ceres solver library, by 50-1500x, and even slightly outperform handwritten GPU solvers for all comparisons.

    Michael researches systems, compilers, algorithms, and applications for enabling new visual computing experiences by accelerating performance through harnessing massively parallel GPUs and accelerating prototyping through high-performance Domain Specific Languages (DSLs) that target said GPUs. Target application domains include real-time direct optimization, global illumination, augmented and virtual reality, and 3D reconstruction.

    He started down this path making realistic realtime rendering faster at Williams College and NVIDIA research; this continued through realtime reflection and raycasting display work for Unity Technologies and Oculus Research. His PhD work in Pat Hanrahan’s lab at Stanford University brought him up an abstraction layer, from making visual computing applications fast to making it fast to write fast visual computing applications through the design of high performance domain-specific languages.

    He is spending a chunk of his lockdown time falling off a surfboard in a socially-distanced manner.
    Host: Professor Daniel Ritchie
    More Information 
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Caren Walker (Assistant Professor University of California, San Diego)

    Title: Achieving Abstraction: The early appearance of Relational Reasoning

    Abstract: Children’s emerging ability to acquire and apply relational same-different concepts is often cited as a defining feature of human cognition, providing the foundation for abstract thought. Yet, young learners often struggle to ignore irrelevant surface features to attend to structural similarity instead. This has led to the widespread belief that children initially lack relational concepts, which only gradually develop over time. I will begin by reviewing work demonstrating early competence in relational reasoning and propose a novel theoretical approach that challenges the traditional view. Specifically, I will argue that young children have-and retain-genuine relational concepts from a young age, but tend to neglect abstract similarity due to a learned bias to attend to objects and their properties. This account predicts that differences in the structure of children’s environmental input should lead to differences in the type of hypotheses they privilege and apply. I will then present new empirical data in support of this alternative account, emphasizing (1) the robustness of early competence in relational reasoning, (2) the conditions under which older children privilege relational or object similarity, and (3) the causal role of contextual factors on abstract reasoning. Together, these studies provide evidence that the development of abstract thought may be far more malleable and context-sensitive than previously thought.

    Research Interests: My research explores how children learn and reason about the causal structure of the world. In particular, I am interested in how even very young learners are able to acquire abstract representations that extend beyond their observations, simply by thinking. How is “learning by thinking” possible? What does this phenomenon tell us about the nature of early mental representations and how they change? To begin to answer these questions, my work focuses on a suite of activities that impose top-down constraints on human inference (e.g., analogy, explanation, and engagement in imaginary worlds). I also explore the development of scientific thinking and reasoning, including children’s understanding of uncertainty. My approach is interdisciplinary, combining perspectives in psychology, philosophy, education, and computational theory.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    16

    Juned Siddique, DrPH

    Associate Professor

    Departments of Preventive Medicine and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

    Bio:  Dr. Siddique’s research efforts focus on developing statistical methods for handling incomplete or missing data. He applies these methods to a range of problems including rater bias, participant dropout, data harmonization in individual participant data analysis, and measurement error. He collaborates closely with lifestyle intervention researchers and is interested in the analysis of diet and physical activity data.

    Title:  “Measurement error correction and sensitivity analysis in longitudinal dietary intervention studies using an external validation study”

    Abstract: In lifestyle intervention trials, where the goal is to change a participant’s weight or modify their eating behavior, self-reported diet is a longitudinal outcome variable that is subject to measurement error. We propose a statistical framework for correcting for measurement error in longitudinal self-reported dietary data by combining intervention data with auxiliary data from an external biomarker validation study where both self-reported and recovery biomarkers of dietary intake are available. In this setting, dietary intake measured without error in the intervention trial is missing data and multiple imputation is used to fill in the missing measurements. Since most validation studies are cross-sectional, they do not contain information on whether the nature of the measurement error changes over time or differs between treatment and control groups. We use sensitivity analyses to address the influence of these unverifiable assumptions involving the measurement error process and how they affect inferences regarding the effect of treatment. We apply our methods to self-reported sodium intake from the PREMIER study, a multi-component lifestyle intervention trial.

    For more information about the Statistics Seminar Series go here.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, BioStatsSeminar, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    13
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  

    Speaker:Sa-kiera Hudson (Postdoc at Yale)

    Title: The connection between hierarchy preferences and (counter-) empathic responding

    Abstract: Social dominance orientation (SDO) measures the extent to which people accept and promote group-based inequality and is positively associated to prejudicial attitudes and behaviors. Despite the large body of scholarship on SDO, we know little about the relationship between SDO and emotions. In this talk I will argue that SDO is tied to people’s willingness to feel empathy and counter-empathy towards others but especially competitively threatening, low status others. First, I provide evidence that SDO is negatively associated with feeling empathy for others and positively associated with feeling counter-empathy, and that competitive group settings exacerbated these relationships. Second, I suggest that this relationship is motivated, as people with higher levels of SDO make similar forecasts of others’ emotions as do those low in SDO, but they desire to feel less empathy toward low-status targets and when given a choice, choose to feel less empathy and more schadenfreude. Lastly, I discuss a preliminary model that explicates how SDO’s relationship with downstream behaviors and policy preferences are mediated by (counter-)empathic responding. This work contributes to the growing body of work on the role that ideologies play in driving emotions and empathic responses.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: The Zoom link will be emailed to registered faculty prior to the talk.

    Please note the following talk is only available to faculty members.

     

    ELI UPFAL

    Professor of Computer Science, Brown University

     

    BIG DATA: Where Practice Meets Theory

    Responsible and relevant data science requires rigorous analytical tools or evaluating and improving prediction and presentation accuracy. Here we’ll discuss techniques for enhancing the accuracy of weakly supervised learning and tools for measuring and reducing structural bias in hyperlinked data.

     

    (F4F) Faculty for Faculty Research Talks

    DSI Faculty for Faculty