Past Events

  • May
    21

    Please join us for the IMSD Alumni Panel on Tuesday, May 21st from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm in the Petteruti Lounge (75 Waterman Street). The event will begin with a panel discussion followed by a reception. Sponsored by the IMSD Program, the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, and the Graduate School. Speakers will include:

    • Diana Borgas, Ph.D., Patent Agent, Wolf, Greenfield & Sacks, P.C.
    • Kirk Haltaufderhyde, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Rhode Island
    • Chima Ndumele, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Health Policy, Yale School of Public Health
    • Anika Toorie, Ph.D, Assistant Professor, Biology Department, Rhode Island Collage

    Moderator: JJ Lomax, EEB graduate student

    Registration is required at link to the left.  For further information, please contact [email protected]

  • Information on speakers

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    21
    All Day

    Biology of Human Aging Colloquium 2019

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    The 2019 Biology of Human Aging Colloquium will be held on Tuesday, May 21 2019.

    Speaker Schedule:

    9:30 AM: Hugo Bellen, Baylor College of Medicine
    “Lipids in neurodegenerative diseases”

    10:30 AM: Mel Feany, Harvard Medical School
    “Genetic analysis of neurodegeneration”

    11:45 AM: Keith Blackwell, Harvard Medical School
    “Nutrient signaling and longevity in C. elegans”

    2:00 PM: Julie Andersen, Buck Institute for Age Research
    “The essence of senescence: what role does it play in neurodegenerative disease?”

    3:00 PM: James Mitchell, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    “Intersection of hydrogen sulfide biology with dietary restriction benefits”

    *Coffee: 9:00 AM, Reception: 4:00 PM*

     

    The Biology of Human Aging Colloquium was founded in 1998 by Drs. Sedivy and Tatar, and is currently under the leadership of Dr. Helfand. The colloquium is a full-day event, with lectures delivered by stars (or upcoming stars) of the aging field.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • May
    20
    2:00pm

    Open House for the new T32 ICoN

    164 Angell Street, 4th floor

    The New interdisciplinary training grant in computational and cognitive neuroscience Open House

    • Are you a graduate student interested in cognitive or computational neuroscience?
    • Are you interested in learning a new level of analysis for your research?
    • Would you benefit from training in a new area involving computation, animal or human research?

    Please join us to learn more about a new training grant on Interactionist Cognitive Neuroscience (ICoN)! This session will provide an overview of the training components, program requirements and how you can apply.

  • May
    16
    4:00pm

    NSGP Seminar Series: David Margolis, PhD; Rutgers University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Cortical and corticostriatal circuits for sensory-guided choices: lessons from the mouse whisker system

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • May
    13
    5:00pm - 6:30pm

    Team Science Workshop

    Women & Infants Hospital

    In this interactive workshop, Katie Sharkey, MD, PhD, and Debbie Cornman, PhD, will discuss the latest findings in the “science of team science,” and teach investigators how to implement strategies and techniques for successful team science approaches into their own research.

    Workshop is free but registration is required. Learn more .

    Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Entrepreneurship, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • May
    13
    3:00pm

    Seminar: Sreeganga Chandra, Ph.D.

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School)

    “Role of a-synuclein in synaptic function and neurodegeneration”

    Sreeganga S. Chandra, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience

    Deputy Chair, Department of Neuroscience

    Yale University

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    10
    12:00pm

    MNE Workshop Day 3: Source Modeling

    164 Angell Street

    Topic: Source Modeling Date: Friday, May 10 Time: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Location: Innovation Zone at 164 Angell St., floor 4 Sign up: https://forms.gle/WsAcVvor8R9oABd78 ~~~Pizza will be provided!~~~ This is the third of a series of three workshops on EEG data analysis using MNE-python (https://martinos.org/mne/stable/index.html). See https://jasmainak.github.io/mne-workshop-brown/readme for further details. During Day 1 (April 5th), we discussed methods for going from raw data to epoch averaged responses. A video capture of Day 1 can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/x0elvmo6785o7tb/20190405_mne_workshop_day1.mp4?dl=0 During Day 2 (April 17), we focused on data preprocessing using different filtering methods including temporal filtering, autoreject for artifact rejection, and spatial filtering. A video recording will be made available in the future. Day 3 (date TBD) will focus on source localization methods and will dive into topics such as covariance estimation, forward computation, and inverse methods. The tutorial will be accessed through a Hub, as such a valid email address is required by all participants. Please complete the following form (https://forms.gle/WsAcVvor8R9oABd78) and use your Brown University email address if you have one. ​Note that the workshop is limited to 40 participants., and we will check to ensure that the attendee information matches the information in the form above.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • May
    10
    12:00pm

    MPPB Seminar Series - Lorenzo Leggio, M.D., Ph.D.

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    9

    Learning and Re-Learning Movement

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Sheila E. Crowell, PhD

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    University of Utah &

    Co-Founder of the Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment

    Wednesday, May 8, 2019
    Bradley Hospital ◊ Pine Room ◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Describe current definitions and theories related to the spectrum of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors; Appreciate the importance of taking a lifespan, intergenerational approach to understanding psychopathology and preventing suicide; and Understand the importance of translating basic developmental findings to clinicians and policy makers in order to improve child outcomes.

    Sheila E. Crowell, PhD has no financial disclosures to report.

    This presentation will be teleconferenced from the Pine Room at Bradley Hospital to Coro West, Suite 204, Conference Room 2.186 and APC 969

    This activity is not supported by a commercial entity.

  • May
    7

    Kenneth A. Dodge, Pritzker Professor of Early Learning Policy Studies at the Sanford School of Public Policy will discuss the use of evidence-based home visiting programs to reduce rates of child maltreatment and improve early childhood health and behavioral development.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Social Sciences
  • Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Social Cognitive Science Seminar Series.  Speaker: David Sobel, Brown University.  Title: Title: Perspectives frame children’s prosocial behavior.  Abstract: In this talk, I will introduce several lines of research that focus on the perspective taking capacities of 3- to 8-year-olds and how those capacities might affect their prosocial behavior. I first consider judgments about first- and third-person frames of knowledge specifically related to compliance with others’ unfair intentions, and find that children’s ability to engage in affective perspective taking relates to whether they will be knowledgeably selfish in first-person but not third-person resource distribution measures. Next, I consider children’s trust in others based on the way in which an act of giving is framed and find that children interpret acts of generosity under different social norms than acts of resource allocation. Finally, I will present evidence that perspective-taking relates to the way in which children resolve inequities. All together, these data suggest that children’s developing perspective taking capacities make an important contribution to the way in which they adhere to social norms involving sharing and trust.

    Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, University Dates & Events
  • May
    3
    10:00am

    Neurodiversity Symposium

    Lyman Hall

    This two-day interdisciplinary symposium features performances, lectures, roundtable discussions and workshops exploring the emerging concepts of neurodiversity and neurodivergence – terms originally developed by autistic activists and mental health self- advocates seeking to destigmatize autism and other forms of mental, neurological and cognitive disability and difference.

    Arts, Performance, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • This tutorial is the second part of a 2-part workshop. Students who have had a prior experience with programming (e.g., students who have taken CLPS0950) who want to learn Python can skip register for part 2 even if they have not attended the first part of the tutorial. Register for part 2 at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dscov-lunch-intro-to-python-workshop-part-2-tickets-60765331743 **************************************************************** About the Data Science Computation & Visualization (DSCoV) lunch series Want to become a Kaggle Master, start a tech company or succeed in research? Ready to get your hands dirty and learn the data science and programming skills needed to solve real-world data science problems? This 2-part workshop will introduce the kinds of things Python can do, introduce some basic concepts, get you writing your first few lines of code, and point you towards some next steps to get you on your way. Instructor: Patrick Rashleigh (Data Visualization Coordinator, Brown University Library) Pre-req: None! The tutorial is especially suited for beginners. Pizza will be served. Seats are limited, so register to reserve your place!

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Humanities, Libraries, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • May
    2
    12:00pm

    Neurodiversity Symposium

    Lyman Hall

    This two-day interdisciplinary symposium features performances, lectures, roundtable discussions and workshops exploring the emerging concepts of neurodiversity and neurodivergence – terms originally developed by autistic activists and mental health self- advocates seeking to destigmatize autism and other forms of mental, neurological and cognitive disability and difference.

    Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • May
    1

    Harold Schlosberg Colloquium.  Speaker: Dr. Jonathan Haidt, NYU-Stern School of Business. Title: How viewpoint diversity makes social scientists smarter and social science research better.  

    Abstract: Science produces important and reliable findings not because scientists are so smart but because they have the great fortune to be embedded into multiple social institutions that guarantee that their ideas and findings will be challenged. In my talk I will argue that the certainty of challenge for some ideas has declined in most social sciences as an important form of diversity has declined since the 1990s: political or ideological diversity. I will show how political homogeneity leads to systematic errors and biases within a research community in general, and within social psychology in particular. I’ll close with recommendations for improving the quality, reliability, and public utility of research in the social sciences by improving viewpoint diversity and reinforcing norms that encourage scientists to challenge dominant ideas.

    Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, University Dates & Events
  • Driscoll
    May
    1
    12:00pm

    MCBGP Seminar: Dr. Monica Driscoll, Rutgers

    Biomedical Center (BMC)

    Monica Driscoll, PhD

    Rutgers University

     

    Neurons Put Out the Trash: A Novel Facet of Proteostasis and Mitochondrial Quality Control

     

    Host: Anne Hart, PhD

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • The 22nd Annual David H. Barlow Oration Academic Grand Rounds*

    Impulsive Responding to Emotion: Definitions, outcomes, and intervention ideas

    Sheri Johnson, PhD

    Professor of Psychology

    Department of Psychology

    University of California

    Wednesday, May 1, 2019
     Butler Hospital ◊ Ray Hall Conference Center ◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Define emotion-related impulsivity; List key psychopathology outcomes tied to emotion-related impulsivity; and Describe recent treatment development regarding emotion-related impulsivity.

     Sheri Johnson, PhD has no financial relationships to report.

    This activity is not supported by a commercial entity.

  • Apr
    26

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Cognition Seminar Series.  Speaker: Aaron Bornstein, UC, Irvine.  Title: Mixing memory and desire.  Abstract:  Memory is arguably the most idiosyncratic feature of our cognition. No two people have the same memories, not even identical twins raised together. Might the individuality of our memories help to explain some of the individuality of our decisions? I will present evidence that decisions for reward are affected by individual memories of past choices. I will then describe a framework for how this influence arises, in which multiple kinds of internal representations of past experience provide “samples” of evidence about the potential outcomes of a choice. I will then discuss some of the implications of this framework, and open questions that remain.

    Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, University Dates & Events
  • Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Social Cognitive Science Seminar Series.   Speaker: Elinor Amit, Brown University.  Title: What Memories are Made of: Distance-dependent memory for visual and verbal information.    Abstract: Our ability to prospect into the future enables us to make predictions and plan for future events, and therefore constitutes a clear evolutionary advantage. A large body of research shows that memory is an adaptive tool that plays a role in prospection. How does the mental architecture of the memory system serve this function? Consistent with the Functional Theory of Mental Representation (Amit et al., 2009), in this talk I will argue that one way it does so is by using qualitatively different representational formats - visual and verbal - depending on the psychological distance of the target from the individual. I will provide evidence that the memory system facilitates memory for congruent combinations of representational formats and distance (i.e., visual representations of proximal targets and verbal representations of distal targets) than vice versa, across multiple distance dimensions and multiple memory tasks. Together, these findings lend support to the idea that episodic memory is not an automatic recording device but rather a tool, which serves the needs and goals of the individual. In particular, the mental architecture of the memory system is designed in an efficient way to prospect about the future, using different cognitive devices for different needs.

    Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, University Dates & Events
  • Ali Momeni

    250th Anniversary Professor of the Practice

    Visiting Fellow in Music

     

    Ali Momeni is a Professor of Practice within the Brown Arts Initiative and Data Science Initiative . His research interests include educational technologies, human-computer interaction for performative applications of robotics, playful urban interventions, interactive projection performance, machine learning for artists and designers, interactive tools or storytelling and experiential learning, mobile and hybrid musical instruments, and the intersection of sound, music and health.

  • Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    25

    Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Neural Connectivity

  • Apr
    25
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street

    Data Science, Computing, and Visualization workshops are held weekly on Thursdays at noon. These are workshops on basic and advanced data science skills–different topics each week, targeting a range of skill levels. For more information, upcoming topics, and registration see the DSI website.  Lunch is served (usually pizza).

  • Apr
    25
    12:00pm

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Speaker: Jody Culham, Western University, London, Canada, Department of Psychology; Brain and Mind Institute.    Title: “The treachery of images”: How the realness of objects affects brain activation and behavior.    Abstract: Psychologists and neuroimagers commonly study perceptual and cognitive processes using images because of the convenience and ease of experimental control they provide. However, real objects differ from pictures in many ways, including the potential for interaction and richer information about distance (and thus physical size). Across a series of neuroimaging and behavioral experiments, we have shown different response to real objects than pictures, in terms of the level and pattern of brain activation as well as visual preferences. Now that these results have shown quantitative and qualitative differences in the processing of real objects and images, the next step is to determine which aspects of real and virtual objects drive these differences.  Co-sponsored by CVR

    Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, University Dates & Events
  • Are you curious about the five Carney Institute centers and initiatives?

    Over coffee and baked goods, get an insider’s look at the centers and discover what they offer to the Carney community – from grant opportunities to fellowships to workshops.

    Carney Institute Centers & Initiatives

    Computation in Brain and Mind

    Center for Vision Research

    COBRE Center for Central Nervous System Function

    MRI Research Facility

    Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits

  • Apr
    19
    12:00pm

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.  Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Turk-Browne, Yale University.   Title: Rethinking memory systems for statistical learning. 

    Abstract: There is a fundamental tension in human memory between encoding episodic memories for individual experiences from life and extracting statistical regularities that hold across these experiences. The tension arises from the fact that these two forms of learning have opposite computational requirements: episodic memory requires rapid, even one-shot learning of representations stored separately from related memories to avoid interference; statistical learning accumulates gradually over time by strengthening common elements that overlap across representations. For this reason, it has long been thought that memory is supported by a division of labor in the brain, with the hippocampus supporting episodic encoding and the neocortex supporting statistical learning. In this talk I will present a series of converging findings from fMRI, neuropsychological patients, intracranial recordings, and neural network modeling that challenge this elegant and influential theory. Namely, I will show that the hippocampus is important for rapid statistical learning and will provide an updated theoretical account about how the same hippocampal system implements these competing computations in different subfields and pathways. I will end with some new findings that arise from this perspective about behavior and development.

    Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, University Dates & Events
  • Apr
    19
    12:00pm

    MPPB Seminar Series - Bruce Goode, Ph.D.

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    18
    6:30pm - 9:00pm

    Contemplative Studies Concentrators’ Open House

    Horace Mann House

    Please come to the Contemplative Studies Concentrators’ Open House on April 18th from  6:30-9 pm at the Horace Mann Building (49 George St.) - Rms. 102 and 103. Come and find out more about this innovative, interdisciplinary concentration. Speak with our Professors and
    Concentrators while enjoying a buffet from Kabob and Curry!