Past Events

  • Dec
    7
    5:00pm - 6:00pm EST

    IP and Patent Law Seminar

    164 Angell Street, Rm Carney Innovation Zone

    We are excited to host two Brown Graduate School alumni who work in the field of intellectual property (IP) and patent law. Our guests, Dr. Diana Borgas, a patent agent, and Dr. Nathan Martin, a technology specialist, are both employed at Wolf, Greenfield, and Sacks, one of the top 10 law firms in the country, devoted to IP and patent law. Expect a brief presentation followed by a Q&A session. The seminar will be followed by a causal, in-person reception.

    RSVP Form: https://forms.gle/pQFr5ry8MMZwscwx7

    Looking forward to seeing everyone there!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Dec
    7
    11:00am EST

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Nadira del Rosario Yusif Rodríguez

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm Room 202

    Title:  The neural representation of abstract visual sequences

    Advisor:  Dr. Theresa Desrochers

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dec
    7
    Virtual
    10:30am - 11:30am EST

    Virtual Panel on Careers Outside Academia

    Online
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 962 5808 9951

    We are pleased to announce our Virtual Panel on Careers Outside Academia. Two amazing Brown graduates will be joining us:

    Dr. Daniel Ullman (CLPS): UX Researcher, Meta Reality Labs
    Danny Ullman is a UX Researcher at Meta Reality Labs. He works on privacy research for Augmented Reality (AR) and wearable products, like Ray-Ban Stories smart glasses. His research centered on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) in the Yale Social Robotics Lab and the Brown Social Cognitive Science Research Lab, with a focus on human-robot trust for his dissertation. Together with his graduate advisor Bertram F. Malle, he developed the Multi-Dimensional Measure of Trust (MDMT)—a model and measure of trust applicable to robot agents and agents more generally. His graduate research was conducted under the Brown University Humanity-Centered Robotics Initiative (HCRI).

    Dr. Rahilla Tarfa (GPP): M.D. Student
    Dr. Rahilla Tarfa is a first-year resident in otolaryngology at the University of Washington. In 2017, Dr. Tarfa completed her Ph.D. in the lab of Dr. Zayd Khalliq at NINDS, NIH, where she studied the excitability properties of midbrain dopamine neuron subpopulations. She earned her M.D. through the University of Pittsburgh MSTP in 2022.

    The format will be similar to the previous panels, where you will have the opportunity to hear a bit of background from the speakers and then ask questions. Zoom information is below.

    Feel free to reach out with any comments or questions!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join us for this 6-part series exploring implementation science, its methodology, and application. Local and national experts will share talks on de-implementation, implementation mechanisms, community engagement, health equity, dissemination strategies, and global implementation science.

    Tuesday, December 6, 2022:

    Alethea Desrosiers, PhD: “Applying Implementation Science to Address the Global Mental Health Treatment Gap”

    Mental health disorders are the second largest contributor to the global burden of disease among youth and adults. This burden is compounded in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) and other low resource settings due to the widening mental health treatment gap, which is particularly pronounced in LMICs with histories of violence and loss. While many promising evidence-based mental interventions have been implemented in LMICs, their reach and sustainability are often limited. Applying an Implementation science lens to global mental health research and practice has the potential to better address the significant gaps in mental health service access in LMICs by designing for implementation and sustainment earlier in the process. This talk will discuss how implementation science processes and approaches can be applied to improve the adoption, reach and sustainment of evidence-based mental health interventions among vulnerable populations of youth residing in LMICs, with case examples from Sierra Leone and Colombia.

    About the Speaker:

    Dr. Alethea Desrosiers is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. Her work focuses on implementation science in the global mental health context. Dr. Desrosiers is the PI of a newly funded National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) R01 hybrid implementation-effectiveness trial to investigate implementation of an evidence-based mental health intervention delivered by teachers in Sierra Leone’s secondary schools, and a Hilton Foundation award to culturally adapt and pilot test an evidence-based mental health intervention delivered within entrepreneurship training to forcibly displaced Colombian and Venezuelan migrant youth in Colombia. She also leads a NIMH R21 study, applying user-centered design to develop Mobile Health tools to improve delivery quality of a family home visiting intervention delivered by community health workers in Sierra Leone.

    Register Now! More Information Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Dec
    5
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    BrainExPo Seminar: “The Coding of Visceral Senses in the Brainstem”

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Hall Room 220

    Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series, featuring Chen Ran, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School.

    Abstract: In vivo brainstem two-photon calcium imaging analyses of sensory inputs from the internal organs reveal fundamental features of the interoceptive nervous system.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Dec
    5
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    CLPS PhD Defense: Alexander Fengler

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    Speaker: Alexander Fengler , Brown University

    Title: Likelihood Approximations for Bayesian Analysis of Sequential Sampling Models

    Advisor: Professor Michael Frank

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours in advance.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    5
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jazlyn Nketia, CLPS PhD Student, Brown University

    Title: The Unique Adaptability of Working Memory to Both Positive and Negative Environmental Experiences

    Abstract : Flexibility in rule use is crucial for learning, decision making, and future planning. Children that can flexibly use rules in novel contexts benefit both socially and academically. Here we test the hypothesis that rule-guided behavior (RGB) develops in a manner relevant to the contextual lived experience of children. We generated a novel task to test RGB in 4-7-year-old children in (a) two analogous computerized and naturalistic tasks in an American sample of children, (b) across versions of the same task where we manipulated task reward and choice components. We also explored the sociopolitical and scientific implications of this work in the context of a Jordanian sample of children. Our data provided preliminary evidence that RGB reflects the similarity of the testing context and children’s daily experiences outside of the laboratory. To further test this idea, we are working with the Ministry of Education in Ghana to test our western RGB task,as well as a culturally-relevant version with the same task demands. We began this series of studies by conducting an exploratory qualitative focus group study with parents and teachers and are using a deductive thematic content analysis to develop a codebook to understand the lived experiences of Ghanaian children. We plan to use these data to develop a culturally-appropriate version of our RGB task for comparison with our western version. These methods and findings will be discussed in the context of the expansion of developmental science into global contexts and call for special consideration of measurement and generalizability biases in investigations with human subjects.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    2
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mariam Aly - Assistant Professor - Columbia University

    Title: How hippocampal memory shapes, and is shaped by, attention
     

    Abstract: Attention modulates what we see and remember. Memory affects what we attend to and perceive. Despite this connection in behavior, little is known about the mechanisms that link attention and memory in the brain. One key structure that may be at the interface between attention and memory is the hippocampus. Here, I’ll explore the hypothesis that the relational representations of the hippocampus allow it to critically contribute to bidirectional interactions between attention and memory. First, I’ll show — in a series of human fMRI studies — that attention creates state-dependent patterns of activity in the hippocampus, and that these representations predict both online attentional behavior and memory formation. Then, I’ll provide neuropsychological evidence that hippocampal damage impairs performance on attention tasks that tax relational representations, particularly spatial relational representations. I will then provide pharmacological evidence that hippocampal contributions to attention and perception may be mediated by cholinergic modulation — a switch that can toggle the hippocampus between internally and externally oriented states. Finally, I’ll demonstrate that hippocampal memories enable preparation for upcoming attentional states and may help resolve competition between similar memories to guide attention. Together, this line of work highlights the tight links between attention and memory — links that are established, at least in part, by the hippocampus.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    2
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    DSCoV Workshop: PySpark

    164 Angell Street, Rm 3rd Fl Seminar Space

    Data Science, Computation, and Visualization (DSCOV) Workshops

    Fridays at noon

    These are one-hour skills-focused workshops, designed to be hands-on, so bring a laptop if you can. They are open to anyone, and any pre-requisite knowledge or resources will be announced beforehand. More info and schedule here.

    Pizza is available (please RSVP below for catering purposes), or bring your own lunch if you wish!

    December 2: PySpark

    Presenter: Aisulu Omar, Senior Data Scientist, Office of Information Technology

    Prerequisites:

    • Familiarity with Jupyter Notebook, Git, GitHub, Anaconda, pip, and basic machine learning algorithms.
    • Basic knowledge of Python
    • A GitHub account
    • An Oscar account
    More Information Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Dec
    2
    12:00pm EST

    NSGP Thesis Defense - Aarit Ahuja

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title:  “Visual Simulation in the Primate Brain”

    Advisor: Dr. David Sheinberg

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dec
    2
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Dec
    1

    Michael P. O’Hara, Chair of the Wargaming Department at the U.S. Naval War College, will present a talk, “The Theory of the Game: Computational Power and Human Decision Making.”

    Abstract: This talk explores the application of technology to aid human decision making in the context of war games and simulations. For decades, increasing computational power and the availability of data have promised to improve timely analyses and aid decisions in the complex context of war. Yet, for all its benefit, technology misapplied can obscure the mechanisms of human decision. To the victorious Admiral Nimitz reflecting on World War II, the analog war games of the interwar period were of such value for developing the Navy’s strategic thinking that the only surprise was the kamikaze. Since 1958, efforts to apply computing to military war games have sought formulas for victory. Yet, in the complex strategic interactions of conflict, greater computational power may not support human decision makers in the ways intended without a shared understanding of the theory of the game and a thorough understanding of its purpose.

    Bio: Captain Michael O’Hara serves as Chair, War Gaming Department at the U.S. Naval War College. His work focuses on strategy, decision making, and emerging technologies. He is a career naval officer with operational and leadership experience in naval aviation and naval intelligence. As a faculty member in the Department of Strategy and Policy, he was founding Director of the NWC Future Warfighting Symposium. He previously held a National Security Fellowship at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs. He holds an M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University and an M.A. in English Literature from the University of Rhode Island. He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and Naval War College.

    This seminar is part of ENGN1931J – “Societal Impact of Emerging Technologies”. Host: Prof. Arto Nurmikko, School of Engineering

    More Information 
  • Dec
    1
    Virtual
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EST

    Carney Methods Meetup: Closed loop fMRI

    Carney Methods Meetup: Closed loop fMRI

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a Carney Methods Meetup featuring Elizabeth Lorenc, staff scientist in the Brown Behavior and Neuroimaging Core (BNC), who will discuss providing neurofeedback through closed-loop fMRI, and related resources available through the BNC. Carney Methods Meetups are informal gatherings focused on methods for brain science, moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience. Videos and notes from previous Meetups are available on the [Carney Institute website](https://www.brown.edu/carney/news-events/carney-methods-meetups).

    Please note: Authenticated Brown IDs are required to join the Zoom.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    30
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ruth Kramer - Associate Professor - Georgetown University

    Title: A critical investigation of phonological gender assignment across languages

    Abstract: According to classic typological research, grammatical gender can be assigned to nouns in several different ways. Gender can be assigned semantically (depending on social gender identity, animacy, etc.), morphologically (depending on the presence of a specific affix), or phonologically (e.g., depending on the final segment of the noun). In this talk, I take a critical look at the last member of this list: phonological gender assignment. I present the results of a crosslinguistic survey of phonological gender assignment as well as case studies of multiple languages that allegedly use phonological gender assignment including Hausa (Chadic), Gujarati (Indo-Aryan), Apurinã (Maipurean), and Guébie (Kru), among others. I argue that the crosslinguistic trends and the case studies point towards phonology *not* being involved in grammatical gender assignment and, more importantly, that a phonological gender assignment analysis is less explanatory than alternative approaches. In Distributed Morphology, phonological gender assignment is predicted to be difficult at best because gender is assigned during the syntactic derivation and the syntax lacks phonological information. This result therefore provide support for Distributed Morphology, and against theories where gender is assigned in the lexicon with access to phonological information. I close the talk with plans for future work to investigate additional languages with (alleged) phonological gender assignment.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Call for Applications! Apply for the Advance-CTR Mentored Research Awards. We’re funding two scholars for a two-year Mentored Research Award which includes the following benefits:

    1. Mentored Research Scholars receive at least 50% protected time up to $90,000 to conduct clinical or translational research projects for two years.
    2. Scholars are awarded an additional $25,000 each year specifically earmarked for education or research supplies.
    3. The program provides mentoring and specialized training that prepare scholars to make significant advances in interdisciplinary strategies devoted to clinical and translational research.

    About the Mentored Research Awards

    The Mentored Research Awards target early-career investigators who are planning on applying for career-development awards (NIH K awards or equivalent) and launch independent research careers. Awardees receive protected time for research all within a structured, 2-year mentorship program.

    Key Dates & Deadlines

    • November 17, 2022: Last day to schedule calls with leadership
    • November 29, 2022: Preliminary applications due
    • February 6, 2023: Invited, full proposals due

    The anticipated performance period is August 1, 2023 to July 31, 2025.

    Application Resources

    Don’t go at it alone. Our Application Resources Page has information on scheduling a call with our program leadership to discuss your questions, two examples from investigators who have successfully applied to the program and other application resources.

    SEE THE RFA More Information Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Abstract: The presentation will share findings regarding multilevel influences on sleep of Latinx children from quantitative and qualitative research. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess the associations among psychological distress, dietary intake, sleep and adiposity among 100 Latinx children ages 10-12 years old. Preliminary results will be presented. A mixed-methods micro-longitudinal study is currently being implemented among the same target population; qualitative results will be shared.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join us for this 6-part series exploring implementation science, its methodology, and application. Local and national experts will share talks on de-implementation, implementation mechanisms, community engagement, health equity, dissemination strategies, and global implementation science.

    Tuesday, November 22, 2022:

    Eva Woodward, PhD: “Six Mindsets to Improve Equity Using Implementation Science: Implications for harm reduction and injury prevention”

    This is a helpful “big picture” talk with something for everyone in implementation science, at any phase of an implementation effort. I will be sharing mindsets to approach your work using implementation to promote equitable health for all – not prescriptions, not rules, not steps, but approaches with actionable ways to operationalize them. These mindsets come from dedicating my work entirely to improving the health of people who have been oppressed, marginalized, or excluded. There are many people thinking about this, writing about this, who have done work to contribute to this – and I am only one of those voices. These mindsets represent an amalgam of those people, their thoughts, their theses and mine – through my lens. Equity work is complex. If you do any implementation science, you will know the same is true – the reason effective treatments / interventions / practices are not widely used is complex. These mindsets are offerings to you as considerations to ground your work as you continue with implementation toward a more equitable and just world.

    About the Speaker:

    Dr. Eva Woodward is a clinical health psychologist. She uses implementation science and practice, community engaged research, and mixed methods to improve equitable health care delivery for groups experiencing disparities. She is a former fellow of the Implementation Research Institute, the NIH Health Disparities Research Institute, a Career Development Awardee, clinician, and researcher through the Veterans Health Administration, and a faculty member at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas.

    Register Here! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Research
  • Nov
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    BrainExPo Seminar: “Neural Cartography: Mapping the Brain with X-ray and Electron Microscopy”

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Hall Room 220

    Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Aaron Kuan, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow in the Neurobiology Department at Harvard Medical School. 

    Abstract: One of the grand quests in neuroscience is to build complete maps of the brain, charting all of its cells and the connections between them. In this talk, I describe how innovations in X-ray and electron microscopy that are expanding the scope and detail at which we can image the brain, and enable us to investigate the circuit basis of cognitive tasks such as decision-making, and will soon allow us to tackle the massive scaling challenges involved in comprehensively mapping mammalian brains.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    21
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mahalia Prater Fahey - Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences PhD student - Brown University

    Title: When is my effort worthwhile? How does learned efficacy influence the allocation of cognitive control during development.

    Abstract : When deciding how hard to work on a task, a person needs to weigh the potential reward for performing well (e.g., college admission) and the extent to which they think this reward is determined by their performance versus factors outside of their control (the ‘efficacy’ of control). People therefore must track how efficacious their control is in a given environment, and adjust accordingly. During adolescence, increased independence creates more opportunities to decide when and how to allocate control. Previous research has examined how adolescents adjust control based on perceived rewards, but less is known about how they do so based on perceptions of efficacy. I will present a project that I am working on examining how the motivational value of performance efficacy changes across development. Two pilots have been conducted so far (n:17 and n:5) and I am about to pilot a third version of the project.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    All Day

    3rd Workshop on Mental Effort

    Brown University

    Scope and Goal
    We can all feel exhausted after a day of work, even if we have spent it sitting at a desk. The intuitive concept of mental effort pervades virtually all domains of human information processing and has become an indispensable ingredient for general theories of cognition. However, inconsistent use of the term across cognitive sciences, including cognitive psychology, education, human-factors engineering and artificial intelligence, makes it one of the least well-defined theoretical constructs across fields.

    The purpose of our two-day workshop is to bridge this gap by (a) offering hands-on tutorials on different computational approaches used to model mental effort and by (b) fostering discussion about the operationalization of mental effort among scientists from different research communities and modeling backgrounds.

    Keynote: Daniel Kahneman (Princeton University)

    List of Speakers (alphabetical order)

    • Danielle Bassett (University of Pennsylvania)
    • Michael Inzlicht (University of Toronto)
    • Yuko Munakata (University of California, Davis)
    • Amitai Shenhav (Brown University)

    List of Tutorial Instructors (alphabetical order)

    • Anastasia Bizyaeva (Princeton University)
    • Alexander Fengler (Brown University)
    • Michael J. Frank (Brown University)
    • Andra Geana (Brown University)
    • Renée S. Koolschijn, Hanneke den Ouden (Radboud University)
    • Randall O’Reilly (University of California, Davis)

    Please visit: https://sites.google.com/view/mental-effort/general-information

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    18
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Liang Qi - PhD student - East China Normal University

    Title: Unfolding social interaction perception over time in the human brain

    Abstract: Humans are social animals, excelling in integrating clues to recognize interacting others. Previous fMRI studies mainly compared typical interacting and non-interacting situations and found a series of brain regions supporting social interaction perception. Due to the limitation of simple comparison methodology and temporal resolution of fMRI, how these regions play different roles in utilizing cues and unfolding social interaction information remains unclear. In this study, we altered spatial cues to quantitatively investigate social interaction perception and used MEG to capture neural dynamics. Participants were asked to watch images of two virtual humans standing in different spatial relationships and judge whether they were interacting or not while a 306-channel MEG device recorded their neural activities. Stimuli were screenshots in a gray-background virtual reality environment, where the participant was observing 7m away from two 1.7m height virtual humans. The interpersonal distance between them changed at 4 levels from 1 to 6m, and the heading orientation of one virtual human changed at 6 levels from 0 to 75° while the other one kept heading toward the virtual human, resulting in 24 conditions. In each trial, the stimulus was presented for 1000ms and the inter-trial interval was randomized from 500 to 700ms. Behavioral results showed that participants were more likely to judge virtual humans standing close and facing each other as interacting. But when the interpersonal distance was too close or too far, heading orientation played a little role in social interaction judgments. A sensor level RSA combined with further sourcing analysis of neural data showed that distance information was read out at 50ms after stimulus onset in V1, heading orientation was decoded at around 400ms in fusiform gyrus, lateral occipital cortex and superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the probability of judging as interacting was represented at 600ms in STS, parietal areas and prefrontal cortex. Since orientation was more important in ambiguous distance conditions, we calculated the RDM of entropy provided by orientation in each distance condition and decoded them from neural activities. Interestingly, the influence of orientation was represented at about 120ms in fusiform gyrus, lateral occipital cortex and prefrontal cortex, quickly after distance was decoded. Connectivity analysis showed a top-down influence from prefrontal cortex to ventral visual areas at 120ms. These results indicate that the human brain perceives others’ social interaction by utilizing cues optimally under the top-down control of prefrontal cortex.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Nov
    17
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series: Petr Baranov, MD PhD; Harvard Medical School

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    “Transplantation of organoid-derived retinal ganglion cells – guiding cells to their fate”

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    17
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Audrey van der Meer, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

    Title: The development of visual motion perception from an Ecological Neuroscience perspective.

    Abstract: During infancy, smart perceptual mechanisms develop allowing infants to judge time-space motion dynamics more efficiently with age and locomotor experience. This emerging capacity may be vital to enable preparedness for upcoming events and to allow safe navigation in a changing environment. Little is known about brain changes that support the development of prospective control and about processes, such as preterm birth, that may compromise it. As a function of perception of visual motion, this talk will employ the Gibsonian concepts of optic flow, looming, and occlusion to describe the neural correlates of prospective control from an ecological neuroscience perspective.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    16
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Nandi Sims- Assistant Professor, Stanford University

    Title: New Dialect Formation: Evidence from a pre-adolescent community

    Personal Statement: My primary research interests lie in language variation and change stemming from situations of ethnic contact in the US. I study the variation related to social identities, institutional ideologies, and the hegemonic structure of race.

    I have conducted research on a number of topics including historical variation in African American Language morphosyntax, English prosodic rhythm comparisons between South Florida ethnicities, and the relationship between the language, ethnicity, and social identity of pre-teens.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    15
    5:30pm - 7:30pm EST

    Color of Care Screening and Panel Discussion

    The Warren Alpert Medical School, Rm 160

    Join the Rhode Island Historical Society and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University on Tuesday, November 15 at 5:30 p.m. for a screening of the Smithsonian Channel documentary The Color of Care,followed by a panel discussion featuring leaders from Rhode Island’s healthcare community.

    The Color of Care chronicles how people of color suffer from systemically substandard healthcare. COVID-19 exposed what they have long understood and lived: they do not receive the same level of care. Produced by Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo Productions and directed by Oscar-nominated and Emmy-winning director Yance Ford, the film traces the origins of racial health disparities to practices that began during slavery and continue today. Using moving personal testimony, expert interviews, and disturbing data, the film reveals the impact of racism on health, serving as an urgent warning of what must be done to save lives.

    Following the screening, local health care leaders will offer insight into health care in Rhode Island. The panel will be moderated by Patricia Poitevien, MD, senior associate dean for diversity, equity, and inclusion at The Warren Alpert Medical School. Panelists include Ronald Aubert, PhD, MSPH, interim dean of the Brown School of Public Health; Joseph A. Diaz, MD, MPH, associate dean for multicultural affairs and associate professor of medicine at The Warren Alpert Medical School; and Anais Ovalle, MD, infectious disease specialist and director, Population Health Track, Care New England.

    Tickets are free, but registration is required. A light dinner will be served before the screening.

    This screening is part of the Rhode Island Historical Society’s Bicentennial Celebrations, sponsored by Amica Insurance.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Nov
    14
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EST

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, OOD), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Nov
    14
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Kathleen Corriveau, Associate Dean for Research,
    Wheelock College of Education & Human Development, Boston University

    Title: Variability in caregiver-child interaction impacts young children’s STEM learning and persistence

    Abstract: How do children learn about the world? Classic research in psychology and education has emphasized how children learn from their own first-hand experience. Yet there are many domains of knowledge where it is difficult – if not impossible – for children to learn from direct experience, such as learning about scientific concepts and historical facts. My research program explores how preschool children determine whether or not an informant is a trustworthy source of information, as well as how children use that information to engage in critical thinking when learning about the world. In this talk, I focus on how variability in caregiver-child and experimenter-child interactions impact children’s learning and persistence in the domain of science. Such 21st-century skills have the potential to broaden the STEM workforce, by impacting the way learners see themselves prior to the onset of formal schooling.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Talk Title: Characterizing Behavioral Activity Rhythms – Going Beyond Sleep & Wake

    Abstract: Accelerometry has been used to assess sleep in for nearly half a century. The continuous raw activity data derived from these devices has been used for the characterization of factors beyond sleep/wake. Behavioral activity rhythms are useful to describe individual daily behavioral patterns beyond sleep and wake and represent important and meaningful clinical outcomes. This talk reviews common rhythmometric approaches for rhythm characterization and present a new approach designed to provide graphical characterization of these behavioral patterns.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    11
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Charley Wu PhD - Research Group Leader, Human and Machine Learning Lab University of Tuebingen

    Title: The Dynamics of Social Learning in Immersive Environments

    Abstract: A key question in social environments is when to innovate alone and when to imitate others. Previous theoretical analyses and simulations have found that the best performing groups exhibit an intermediate balance, yet it is still largely unknown how individuals collectively negotiate this balance. We use an immersive collective foraging experiment implemented in the Minecraft game engine, to provide unprecedented access to spatial trajectories and visual field data. The virtual environment imposes a limited

    field of view, creating a natural trade-off between allocating visual attention towards individual search or towards peers for social imitation. At the heart of this task is a coordination problem, where too many imitators can lead to a tragedy of the commons, causing a collapse in both individual and group fitness. This work utilizes an unprecedented combination of social network analysis (via automated transcription of visual field data), detection of social influence events, computational modeling of choices, and agent-based simulations to understand how people adaptively balance individual and social learning. Rather than homogeneity of strategies and indiscriminate copying of others, groups collectively adapt to the demands of the environment through specialization of learning strategies and selective imitation.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Nov
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    DSCoV Workshop: Remote 3D rendering for Large Datasets

    164 Angell Street, Rm 3rd Floor Seminar Space

    Data Science, Computation, and Visualization (DSCOV) Workshops

    Fridays at noon

    These are one-hour skills-focused workshops, designed to be hands-on, so bring a laptop if you can. They are open to anyone, and any pre-requisite knowledge or resources will be announced beforehand. More info and schedule here.

    Pizza is available (please RSVP below for catering purposes), or bring your own lunch if you wish!

    November 11: Remote 3D rendering for Large Datasets

    Presenter: Camilo Diaz, Graphics Software Engineer, Center for Computation and Visualization, Brown University

    Prerequisites: Oscar account

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Nov
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Nov
    10
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series: Greg Bashaw, PhD; Univ. of PA

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220, Marcuvitz

    “To cross or not to cross: conserved mechanisms of axon guidance at the midline in fly and mouse”

    More Information 
  • Nov
    10
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Abdul-Rahim Deeb - PhD Student - CLPS Department - Brown University
     
    Title: Perception of Relative Mass Over Time

    Abstract: Without special training or feedback, observers can make accurate judgements concerning the relative mass of two colliding objects. However, judgments of relative mass are subject to bias, and subjects tend to perceive the initially faster of two collision objects as heavier. This is especially true when physical systems are displayed with a significant loss in kinetic energy after the collision. This bias, the Motor Object Bias, has been understood as a deviation from Newtonian mechanics, suggesting that the visual system is not capable of taking advantage of physical regularities when making physical inferences. Both heuristics and ideal-observer models have been proposed to explain how observers select and utilize kinematic information to obtain a dynamical judgment. Instead, we argue that the visual system may be able to compute a mass ratio based on sensory inputs and Newtonian regularities. However, the process is not atemporal. Rather, the visual system produces mass judgments about objects continuously and from multiple sources of information.

    We investigated the effect of mass perception from static cues, such as volume, as well as the momentum cues such as elasticity and relative velocity and found that the physical inconsistency can be easily explained by the commonsense assumption that the visual systems impression of relative mass of two colliding objects is influenced by the impression of mass from static cues, prior to any motion event.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    9
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Kathryn Franich- Assistant Professor- Harvard University

    Title: Cross-Language and Language-Specific Patterns in the Relationship Between Coordination, Phonetic Enhancement, and Prosodic Prominence

    Abstract: Languages vary in terms of how (or even whether) they show phonetic evidence of word-level metrical prominence asymmetries. Even in languages where phonetic cues to prominence are either weak or ambiguous, however, evidence for prominence asymmetries may often be observed through coordinative patterns between speech and other systems, as in the alignment of speech to music, or in the alignment of speech with co-speech gestures. In this talk, I discuss the relationship between coordination, prominence, and phonetic enhancement in the context of two languages with very different prosodic patterning, English and Medʉmba (Grassfields Bantu). I suggest that coordination is a key behavior of metrically prominent syllables cross-linguistically, while phonetic enhancement effects—though also intricately connected with coordination—are more variable and less reliable cues to enhancement cross-linguistically.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    9
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Pediatric Pain Management: A Deeper Dive into Complex Dynamics

    Mirabelle Mattar, M.D.
    Assistant Professor (Clinician Educator)
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Psychiatry Co-Director
    Integrated Care Unit at Selya 6
    And

    Heather Pelletier, Ph.D.
    Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Director, Integrated Behavioral Health
    East Greenwich Pediatrics
    Wednesday, November 9, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/22-23-CAGR

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Discuss the various therapeutic modalities employed in pediatric pain management across levels of care;
    Understand the complexity of the selection, the timing and the dynamics of prescribing and; Describe the importance of considering diversity in a chronic pain population.
    Disclosure: Drs. Mattar and Pelletier have no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Nov
    7
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Dan Swingley , University of Pennsylvania

    Title: Rethinking the developmental pathway of early infant language learning

    Abstract : Prominent empirical results of the 1980s and 1990s in which infants were revealed to have learned aspects of their language’s system of phonetic categories contributed to a standard theoretical model in which infants first learn to perceive speech sounds, then aggregate these into possible words, and then seek to identify meanings for those words while grasping at regularities caused by grammar. Modeling approaches that are based on this pathway have shown how simple statistical heuristics computed over phoneme sequences could help point infants to the early vocabulary. I will argue that this pathway is wrong and that current quantitative psychological models of infant word-form discovery are misguided. I will show that infant-directed speech is too variable and too unclear for such models to be plausible characterizations, and will sketch what an alternative looks like.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Nov
    3

    Carney Methods Meetup: Omics During Development 

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a Carney Methods Meetup featuring Kate O’Connor-Giles, associate professor in the Department of Neuroscience, and Erica Larschan, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology, Cellular Biology, and Biochemistry, who will discuss a variety of “omics” approaches and analysis methods useful in the study of gene expression during synaptogenesis in the developing brain, and other applications. Carney Methods Meetups are informal gatherings focused on methods for brain science, moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience. Videos and notes from previous Meetups are available on the (https://www.brown.edu/carney/news-events/carney-methods-meetups).

    Please note: Authenticated Brown IDs are required to join the Zoom.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Denise Henriques, School of Kinesiology and Health Science,York University
     
    Title: Proprioception and prediction in visuomotor learning.

    Abstract: Knowing the position of one’s limbs is essential for moving it and hence it makes sense that several signals provide information on limb position. This includes vision and proprioception, as well as predictive estimates based on efference copy of the movement. And while both proprioceptive and predictive estimates of hand position have been shown to change when we adapt our movements to altered visual feedback of the hand (i.e., a visuomotor rotation), it is unclear how much each contributes to adaptation induced changes in where we localize our hand. By having participants localize their hand with and without efference signal, we can start teasing the two contributions apart. Here I will discuss our results investigating predicted and perceived changes both as a function of the size and nature of visual discrepancy, and as a function of age. Furthermore, I will characterize the time course of these changes in hand localization by measuring them after every visuomotor training trial. In summary, we find that visuomotor training leads to changes in both predicted, efferent-based and proprioceptive, afferent-based estimates of the hand. These changes in proprioceptive-based estimate were larger in older adults compared to young adults. These changes in localizing the unseen hand position emerge even when it’s clear that the source of the errors isn’t due to the hand or motor system at all. Moreover, these hand localization shifts occur very rapidly, but mainly reflect changes in the proprioceptive-based estimates. These findings imply that estimates of hand-position are quite malleable, but that this plasticity in our estimates of limb position depends on multiple sources of feedback, and our brains likely considers the peculiarities of the separate signals to arrive at a robust limb position signal.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    2
    5:00pm - 6:30pm EDT

    BioCon Founders in Science Seminar

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    We are excited to host the founders and CEO, Dr. Justin Fallon (Professor at Brown) and Johnny Page (Master’s Alum), of Bolden Therapeutics. The seminar will take place in person in Marcuvitz Auditorium (with zoom options if people can’t attend in person) on Wednesday November 2nd, 2022 at 5-6pm. Expect a brief presentation followed by a Q&A session. The seminar will be followed by a casual, in-person reception.

    RSVP Form: https://forms.gle/AM4eRTukYXxAeFzh7

    Looking forward to seeing everyone there!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    2
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Anna Obukhova- PhD student- University of Tromso - The Arctic University of Norway

    Title: Corpus Assisted Discourse Analysis: How the Russian Media Are Approaching Svalbard (Spitsberge)

    Abstract: In my talk, I will present my PhD project that investigates how the Svalbard archipelago (Spitsbergen) has been covered by a number of Russian media outlets. Russia has a direct connection to Svalbard, which is a Norwegian territory, by means of Russian presence there in accordance with the Svalbard Treaty signed in February 1920. The Treaty recognizes the sovereignty of Norway over Svalbard and gives equal rights to other countries to conduct economic activity there. The present study deals with newspaper text data produced between 2010 and 2021 and is aimed at revealing the narrative lines related to Svalbard. I demonstrate how some political events within this timeline, e.g., the Treaty on Maritime Delimitation and Cooperation in the Barents Sea and the Arctic Ocean (2010) and the start of the Ukrainian crisis (2014), form the narrative lines produced in the texts.

    A method used as a starting point within the present project is MBA (Market Basket Analysis), a data-mining technique that can be used to facilitate corpus-assisted discourse analysis. MBA reveals associative links between keywords occurring in different texts that comprise a corpus (Cvrček & Fidler 2022). Keywords are prominent words typical for a text and they can be considered as indicators of the topic and style of a text (Fidler & Cvrček 2018: 198-199). Associative links produced by MBA provide a wider context for keywords within the discourse. At the same time, associative links can be interpreted as patterns of associations between concepts in the discourse (Cvrček & Fidler 2022).

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    2
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Just-in-time Adaptive Approaches for Intervention: Applying Digital Tools and Predictive Analytics Learning

    Stephanie Goldstein, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor (Research)
    Weight Control & Diabetes Research Center
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    The Miriam Hospital
    Wednesday, November 2, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-22-23

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Describe an established framework for conceptualizing, developing, and evaluating novel interventions that provide support ‘just-in-time’, when individuals may need it most (i.e., just-in-time adaptive interventions [JITAI]); Outline how data from digital health tools and machine learning can be applied to advance assessment and intervention for physical and mental health outcomes and; Identify common challenges to using digital tools/machine learning in research and clinical practice, including issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion.
    Disclosure: Dr. Goldstein has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Open House flier

    Join the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior’s Clinical Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship Training Program for a virtual open house featuring an overview of the program, breakout sessions with program leaders, and Q&A opportunities. 

    Learn more about clinical psychology postdoctoral training at Brown More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    1
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT

    CCBS Seminar

    Zoom & Carney Institute, 164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 944 8598 5759
    Passcode: ccbs

    Read Montague will present a seminar entitled “Decoding human neuromodulatory signaling and its connection to reinforcement learning”. Read will be talking about his latest machine learning methods for decoding sub-second changes in dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin neurochemical signals from humans and how they relate to reward-based learning and decision making.

    Limited seating, zoom link is now available.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    29
    8:00am - 4:30pm EDT

    Black Men in White Coats Youth Summit

    Warren Alpert Medical School

    Join us for an exciting day of exposure to the field of medicine, mentorship, and networking, as we strengthen and diversify the future of health care. Boys and girls in third grade through college, parents, educators, health care professionals, and community leaders are all welcome to attend.

    This free program includes:

    • A keynote address by Dr. Dale Okorodudu, founder of Black Men in White Coats;
    • Talks by current medical students, resident physicians, and health care providers;
    • “How to Raise a Doctor” session for parents and guardians.

    This event is free and open to the public but you must register to attend. Free parking is available. The Warren Alpert Medical School is accessible by RIPTA.

    If you need accommodations to attend this event, please contact Nina Guidaboni as soon as possible. 

    Learn more and register More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Oct
    28
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    DSCoV Workshop: Intro to the Rust Programming Language

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor

    Data Science, Computation, and Visualization (DSCOV) Workshops

    Fridays at noon

    These are one-hour skills-focused workshops, designed to be hands-on, so bring a laptop if you can. They are open to anyone, and any pre-requisite knowledge or resources will be announced beforehand. More info and schedule here.

    Pizza is available (please RSVP below for catering purposes), or bring your own lunch if you wish!

    October 28: Introduction to the Rust Programming Language

    Presenter: Paul Stey, Assistant CIO, Research Software Engineering and Data Science, Brown Center for Computation and Visualization

    Sponsored by the Data Science Initiative, the Center for Computation and Visualization, and the Carney Institute.
    More Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Training, Professional Development
  • Oct
    28
    Virtual
    12:00pm EDT

    i-BSHS Seminar Series

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98047217230

    “Research on Us, by Us: Centering a Racial Equity Lens in Addressing LGBTQ+ Health Disparities”

    Dr. Alison Cerezo’s primary line of research centers on addressing social and health disparities using an intersectionality framework. Their current projects focus on the associations between trauma, social stress, mental health and substance use for diverse LGBTQ+ communities. Most recently, their work has focused on the links between stigma, discrimination and alcohol misuse and alcohol risk behaviors in sexual minority women. They are also interested in reducing barriers to mental health treatment for this community. Dr. Cerezo uses qualitative, quantitative and mixed methodologies and has carried out research on sexual and gender diverse communities in the U.S. and Mexico. Dr. Cerezo received the Distinguished Early Career Professional Award from the National Latinx Psychological Association in 2018, and the American Psychological Association Barbara Smith & Jewell E. Hovart Early Career Award for Research with Queer People of Color in 2019.

    The i-BSHS (Innovations in Behavioral and Social Health Sciences) lecture series fosters collaborative discussion on innovative behavioral and social science-based approaches to improving population health.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Oct
    28
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Oct
    27
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mark Schurgin, PhD,
    Staff UX Researcher, Google

    Title: Beyond Academia: What it’s like doing research in industry

    Abstract:

    Obtaining a PhD in Psychology, Cognitive Science and/or Neuroscience can unlock many potential career paths. However, in a PhD program it can be difficult to understand what opportunities exist outside of academia. Dr. Mark Schurgin obtained his PhD in Psychological & Brain Sciences from Johns Hopkins University and conducted post-doc work at University of California, San Diego before transitioning to his current position as a Staff UX Researcher at Google. In this talk, Mark will demystify what it’s like doing research in industry. Specifically, he will discuss the similarities and differences between academic and industry positions from exploring the jobs initially, to interviewing for opportunities and what it is like to conduct research day-to-day.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    27
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 230

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Special Date and Location.

    Speaker: Augustina Owusu, PhD - visiting professor - Boston College

    Title: Definiteness Across Domain

    Abstract: In this talk, I examine the expression of definiteness across multiple domains by analyzing the semantic contribu-
    tion of the Akan (Kwa, Niger Congo) morpheme no`, typically glossed as a definite determiner. This morpheme occurs in noun phrases
    (1), as well as clause final in simple declarative sentences (2), and other clause types.
    (1) Kofi
    Kofi
    di-i
    eat-PST
    aduane
    food
    (no ́).
    DEF

    ‘Kofi ate the food.’ nominal definite determiner
    (2) Kofi
    Kofi
    a-didi
    PERF-eat
    (no ́).
    DEF

    ‘Kofi has eaten.’ clausal definite determiner
    The distribution of this morpheme is semantically and syntactically interesting, as cross-linguistically, determiners are
    typically not found outside noun phrases. I demonstrate that no` is a cross-categorial definiteness marker. At the core
    no ́ encodes the presupposition of familiarity — it requires the existence of a discourse referent with the descriptive
    content of its complement in the discourse. As a cross-categorical determiner, the complement of no ́ is NP and TP (as
    well as additional propositional nodes, including NegP).
    In the nominal domain, no ́ imposes two conditions on its nominal complement: it must be familiar in the discourse
    and have a non-unique denotation in the larger discourse. These two requirements, encoded in the lexical entry for
    no ́ as presuppositions, capture two essential components of the determiner. The familiarity presupposition captures
    the fact that no ́ has anaphoric and immediate situation uses. The second presupposition, anti-uniqueness, defined by
    Robinson (2009) as a property associated with demonstratives that restricts their use when their referent is known to
    be the only entity which fits its descriptive content in the domain of reference, accounts for the incompatibility of no ́
    with inherently unique nouns such as president and superlatives.

    Clausal no ́ takes a propositional argument. No ́-clauses are definite propositions that have two semantic contri-
    butions: a presupposition of familiarity and an assertion. While clausal no ́ encodes familiarity, it cannot be used to

    reintroduce a proposition already present in the Common Ground. To account for this property, I adopt Portner’s
    (2007) notion that information is updated at two levels during a conversation: the Common Propositional Space (CPS)
    and the Common Ground (CG). Each proposition uttered is stored in the CPS, whereas only true propositions are
    stored in the CG. Thus, prior to the utterance of a no ́-clause, the information it encodes is contained solely in the CPS.
    The no ́-clause passes the information to the CG. Thus the distribution of clausal no ́ provides empirical evidence for a
    textured perspective of discourse structure.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    27
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Carney Career Conversation: Scientific Publishing with Robert Prior, Executive Editor, The MIT Press

    164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Rm Innovation Zone

    Please join the Carney Institute for a special seminar featuring Robert Prior Executive Editor, The MIT Press.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Oct
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    BrainExPo Seminar: “Neural Sources of Individual Variability in Cognitive Behavior”

    Zoom and Life Sciences Marcuvitz Hall, Rm Room 220

    Join the Carney Institute for the Brain Science for its External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Marino Pagan, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at Princeton University. 

    Abstract: Using a high-throughput procedure, I trained many rats to perform a task requiring context-dependent selection and accumulation of evidence towards a decision. Detailed neural and behavioral analyses revealed remarkable heterogeneity across rats, despite uniformly good task performance. This approach opens the door to the study of individual variability in neural computations underlying higher cognition. Finally, I will present preliminary data leveraging this behavioral paradigm to study the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits in rat models of autism.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    24
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Kimberly Cuevas , Associate Professor, University of Connecticut

    Title: Neural and Behavioral Building Blocks of Early Social and Cognitive Processes

    Abstract :My program of research examines the fundamental building blocks of early social and cognitive processes. Our work combines neuroscience and psychobiological perspectives to investigate memory, cognitive control, and social learning. We utilize EEG to examine neural oscillatory rhythms during early development with a focus on their role in early social-cognitive processes. This presentation will highlight some of our most impactful findings in these areas, including preliminary evidence of “neural mirroring” in 6- to 9-week-olds as part of a longitudinal investigation of social learning. Our experimental work on early associative networks and memory potentiation reveals potential underlying mechanisms for increasing transfer of learning and duration of memory during infancy. Our longitudinal research identifies biopsychosocial behavioral and neural correlates of individual differences in emerging executive functions. I will share my thoughts on theoretical implications, limitations, and future directions.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    24
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    MRF/BNC Users Meeting

    164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Rm Carney Innovation Zone

    MRF/BNC User Meeting Description: BNC staff scientist Elizabeth Lorenc will introduce herself and present some of her past work in a talk titled “Shaping visual memories with real-time fMRI neurofeedback”

    Lunch will be provided, RSVP:

    https://forms.gle/vkASp7ZkryXCFp6c8

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    21
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Oct
    20
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Oliver Layton, Assistant Professor, Colby College

    Title: Deep learning and self-motion perception from optic flow

    Abstract: Over the past decade, deep neural networks have made impressive strides in rivaling or even exceeding human performance on certain visual recognition tasks. Visual recognition involves the primate ventral (“what”) stream, which, interestingly, deep networks have also been shown to effectively model. In this talk, I will describe work that explores the extent to which deep neural networks capture human performance at heading estimation from optic flow, a key function of the complementary dorsal (“where”) stream. Motivated by neural modeling that shows how certain temporal dynamics may play a key role in capturing human heading judgments, we compare the performance of two types of deep networks: a convolutional neural network (CNN) that processes each instance of optic flow independently and a recurrent neural network (RNN) that integrates optic flow signals over time. We assess the performance of the deep networks in simulated self-motion scenarios within which humans excel at accurately judging their self-motion, such as from sparse optic flow and in the presence of large moving objects. As time permits, I will describe related work in which we use deep learning to accurately decode the parameters specifying the observer’s self-motion along a curved path from a neural model of MSTd, an area along the dorsal stream involved in self-motion perception.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    19
    5:00pm - 6:30pm EDT

    BioCON Science Communication Panel

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    We are delighted to host Neuro Ph.D. alumni Kathryn Russo, and Jey McCreight from 23andMe for our first Science communication panel on Next Wednesday 10.19.22 at 5 - 6:30 p.m. in Marcuvitz Auditorium, SFH (food will be served!).

    Please RSVP and we look forward to seeing you! If you cannot attend in person, please email us! BioCON Committee

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Oct
    19
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Tanya Bondarenko - Assistant Professor of Linguistics- Harvard University

    Title: Factivity alternations in Azeri: an argument for the structural approach

    Abstract: Factivity alternations received at least two kinds of explanations in the literature: approaches that attribute the two readings to two different LFs (e.g., Özyıldız 2017, 2018) and approaches that derive the presence/absence of a factive inference by appealing to general pragmatic mechanisms (Beaver 2010, Abrusán 2011, Simons et. al 2017, Jeong 2021). In this talk I investigate verbs displaying factivity alternations in Azeri and argue for the former view of how factivity alternations emerge.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Talk title: “Ontogenesis of sleep function and regulation”

    Abstract: Sleep is maximally expressed at ages when the brain undergoes dramatic changes in its circuitry based on innate programs and in response to experience during critical periods. This suggests that sleep may play essential roles in normal brain development. In this presentation, I will summarize several findings that demonstrate that sleep indeed is essential for canonical forms of developmental plasticity. I will also show that on a genomic level, the impact of sleep loss on the brain also changes during perinatal development.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    18
    12:00pm EDT

    EEOB Tuesday Seminar Series

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm 291

    Dr. Nicole Creanza- Vanderbilt University

     

    Talk Title: Evolution of learned behaviors: insights from birds and humans

     

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/95365408175

    More Information 
  • Oct
    17
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Roman Feiman, PhD, Assistant Professor, Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences Department, Brown University

    Title: Not as hard as it looks? Disentangling cognitive and input factors in the acquisition of negation

    Abstract : For English-speaking adults, “no” and “not” express truth-functional negation. For children, learning these words might be hard because negation is not something they can observe. While most children produce no as early as 16mo, they initially use it only to comment on absence (e.g., “No more juice”) or to express their dislike (“No veggies!”). Children only reliably produce clearly truth-functional negation (e.g., “That’s no Mommy!”) around age 2½ , when they also begin producing the word “not”. By age 3, however, these logical expressions become the most frequent usage. This developmental trajectory raises two possibilities for why expressions of truth-functional negation take so long to learn: younger children could face (1) a cognitive limit, lacking the mental capacity to represent truth-functional negation, but able to represent absence and negative affect; or (2) an information limit, with truth-functional uses having few observable correlates or reliable cues that this meaning is what’s expressed, even if children have all the relevant concepts. I will describe three sources of evidence from three different populations that can help tell between these possibilities: data from typical children learning different languages that express negation in different ways, internationally adopted children learning English at an older age than usual, and adults guessing whether a mystery word is negation in the Human Simulation Paradigm. I’ll argue that – perhaps surprisingly – all the extant evidence favors an information limit account of why negation is so hard to learn. The upshot is that a concept of negation may be available for children to think with before they ever learn how to express it in words.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    17
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Carney Seminar: “The Long and Short of Altered Translation in Fragile X”

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm 202 “Purple Palace”

    Emily Osterweil, Ph.D., Professor of Molecular Neuroscience, University of Edinburgh

    Title: “The Long and Short of Altered Translation in Fragile X”

    Abstract: Dysregulated protein synthesis is a core pathogenic mechanism in Fragile X Syndrome (FX). The mGluR Theory of FX predicts that pathological synaptic changes arise from the excessive translation of mRNAs downstream of mGlu1/5 activation. Here, we use a combination of CA1 pyramidal neuron-specific TRAP-seq and proteomics to identify the overtranslating mRNAs supporting exaggerated mGlu1/5 -induced long-term synaptic depression (mGluR-LTD) in the FX mouse model (Fmr1-/y). Our results identify a significant increase in the translation of ribosomal proteins (RPs) upon mGlu1/5 stimulation that coincides with a reduced translation of long mRNAs encoding synaptic proteins. These changes are mimicked and occluded in Fmr1-/y neurons. Inhibiting RP translation significantly impairs mGluR-LTD and prevents the length-dependent shift in the translating population. Together, these resu­lts suggest that pathological changes in FX result from a length-dependent alteration in the translating population that is supported by excessive RP translation.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    14
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Oct
    13
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Bench to Bedside Series: Brian Kavanaugh, PsyD., ABPP; Sofia Lizarraga, PhD

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud.

    Neuropsychological Phenotyping of ASH1L and other rare genetic mutations & Studies on ASH1L-related disorders using human stem cell technology

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • Oct
    13
    12:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

    Strong vs. Weak Compositionality in Humans and Machines!

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 477

    The Language Understanding and Representation (LUNAR) Lab at Brown University will host a special one-off talk + panel event on Strong vs. Weak Compositionality in Humans and Machines! We have a truly stellar lineup with speakers and panelists.

    In the good old days of sub-billion parameter AI language models (LMs), it seemed clear that humans could perform symbolic reasoning, while LMs could only poorly mimic symbolic behaviors with shallow and fragile heuristics. Today, however, both newer LMs as well as humans can have good—albeit imperfect—performance on various symbolic and compositional tasks; and such apparently converging behaviors between LMs and humans question if LMs really have a fundamental lack in some special cognitive mechanisms unique to humans, or are LMs mostly held back by a lack of grounded and interactive training data.

    We will first have two 20-minute talks where Tom McCoy (CogSci PhD at Johns Hopkins -> professor of linguistics at Yale) will argue for the former, noting that although compositional structures do emerge from unstructured neural networks, this is still insufficient, and explicit mechanisms for compositionality is still needed. On the other hand, Andrew Lampinen (CogSci PhD at Stanford -> research scientist at DeepMind) will argue for the latter, highlighting that human compositional behaviors are also imperfect, while offering his own proposal for what’s needed for the future of human-like AIs. After the talks, we will have an hour of informal discussion joined by Raphaël Millière (professor of philosophy at Columbia), Ishita Dasgupta (research scientist at DeepMind), and our own Roman Feiman (professor of psychology at Brown)! Even more excitingly, Tom, Raphaël, Roman, and maybe Ishita will join us in person! And there will also be 1:1 meeting slots with all of our guests.

    Additionally, the speakers have kindly provided an optional reading list (https://awebson.org/compositionality) with which you can get up to speed with the background literature, and you’re encouraged to submit questions via Dory ahead of time (https://awebson.org/compose-questions), optionally anonymously with no login required.

    Talks: Noon to 1P

    Discussion: 1P to 2P
    More Information 
  • Oct
    13
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Kevin Smith, PhD , Research Scientist, MIT

    Title: Representations for physical scene understanding

    Abstract:Every day we interact with the world around us in a myriad of ways: we pour coffee into a cup, stack dishes in the sink, or judge whether a box is full based on the way it sinks into the couch cushions. Recent work suggests that these capabilities rely on an “Intuitive Physics Engine”: a mental model that takes representations of the world and probabilistically simulates possible future outcomes. But due to memory and attentional limitations, these representations cannot perfectly capture the world in perfect fidelity. In this talk I will discuss recent work investigating the nature of the representations that underlie commonsense physical reasoning. First I will use physical knowledge infancy as a case study in which these representations are likely to be most constrained, and show that classical findings from developmental psychology can be explained by assuming drastically simplified object representations; these same types of simplifications are also carried forward in adulthood when we reason about physical events. Next I will discuss how we use physical reasoning to support creative tool use, and how learning generalized strategies for using tools involves developing abstract representations about how objects relate. Together this work suggests that physical scene understanding relies on a set of approximate representations of the world that support efficient prediction and action planning.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    13
    Virtual and In Person
    11:00am EDT

    Health Informatics Seminar Series: Applying Information Retrieval to the Electronic Health Record for Cohort Discovery and Rare Disease Detection with Dr. William Hersh

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School), Rm 270

    Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics

    Health Informatics Seminar Series: Applying Information Retrieval to the Electronic Health Record for Cohort Discovery and Rare Disease Detection 

    William Hersh, MD

    Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology
    Oregon Health & Science University

     

    Abstract

    The last decade has seen rapid adoption of electronic health records in the United States and elsewhere. This has resulted in vast amounts of data that can be re-used for other purposes such as clinical research. However, most of this data is non-standardized and unstructured, making retrieval and other uses challenging. This talk will describe recent research applying and evaluating information retrieval (IR) techniques to two use cases: discovering cohorts for clinical research studies and detecting rare diseases.

    Bio

    William Hersh, MD is Professor and Chair of the Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland, Oregon, USA. Dr. Hersh is a leader and innovator in biomedical informatics both in education and research. Dr. Hersh’s main research efforts are in the area of information retrieval (also known as search) applied to biomedicine. He has authored over 200 scientific papers and abstracts as well as the book, Information Retrieval: A Health and Biomedical Perspective, 4th Edition(Springer, 2020). His current work focuses on the application of search techniques to electronic health record data, aiming to improve patient cohort discovery and amplification of signals of rare diseases. He maintains a Web site and the Informatics Professor Blog.

    BCBI Research More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. BCBI Seminars, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    12
    3:00pm EDT

    Special Seminar: Dr.Brad Postle,University of Wisconsin–Madison

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium, Room 101

    Special Seminar

    Speaker: Dr. Brad Postle,University of Wisconsin–Madison

    Title: Controlling the Contents of Working Memory

    Abstract: Working memory (WM) refers to the ability to hold information in an accessible state – in the absence of relevant sensory input – to transform it when necessary, and to use it to guide behavior in a flexible, context-dependent manner. One of the hallmarks of WM is the ability to mentally juggle multiple pieces of information, prioritizing what’s relevant for the task immediately at hand while also keeping potentially important but currently unprioritized information in an accessible state. A second is that the contents of WM are rapidly updatable, allowing for the rapid replacement of the no-longer-needed with the newly relevant. This presentation will explore these two aspects of the control of WM at the level of algorithmic operation and neural implementation. Specifically, although parsimony holds that “deprioritization” and “removal” might be accomplished via the same mechanism, I will draw on neuroimaging (EEG and fMRI), computational (RNN, RL), and behavioral data to argue for two distinct, novel, processes for controlling the contents of WM: the flipping of neural representations as a function of priority; and the top-down hijacking of mechanisms of adaptation to accomplish active removal. This work may generalize to broader questions, such as of how we control the moment-to-moment contents of conscious awareness, and how we diagnose and treat disorders of thought.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Filip Smolik - Assistant Professor - Charles University

    Title: Acquiring grammatical morphology: the early stages

    Abstract: Many languages of the world have rich and complex morphological system in nouns as well as verbs. The traditional notion of telegraphic speech implies that grammatical morphology is delayed in development. But more recent findings suggest that it is not generally the case, even though young children may avoid using in production. Early comprehension of morphology seems to be the key to morphological development. I will talk about the current research and show some of our work on early comprehension of grammatical gender, number and agreement in Czech, with some ideas for other languages.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    12
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    DPHB Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Addressing co-occurring depression (COD) in youth with Substance use Disorders (SUD)

    Yifrah Kaminer, M.D., MBA
    Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry & Pediatrics
    Alcohol Research Center
    University of Connecticut School of Medicine
    Wednesday, October 12, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/22-23-CAGR
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Review the nature of the association between SUD and COD; Address challenges in recruitment, engagement and assessment of youth with COD; and Discuss treatment response and outcomes heterogeneity in youth with COD.

    Disclosure: Dr. Kaminer has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Teaching & Learning
  • Oct
    11
    4:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    The Center for the Biology of Aging PAARF

    70 Ship Street, Rm LMM 107

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Oct
    7
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    BigAI Talk: A targeted evaluation of human-like linguistic knowledge in neural language models - Jennifer Hu

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    Abstract: Neural language models (NLMs) continue to dazzle on NLP benchmarks, but it remains unclear how well they capture human-like linguistic knowledge. In this talk, I present three case studies investigating NLMs’ language abilities, focusing on aspects of linguistic structure and meaning which may pose challenges for generic learning algorithms applied to text-only input. First, we assess NLMs’ ability to learn generalizations about the syntactic structure of English, and how this ability depends on a model’s inductive bias and training data size. Second, we evaluate whether NLMs predict human inferences about sentence meanings, based on more informative alternative sentences that were not said (e.g., “The bill was supported overwhelmingly” implies that the bill was not supported unanimously). Finally, in ongoing work, we test NLMs on a set of language understanding tasks that are hypothesized to require social reasoning and world knowledge (e.g., inferring a speaker’s intended meaning from ironic statements). We find that NLMs demonstrate remarkable learning outcomes but still fall short in important ways, suggesting lower bounds on what is learnable from text as well as directions for improving future AI models.

    Jennifer Hu is a 5th year PhD candidate in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. Her research investigates the computational and cognitive principles underlying human language, with the dual goals of understanding the human mind and building better AI systems. She earned a B.A. in Mathematics and Linguistics from Harvard University in 2018.

    Host: Ellie Pavlick

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  • Join us for the Fall offering of the Machine Learning for Health Seminar Series. These talks will explore machine learning, its methodology, and application in biomedicine and health. The purpose of this series is to serve as an introduction to machine learning for researchers, clinician scientists, and others who may be interested in using these methods in their research.

    Friday, October 7th, 2022:

    Carsten Eickhoff, PhD, MSc: “Introduction to Deep Learning” 

    Building on last year’s general introduction to machine learning, we will visit a number of advanced concepts from the Deep Learning family of models. We will begin by discussing the representation learning paradigm that allows models to discover useful data abstractions on their own, and backpropagation as a means of making it happen in practice. After that, we will have a look at convolutional and transformer neural networks used in modern image and text processing architectures. In the second part of the talk, we will hear about two concrete examples of Deep Learning at work to improve CT-based stroke localization and risk scoring for kidney injuries.

    About the Speaker:

    Dr. Eickhoff is the Manning Assistant Professor of Medical and Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Brown University where he leads the Biomedical AI Lab, specializing in the development of data science and information retrieval techniques with the goal of improving patient safety, individual health and quality of medical care. Prior to joining Brown, he graduated from The University of Edinburgh and TU Delft, and was a postdoctoral fellow at ETH Zurich and Harvard University. Carsten has published more than 100 articles in computer science conferences (SIGIR, EMNLP, NAACL, WWW, KDD, WSDM, CIKM) and clinical journals (Nature Digital Medicine, The Lancet - Respiratory Medicine, Radiology, European Heart Journal). His research has been supported by the NSF, NIH, DARPA, IARPA, Google, Amazon, Microsoft and others. Aside from his academic endeavors, he is a founder and board member of several deep technology startups in the health sector that strive to translate technological innovation to improved safety and quality of life for patients.

    Register Here! More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Research
  • Oct
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    “AI For Good” Isn’t Good Enough: A Call for Human-Centered AI

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    Hybrid Event: Zoom link remote option: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97233372116

    James A. Landay
    Anand Rajaraman and Venky Harinarayan Professor in the School of Engineering
    Professor Computer Science Department
    Stanford University

     

    The growing awareness of the pervasiveness of AI’s impact on humans and societies has led to a proliferation of “AI for Good” initiatives. I argue that simply recognizing the potential impacts of AI systems is only table stakes for developing and guiding societally positive AI. Blindly applying AI techniques to a problem in an important societal area, such as healthcare, often leads to solving the wrong problem. In this talk, I will advance the idea that to be truly Human-Centered, the development of AI must change in three ways: it must be user-centered, community-centered, and societally-centered. First, user-centered design integrates well-known techniques to account for the needs and abilities of a system’s end users while rapidly improving a design through rigorous iterative user testing. Combined with creative new ideas and technologies, user-centered design helps move from designing systems that try to replicate humans to AI systems that work for humans. Second, AI systems also have impacts on communities beyond the direct users—Human-Centered AI must be community-centered and engage communities, e.g., with participatory techniques, at the earliest stages of design. Third, these impacts can reverberate at a societal level, requiring forecasting and mediating potential impacts throughout a project as well. To accomplish these three changes, successful Human-Centered AI requires the early engagement of multidisciplinary teams beyond technologists, including experts in design, the social sciences and humanities, and domains of interest such as medicine or law. In this talk I will elaborate on my argument for an authentic Human-Centered AI by showing both negative and positive examples. I will also illustrate how my own group’s research in health, wellness, and behavior change is both living up to and failing in meeting the needs of a Human-Centered AI design process.

    James Landay is a Professor of Computer Science and the Anand Rajaraman and Venky Harinarayan Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He specializes in human-computer interaction. Landay is the co-founder and Associate Director of the Stanford Institute for Human-centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). Prior to joining Stanford, Landay was a Professor of Information Science at Cornell Tech in New York City for one year and a Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington for 10 years. From 2003-2006, he also served as the Director of Intel Labs Seattle, a leading research lab that explored various aspects of ubiquitous computing. Landay was also the chief scientist and co-founder of NetRaker, which was acquired by KeyNote Systems in 2004. Before that he was an Associate Professor of Computer Science at UC Berkeley. Landay received his BS in EECS from UC Berkeley in 1990, and MS and PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1993 and 1996, respectively. His PhD dissertation was the first to demonstrate the use of sketching in user interface design tools. He is a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy and an ACM Fellow. He served for six years on the NSF CISE Advisory Committee.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    DSCoV Workshop

    164 Angell Street, Rm 335

    Data Science, Computing, and Visualization (DSCoV) Workshops

    Fridays at noon

    These are one-hour skills-focused workshops, designed to be hands-on, so bring a laptop if you can. They are open to anyone, and any pre-requisite knowledge or resources will be announced beforehand. More info and schedule here. 

    Pizza is available, or bring your own lunch if you wish!

    October 7: Collaborative Coding: How To PR with GitHub

    Presenter: John Holland, Senior Data Scientist, Advanced Research Computing, Brown Center for Computation and Visualization

    In this hands-on workshop we’ll be covering how to:

    • Get started with collaborative coding: GitHub basics and best practices (organizations and repository naming conventions).

    • Make new code suggestions using “branches”: basics (“what is a branch, anyway?“) and best practices (naming conventions).

    • Pull Request (PR):

    • Create a PR and ask for feedback.

    • Review a PR effectively.

    • Finish a PR by merging, closing, or splitting it.

    Prerequisites: please ensure you have a computer and a GitHub account.

    Sponsored by the Data Science Initiative, the Center for Computation and Visualization, and the Carney Institute. 
    More Information 
  • Oct
    7
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Oct
    6
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: ChangHui Pak, PhD; Univ. of MA, Amherst

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220

    Title:  Interrogating synaptic dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders using human induced pluripotent stem cell models

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    6
    Virtual
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

    Carney Methods Meetup: Cell programming

    Carney Methods Meetup: Cell reprogramming

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a Carney Methods Meetup featuring Ashley Webb and Alvin Yu-Wen Huang, both assistant professors in the Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry, who will discuss methods for direct and induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. Carney Methods Meetups are informal gatherings focused on methods for brain science, moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience.  Videos and notes from previous Meetups are available on  (https://www.brown.edu/carney/news-events/carney-methods-meetups).

    Please note: Authenticated Brown IDs are required to join the Zoom.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    6
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Geoffrey Aguirre , University of Pennsylvania

    Title: Perceptual consequences of melanopsin stimulation

    Abstract: In addition to the opsins present in the rods and cones, the retina contains the photopigment melanopsin. Rodent work suggests that melanopsin—and the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) that express it—subserve reflexive functions of vision. I will describe a series of studies that examine the role of melanopsin and the ipRGCs in human vision, including pupil control, the perception of “brightness”, and the sensation of discomfort from light. In each of these cases, the quantitative effect of combinations of melanopsin and cone signals can be used to probe the circuitry of these visual functions in health and neurologic disease.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    5
    4:00pm EDT

    Data Matters Seminar Series: Gamze Gürsoy, Columbia University, New York Genome Center

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor, Open Seminar Area

    DATA MATTERS SEMINAR SERIES

     
    Featuring
    Gamze Gürsoy

    Assistant Professor, Biomedical Informatics, Computer Science, Columbia University; Core Member, New York Genome Center

    Discussion led by
    Ritambhara Singh

    Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Computational Biology, Brown University

    Addressing the Challenges of Precision Medicine: Privacy, Sharing, and Analysis at Scale

    Recent advances in biotechnology and medicine allow us to collect an immense amount of physiological, contextual, and biological data at the personalized and population level. This surge in data gives rise to a paradigm shift in biology and medicine towards data intensive discoveries. While this provides the perfect opportunity to study human genetics and disease, it also presents daunting challenges in maintaining the privacy of patients, secure sharing and movement of large data, and inferring medically actionable knowledge. Gürsoy’s lab aims to address these challenges by developing scalable computational tools to overcome privacy concerns associated with sharing and analyzing omics and clinical data. In this talk, Gürsoy will discuss an overview of these tools that are based on various techniques such as machine learning, homomorphic encryption, data sanitization, and blockchain technology.

    Gamze Gürsoy, PhD, is a Core Faculty Member at the New York Genome Center and holds a joint appointment as Assistant Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Informatics and Computer Science at Columbia University. Her research focus is specializing in genetic data privacy, a critically important aspect of genomics research. She and her lab team develop software, file formats, and pipelines that enable broad data sharing among researchers while also preserving individual patient and study participant privacy.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    5
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB October Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    The Annual Dr. Henrietta Leonard Visiting Professor Academic Grand Rounds*

    Marijuana in New England Kids: A Pandemic in a Pandemic?
    Timothy E. Wilens, M.D.
    Chief, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Co-Director, Center for Addiction Medicine,
    MGH Trustees Chair in Addiction Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital,
    Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
    Wednesday, October 5, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-22-23
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Learn the basic neurobiology of marijuana; Understand the use of marijuana in New England; and List treatment strategies for Cannabis Use Disorders.

    Disclosure: Dr. Wilens reports the following financial relationships: Grant/Research Support to MGH-NIH (NIDA); Co-Editor, Elsevier Psychiatric Clinics of North America (ADHD); Royalties, Guilford Press, Ironshore, Cambridge University Press, Clinical Consulting, Gavin Foundation, Bay Cove Human Services, US National Football League (ERM Associates), US Minor/Major League Baseball; Consultant, Shared IP-White Rhino/3D; Employee, MGH.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Oct
    4
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Thomas F. Anders Seminar Series: Joshua Gooley, “Early school start times are bad for sleep, attendance, and grades”

    300 Duncan Dr, Providence, RI 02906
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please register to receive the Zoom link or join us in person. 

    Early school start times are bad for sleep, attendance, and grades

    Abstract: Healthy sleep is important for academic success and wellbeing. Universities need scalable methods for assessing how their practices and programs influence students’ sleep and learning. We analysed students’ interactions with digital platforms to derive estimates of sleep opportunities, chronotype, and social jet lag across our entire student population (>35,000 students). We found that early school start times were associated with shorter sleep, lower class attendance, and lower academic achievement. Effects were greatest in ‘late-type’ students who had larger social jet lag. Our findings suggest that universities should avoid scheduling mandatory early morning classes to improve students’ sleep health and learning.

    Biography: Dr Joshua Gooley is an Associate Professor in the Neuroscience & Behavioural Disorders Programme at Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. He is Principal Investigator of the Chronobiology and Sleep Laboratory and Director of Research of the SingHealth Duke-NUS Sleep Center. He is Neuroscience Theme Lead of the Institute for Applied Learning Sciences and Educational Technology at the National University of Singapore, and past president of the Singapore Sleep Society. He received his PhD in Neurobiology from Harvard Medical School, where he studied neural pathways that regulate sleep and circadian rhythms. His research program at Duke-NUS focuses on understanding the role of sleep and circadian rhythms in regulating human performance and health outcomes.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    3
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, OOD), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Oct
    3
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor David Sobel , Brown University

    Title: Perspectives on children’s prosocial behavior

    Abstract : In this talk, I will describe four lines of research on children’s understanding of different kinds of prosocial behavior. In the first line of studies, I will describe how children’s developing understanding of intentionality relates to their ability to defy unjust punishments. In the second and third lines, I will consider how children’s developing affective perspective taking relates to their defying unfair distributors and rectifying inequities when distributing resources. Finally, the fourth line of studies considers how children develop a concept of equitable resource collection particularly for the common good, which might form the basis for broader economic concepts like taxation. Taken together, the studies suggest a rational constructivist approach to understanding prosocial behavior in which children’s existing knowledge or social-cognitive capacities constrain their inferences about fairness.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    30
    4:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    Extending the Healthspan with Age: A Case for Social, Scientific, and Economic Preparedness

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School), Rm Atrium

    The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care

    Extending the Healthspan with Age: A Case for Social, Scientific, and Economic Preparedness


    Presented by Victor J. Dzau, MD

     

    Victor J. Dzau, MD, is the president of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), formerly the Institute of Medicine (IOM). In addition, he serves as vice chair of the National Research Council. Dr. Dzau is chancellor emeritus and James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Duke University and the past president and CEO of the Duke University Health System. Previously, Dr. Dzau was the Hersey Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and chairman of Medicine at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as well as Bloomfield Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University.

    About the Lecture

    The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care was endowed in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by his wife, the late Ruth N. Levinger, and his daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and John M. Cohen, MD ’59.

    Watch live stream. More Information 
  • The new NIH Policy on Data Management and Sharing goes into effect on January 25, 2023. How should researchers prepare for changes in proposal development, data collection, and depositing data? How will the policy impact research, including new pre- and post-award engagement with NIH repositories, and updated timelines for data preparation and depositing?

     

    On September 30th from 1:30pm-2:30pm join Brown University’s Arielle Nitenson, Assistant Director of Research Integrity, & Andrew Creamer, Science Data Specialist, for an educational seminar regarding this new policy.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Sep
    30
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Sep
    29
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Michael Silver, Associate Professor - Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute and School of Optometry - University of California, Berkeley

    Title: Spatial attention, visual perception, and endogenous brain activity

    Abstract: Spatial attention improves performance on visual tasks, increases neural responses to attended stimuli, and reduces correlated noise in visual cortical neurons. In addition to being visually responsive, many retinotopic visual cortical areas exhibit very slow (<0.1 Hz) endogenous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) signals. I will present recent findings from our group that relate the amplitude of these fluctuations to behavioral measures of attentional suppression in human subjects. In another project, we used fMRI to characterize attentional modulation of visual responses across the visual field in a large number of topographically-organized cortical areas and found that different cortical areas exhibit distinct patterns of attentional modulation as a function of eccentricity. These patterns may reflect separate roles of attention in form and object perception and in planning motor responses to attended locations. Finally, I will describe effects of spatial attention on the location and size of voxel receptive fields, including modulation by hemisphere and handedness. These hemispheric asymmetries suggest potential mechanisms for the behavioral deficits that are associated with hemispatial neglect.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    28

    Carney Institute Seminar: “Dissecting Interaction Codes: Engineering connexin proteins for neural circuit modulation and beyond”

     

    Elizabeth Ransey, Ph.D.
    Postdoctoral Scientist, Dzirasa Lab
    Duke University

    The coordination of activity between brain cells is a key determinant of neural circuit function in both normal physiology and disease states; nevertheless, methodologies capable of selectively regulating distinct circuits without affecting the surrounding context of brain activity remain sparce. Here, I discuss how I addressed this
    limitation by developing the components of a novel electrical synapse capable of synchronizing neurons by rationally engineering two gap junction proteins (connexins).


    Specifically, I utilized protein mutagenesis, a novel in vitro assay of connexin docking, and computational modeling of connexin hemichannel interactions, to identify the structural motif that defines connexin docking specificity of Morone americana (white perch fish) connexin34.7 (Cx34.7) and connexin35 (Cx35). I then rationally designed this motif to generate Cx34.7 and Cx35 hemichannels that dock with each other, but not with themselves nor other major connexins expressed in the human central nervous system. The functionality of these hemichannels was validated in vivo within distinct neuronal circuits of two live animal models. In Caenorhabditis elegans (worms), the expression of the engineered GJs was sufficient to recode a learned behavioral preference. Additionally, I demonstrated in vivo functionality in mice using two experimental paradigms: phase-amplitude coupling in a prelimbic microcircuit and the modulation of a stress adapted behavior via expression across a long-range monosynaptic projection. Thus, I established a genetically encoded, translational approach, ‘Long-term integration of Circuits using connexins’ (LinCx), for context- precise circuit-editing with unprecedented spatiotemporal specificity. Ultimately, I highlight how the strategies employed and methodologies developed to establish LinCx will contribute to the further development of next generation neural modulatory tools and novel therapeutics for Cx-associated pathologies.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Sep
    23
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Health Informatics Seminar Series: What is Biomedical Informatics?

    Brown University Medical Education Building (Alpert Medical School), Rm 275

    Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics

    Health Informatics Seminar Series: What is Biomedical Informatics?

    Elizabeth Chen, PhD, Carsten Eickhoff, PhD

    Hamish Fraser, MBCHB, MSc, & Neil Sarkar, PhD, MLIS

     
    BCBI Research More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    23
    12:00pm EDT

    Therapeutic Sciences Seminar Series: Colin Smith, PhD - Wesleyan University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Characterizing aberrant energy landscapes in computationally designed and naturally occurring proteins

    Abstract: Proteins are in constant motion and interconvert between different conformational states. The function of proteins often depends on them folding to very particular structures and avoiding aberrant conformations which may have deleterious or toxic effects. Several projects addressing this critical issue in protein biophysics will be highlighted including work to optimize the function of computationally designed fluorescent proteins and understand the maturation of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) related protein SOD1: 1) The recent creation of mini Fluorescence Activating Proteins (mFAPs) capable of binding to and activating the florescence of a small-molecule chromophore is a prime example of the power of de novo protein design. The primary hypothesis for how these proteins function is that they keep the chromophore ligand in a planar conformation long enough to fluoresce. We have developed a computational protocol to predict mFAP rigidity/fluorescence and are developing methods for optimizing rigidity through rational design. We are also using this as a model system to understand how proteins stabilize small molecules in particular conformations, an essential aspect of enzyme catalysis. 2) ALS, otherwise known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, affects approximately 6 people in 100,000 annually. It affects motor neurons, gradually leading to a loss of muscle control and often death. While SOD1 was the earliest protein linked to the disease nearly 30 years ago, the mechanism by which it causes ALS is still unknown. An emerging hypothesis is that non-native interactions involving immature forms of the protein are disease-causing. We are using alchemical free energy simulations to study how several ALS-associated mutations affect SOD1 maturation. This enables the calculation of how mutation perturbs the SOD1 free energy landscape, with the goal of helping to uncover the disease mechanism and eventually develop treatments.

    Colin Smith, PhD earned his BA from New York University and PhD from the University of California San Francisco, where his research focused on protein design and developing new methods for computationally modeling protein flexibility. He was a postdoctoral scholar at the Max Plank Institute for Biophysical Chemistry. There he studied how proteins move at the atomic level and use that to regulate their activity. His lab at Wesleyan University now studies protein structure and dynamics using a combination of computer simulation and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. He is particularly interested in optimizing the dynamics of computationally designed proteins and understanding how mutations allosterically affect the functions of natural proteins.

    More Information 
  • Sep
    23
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Sep
    22
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Mary Peterson, PhD; Univ. of Arizona

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    22
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Room 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Lakshmi Govindarajan- PhD Student - CLPS Department, Brown University

    Title: The Representation-Utilization Dichotomy in Deep Reinforcement Learning Agents

    Abstract: Humans learn by interacting with their environments and perceiving the outcomes of their actions. A landmark in artificial intelligence has been the development of deep reinforcement learning (dRL) models capable of doing the same in video games, rivaling humans by learning to perceive and behave directly from images. However, it remains unclear whether the successes of dRL models reflect advances in visual representation learning, the effectiveness of reinforcement learning algorithms at discovering better policies for decision-making, or both. To address this, we systematically modify visual and credit assignment challenges in the Procgen benchmark, an extensive suite of parameterized video games. We discover a computational taxonomy of Procgen games and demonstrate that the most efficient way to develop performant agents is to imbue them with biologically-inspired mechanisms that facilitate visual perception.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    21
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Stefon Flego- Postdoctoral Research Associate- CLPS Department - Brown University

    Title: Capturing cross-linguistic variation in the phonotactic behavior of consonant-glide-vowel sequences

    Abstract: This research examines the phonotactic behavior of sound sequences in which a consonant (C) is released into a high vocoid (G), which is in turn followed by a tautosyllabic vowel (V), hereafter represented CGV, e.g. [kwɛ] in quest, or [mju] in mute. As CGV sequences are exceedingly common cross-linguistically, phonologists and field linguists working with understudied languages are often tasked with dividing them into strings of sound categories as a first step in developing a language’s sound profile. However, there are at least at least three possible ways to discretize such sequences: 1) as a consonant with secondary vocalic articulation followed by a vowel, e.g. /gw/ + /a/, 2) as a sequence of consonant followed by a diphthong, e.g. /g/ + /u͡a/, or as a sequence of three separate categories, e.g. /g/ + /w/ + /a/. In other words, the G portion of a CGV sequence may be considered closely affiliated with the preceding C, the following V, or independent of both. As the speech signal itself does not usually provide evidence for one of the three schemas, other factors often implicitly or explicitly influence analysts’ choices, e.g. familiarity with transcription practices of related or neighboring languages, existing orthographic conventions for the language, native speaker intuition and psycholinguistic evidence, or perhaps most commonly, phonotactic distributions. The current research focuses on the latter, and introduces a gradient measure of CG and GV affiliation that can be generated using word frequency data. The metric is an entropic Jaccard similarity measure, which captures the degree to which C and G (or G and V) predict one another. Using phonotactic frequencies taken from the combined XPF and Crúbadán corpora, several languages will be presented as case studies to illustrate how this metric captures phonotactic variation in CGV sequences. For many languages, the Jaccard similarity measures align well with existing descriptions of their sound system, but for some languages they point to different CG and GV affiliations than have been described.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    “Molecular and Functional Analysis of Epilepsy” MCB Faculty Seminar Presented by Judy Liu, M.D., Ph.D.

    70 Ship Street, Rm LMM107

    “Molecular and Functional Analysis of Epilepsy”

    MCB Faculty Seminar Presented by Judy Liu, M.D., Ph.D.

    Wednesday, September 21, 2022

    10:00-11:00 AM

    LMM 107

    and via Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97896052783Judy Liu Seminar

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    20
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Thomas F. Anders Seminar: Mark Blumberg, Ph.D.

    Development Needs Sleep and Sleep Needs Development

     

    This lecture begins with a historical overview of the concept of instinct and how the study of sleep fits into that history. The developmental significance of sleep is then reviewed, particularly with regard to the fact that humans and other animals sleep the most in early life. Solving this mystery requires a focus on the features of infant sleep and how they relate to the functional requirements of developing animals. The speaker’s research on the contributions of REM sleep to the rodent developing sensorimotor system is then reviewed, and the role of sleep in developing the distinction between self and other is discussed. The lecture ends with a review of recent research on sleep in human infants and its implications for understanding typical and atypical development.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Sep
    19
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 330

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Idea Blitz!!

    Students, Postdocs, and Faculty interested in Development are all invited to present ideas for research - either in the form of a completed or underway project or in the form of an idea that is being actively considered or operationalized. Presenters will have 5 minutes to discuss their idea with at most 2 Powerpoint slides.

    This is a good way to get to know what others are working on and a good way to get your ideas out. Anyone interested in development is encouraged to attend and/or present. Even if you have never worked on a developmental study before, if you have ideas that might translate to work with children, this would be a good way to spread the word.

    Please contact Professor David Sobel if you’d like to present.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    16
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Dissertation Defense - Daniel Scott

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    All Are Welcome!
    Please try to attend in person!

    Speaker: Daniel Scott, Brown University

    Title: Credit Assignment by Three-Factor Plasticity

    Advisor: Professor Michael Frank

    ~ zoom information sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend virtually, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours in advance.

     

    More Information 
  • Sep
    16
    2:00pm - 2:45pm EDT

    Social Cog and Cognition Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Presentations from Social Cognitive Science & Cognition first-year PhD students.
    A series of short 8 minutes talks
    Speakers: Including but not limited to:
    Yi-Hsin Su
    Daantje de Bruin
    Samantha Reisman

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    16
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Sep
    16
    Virtual
    8:00am - 5:00pm EDT

    Rhode Island Stroke Symposium

    Zoom Meeting Platform

    Live Webinar via Zoom
    Registration Fee: $50 physicians | $25 non-physicians

    The Rhode Island Stroke Symposium seeks to integrate the most advanced research and medical knowledge in the treatment of stroke and provide a forum for dissemination of that knowledge by advanced practice professionals, stroke neurologists and registered nurses at Rhode Island Hospital. The purpose of the program is to provide an update on state-of-the-art acute stroke treatment as practiced at a Comprehensive Stroke Center.

    Rhode Island Hospital is the oldest Comprehensive Stroke Center in New England and a high-volume center that provides care for patients with acute ischemic stroke, intraparenchymal hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this program, participants will be exposed to a variety of disciplines including neuro critical care, stroke neurology, neuro interventional radiology, advanced practice professionals, registered nurses and other members of the stroke team at Rhode Island Hospital. The goal of the activity is to enhance the care of the stroke patient in Rhode Island and the wider New England region.

    For symposium registrants unable to participate live the entire day, a recording will be available for viewing and credit claiming for 30 days.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Sep
    15
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Ziv Williams, PhD; Harvard Medical School

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    15
    Virtual and In Person
    2:30pm - 4:30pm EDT

    Dissertation Defense of Biostatistics Doctoral Candidate Xiaoyu Wei

    School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Rm 245

    Biostatistics Doctoral Candidate Xiaoyu Wei

    Incorporating Biological Knowledge into the Statistical Analysis for Genomic Studies

    Please join us as Biostatistics doctoral candidate Xiaoyu Wei defends his thesis, “Incorporating Biological Knowledge into the Statistical Analysis for Genomic Studies.”

    The development of high-throughput sequencing technology enables a deeper understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms by performing statistical analyses of genomic data. Most traditional statistical approaches treat all genes identically and independently, and overlook the complicated relationship among genes, which are regulated through biological pathways. Functional genomic studies have elucidated such relationships, and the information is now stored in many public databases. Utilizing these known biological knowledge could potentially improve the statistical analysis and the power for biological discoveries. In this dissertation, we address incorporating biological knowledge into the statistical analysis of high-throughput sequencing data from three different aspects. First, we focus on the differential expression analysis in complex study designs and repeated measures. We provide a new perspective on detecting differential expression in these situations with visualizations. We also propose a weighting approach to address heteroscedasticity issues in genomic studies to improve power. Identifying differentially expressed genes may not be the ultimate goal, and researchers are often interested in learning about phenotypic outcomes. Therefore, in the second chapter, we investigate the mediation mechanisms of genes between the treatment and the outcome. A network-constrained regularization is applied to the variable se- lection in the mediator models. Finally, to further understand the relative strength of association within the networks, we employed a deep learning model, variational autoencoders, to learn the latent networks in scRNA-Seq data. Constraints are imposed on the neural network structure to reflect the biological knowledge. The original high-dimensional input data can be compressed into a lower-dimensional representation with biological interpretations. The performances of proposed methods are evaluated through simulation studies, and applications to high-throughput sequencing data are provided to demonstrate the use of proposed methods.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Sep
    15
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Cassandra Engstrom- 1st Year PhD Student, CLPS Department, Brown

    Title: Individual differences in spatial navigation strategy under multimodal conflict

    Abstract: Maintaining one’s sense of position and direction in space can be achieved by following one of two strategies: path integration, where self-motion cues drive continual updates, or the use of an internal map.
    This master’s thesis examined whether humans prefer either strategy by placing the sensory modalities that serve them in conflict. Subjects were trained to navigate to different “dead ends” in a virtual city and orient towards their starting point in darkness. On select (“incongruent”) trials, subjects’ virtual trajectories were mirrored relative to their physical movements. During subsequent analysis, participants were grouped depending on whether they consciously detected this discrepancy. While no subject adhered to one strategy throughout the experiment, all exhibited biases. Those who were sensitive to the conflict (group 1) more heavily weighted landmark-based memory. They were also more accurate in congruent trials, performed uniformly regardless of pathway shape, and were more prone to cue-discounting under conflict. Those who were insensitive to the conflict (group 2) depended more on path integration, although they tended to average between modalities. Their performance also varied depending on trajectory shape, and they were less accurate in control conditions.
    This study suggests that humans, unlike other mammals, differ in the strategy they fall back on when reconciling spatial cue conflicts. Strategy preference was also associated with specific traits, such as baseline accuracy, the effects of trajectory geometry, or whether multimodal discrepancy triggers modality discounting. These findings provide insight into the ‘system properties’ of the different computational approaches that support spatial navigation.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    14
    1:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ben Falandays- postdoc, Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences Dept. - Brown

    Title: The emergence of cultural attractors: How dynamic populations of learners achieve collective cognitive alignment.

    Abstract: When a population exhibits collective cognitive alignment, such that group members tend to perceive, remember, and reproduce information in similar ways, the features of socially transmitted variants (i.e., artifacts, behaviors) may converge over time towards culture-specific equilibria points, often called cultural attractors. Because cognition may be plastic, shaped through experience with the cultural products of others, collective cognitive alignment and stable cultural attractors cannot always be taken for granted, but little is known about how these patterns first emerge and stabilize in initially uncoordinated populations. We propose that stable cultural attractors can emerge from general principles of human categorization and communication. We present a model of cultural attractor dynamics, which extends a model of unsupervised category learning in individuals to a multiagent setting wherein learners provide the training input to each other. Agents in our populations spontaneously align their cognitive category structures, producing emergent cultural attractor points. We highlight three interesting behaviors exhibited by our model: (1) noise enhances the stability of cultural category structures; (2) short ‘critical’ periods of learning early in life enhance stability; and (3) larger populations produce more stable but less complex attractor landscapes, and cliquish network structure can mitigate the latter effect. These results may shed light on how collective cognitive alignment is achieved in the absence of shared, innate cognitive attractors, which we suggest is important to the capacity for cumulative cultural evolution.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    13
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    70 Ship Street, Rm LMM107

    PAARF

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Sep
    12
    12:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

    MRI Users Meeting

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm Innovation Zone

    We are pleased to announce that we will be resuming in-person MRI Users Meetings (with a hybrid Zoom option), with our first meeting on September 12, at 12 p.m.

    We will present an update on the current activities and resources at the MRF, with a focus on XNAT, data transfer, and management systems. There will be an opportunity for community feedback and questions about any MRF-related issues you may have.

    Lunch will be provided!

    Please use the link below to register before 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 8. We look forward to seeing you.

    Click to register by September 8 More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Sep
    12
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mariel Goddu - Postdoc - Harvard University

    Title: Play: A computational perspective

    Abstract : Play presents a puzzle. Why do animals engage in time- and calorie-expensive behavior that serves no immediate survival purpose (and often even increases risk)? Previous work has suggested many potential benefits for play––e.g., that it enables agents to practice problem-solving, making predictions, or other species-specific behaviors. Here, we outline a novel theoretical perspective that aims to unify these prior proposals under the notion of “empowerment,” a term from artificial intelligence that references an agent’s ability to leverage control in the environment. I present the results of 5 experiments (3 completed, 2 ongoing) investigating empirical predictions that fall out of this theoretical framework and discuss directions for future research.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sep
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Chair’s Invited Seminar in Statistics | Ani Eloyan, Ph.D.

    School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Rm 245

    The Chair’s Invited Seminar in Statistics is designed to showcase outstanding research being conducted by faculty in the Department of Biostatistics at Brown, and to provide an opportunity for the larger Brown community to learn about the work being conducted in our department. It will be delivered each year by a current faculty member or affiliate of the Department of Biostatistics.

    Talk Title: Imaging and Clinical Biomarker Estimation in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Abstract: Estimation of biomarkers related to disease classification and modeling of its progression is essential for treatment development for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). The task is more daunting for characterizing relatively rare AD subtypes such as the early-onset (AD) and others. In this talk, I will describe the Longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Study (LEADS) intending to collect and publicly distribute clinical, imaging, genetic, and other types of data from people with EOAD, as well as cognitively normal (CN) controls and people with early-onset non-amyloid positive (EOnonAD) dementias. I will discuss factor-analytic methods for estimation of clinical biomarkers of AD and their use for modeling differences in longitudinal trajectories of clinical deterioration between CN, EOAD, and EOnonAD groups in LEADS. Finally, I will discuss our work in leveraging magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography data to characterize distributions of white matter hyperintensities in people with EOAD and to obtain imaging-based biomarkers of disease trajectories of AD subtypes.

    *Light refreshments will be served

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    9
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Sep
    8
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Erin Calipari, PhD; Vanderbilt Medical School

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Title:  A Novel Framework for the Role of Dopamine in Learning and Memory

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • This lecture will be presented by Liam Koehn, a PhD student at the University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    More Information 
  • Sep
    2
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Aug
    31
    11:00am EDT

    MCBGP Thesis Defense: Yuliya Nemtsova

    185 Meeting Street, Rm SFH 220
  • Aug
    29
    Virtual and In Person
    1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Thesis Defense: Learning Task-Specific Grasps (Matthew Corsaro)

    115 Waterman St, Rm CIT Room 477

    Grasping is one of the most important open problems in robotics; the very point of a robot is to exert force on the world to achieve a goal, and most such exertions require the robot to execute a grasp first. For a home robot to be effective, it must load a dishwasher with breakable plates; for a repair robot to be effective, it must operate tools; for a caretaker robot to be effective, it must perform chores for those with illnesses. All of these activities require manipulating objects, which in turn requires grasping them effectively. Additionally, to be useful, the robot must be able to perform these tasks on objects it has never seen before, in applications where manipulation failures can be very costly. Deploying a robot to such an environment, where exact operating conditions are unknown and vary between instances, is therefore challenging because systems and algorithms developed in a lab may perform poorly when introduced to a novel environment. A robot must quickly learn to manipulate new objects it encounters using limited prior knowledge.

    In this thesis, I examine robot grasping in three contexts. First, I propose a general grasp detection system that enables a multi-finger gripper to use multiple types of grasps to pick objects of varying sizes from dense clutter. For example, precision grasps are necessary for precisely picking small objects from the surface of a table using fingertips, while power grasps stably hold large objects by enveloping them with the gripper’s fingers. Given a visual representation of the scene, the system proposes a set of potential candidate grasp poses. These poses are evaluated using a neural network model that takes as input point clouds centered at a grasp pose and returns the probabilities that a grasp of each type would succeed at the given pose. This system is trained using a dataset generated in simulation and evaluated on a real robot. Explicitly modeling grasp type boosted the system’s object removal rate by 8.5% over the highest performing baseline.

    Next, I propose a framework for specializing a generic grasp detector to a task-oriented grasp detector. A generic grasp detector detects a stable grasp, which is sufficient for picking up an object but may not be sufficient for manipulating it. For example, a stable grasp very close to the fulcrum of a door handle will make it hard to turn, while grasping far from the fulcrum will make it easier. A task-oriented grasp detector is a classifier that predicts which grasp poses serve as initial states that enable a given manipulation controller to complete a task. As these classifiers are instance dependent, they cannot be trained in simulation and transferred to the real world. Instead, they must be trained directly in the task for which they are required. To this end, I introduce the Augmented Task-Oriented Grasp Detection Network (ATOG), which learns to predict which grasp poses allow a robot to successfully manipulate an object from a single-digit-sized training set. ATOG achieves this via a deep architecture built on an existing network that has been pre-trained to predict general grasp stability. Given a partial point cloud containing the local geometry around a grasp pose and the pose’s relation to the object, ATOG predicts whether the grasp will enable the robot to successfully execute a motor skill. I evaluate ATOG in four simulated domains; it outperforms the nearest baseline by up to 6.5%.

    Finally, I propose a learning algorithm that learns a task-oriented grasp detector for a given task while simultaneously learning the manipulation policy that the grasp must enable. Learning a policy to control a robot to perform a specific task is difficult because of the large action space and potentially sparse reward signal. This learning process can be simplified by bootstrapping the policy with a grasp controller and learning after a grasp has been executed. For instance, a robot would execute a grasp on the back side of the handle of a hammer, then learn a control policy that raised the hammer over a nail and struck the head down onto the nail. Though bootstrapping with a grasp controller simplifies the policy learning process, a task-oriented grasp classifier still must learn which grasp poses enable the policy to succeed. This joint learning problem is challenging due to the entanglement between the task-oriented grasp detector and the manipulation policy, which changes over time as it is learned; selecting different grasps changes the initial states of the manipulation policy, while a grasp pose that one policy fails the task from could enable an updated policy to complete the task. This system overcomes a key obstacle to robot learning with grasping, enabling a robot to quickly learn both how to manipulate an object and where to grasp the object to begin the manipulation. With this system, a robot could be deployed to a novel environment and learn to manipulate novel objects within a small number of attempts.

    This event is online: https://brown.zoom.us/j/94293621133

    Host: Prof. George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • Aug
    26
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Aug
    19
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Honeycomb Workshop: Converting a jsPsych 7 Task to Honeycomb and Deploying with Firebase

    164 Angell Street, Rm Carney Innovation Hub, 4th Floor

    RSVP for the event

    Honeycomb is a template for reproducible psychophysiological tasks for clinic, laboratory and home use. In this workshop we will continue to build our understanding of Honeycomb. If you attended our previous workshop, “Honeycomb Workshop: Getting Started”, you’ll be able to extend the project you started there.

    This workshop is the second part of a series where we will focus on developing a task, generating data and extracting that data. We will focus on:
    - Updating the jsPsych task for a new task
    - Deploy the new task to the web using firebase
    - Generate the response data in firebase, our database
    - Download the response data from firebase onto our local computer

    More Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Aug
    19
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • “Corticostriatal circuit defects in Hoxb8 mouse model of repetitive behaviors”

    Naveen Nagarajan, PhD
    Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah

    Abstract: Dr. Naveen Nagarajan has a longstanding interest in identifying mechanisms underlying microglia-neuronal interaction in neural circuit function and circuit specific behaviors. Dr. Nagarajan in Dr. Capecchi’s lab identified a novel neural circuit that controls repetitive behavior in Hoxb8 mouse model of OCD-type repetitive grooming behavior. Hoxb8 gene is exclusively expressed in 30% of brain microglia. Notably, the loss of function of Hoxb8 gene that leads to repetitive grooming behavior results in corticostriatal circuit defects. A deeper analysis within the corticostriatal circuit led to surprise findings where Hoxb8 microglia within specific sub regions of the corticostriatal circuit are optogenetically active and generates site specific behavior upon microglia activation. More recent experiments have revealed that Hoxb8 microglia utilizes calcium signaling as a mechanistic way to communicate with neurons within corticostriatal circuit. The studies provide insights into how proper function of microglia is essential for maintaining a healthy neural circuit required for the optimal behavioral function and how genetic defects in microglia could alter neural circuit function and the behavioral output.

    Bio: Naveen Nagarajan, PhD., is Postdoctoral associate in the laboratory of Dr. Mario Capecchi at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah. His work is focused on investigating the neural circuit and cellular mechanisms underlying microglia-neuronal interaction in repetitive behaviors using multidisciplinary neuroscience approaches that include genetics, behavioral, optogenetics, miniature fluorescence endoscopy, electrophysiological and computational approaches. Dr. Nagarajan received his PhD in Chemistry with specialization in Biophysics and Neuroscience from the Department of Membrane Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical chemistry, Goettingen, Germany under the able guidance of Dr. Christian Rosenmund and Dr. Erwin Neher. He did a postdoctoral fellowship in cellular neuroscience in Mark Bear’s lab at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT and systems neuroscience at the Keck Center for Integrative Neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco with Dr. Michael Merzenich. He joined Dr. Mario Capecchi’s laboratory as a Postdoctoral fellow in 2009 to investigate the role of Hoxb8 gene function in repetitive, anxiety and social behavioral functions in Hoxb8 mutant mouse model of repetitive behaviors. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and whole brain imaging techniques in conjunction with electron microscopy and electrophysiological approaches, Dr. Nagarajan discovered corticostriatal circuit defect in Hoxb8 mutants. Unlike mutations in other neuronal genes that lead to repetitive behaviors, Hoxb8 gene is exclusively expressed in 30% of the brain microglia. Using optogenetics and miniature endofluorescence imaging techniques the team for the first time discovered that the optogenetic stimulation of Hoxb8 microglia could induce repetitive grooming behavior in a control mouse. This resulted in a paradigm shift on how brain utilizes unique microglial function and capabilities to generate specific behaviors in circuit dependent and cell specific fashion. These studies provide a novel research direction and insights to unravel the mechanisms of microglia-neuronal communication in repetitive behaviors. The communicative signals between the brain’s immune cell and neural circuit is the first of its kind that will lead to the elucidation of how mutations in immune cell, the response of the neural circuit and the brain microenvironment directly impacts the cognitive, emotional and social function of brain in healthy and disease states.

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title: Identification of novel neuronal subpopulations within the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus

    Advisor: Dr. Mario A. Penzo, NIH

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Aug
    12
    11:00am EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Seth Akers-Campbell

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220 Marcuvitz

    Title:  Cortical Dynamics for Active Vision

    Advisor:  Dr. Michael Paradiso

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Aug
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    10:00am - 1:00pm EDT

    School of Engineering Dissertation Defense

    Engineering Research Center, Rm 125

    Ph.D. candidate Sijun Niu will present his dissertation defense: “Finite Element and Neural Networks for Flaw Characterization and Plasticity Models.”

    The presiding officer will be Professor Vikas Srivastava.

    More Information 
  • Aug
    9
    Virtual
    12:00pm EDT

    CIRTL Information Session

    Are you interested in joining a national network of colleges and universities aiming to improve evidence-based teaching and learning through graduate and postdoc training? The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) seeks to enhance excellence in STEM undergraduate education through development of a national faculty committed to implementing and advancing evidence-based teaching practices for diverse learners. CIRTL uses graduate education as the leverage point to develop a national STEM faculty committed to implementing and advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences as part of successful professional careers. Please register for the Zoom link. If you are a graduate student, postdoc, or administrator interested in learning more about CIRTL at Brown but not able to attend on August 9, please fill out this form or contact Logan Gin at [email protected].

    More Information 
  • Aug
    5
    11:00am - 1:00pm EDT

    2022 Summer Research Symposium

    Sayles Hall, Rm Auditorium

    The 2022 Summer Research Symposium, sponsored by the College, will be held on Thursday, August 4 andFriday, August 5, from 11:00am – 1:00pm in Sayles Hall.

    Undergraduate research and curricular projects conducted throughout this summer will be on display for review and questions. All are welcome!

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Research
  • Aug
    5
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Aug
    4
    11:00am - 1:00pm EDT

    2022 Summer Research Symposium

    Sayles Hall, Rm Auditorium

    The 2022 Summer Research Symposium, sponsored by the College, will be held on Thursday, August 4 andFriday, August 5, from 11:00am – 1:00pm in Sayles Hall.

    Undergraduate research and curricular projects conducted throughout this summer will be on display for review and questions. All are welcome!

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Research
  • Jul
    29
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Jul
    28
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Joseph Heffner

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    All Welcome!
    Please try to attend in person!

    Speaker: Joseph Heffner

    Title: A generalizable framework for measuring emotion’s role in social decision-making

    Advisor: Oriel FeldmanHall

    Location: Hybrid
    Friedman Auditorium with zoom option

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend virtually, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours ahead of the event.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jul
    26
    11:00am EDT

    CAAS Research Talk

    121 South Main Street, Rm 331

    Join us for a CAAS Research Talk at the Brown School of Public Health on Tuesday, July 26th! 

    Tuesday, July 26, 2022:

    E. Jennifer Edelman, MD, MHS, AAHIVS - “Addressing the Intersection between Substance Use and HIV: Leveraging Interdisciplinary Collaborations to Move the Needle”

    Hybrid Format

    11 am - 12 pm | 121 S Main St. | Rm 331

    ZOOM Link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/93563784824

    More Information 
  • Jul
    25
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CAAS Research Talk

    Virtual
    Join us for a CAAS Research Talk at the Brown School of Public Health on Monday, July 25th at 12 pm via Zoom
    Monday, July 25, 2022:
    William W. Stoops, PhD - Using the Human Laboratory to Identify Treatments and Treatment Targets for Cocaine Use Disorder”
    Virtual Format
    12 pm - 1 pm
    More Information 
  • Jul
    22
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Jul
    21
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Special Seminar: “Sleep, Light Exposure, and Cognition”- Molly Zimmerman, Ph.D.

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Molly Zimmerman

    Professor of Psychology at Fordham University

     

    Please note that this is a hybrid seminar in Marcuvitz Auditorium, Sydney Frank Hall, Room 220, through Zoom. Please email [email protected] for the Zoom link.

     

    Bio:

    Molly Zimmerman received her PhD in clinical psychology with a focus in neuropsychology from the University of Cincinnati. She completed her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship, both with a focus in clinical neuropsychology, at Brown University. She is currently on faculty in the department of psychology at Fordham University in the Bronx, NY where she enjoys teaching undergraduate and graduate courses and working with students. Her primary research interests span cognition and sleep disturbances, cognitive and neuroimaging correlates of sports-related mild traumatic brain injury, and the clinical neuropsychological assessment of dementia and preclinical dementia.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jul
    19
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Thesis Defense: Dmitrijs Celinskis

    Building for Environmental Research and Teaching (BERT), Rm 130

    Dmitrijs Celinskis

    Multisite and Multimodal Imaging Methods for Studying Spinal, Brain and Vascular Dynamics

    Advisors: David Borton, Ph.D. & Christopher Moore, Ph.D.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Jul
    15
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • PLM Works in Progress Seminar Series

    Learn More More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Jul
    12
    11:30am - 12:30pm EDT

    CAAS Research Talk

    121 South Main Street, Rm 331
    Join us for an upcoming CAAS Research Talk at the Brown School of Public Health on Tuesday, July 12th at 11:30am in Room 331.
     
    This talk will be held in Hybrid Format - see below for details and Zoom link to join virtually:
    Tuesday, July 12, 2022:

    Sarah W. Feldstein Ewing, PhD - “Time for a Paradigm Shift: The Adolescent brain in Addiction Treatment”

    11:30 am - 12:30 pm | 121 S Main St. | Rm 331
    More Information 
  • Jul
    8
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Please join the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Series for a lecture by Heiner Fruehauf, Founding Professor of the College of Classical Chinese Medicine at National University of Natural Medicine, on The Transformation of Chinese Medicine in the Age of Scientific Materialism: Overview of a Journey. This lecture and discussion will be held on July 7th from 7 - 8:30 pm, EDT.

    This is a virtual event, so please register at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScgIiADoRsgsQBF96GZEhs22omecfYgki-SmdANFTTAHD-OmQ/viewforms in order to receive a Zoom link. You will also find an abstract of Prof. Fruehauf’s lecture when you register.
    More Information 
  • Jul
    1
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Jun
    27
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    BrainExPo Seminar Series: “Artisans of Brain Wiring: neuron-microglia selective crosstalk in brain wiring and function”

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220
    Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Emilia Favuzzi, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute.

    Abstract

    Microglia, the primary brain macrophages, regulate a plethora of events that impact the organization of neural circuits, including synapse fine-tuning. Neuronal synapses exhibit a striking diversity that reflects a specialized molecular architecture. I have explored whether the interactions between microglia and synapses are similarly specialized. Using inhibitory synapses as a point of comparison, I identified a subset of microglia that is receptive to GABA and selectively remodels inhibitory synapses. Perturbing these specialized microglia causes long-lasting defects in inhibitory connectivity that lead to behavioral abnormalities, without impacting excitatory synapses. These findings demonstrate that specialized microglia differentially engage with specific synapse types and highlight a critical function of the selective communication between neuronal and microglia types in brain wiring.
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Tyler Barnes-Diana

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    All Are Welcome!

    Speaker: Tyler Barnes-Diana

    Title: Evaluating and improving models of visual perceptual learning

    Advisor: Takeo Watanabe

    Location: Hybrid
    Friedman Auditorium with zoom option

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend virtually, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours ahead of the event.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jun
    24
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Educators in academic medicine are driven to share their work, to disseminate ideas and findings, to influence practice, and to attain professional advancement. Workshops and didactic presentations are two common vehicles for spreading your message at conferences or here at your home institution. But a growing number of venues for giving local, regional, and national presentations means greater competition and higher standards for cross-institution collaboration and facilitation of active learning. As a presenter, you must be able to communicate your vision succinctly and compellingly to get your proposal accepted. We are all far too busy to keep writing proposals only to have them rejected time and time again! In this faculty development workshop, our education experts will identify the common required elements of calls for proposals, and discuss tips to make your proposal stand out from the crowd.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. By the end of this activity, participants will be able to…
    2. Identify common required elements of calls for proposals, possible presentation types, and venues to disseminate their education work.
    3. Recognize common mistakes in proposal submissions.
    4. Enact a variety of techniques to construct clear and compelling proposals to maximize the chances of acceptance.

    REGISTER HERE!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Jun
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    3:30pm EDT

    Ken Miller’s Retirement Celebration

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Please join us for Ken Miller's Retirement Celebration in honor of 42 years at Brown University!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction
  • Jun
    17
    1:00pm - 1:50pm EDT

    BigAI Talk: Correctness and Understandability of Model Interpretability Methods (Yilun Zhou, MIT)

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    To watch virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/98393578960

    Abstract: Neural networks are typically considered black-boxes, but their deployments in high stakes scenarios require human understanding of their inner workings. Thus, many interpretability methods have been proposed to illustrate their reasoning process. Nonetheless, recent empirical evidence casts doubt on their effectiveness. In this talk, starting from this observed deficiency, I focus on two aspects that might explain it. First, I talk about the correctness of these methods, or whether the generated explanations can faithfully reflect the true model decision making process. Second, I talk about their understandability, or whether users can reliably understand the generated explanations, even if they are correct. On both fronts, I demonstrate how careful evaluations can reveal hidden properties about the interpretability methods and models themselves, which can further guide the efforts to improve them.

    Yilun Zhou is a fifth-year Ph.D. student at MIT EECS, advised by Prof. Julie Shah. His research broadly aims to help humans better understand machines that make important decisions in the world. Specifically, he develops models, algorithms and evaluations in interpretable machine learning, with particular preference on model agnosticity, and apply them in diverse domains including natural language processing, computer vision and robotics. Ultimately, he envisions a world where humans and machines can effortlessly communicate, coordinate and collaborate with each other.

    Host: George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • Jun
    17
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Register now for the Fourth Annual Dr. Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars, June 16-17, an inclusive in-person event showcasing the work of molecular life scientists from underrepresented groups. The conference will conclude with a joint afternoon session with the New England Regional Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Conference. 

    Download the full program.

    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Register now for the Fourth Annual Dr. Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars, June 16-17, an inclusive in-person event showcasing the work of molecular life scientists from underrepresented groups. The conference will conclude on June 17th with a joint session with the New England Regional Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Conference. 

    Download the full conference program.

    Register now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Jun
    15
    Virtual
    2:30pm - 4:00pm EDT

    COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    Walk-in office hours for the <a href=”https://cbc.brown.edu” id=”ow2878”>Computational Biology Core</a>.

    More Information 
  • Jun
    14
    12:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

    Carney Summer BBQ

    Pembroke Green

    Save the Date

    Tuesday, June 14, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.

    Pembroke Green

    Please RSVP

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Jun
    14
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am EDT

    COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    Walk-in office hours for the <a href=”https://cbc.brown.edu” id=”ow2878”>Computational Biology Core</a>.

    More Information 
  • Jun
    13
    Virtual and In Person
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: James Wilmott III

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    All Are Welcome!

    Speaker: James P. Wilmott III

    Title: Sensorimotor Learning of Depth Estimation for Perception and Action

    Advisor: Fulvio Domini

    Location: Hybrid
    Friedman Auditorium with zoom option

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend virtually, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours ahead of the event.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jun
    10
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Register now for our upcoming CRISP Symposium: Suicide Prevention: Connecting Research and Clinical Care in Rhode Island to be held on the Brown University campus on Friday, June 10th. Brian Ahmedani, Director of the Center for Health Policy & Health Services Research, Henry Ford Health, and Cheryl King, Professor, Director of the Youth and Young Adult Depression and Suicide Prevention Research Program at the University of Michigan will be joining us as our keynote speakers. The event is free, but will be limited to the first 100 to register. Click on the link to register.

    Suicide Prevention Symposium Tickets More Information 
  • Jun
    10
    8:00am - 4:30pm EDT

    Symposium: “Emerging Areas of Science”

    Warren Alpert Medical School

    The 2022 Emerging Areas of Science Symposium will be held at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University on June 10, 2022. This year’s event will be held in a hybrid format, allowing both virtual and in-person attendance.

    The theme of the 2022 symposium is “Health Disparities in Clinical and Translational Research”. The symposium aims to educate and engage biomedical investigators in RI regarding the importance of engaging diverse populations in the planning and the execution of clinical and translational research, with the ultimate goals to reduce health disparities in our state and to improve the health of all Rhode Islanders.

    For the past 15 years, the NIGMS-funded Innovation Development Awards (IDeA) programs in Rhode Island have joined together to hold a state-wide, day-long symposium that both celebrates successes and fosters collaborations among Rhode Island investigators. The symposium includes programs from Brown University, the University of Rhode Island, Lifespan Hospital System, Care New England Health System, and the VA Providence Health Care System.

    We are pleased to announce that the keynote speakers of this year’s Symposium are Dr. Clyde Yancy and Dr. Mariana C. Stern. We’re certain that both Drs. Yancy and Stern will provide investigators in attendance with engaging talks that will inspire their research. Additionally, we hope you will enjoy the science talks and additional sessions featuring investigators representing Rhode Island’s IDeA programs. Additional information about these speakers and their presentations can be found on the Symposium website. Please note that the schedule of the day is subject to change.

    Registration for the Symposium is now open. Please click here to indicate your interest in the virtual portions of the event. Zoom Information for those who have registered to attend the Symposium virtually is available now on the Symposium website. 

    Register Now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jun
    8
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Finding the EHR Data to Tell Your Clinical Story: Early Experiences with Lifespan Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Services
    Kathleen R. Donise, MD
    Director, Lifespan Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Services
    Associate Professor, Clinician Educator, Dept. of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Brown University
    And
    Elizabeth S. Chen, PhD, FACMI
    Interim Director of the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics
    Associate Professor of Medical Science and Health Services, Policy & Practice
    Brown University
    Wednesday, June 8, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Summarize the current state of Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Services and need for data-driven approaches to improve services; Describe process and methods for identifying, extracting, managing, and analyzing data from electronic health record (EHR) systems; and Discuss the value of transdisciplinary teams and collaborations for conducting EHR-based projects to support clinical practice, quality improvement, research, and public health.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • The 5th Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM2022)

    Over the last few decades, reinforcement learning and decision making have been the focus of an incredible wealth of research spanning a wide variety of fields including psychology, artificial intelligence, machine learning, operations research, control theory, animal and human neuroscience, economics and ethology. Key to many developments in the field has been interdisciplinary sharing of ideas and findings. The goal of RLDM is to provide a platform for communication among all researchers interested in “learning and decision making over time to achieve a goal”. The meeting is characterized by the multidisciplinarity of the presenters and attendees, with cross-disciplinary conversations and teaching and learning being central objectives along with the dissemination of novel theoretical and experimental results. The main meeting will be single-track, consisting of a mixture of invited and contributed talks, tutorials, and poster sessions.

    Confirmed Speakers
    • Josh Tenenbaum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Yunzhe Liu, University College London
    • Jill O’Reilly, University of Oxford
    • Nao Uchida, Harvard University
    • Melissa Sharpe, University of California, Los Angeles
    • Alexandra Rosati, University of Michigan
    • Frederike Petzschner, Brown University
    • Oriel Feldman-Hall, Brown University
    • Scott Niekum, University of Texas at Austin
    • Satinder Singh Baveja, University of Michigan and DeepMind
    • Stephanie Tellex, Brown University
    • Martha White, University of Alberta
    • Sonia Chernova, Georgia Tech
    • Jeannette Bohg, Stanford University
    • Jakob Foerster, Facebook AI Research

    Stay tuned for updates as the conference gets closer.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, BRAINSTORM, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    3
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Jun
    2
    1:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Center for Translational Neuroscience Spring Retreat 2022

    70 Ship Street, Rm LMM 107

    Please join us for a half-day retreat, featuring faculty speakers from the Center for Translational Neuroscience. 

    Refreshments and Food to Follow.

    Speakers include: 

    Ashley Webb, PhD

    Justin Fallon, PhD

    Alvin Huang, MD PhD 

    Chun Geun Lee, PhD 

    Judy Liu, MD PhD

    Stephen Helfand, MD 

    Eric Morrow, MD PhD 

    Nicola Neretti, PhD 

    Gregorio Valdez, PhD

    Lalit Beura, PhD 

     

    More Information CTN
  • Social (In)Justice and Mental Health
    Ruth Shim, MD, MPH (she/her)
    Luke & Grace Kim Professor in Cultural Psychiatry
    Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
    Associate Dean of Diverse and Inclusive Education
    University of California, Davis School of Medicine
    Wednesday, June 1, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Define social justice, the social determinants of mental health, and mental health inequities; Consider how social injustice contributes to mental health inequities; and Examine the role of social injustice on the field of mental health.

    More Information 
  • Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is the most dramatic form of premature aging, and most cases are caused by a single nucleotide misspelling in the lamin A gene. An intense team effort to identify effective therapies has recently led to the first FDA-approved drug that provides significant benefit. But now greater promise is emerging in adapting RNA morpholino and DNA gene editing therapeutics.

    Speaker:
    Francis Collins, M.D.
    Acting Science Advisor to President Joe Biden; Former Director of the National Institutes of Health

    Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Watch the Livestream More Information 
  • Join us for a conversation about the evolution of the opioid crisis, evidence-based care that decreases mortality, and innovative community-based solutions to care for patients at high-risk for overdose death. A reception will immediately follow the lecture.

    Speaker:
    Kavita M. Babu ’96, ’00 M.D., ’04 RES
    Division Chief, Medical Toxicology and Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School

    Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Watch the Livestream More Information 
  • May
    27
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    CLPS - Cognition Seminar Series: “Neural Mechanisms of Reward Identity”- James Howard, PhD

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Room 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: James Howard- Assistant Professor - Brandeis
    Title: To be specific: neural mechanisms of reward identity learning inthe human brain
    Abstract:Research on the neuroscience of reward learning and decision making hastraditionally focused on characterizing representations of abstract value inthe brain. However, there is increasing appreciation of the broad range of task-relevantinformation contained in putative “value” regions, and how this information criticallyunderpins complex decision processes. In this talk I will present recentfindings suggesting that one such piece of information, the sensory identity ofexpected rewards, is represented at multiple stages in the mesocortical pathway.I will demonstrate how identity information carried in midbrain predictionerror signals directly relates to updating of identity information indownstream regions for later predictions. I will further present behavioralevidence that specific outcome expectations themselves may mediate experientiallearning in the absence of rewards, and speculate on the relevance of suchlearning for our understanding of certain aspects of psychosis. Together thesefindings motivate future studies aimed at more fully characterizing thedistributed networks that link sensation to prediction, and back again, in thehuman brain.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    27
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    26
    Virtual
    4:00pm EDT

    Neuroscience Special Seminar

    zoom
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Email [email protected] for event passcode

    Department of Neuroscience Special Virtual Seminar:

    Elizabeth Ransey, Ph.D.
    Duke University

    “Dissecting Interaction Codes: Engineering connexins for neural circuit
    modulation and beyond”

    Host: Dr. Anne Hart

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Groops is an emotional wellness platform reinventing the group counseling model for the modern world to serve the millions of people who need and want mental wellness support and cannot get it from the limited resources available today. Groops brings small groups of people together virtually to have expert-guided conversations around the worries and wonders of modern life, from stress and anxiety, to relationships and parenting, to finding purpose in the everyday. The platform creates space for people to reflect, share and grow — together.

    In this session, the Groops leadership team will share how they are revolutionizing the world of mental wellness, get real about their startup highs and lows, share digital marketing strategies, and open up a dialogue around the power of infusing social connection into the world of mental wellness through deep conversations with strangers.

    Speaker Bio

    Dr. Bobbi Wegner is a clinical psychologist, lecturer at Harvard, author, advisor, writer, international speaker, and CEO/Founder of Groops: an online mental wellness platform that brings people together to talk about their real issues with the help of a trained facilitator. She works with individuals and organizations to promote mental wellness for everyone – everywhere.

    Dr. Bobbi writes and speaks internationally on modern mental health. She has a column in Psychology Today (“Perfectly Imperfect Parenting”), is a parenting expert on NBC News Learn, is on the Today Show parenting team, and has spoken on or written for numerous popular publications including NPR, Harvard Health Blog, The Associated Press, Mind Body Green, and Sunrise (Australia’s No. 1), to name a few. Her book, Raising Feminist Boys: How to Talk to Your Child about Gender, Consent, and Empathy, published in June 2021 with New Harbinger. She has given three TEDx talks on the subject.

    Given her interest in mental health, access, innovation, and entrepreneurship, Dr. Bobbi teaches Advocacy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and courses on Motivation and Groups & Culture at the Harvard Extension School in the Industrial Organizational Psychology Program.

    She is committed to furthering mental health access on the board of directors for USA for IOM (the UN Migration Agency) and the board of advisors for Ignite Mental Health, out of Harvard Innovation Lab. She is also a medical writer and reviewer for Buoy Health, a Harvard-Innovation Lab digital health company.


    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through the Center for Digital Health’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to CDH reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Micaela Chan, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas at Dallas.

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows us to examine patterns of large-scale brain network organization. Over the course of healthy adult aging, the functional brain network desegregates (i.e., fewer connections within a system, more connections between systems), which in turn, is predictive of poorer behavioral performance. Brain network segregation is also clinically relevant, providing prognostic value for dementia. We have found that this aging trajectory of brain network desegregation varies across individuals that are embedded in distinct environments. Measures of environment are typically coarse, based on individual-level variables (e.g., education, socioeconomic status). The next step in my research is focused on linking brain measures with a more comprehensive description of an individual by (1) collecting information on an individual’s life history and daily activities (e.g., activity tracking, ecological momentary assessment); and (2) linking neighborhood-level data such as Census data or other geographically anchored data back to the individual. Together, this will better capture how an individual’s environment impacts their brain network organization over the course of aging and disease such as dementia.

    Zoom More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    23
    Virtual and In Person
    9:00am - 5:00pm EDT

    Biology of Aging Colloquium

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Contact [email protected]  for passcode.

    Colloquium Program

    More Information 
  • May
    20
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    20
    9:00am - 5:00pm EDT

    Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience Symposium

    Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center, Rm Petteruti Lounge

    Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience

     

    Are you an undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoc interested in learning more about the Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging?

     

    Any early career researcher interested in aging neuroscience across a wide range of domains – including cognition, affect, memory, and everything in between – is invited to attend the Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience (GRAN) mini-symposium. Our objective is to provide a setting in which junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience can learn about the latest developments (and people behind it). We have brought together world-class researchers across a wide range of career stages to present their work as well as share their unique experiences relating to how they became investigators (inspired by the Growing Up in Science series), in hopes of encouraging junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience. To make this event accessible to a broad audience and reduce financial barriers for trainees, the event registration will be free to all attendees.

    Confirmed Speakers:

    • Heidi Jacobs (Harvard)
    • Matthew Nassar (Brown)
    • Yakeel Quiroz (Harvard)
    • Michael Cole (Rutgers)
    • Ray Razlighi (Cornell)
    • Ifat Levy (Yale)

    More information on GRAN can be found on our website:

    For updates, please follow us on Twitter

    Please Register by Friday 5/6 Here

    If you have any questions about our current series, please feel free to email our organizers:

    Debbie Yee

    Hwamee Oh

    More Information 
  • May
    19
    9:00am EDT

    K99/R00 Grant Writing Workshop

    Smith-Buonanno Hall, Rm Room 106 and via Zoom

    Join us for a K99/R00 Grant Writing workshop on Thursday, May 19, 2022 from 9AM to 12PM EST. This workshop will bring together excellent sessions and Q&A with experts, current K99 and R00 awardees, and experienced grant review panelists from Brown.

    Interested postdocs are asked to RSVP by Friday May 13 to be part of this workshop! We plan on holding this workshop as a hybrid event, including the option to attend in-person or via Zoom. We ask that you RSVP early so that we can best accommodate all participants.

    RSVP for BPC K99-R00 grant writing workshop More Information 
  • You’re Invited: The Business of Innovation, Panel Discussion and Reception

    Brown Technology Innovations invites Faculty Researchers, Graduate Students
    and Postdocs Interested in Startups, Venture Capital and Finance to join us for panel discussions and an introduction to the new Brown Innovation Fellows
    program.


    When: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 at 3:00pm
    Location: 350 Eddy St, South Street Landing, 4th Floor, Multipurpose Room

    Agenda:
    3:00-3:05 Welcome Remarks
    3:05-3:20 Introduction to Brown Tech Innovations and Brown Innovation Fellows Program
    3:25-4:25 High Tech Startups - founders and funders speak out
    4:30-5:15 How to have fun and stay out of trouble!
    5:15-6:15 Reception

    How to get here: All Brown shuttles stop at South Street Landing; Street and garage parking are available for a fee - https://www.brown.edu/a-z/south-street-landing
    Once inside South Street Landing, take the East Elevators to the 4th floor. The room is behind the reception desk, to the left

    Register Here: The Business of Innovation More Information 
  • May
    18
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    MCB Faculty Seminar Presented by Ashley Webb, PhD

    Sidney Frank Hall Marcuvitz Auditorium, Rm Room 220

    ?Molecular mechanisms of brain aging and neurodegeneration?

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  •  

    Towards Mechanisms of Sleep Disruption Hyperalgesia

    Michael Smith, Ph.D.

    Director, Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Psychiatry

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

     

    This presentation will provide general background on the relationship sleep and chronic pain and discuss human experiments related to effects of sleep disruption on pain inhibition and morphine analgesia. Findings related to the effects of sleep disruption on central pain facilitatory phenomena, including: Temporal summation and Secondary Hyperalgesia (spinal sensitization) will be presented.

    More Information 
  • May
    14
    10:00am - 1:00pm EDT

    “A Taste of Qigong” with Sifu Donald Wong

    Weiner Center (Hillel), Rm Winnick Chapel
    Please join the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Series for a workshop with Sifu Donald Wong  on A Taste of Qigong. This workshop will be held on May 14th from 10 am - 1 pm, EDT at the Brown/RISD Hillel (80 Brown St., Providence), Winnick Chapel.
    Please RSVP to [email protected] at your earliest possible convenience. If you do attend, wear loose fitting clothing, bring a bottle of water and a towel.
    More Information 
  • May
    14
    9:00am EDT

    Topological and Dynamical Analysis of Brain Connectomes

    121 South Main Street, Rm ICERM

    With the substantial recent progress in connectomics, the study of comprehensive maps of nervous systems much more is known about the connectivity structure of brains. This has led to a multitude of new questions about the relationship between connectivity patterns, neural dynamics, and brain function, many of which lead to new mathematical problems in graph theory and dynamics on graphs. The goal of this workshop is to bring together a broad range of researchers from neuroscience, physics, mathematics, and computer science to discuss new challenges in this emergent field and promote new collaborations.

    This workshop is fully funded by a Simons Foundation Targeted Grant to Institutes.

    Learn More More Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering
  • May
    13
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    13
    9:00am - 4:00pm EDT

    A Celebration of the Scientific Career of Professor Barry Connors

    222 Richmond Street, Providence, RI, Rm LH-170

     

    Barry Fest: A Celebration of the Scientific Career of Professor Barry Connors

     

    Please join us for a special symposium celebrating Professor Barry Connor’s career,  featuring talks from Connor’s lab alumni.

     

     
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    12
    4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT

    Epilepsy through the Lifespan; NSGP Bench-to-Bedside Seminar

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz 220

    Please join us for a bench to bedside seminar on “Epilepsy through the Lifepsan”, featuring Jennifer Kim, MD PhD, and Omar Ahmed, PhD.

    This special bench to bedside seminar is being held in honor of the career and science of Barry Connors, PhD. 

    Social event to follow. 

    Hosted by Judy Liu, MD PhD, Associate Director of the Center for Translational Neuroscience at Brown University.

    More Information CTN
  • Adam Brickman, Ph.D.

    Professor of Neuropsychology
    Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain
    Department of Neurology
    Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
    Columbia University
     


    Please note that this is a hybrid seminar in Smith-Buonanno room 106 and through Zoom (please email [email protected] for the link information).

     

    Bio:

    Adam M. Brickman, PhD is a tenured Professor in the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain and in the Department of Neurology at Columbia University. Dr. Brickman’s work primarily focuses on understanding the vascular contributions to cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease by integrating neuroimaging techniques with observational neuropsychological studies, basic neuroscience, and epidemiological approaches. He is also interested understanding sources of racial and ethnic disparity in Alzheimer’ disease, developing interventions for cognitive decline in aging, and designing neuropsychological instruments to assess cognition in older adults.

    Dr. Brickman leads neuroimaging efforts in several large community- and clinic-based observational studies, such as the Washington Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP), the WHICAP Offspring Study, the Alzheimer’s Biomarker Consortium-Down Syndrome (ABC-DS), and others. Dr. Brickman is the Core Leader of the Columbia Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Biomarker Core, which integrates fluid and neuroimaging based biomarkers into studies of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorder.

    Dr. Brickman completed his undergraduate studies in neuroscience and psychology at Oberlin College, his PhD in psychology/neuropsychology at the City University of New York, his clinical internship at Brown Medical School, and his postdoctoral training at Columbia University, where he has been on faculty since 2007.

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    11
    2:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    2022 Lipsitt Lecture in Child Behavior & Development | Rinad S. Beidas, PhD.

    Rhode Island Convention Center 1 Sabin Street Providence, RI 02903
    Join us for the 2022 Lewis Paeff Lipsitt and Edna Duchin Lipsitt Lecture in Child Behavior and Development featuring Rinad S. Beidas, PhD.

    “Harnessing Implementation Science to Achieve the Promise of Evidence-Based Practices in Pediatric Mental Health: Implications for School Settings”

    Rhode Island Convention Center - 5th Floor West Ballroom. Parking will be free. Please arrive 15 minutes early.

    Masks are required if you are not vaccinated and optional if you are vaccinated. Please do not come if you are experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 or if you have been recently exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

    Seating will be limited - so please return your ticket if you are unable to attend!

    Please register More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Lite

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Speaker: Bruno Ferenc Segedin_ PhD student - CLPS

    Title: Do languages overrepresent words with vowel harmony?

    Abstract: Some languages like Hungarian and Turkish have a rule known as ‘Vowel Harmony’, whereby all the vowels in a given word must share a particular feature like frontness or roundness. While most of the world’s languages do not have strict vowel harmony rules, it remains to be investigated whether there is evidence for a universal statistical bias in favor of keeping vowels within words similar. Such a bias might be rooted in, for example, the benefit of redundant linguistic properties to perception or production. Conversely, a language may prefer to allow vowels to freely combine in words in order to, for example, maximize the amount of lexical contrasts its vowel system can contribute to. This study of 201 languages’ lexicons examines whether a statistical bias favoring vowel harmony is universal among the world’s languages. Specifically, I test whether languages overrepresent words that contain only similar/identical vowels relative to random baseline lexicons. My current results point away from the existence of a universal bias for vowel harmony; in fact, nearly all lexicons appear to exhibit a bias maximizing entropy of vowel patterns and disfavoring any constraints on vowel co-occurrence within words.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    11
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds*

    Virtual

    #TikTokTherapist: Understanding the role of social media in adolescent mental health
    Jacqueline Nesi, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Dept of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital
    Wednesday, May 11, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Describe current research on the role of social media use in adolescent mental health; Identify ways in which youths’ social experiences are transformed in the digital media context;
    and Discuss risks and benefits of social media use for adolescents at risk for suicidal thoughts and behavior.
    Disclosure: Dr. Nesi has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Greek & Program Houses, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • May
    10
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell St., Rm 475

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Ahmed Abdelfattah, Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Assistant Professor of Brain Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    10
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing

    Virtual

    The new NIH Policy on Data Management and Sharing goes into effect on January 25, 2023. How are the departments at Brown that support researchers preparing for this new policy? How should researchers prepare for changes in proposal development, data collection, and depositing data? How will the policy impact research, including new pre- and post-award engagement with NIH repositories, and updated timelines for data preparation and depositing? In this session, we will give an overview of the new policy and Brown resources such as templates to help researchers with writing plans, tools for managing their data throughout a project, and sharing data during and after a project closes. Discussion led by Arielle Nitenson and Andrew Creamer.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    9
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Statistics Seminar | Yoav Benjamini, Ph.D.

    121 South Main Street, Rm 245

    Dr. Yoav Benjamini, Professor Emeritus of Applied Statistics at the Department of Statistics and Operations Research at Tel Aviv University, and a member of the Sagol School of Neuroscience and the Edmond Safra Bioinformatics Center.

    Replicability Issues in Medical Research: Science and Politics

    Selective inference and irrelevant variability are two statistical issues hindering replicability across science. I will review the first in the context of secondary endpoint analysis in clinical and epidemiological research. This leads us to discuss the debate about p-values and statistical significance and the politics involved. I will present practical approaches that seem to accommodate the concerns of NEJM editors, as reflected in their guidelines.
    I shall discuss more briefly the issue of addressing the relevant variability, in the context of in preclinical animal experiments, and the implication of this work about assessing replicability in meta-analysis.

    Major parts of this work done jointly with Iman Jaljuli, Orestis Panagiotou and Ruth Heller.

    Dr. Yoav Benjamini

    Yoav Benjamini is Professor Emeritus of Applied Statistics at the Department of Statistics and Operations Research at Tel Aviv University, and a member of the Sagol School of Neuroscience and the Edmond Safra Bioinformatics Center. He was a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, University of California, Berkeley, Stanford, and Columbia Universities. Yoav is a co-developer of the widely used False Discovery Rate concept and methodology. His other research topics are replicability and reproducibility in science and data mining, with applications in Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, Animal Behavior, Geography, Meteorology, Brain Imaging and Health Informatics. He is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the US National Academy of Sciences, and received the Israel Prize in Statistics and Economics and the Founders of Statistics Prize of the International Statistical Institute.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • May
    6
    1:00pm - 1:50pm EDT

    BigAI Talk: Leveraging SE(2) Symmetries in Robotics (Rob Platt, NEU)

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    To watch virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97651541594
    Add to calendar

    Abstract: Many robotics problems have transition dynamics that are symmetric in SE(2) with respect to rotation, translation, scaling, reflection, and other transformations. In these situations, any optimal policy will also be symmetric over these transformations. In this talk, we leverage this insight to improve the sample efficiency of policy learning by encoding the symmetries directly into the neural network model using group invariant and equivariant layers. The result is that we can learn non-trivial visuomotor control policies with very little experience. In many cases, we can learn good policies from scratch by training directly on real robotic hardware in real time. We apply this idea both to reinforcement learning and behavior cloning and achieve state of the art results in both cases.

    Rob Platt is an Associate Professor in the Khoury College of Computer Sciences at Northeastern University. He is interested in developing robots that can perform complex manipulation tasks alongside humans in the uncertain everyday world. Much of his work is at the intersection of robotic policy learning, planning, and perception. Prior to coming to Northeastern, he was a Research Scientist at MIT and a technical lead at NASA Johnson Space Center.

    Host: George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • May
    6
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    5
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Gerald Downes, PhD; University of MA, Amherst

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud., Room 220

    Title:  TBA

    Host:  Dr. Carlos Aizenman

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    5
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Bart Anderson - Professor- University of Sydney

    Title: Mid-level vision: Understanding how the visual system extracts the causes of optical structure

    Abstract:
    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding both low level vision – the encoding of image properties – and ‘high level’ vision, such as object recognition. However, mid-level vision – extracting the properties of surfaces and materials that generate the optical structure that reaches our eyes – is comparatively poorly understood. The light reaching our eyes is a conflated mixture of different sources, such as 3D shape, reflectance, color, and the optical properties (defocus) of our eyes. In this talk, I will describe recent work in our lab on how the visual system extracts 3D shape, colour, and material; and the problems (and ‘illusions’) that arise when the visual system misattributes these causes to the wrong source.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • For machines to communicate naturally with humans in the real world, they need to connect the meaning of words to objects and actions in the world. This includes verbs like toss vs. throw and slide vs. roll, for which there is a nuanced difference in the physical mechanics of the verb. Ideally, in the future, a robot would be able to understand this difference, as a human would. So, to what extent do existing visually-grounded models capture this difference? What about models that learn from ground-truth trajectory data, i.e. the positions and rotations of objects over time? This thesis investigates these questions. The primary contributions of this work are 1) developing two virtual environments that allow parallel spatiotemporal and visual data collection, 2) building models that represent verbs in terms of spatiotemporal data, and 3) comparing these representations to existing visually-grounded representations, giving insight into how future models may understand physical nuances in verb meaning, which may then be applied to downstream tasks like instruction following.

    More Information 
  • May
    4
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Speaker: Natalie Weber- Assistant Professor - Yale University

    Title: Late vocabulary insertion and even later metrification in Blackfoot

    Abstract: One aspect of the phonology-syntax interface concerns the timing of vocabulary insertion relative to other syntactic and phonological operations. This talk focuses on patterns of prosodically-conditioned allomorphy in Blackfoot (Algonquian; ISO-639-3: bla) and what this can tell us about the relative timing of operations. I argue that root exponence in Blackfoot must occur after linearization, because it is sensitive to the presence or absence of prefixes within a phrase. Root exponence is also post-syntactic and phonologically optimizing, because the distribution of allomorphs and regular phonological processes (epenthesis, deletion) both serve to avoid [+cons] segments at morphological junctures within a phrase. Finally, root exponence must occur before metrification (syllabification and stress assignment), because processes like vowel coalescence and vowel shortening in closed syllables interact opaquely with the constraint against [+cons] segments. Together, these show that post-syntactic operations must be ordered as follows: (1) linearization, (2) vocabulary insertion and certain morphophonological processes, (3) metrification. This architecture has further implications for interactions with phases or phonological cycles.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    4

    Psychological Flexibility: Building a Pragmatic Model and Method of Intentional Change
    Akihiko (Aki) Masuda, Ph.D.
    Professor of Psychology - Department of Psychology
    University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
    Wednesday, May 4, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Demonstrate knowledge of the philosophy (assumption), theory, and practice underlying “psychological flexibility model”; and Demonstrate knowledge of research development based on the perspective of functional contextualism.
    Disclosure: Dr. Masuda has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information 
  • Join the provost as he introduces Dr. Mukesh K. Jain, the new dean of medicine and biological sciences, to staff.


    Aging and age-associated disorders constitute some of the greatest unmet medical challenges facing society today. Current paradigms suggest that dysfunction of the immune and metabolic systems contribute to aging and age-associated disorders, but the molecular underpinnings controlling these processes remain incompletely understood. Jain’s work has identified a family of genetic factors termed Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) as nodal regulators of immunity and metabolism. Studies in C. elegans demonstrate that KLFs are necessary and sufficient to control lifespan and healthspan. Mammalian studies demonstrate an essential role for KLFs in immunometabolism and the development of age-associated metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurocognitive dysfunction. Collectively these findings support an essential role for KLFs in aging and age-related disorders across metazoan phylogeny. Here these insights will be reviewed and therapeutic implications discussed.

    Resgister More Information 
  • Apr
    29
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Harrison Ritz

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    Speaker: Harrison Ritz , Brown University

    Title: Multivariate Cognitive Control

    Advisor: Amitai Shenhav

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    29
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Seminar: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: Structure meets Function in the Aging Brain

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/99610405445

    The human brain as it ages over time can follow a number of possible trajectories—some individuals age “abnormally” while others age “successfully”. My work integrates longitudinal clinical and neuropsychological information obtained during life with anatomic patterns of vulnerability, and microscopic pathology collected on the autopsied brain at death. The overarching theme is that the relationship between cognitive phenotype during life and underlying pathology at death is not absolute but probabilistic. In the clinic and in the laboratory, the neuropsychologist can benefit from a nuanced view of the postmortem factors that contribute to vulnerability versus resistance in the field of neurodegeneration. During this talk, I will highlight some exciting findings from my laboratory that contribute to understanding the neurobiology of dementia syndromes and “SuperAging”; I will also describe several creative “quality of life” initiatives that are taking place at the Northwestern Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center that have brought personal meaning and value to our patient population, scientists, clinicians, and students alike. Together, I hope to share insights into how the aging brain reflects the dynamic intersection of neuroanatomic structure and human behavior.

    Tamar Gefen, PhD is an academic clinical neuropsychologist with an interest in neurodegenerative disorders and trajectories of aging (both abnormal and successful). She directs the Laboratory for Translational Neuropsychology at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern, which attempts to bridge antemortem clinical features of dementia with postmortem microscopic neuropathology found at autopsy. She co-Directs the Clinical Core of the NIH/NIA-funded (P30) Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) housed within the Mesulam Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease. Her clinical work is focused on the neuropsychological characterization of typical and atypical dementia syndromes (Alzheimer’s disease, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, etc.), and other age-related disorders. She is passionate about mentorship, teaching, and collaboration.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    29
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Apr
    28
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Youtao Lu

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    Speaker: Youtao Lu , Brown University

    Title: Homophones: A Cross-Linguistic Perspective

    Advisor: James L. Morgan

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    28
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Jin Zhang, PhD; University of CA, San Deigo

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud. Room 220

    Title:  TBA

    Host: Dr. Ahmed Abdelfattah

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    28
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Carney Career Chat with Senior Patent Agent Colleen McKiernan, Ph.D.

    Carney Institute, 4th floor, 164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone

    Please join the Carney Institute for a conversation with Colleen McKiernan, Ph.D., about her journey from earning a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology to working as a Senior Patent Agent at Intellia Therapeutics. Colleen will discuss what it’s like to work in patents and intellectual property with a background in science. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Apr
    28
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Howie N. Zelaznik - Purdue University

    Title: Timing with and without a central timekeeper, i.e. a clock, in motor behavior

    Abstract:
    Due to a good misfortune, Robertson, Zelaznik, Spencer, Doffin and Schneidt (1999) discovered that individual differences in timing precision in tapping did not predict individual differences in timing precision in circle drawing timing. Although this finding was unexpected, we realized it theoretical importance and began a 13 year research program developing the event-emergent framework for movement timing. In this framework we postulate that whether an individual utilizes a clock-like timing process (event timing) or an emergent timing operation depends on whether there are salient perceptual events that a person can time to. In the present presentation, I review the bulk of that evidence, and digress about the progress of science to propose that information processing (event timing) and dynamical system approaches (emergent timing) can exist in the same human being.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    27
    Virtual
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Faculty Grant Writing Workshop

    Zoom
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 995 4583 7173
    Passcode: 311907

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a virtual conversation on Grant Writing, featuring Christopher Moore, associate director of the institute. Topics covered include the difference between federal, foundation and university grants, how to craft a compelling scientific argument, and how to talk to program officers.

    Please note, this event is targeted to faculty, particularly those in the early stages of their career.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    27
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS Honors Students Poster Presentations

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 230 and 330
    Join us to celebrate the CLPS honors students’ research efforts this past year.
    Students will be showcasing their work at an in-person Honors Poster Presentation session with light refreshments in the lounge areas outside of Rooms 230 and 330.
    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Julieta Lischinsky, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at New York University.

    Julieta Lischinsky’s research focuses on understanding the neuronal substrates and circuitry for the generation of innate social behaviors in the limbic system.

    Abstract: Innate social behaviors are crucial for survival, thus shared across animal species. In humans, psychiatric disorders with deficits in social interactions, e.g. autism spectrum disorders, can be observed during child development and have been associated with amygdala dysfunction. There is still a lack of understanding of the circuitry and developmental mechanisms for the generation of social behaviors. We have focused on the murine medial amygdala (MeA) as it receives conspecific pheromone inputs and projects to hypothalamic regions. The MeA GABAergic cells have been shown to be sufficient for the production of social behaviors including aggression and mating. Given that these diverse social behaviors differ in their sensory trigger and behavioral outcomes, can the neuronal substrates for these behaviors be distinct? Taking a developmental approach, we have previously characterized two MeA GABAergic neuronal subpopulations, marked by the expression of the transcription factors Foxp2 and Dbx1 which originate from the same embryonic region. The Foxp2+ and Dbx1-derived subpopulations are spatially, molecularly and physiologically distinct. Interestingly, I have now observed that these two subpopulations receive distinct inputs and differ in their processing of social conspecific information. Furthermore, I uncovered that these subpopulations differ in their functional roles during social behaviors. In addition, as the Foxp2+ cells respond to conspecific cues even with no/minimal social experience, I aimed to determine the extent to which these neuronal responses are hard-wired by investigating the social tuning of Foxp2+ cells across development. In conclusion, developmentally distinct MeA neuronal subpopulations differ in their anatomical circuitry, are differentially relevant for processing conspecific sensory cues and mediating social behaviors.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    25
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Working on the Command Line

    A practical introduction to the Linux operating system. Topics covered include: basic Linux commands for maneuvering within the file system and manipulating files, Unix shells, and working with environment variables and paths.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Todd Golde, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor, Department of Neuroscience
    Director, McKnight Brain Institute
    University of Florida
     


    Please note that this is a hybrid seminar, in Marcuvitz Auditorium in Sidney Frank Hall and through Zoom (please email [email protected] for the link information).

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    25
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Katherine Tillman - Assistant Professor - University of Texas at Austin

    Title: Children’s concepts of the past and future

    Abstract: Adults typically conceive of the past and future as fundamentally distinct. The past is fixed, knowable, and unalterable; while the future is open-ended, unknowable, and changeable. How do children acquire this way of thinking? In this talk I’ll discuss my research exploring three facets of this process, including the development of 3- to 6-year-old children’s causal reasoning about past and future events, their gradual acquisition of deictic time words like “tomorrow” and “yesterday,” and their beliefs about abstract concepts like “the future” and phenomena like time travel.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    25
    10:00am EDT

    Special Seminar: Counteracting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Dr. Sofia Lizarraga

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220, Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Please join us for a special seminar, organized by the Center for Translational Neuroscience and hosted by Dr. Judy Liu. 

    Dr. Sofia Lizarraga will be presenting her work in a talk titled Counteracting Epigenetic Mechanisms in AutismSpectrum Disorders. 

     

     

    More Information CTN
  • Apr
    22
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Rasha Abdel Rahman - Professor - Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

    Title: Face processing and social judgments in the context of emotional (mis)information: A neurocognitive perspective
    Abstract: Emotional information about other people’s social behaviour, transmitted during conversations, in the news or via social media, shapes our social judgments and prejudice social interactions. I will present experimental studies on the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the processing of person-related emotional information. We find influences on early processes related to face perception, on rapid brain responses related to emotional perception and arousal, and on slow and relatively controlled brain responses related to evaluations. These observations suggest that we perceive faces and expressions in light of the person-related information and that emotional information drives early and reflexive responses as well as more controlled evaluations, resulting in social judgments dominated by emotion. Crucially, we demonstrate that insight into the lack of credibility of the information or the credibility of the source of the information has little influence on these effects. Our brain responses and social judgments seem to be dominated by emotion even against better knowledge. These insights may shed light on the apparent “success” of social-emotional (mis)information and may guide the search for protective measures against their potentially detrimental effects.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    22
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Data Visualization Seminar

    Zoom

    Join Advance-CTR, S4, and the Brown Library for the first of this 2-part series exploring data visualization, its methodology, and application in biomedicine and health. The purpose of this series is to serve as a data visualization introduction for clinicians and others who may be interested in using these tools and methods in their research. 

    Friday, April 22, 2022 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
    “Data Visualization from 10,000 feet: A Quick Introduction to Visual Communication”
    Featuring E. Patrick Rashleigh
    The Center for Digital Scholarship, Brown University Library

    Poised to plunge into data visualization, making the latest-and-greatest fancy interactive extravaganzas? Well, hang on—before pulling out all the tools, let’s take a step back and think about some basic principles of visual perception, design and representation, and communicating to an audience.

    Register Now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Apr
    22
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Apr
    21
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Scott Baraban, PhD; University of CA, San Francisco

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud., Room 220

    Title: Interneurons, inhibition, epilepsy and a sea lion

    Host:  Dr. Judy Liu

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    21
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Eero Simoncelli - Professor- FlatIron Institute and New York University

    Title: Metric properties of neural representations

    Abstract:
    Deep neural networks have demonstrated the remarkable potential of distributed cascaded computation with simple canonical elements. These systems were inspired by study of biological brains, and provide a substrate for their understanding. But biological systems have many additional properties, and although some of these are undoubtedly idiosyncracies of their implementation, others are likely to provide fundamental computational capabilities. Specifically, biological neural circuits adapt their response levels over multiple time scales. They are also quite noisy. Both attributes affect the metric properties of stimulus representation - that is, the effective distances between encoded stimuli. I’ll describe some of our recent efforts to assess these in the context of biological visual representations, and their effect on perceptual capabilities.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    20
    1:00pm EDT

    Neuroscience Graduate Partnership Program Thesis Defense: Christina Porras

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud. Room 220

    Title:  Elucidating the consequences of iron metabolism misregulation in the central nervous system

    Advisor:  Dr. Tracey Rouault, NIH

    More Information 
  • Apr
    20
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Non- Academic Career Panel

    CLPS, GPP, and NSGPP students are sponsoring a panel on careers outside of academia.

    Brown Alumni will discuss their non-academic career paths.

    Speakers:

    Jing Liang-Guallpa (she/her/hers)
    Field Scientific Consultant with Inscopix, Inc.
    Jing is a fellow NIH-Brown GPP alumnus who graduated with her PhD in Neuroscience in late 2020. In Spring of 2021, she transitioned to a field applications scientist position with Inscopix, a private biotech company, and has since consulted on over 80 unique scientific projects covering learning and memory, feeding and homeostatic drive, social behaviors and hierarchy, addiction, sleep, and translational research projects on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

    Mary Bates
    Freelance science writer
    Mary Bates is a freelance science writer who specializes in telling stories about the brains and behavior of humans and other animals. Her work has appeared in print and online publications including National Geographic news, Mongabay, The Scientist, and Muse magazine. She has written for such organizations as the Society for Neuroscience, American Society for Human Genetics, Alzheimer’s Association, and Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Mary is also the co-author of the 6th edition of Sensation and Perception, an undergraduate psychology textbook. She earned her PhD in psychology from Brown University, where she studied echolocation in bats. When not writing, she creates science- and nature-inspired embroidery for her shop, Historia Naturale. She lives outside Boston with her partner, two cats, and two guinea pigs.

    Organized by: Brown CLPS, GPP, and NSGPP Students

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: ID: 97689873127
    Passcode: 941676

    Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Sabriya Fisher, Wellesley College

    Title: Innovation and social stratification in AAE negation

    Abstract: This talk presents the results of a sociolinguistic investigation of variation in the use of negation in a corpus of naturalistic speech from 42 speakers of African American English in Philadelphia. Particular focus is placed on the use of ain’t in the past tense, where it varies with didn’t, which is a unique feature of AAE that may also be a recent innovation in the grammar (Fasold & Wolfram, 1970; Green, 2002; Howe, 2005; Labov et al., 1968; Loman, 1967; Weldon, 1994, 2021; Wolfram, 1969). Use ofain’tin the past tense is compared to its uses in other tense-aspect contexts whereain’thas been used for centuries (Anderwald, 2006; Jespersen, 1961). Results of apparent time comparisons reveal that past tense uses of ain’t increased over the course of the 20th century while uses in other contexts remained stable, aligning with the hypothesis that past tense uses ofain’t result from a recent change. Generalized linear models of variation between ain’t and other negated auxiliaries in past tense vs. other contexts support the recent change hypothesis and point toward innovation in Northern cities like Philadelphia following the Great Migration. Finally, these results are evaluated in light of the Divergence Hypothesis (Labov & Harris, 1986, Bailey & Maynor, 1987) as well as new insights on social stratification in the use of morphosyntactic features of AAE (Weldon, 2021).

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    19
    12:00pm EDT

    NSGP In-House Seminar: Miguel Arenivar; Tejeda Lab / Emma Macdonald; Penzo Lab

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Apr
    18
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Slurm for Beginners

    A primer on submitting jobs to the job scheduler on Oscar. Some basic familiarity with Unix/Linux systems is assumed. Topics covered include: an overview of the use of Slurm for resource allocation, submitting jobs to Slurm, and using Bash scripts to configure and submit jobs to Slurm.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Apr
    15
    1:00pm EDT

    MCBGP Thesis Defense: Laura Madigan

    185 Meeting Street, Rm 220
  • Apr
    15
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Is There a Role for Nicotine in Society? Comparisons with Alcohol and Cannabis

    121 South Main Street, Room 245

    *Co-sponsored by the Legorreta Cancer Center at Brown University

    This talk will discuss the role of nicotine products in the cigarette end-game, and the question of whether there should be a place for nicotine in society once cigarette smoking has been minimized or eliminated. Comparisons regarding benefit and harm will be made for nicotine, alcohol and cannabis.

    Zoom link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/94619986264

    Neal L. Benowitz, MD, is Emeritus Professor of Medicine in the Research Program in Clinical Pharmacology, Division of Cardiology, at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He was Chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at UCSF for 35 years. He received his medical degree from the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1969, following which he served as a resident in internal medicine at the Bronx Municipal Hospital Center from 1969 to 1971. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical pharmacology at UCSF and joined the faculty in 1974. His research interests have focused primarily on the human pharmacology and toxicology of nicotine. He has published more than 700 research papers. Dr Benowitz maintains an active clinical practice in cardiovascular medicine and medical toxicology.


    Dr Benowitz was a scientific editor of the 1988 United States Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health: Nicotine Addiction; a scientific editor of the 2001 NCI Monograph 13 Report on Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine; and served as section editor for the 2010 Surgeon General’s Report on How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. He, has served as a member of the National Institutes of Health Pharmacology Study Section and the FDA Nonprescription Drug and Tobacco Products Science Advisory Committees. He has served as President of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and as President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Dr Benowitz has received the Ove Ferno, Alton Ochsner, and Rawls-Palmer Progress in Medicine awards, and the Oscar B. Hunter Memorial Award in Therapeutics for his research on nicotine, tobacco, and health, and was the 2002 UCSF Annual Distinguished Clinical Research Lecturer.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Apr
    15
    Virtual
    12:00pm EDT

    CCMB Special Seminar: “Relating Enhancer Genetic Variation Across Mammals to Complex Phenotypes Using Machine Learning”

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor Seminar Space

     

    This will be a hybrid talk. In-person attendance is encouraged. 

     

    IRENE KAPLOW

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Carnegie Mellon University

     

    Relating Enhancer Genetic Variation Across Mammals to Complex Phenotypes Using Machine Learning

    Advances in genome sequencing have provided a comprehensive view of cross-species conservation across small segments of nucleotides. These conservation measures have proven invaluable for associating phenotypic variation, both within and across species, to variation in genotype at protein-coding genes or very highly conserved enhancers. However, these approaches cannot be applied to the vast majority of enhancers, where the conservation levels of individual nucleotides are often low even when enhancer function is conserved and where activity is tissue- or cell-type-specific. To overcome these limitations, we developed the TACIT (Tissue-Aware Conservation Inference Toolkit) approach, in which convolutional neural network models learn the regulatory code connecting genome sequence to open chromatin in a tissue of interest, allowing us to accurately predict cases where differences in genotype are associated with differences in open chromatin in that tissue at enhancer regions. We established a new set of evaluation criteria for machine learning models developed for this task and used these criteria to compare our models to models trained using different negative sets and to conservation scores. We then developed a framework for connecting these predictions to phenotypes in a way that accounts for the phylogenetic tree. When applying our framework to the motor cortex and parvalbumin neurons, we identified dozens of new enhancers associated with the evolution of brain size and vocal learning.

     

    Learn more about Irene Kaplow…

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Apr
    15
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Apr
    14
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Martin Wiener - Assistant Professor- George Mason University

    Title: How movements shape the perception of time

    Abstract:
    Movement and time are naturally intertwined. However, while it has long been known that our sense of time can affect our movements, relatively recent research has begun to also show the converse – that our movements can affect the sense of time. Here, I will present recent work that displays this relationship, in which movements, either performed, imagined, or observed, can influence the perception of time. Through this work, which relies on measuring precise kinematics of the observer, two phenomena are found: movements can both enhance our sense of time and bias it. To explain these effects, I will present a model of Bayesian cue combination, in which movements afford the most precise representation of temporal intervals. Further, two modes of neural instantiation will be presented, in which movements can influence time either through “active sensing”, in which they shape responses directly in sensory cortices, or “feedforward enhancement”, in which downstream activity in motor regions alters the memory for timed events. Evidence for both modes will additionally be presented. Further, cue combination provides several predictions of how movements should affect time estimates; a final series of experiments will be presented that address these predictions. Altogether, these results suggest that humans engage the motor system while measuring intervals of time, even when overt movements are not required for the task.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    14
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Translational Research Seminar Series

    Zoom

    “Treatment of Anger Problems in OEF/OIF Veterans - Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial” with Tracie Shea, PhD - Co-Director, Advance-CTR Pilot Projects Program Core and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Register Now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Teaching & Learning
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  Microglia regulate myelin health across the lifespan

    Host: Dr. Sonia Mayoral

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Robotic perception is a key step in any autonomous robotic task including manipulation, localization and planning. The more precise the perception system is, the more complicated and detailed tasks the robot can carry out. Since robots are operating in a dynamic environment, robot perception algorithms need to be robust to different interference. Development in perception algorithms requires increasingly complex algorithms, making real-time perception challenging on the robot computing platforms. Domain-specific hardware accelerators offer the opportunity for creating the optimal hardware design with low-power execution. Although such accelerators have been widely studied for neural networks inference, their applications in the field of robotics are limited.

    In this dissertation work, we create both software and hardware solutions for energy efficient robust robot perception systems. We focus on Monte-Carlo based generative algorithms for 6 DoF rigid and articulated object pose estimation. We show that by combining generative inference algorithm with neural network output as a prior distribution, we can perform efficient inference with robust performance and explainable results. In this work, we focus on algorithms of particle-filtering and belief propagation and accelerate the two algorithms on FPGA through optimized dataflow design, deep pipelined processing units, and concurrent memory access. We are able to achieve significant runtime, power and energy improvement compared to both high-performance and low-power embedded GPU implementation.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    13
    1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

    BSHS Dissertation Defense: Holly Boyle

    Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/98407635709

     

    The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the dissertation defense of Holly Boyle. 

    Simultaneous Alcohol and Cannabis Use Among Young Adults: A Mixed-Methods Exploration of Determinants, Mechanisms, and Consequences

    Alcohol and cannabis are two of the most commonly used substances among young adults, and most individuals who use both substances sometimes use them simultaneously, such that their effects overlap. This dissertation involved a mixed methods design to examine predictors and acute outcomes of simultaneous use. Qualitative interviews among young adults who engage in simultaneous use were conducted to understand intentions and willingness to engage in simultaneous use, contexts where simultaneous use occurs, and positive and negative consequences of simultaneous use. Informed by these findings, a daily survey study was developed and conducted to examine psychosocial predictors of simultaneous use and to examine the relationship between simultaneous use, alcohol quantity, and consequences among young adults. Together these findings provide insight into future directions for simultaneous use research and can inform intervention development.

    PhD Advisor: Jennifer Merrill, PhD

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    13
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Screen Media, Social Interaction and ASD: Connecting Theory and Research

    David Bennett, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Department of Psychiatry
    Drexel University College of Medicine

    And

    Karen F. Heffler, M.D.
    Associate Professor and Autism Researcher
    Department of Psychiatry
    Drexel University Colle of Medicine

    Wednesday, April 13, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Describe the visual brain hyper-connectivity found in autism spectrum disorder; Discuss evidence-based guidelines regarding screen viewing in infants and toddlers; and Review recent findings regarding the association between early-life digital screen exposure and autism symptoms and diagnosis.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    12
    5:30pm EDT

    Chasing Childhood

    Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Rm Martinos Auditorium

    In today’s world of structure, stranger danger, and helicopter parenting, free play and independence have virtually disappeared from childhood, giving way to unprecedented anxiety and depression (now compounded by two years of the COVID-19 pandemic). In Chasing Childhood, psychologists, activists, and leaders of the “free play” movement fight to bring back the untold benefits of a less curated childhood.

    Following the screening, the BAI hosts a panel featuring Yulia Chentsova Dutton, Cultural Psychologist and Associate Professor, Georgetown University; Dr. Bryant Ford, Director of Psychological Services, Brown University; Margaret Munzer Loeb ’94, Director/Executive Producer, Chasing Childhood; and Logan Powell, Dean of Admission, Brown University. Moderated by Lisa Eisenpresser ’89, Producer, Chasing Childhood.

    More Information Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Teaching & Learning
  • Apr
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107
    Corinne Hutfilz, Tatar Lab
    Azu Rocha, Neretti Lab
    More Information 
  • Apr
    12
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell St., Rm 475

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Judy Liu, Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, associate professor of neurology, associate professor of molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    12

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a lively conversation about health disparities in brain-related disorders, featuring:

    • Monica Rivera-Mindt, Ph.D., president of the Hispanic Neuropsychological Society, a professor of psychology at Fordham University and a board-certified neuropsychologist. Rivera-Mindt’s research focuses on the intersection between cultural neuroscience, neuropsychology and health disparities utilizing a novel community-based approach.
    • Diana Grigsby, Ph.D., an associate professor of behavioral and social sciences and of epidemiology at Brown University. Grigsby’s research seeks to capture complex processes in the food, social and built environments to facilitate a better understanding of their influence on what has been coined the three pillars of health: diet, physical activity and sleep.

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • PSRIG Seminar: “Police Contact and Sleep Patterns During Adolescence and Adulthood”

     

    Dylan Jackson, Ph.D. & Alexander Testa, Ph.D.

     

    The current project assesses associations between police contact, its features and mental and/or physical health repercussions, and indicators of sleep quality and quantity in two national samples of adolescents and/or adults in the United States: The Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS) and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). Findings suggest that strategies may be needed among public health practitioners and law enforcement to mitigate the potential impacts of adverse police contact on sleep health.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    12
    12:00pm EDT

    NSGP In-House Seminar: Hannah Goldbach; Alvarez Lab / Adrianne Corseri; Tapinos Lab

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Apr
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Jiuyang Bai

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    Speaker: Jiuyang Bai, Brown University

    Title: Visual control laws for collision avoidance with moving obstacles

    Advisor: William Warren

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    11
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, VNC), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Apr
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Marshall - Postdoctoral Fellow- Boston College
    Title: The Early Pursuit of Third-Party Punishment
    Abstract: Responding to wrongdoing is a central feature of our social lives. Indeed, a core assumption of modern institutional justice systems is that transgressors should be punished for their misdeeds. In the present talk, I argue that the pursuit of punishment by third-parties is anchored in human development, showing that the kinds of intervention that form the foundation of institutions of justice can be traced to judgments and behaviors present in early childhood. Specifically, I outline research showing that children are both assessors and agents of third-party punishment. With respect to assessment, children make specific predictions about the pursuit of punishment and also hold rich notions about the obligatory nature of third-party punishment. With respect to agency, children punish wrongdoing (even when doing so is costly), and their motives to do so are tethered to a variety of justice-related concerns (such as retribution and norm communication). My talk will showcase third-party punishment as a signature of children’s sophisticated toolkit for regulating social relationships and behavior.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    11
    9:30am - 10:00am EDT

    Biotechnology Master’s Thesis Defense - Faith Keller

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Please join the Biotechnology Graduate Program for the final examination of Faith Keller for the degree of master of science.

    Advisor: Justin Fallon, PhD

    Title: Identification of exon-skipping antisense oligonucleotides that modulate alternative splicing of MuSK

    More Information 
  • Apr
    8
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Claudio Toro Serey, Postdoc - Haber Lab, Harvard Medical School
    Title: Evaluatingthe neural juxtaposition of value-related and introspective cognitive functionsin individuals
    Abstract: A diverseset of higher order psychological phenomena, including economic judgments,engage overlapping swaths of association cortex, prompting the question ofwhether these are truly distinguishable functions, or if they are subserved bya common cognitive operation. However, much work has highlighted the need toconsider how different sources of behavioral and neural variability can impactthe localization of function in the brain, and whether distinct cognitiveoperations are indeed juxtaposed at the neural level. In this talk I willdiscuss behavioral and neuroimaging studies in humans that leveraged individualvariability to evaluate the apparent overlap between decision-related corticalregions and the default network (a brain network commonly associated withintrospective processes). First, I will highlight the degree of topographicidiosyncrasy within medial cortical regions of the default network thatconsistently overlap with subjective value effects (an observation that isblurred by traditional group averages). Second,I will show how choices can fluctuate even in fully known environments, posinga potential problem for brain mapping. ThenI will explore the potential interaction of these types of variability todetermine whether value-sensitive regions could be disentangled from the defaultnetwork across multiple task contexts at the individual level. I will finish bypresenting preliminary work on how neuroanatomical tracing can shed light onthese neuroimaging findings.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    8
    1:00pm - 1:50pm EDT

    BigAI Talk: Deploying Autonomous Service Mobile Robots, And Keeping Them Autonomous (Joydeep Biswas from UT Austin)

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    To watch virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/94484109789

    Add to calendar

    Abstract: Why is it so hard to deploy autonomous service mobile robots in unstructured human environments, and to keep them autonomous? In this talk, I will explain three key challenges, and our recent research in overcoming them: 1) ensuring robustness to environmental changes; 2) anticipating and overcoming failures; and 3) efficiently adapting to user needs.

    To remain robust to environmental changes, we build probabilistic perception models to explicitly reason about object permanence and distributions of semantically meaningful movable objects. By anticipating and accounting for changes in the environment, we are able to robustly deploy robots in challenging frequently changing environments. To anticipate and overcome failures, we introduce introspective perception to learn to predict and overcome perception errors. Introspective perception allows a robot to autonomously learn to identify causes of perception failure, how to avoid them, and how to learn context-aware noise models to overcome such failures.

    To adapt and correct behaviors of robots based on user preferences, or to handle unforeseen circumstances, we leverage representation learning and program synthesis. We introduce visual representation learning for preference-aware planning to identify and reason about novel terrain types from unlabelled human demonstrations. We further introduce physics-informed program synthesis to synthesize and repair programmatic action selection policies (ASPs) in a human-interpretable domain-specific language with several orders of magnitude fewer demonstrations than necessary for neural network ASPs of comparable performance. The combination of these research advances allows us to deploy a varied fleet of wheeled and legged autonomous mobile robots on the campus scale at UT Austin, performing tasks that require robust mobility both indoors and outdoors.

    Joydeep Biswas is an assistant professor in the department of computer science at the University of Texas at Austin. He earned his B.Tech in Engineering Physics from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in 2008, and M.S. and PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University in 2010 and 2014 respectively. From 2015 to 2019, he was assistant professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research spans perception and planning for long-term autonomy, with the ultimate goal of having service mobile robots deployed in human environments for years at a time, without the need for expert corrections or supervision. Prof. Biswas received the NSF CAREER award in 2021, an Amazon Research Award in 2018, and a JP Morgan Faculty Research Award in 2018.

    Host: George Konidaris

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  • Apr
    8
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Apr
    7
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series: Melissa Warden, PhD; Cornell University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Aud. Room 220

    Title:  Neuromodulation and the balance between goal-directed and reactive behavior

    Host:  Dr. Theresa Desrochers

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Carney Institute Seminar: “Bridging the Gap: Engineering connexin proteins as novel tools for neural circuit modulation”

    Elizabeth Ransey, Ph.D.
    Postdoc
    Duke University

    The coordination of activity between brain cells is a key determinant of neural circuit function in both normal physiology and disease states; nevertheless, methodologies capable of selectively regulating distinct circuits without affecting the surrounding context of brain activity remain sparce. To address this limitation, we developed the components of a novel electrical synapse capable of synchronizing neurons by rationally engineering two gap junction proteins (connexins).

    Using protein mutagenesis, a novel in vitro assay of connexin docking, and computational modeling of connexin hemichannel interactions, we identified a pattern of structural motifs that define the connexin docking specificity of Morone americana (white perch fish) connexin34.7 (Cx34.7) and connexin35 (Cx35). We then utilized this knowledge to design Cx34.7 and Cx35 hemichannels that dock with each other, but not with themselves nor other major connexins expressed in the human central nervous system. We validated these hemichannels in vivo by demonstrating that they facilitate communication between two neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans (worms) and recode a learned behavioral preference. Additionally, we have recently demonstrated in vivo functionality in mice using two experimental paradigms: phase-amplitude coupling in a prelimbic microcircuit and the modulation of a stress adapted behavior via expression across a long-range monosynaptic projection. Thus, we establish a genetically encoded, translational approach, ‘Long-term integration of Circuits using connexins’ (LinCx), for context-precise circuit-editing with unprecedented spatiotemporal specificity

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Apr
    7
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    Pathobiology Seminar: Dorian McGavern, Ph.D.

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Senior Investigator Dorian McGavern from the Viral Immunology & Intravital Imaging Section at the NIH will present “Immune defense of CNS barriers against infections”. This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Apr
    6
    3:00pm - 4:30pm EDT

    PLM Seminar Series with Mario Suva, MD, PhD

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    PLM Seminar Series

    Dissecting Brain Tumors Biology by Single-Cell Genomics

    Zoom Link

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Apr
    6
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Lorna Quandt - Assistant Professor - Gallaudet University

    Title: Sign Language and Embodied Cognition: Bringing Together EEG, Behavior, and Emerging Technology

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    4
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Joint Materials/Solid Mechanics Seminar: K.T. Ramesh, Johns Hopkins

    Barus and Holley, Rm 190

    K.T. Ramesh, Decker Professor of Science & Engineering and Director, Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute, of the John Hopkins University, will present a talk: “The Mechanics of the Live Human Brain.”

    Abstract: Understanding traumatic brain injury in humans is very difficult in part because we cannot do controlled experiments that lead to injury (apart from the peculiar liberties that certain professional sports seem to be allowed to take). This seminar focuses on the mechanics of the living human brain, and on the likelihood of traumatic brain injury.
    We begin with a primer on brain anatomy and tissue properties. We then move on to consider the dynamics of the whole head, using experiments performed by human volunteers within an MRI. Next, the baseline tissue properties are established through a combination of in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Now that we have the anatomy and the tissue properties, we develop computational simulations of brain deformation for specific subjects, using their specific anatomy and the associated boundary conditions. The subject-specific computations are performed using the material point method so that we can simulate the 3D motions. We use one type of motion (the “no” shake of the head) to recalibrate the tissue properties for the live brain, and a second type of motion (the “yes” shake of the head) to validate the simulations.
    We show that incorporating the specific anatomy of the head (e.g., the falx and tentorum) is important if we are to capture the measured brain deformations in live humans. Using these validated simulations (validated at small deformations), we now run computational models of potentially injurious motions of the head, intending to address the when and where questions: establishing the onset of injury (for an axonal strain criterion), and the likely locations of injury within the brain. We also attempt to understand the mechanisms of injury through single-axon experiments and direct injury-causing experiments on laboratory mice. Finally, we use surrogate models to obtain some sense of the uncertainties associated with such simulation approaches for understanding injury in humans.

    Bio: K.T. Ramesh is the Alonzo G. Decker Jr. Professor of Science & Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, Director of the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute, and a Professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Earth & Planetary Sciences. His research interests are the broad areas of impact and failure of materials under extreme conditions, with specific interests in protection materials, the massive failure of brittle solids, impact processes in planetary science, and impact biomechanics. His work has applications in protecting people, structures, and the planet. Professor Ramesh also has a particular interest in the ways in which creativity can be integrated into the sciences, arts, and engineering.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    4
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - MATLAB: Improving Performance

    This workshop will cover basic performance optimization techniques using MATLAB, including: code profiling, pre-allocation, sequential memory access, vectorization, and efficient matrix-vector storage and operations. We will assume that participants have a basic understanding of the MATLAB programming language.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Apr
    4
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Shari Liu- PostDoc - MIT
    Title: Neural and developmental origins of social intelligence
    Abstract: From infancy we have expectations about the social and physical world - e.g. that objects are solid and people have goals. I propose that this understanding is organized as domain-specific intuitive theories of psychology and physics, that work together in our minds and brains starting early in life. In this talk, I will present past work showing that infants represent information about other people’s minds and actions in terms of their surrounding physical constraints. One future aspiration is to test this proposal further by comparing the predictions of formal computational models of these intuitive theories to infant behavior, when the same stimuli are shown to infants and the model. However, there are at least two challenges to this goal: (1) slow and laborious data acquisition, and (2) the ambiguity of the behavior (longer looking) to be modeled. Thus, I will spend the rest of the talk discussing progress on both fronts, including automated gaze annotation from video, and studies using cognitive neuroscience to disentangle sources of novelty in stimuli from developmental psychology. Together, these tools have the potential to enable high-powered, conceptually precise studies of the origins of the human mind.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    1
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    30
    Virtual
    12:30pm - 2:00pm EDT

    24th Annual Mind Brain Research Day

    Zoom, Rm https://brown.zoom.us/j/96432454551

    Keynote Speaker – Lisa L. Barnes, Ph.D.

    Alla V. and Solomon Jesmer Professor of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, cognitive neuropsychologist within the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL

    “Epidemiology of Alzheimer’s Dementia and Cognitive Decline in Diverse Older Adults”

    12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

    (Zoom Webinar)

    Zoom Link More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Danique Jeurissen, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University.

    Abstract

    Neural substrates of higher cognitive functions like decision-making are distributed across multiple brain areas. The flexibility afforded by such architecture renders some cognitive functions resilient to focal lesions. We used pharmacological and chemogenetic approaches to disrupt activity in the parietal cortex of monkeys performing two perceptual decision-making tasks. Inactivation initially disrupted decision-making in all four monkeys. This was followed by behavioral compensation occurring at two time scales: within experimental sessions and across sessions. Our results suggest that compensatory mechanisms can account for the disparate effects of causal manipulations on higher cognitive functions.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • “Instability with a purpose: an out-of-equilibrium neural mechanism for continuous decision-making in an unpredictable world”

    Jochen Braun, Ph.D.
    Cognitive Biology Group
    Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg

    Host: Professor Takeo Watanabe

    Abstract

    Visual perception continuously evaluates and chooses between alternative interpretations of changing visual scenes. Introspectively, this becomes evident under challenging conditions (e.g., when running in a fog). Here I present a new hypothesis on how human vision performs continuous inference. I propose that out-of-equilibrium processes accumulate competing evidence in discrete increments and that the accumulation is both terminated and restarted when a perceptual decision changes the dynamic equilibrium. This proposal reconciles “diffusion-to-bound accumulation” and “discrete attractor dynamics”, the main alternative theories of perceptual decision-making.

    In the first part of my talk, I explain how the reversal dynamics of multistable perception reveal many aspects of the inferential mechanism of perception, including its possible neural realization. Multistable perception exhibits quasi-universal statistical features, such as a scaling property, a peculiar input depencence (“Levelt’s propositions”), and positive sequential correlation. A hierarchical process comprising discretely stochastic elements, and operating out-of-equilibrium, would explain, and indeed guarantee, these features [1]. I also show how the elements in question could be realized with metastable cortical networks [2].

    In the last part of my talk, I consider the proposed mechanism from a normative perspective. I show that evidence accumulation is statistically efficient, that the initiation and termination of evidence accumulation approximate continuous inference [3], and that decisions are ‘robust’ with heavy-tailed input distributions [4]. I conclude that an out-of-equilibrium dynamic with discretely stochastic elements has surprising explanatory power in several respects: multistable perception, cortical activity dynamics, and optimal inference in a volatile and unpredictable world.

    [1] Cao, Pastukhov, Aleshin, Mattia, Braun (2021) Binocular rivalry reveals an out-of-equilibrium neural dynamics suited for decision-making. eLife, 10: e61581
    [2] Brinkman, Yan, Maffei, Park, Fontanini, Wang, La Camera (2021) Metastable dynamics of neural circuits and networks. arXiv: 2110.03025.
    [3] Veliz-Cuba, Kilpatrick, Josic (2015) Stochastic models of evidence accumulation in changing environments. SIAM Review, 58: 264-89.
    [4] De Menezes, Prata, Secchi, Pinto (2021) A review on robust M-estimators for regression analysis. Computers & Chemical Engineering, 147: 107254

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Charan Ranganath - Professor - UC Davis
    Title: Moments for memories
    Abstract:When we remember a past event, we use our prior knowledge, along with recovered details, to build rich narratives that can capture the essence of an extended sequence of events. This intuitive understanding of episodic memory is not captured by typical lab paradigms in which people memorize lists of unrelated words or pictures, nor is it captured by conventional theories in psychology and neuroscience which imply that the brain continuously encodes memories for every moment of experience. In research using controlled, naturalistic stimuli, we have found that the hippocampus–known to be critical for episodic memory–encodes snapshots of experience at specific moments of uncertainty, prediction error, or a change in one’s understanding of the current situation. From a computational perspective, this might be an optimal use of episodic memory, such that memory is optimized to provide the most useful information when we need it most.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Update on Mechanisms of the Pathophysiology of Neonatal Encephalopathy”


    Joanne Davidson, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Physiology
    The University of Auckland
    Fetal Physiology and Neuroscience Group

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • This Friday (3/25/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. John F. Kelly will present, “Addiction Recovery: From Culture to Science” for this week’s CAAS Rounds and The CAAS Colloquia Series!

    This talk will review the knowledge gained during the past 50 years about addiction recovery and describe how this has led to a new movement of addiction recovery science that promises to better inform the nature and scope of the type of clinical and public health infrastructure needed to address it. 

    More Information 
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    24
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jonathan Victor - Professor - Weill Cornell Medical College

    Title:Information-theoretic analysis of sensing for olfactory navigation

    Abstract:
    A wide range of species rely on olfaction for life-critical functions, including navigation towards food sources or mates. Since odor environments are typically turbulent, olfactory navigation is a computationally-challenging task – yet successful organisms have evolved effective solutions. Thus, olfactory navigation is an excellent model system to test normative theories of sensory processing. Here, combining information-theoretic analyses and high-resolution spatiotemporal measurements of naturalistic odor environments, we investigate the utility of a range of sampling strategies. Several findings emerge. First, coarse resolution of odor concentration at multiple times and/or locations is a more efficient use of coding resources than fine resolution of a single sample. Second, the optimal coding strategy for navigation allocates greater resources to the upper end of the concentration range than the optimal coding strategy for plume reconstruction (i.e., histogram equalization). Interestingly, the nonlinear transformation of ligand binding closely approximates the performance of the theoretically-optimal encoding strategy for navigation. Finally, local mixing prior to sampling can improve efficiency, a result that suggests ways in which active sensing strategies could be tuned to the statistics of the odor environment.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    24

    Title: Dynamically relevant motifs in inhibition-dominated networks

    Abstract:  Many networks in the brain possess an abundance of inhibition, which serves to shape and stabilize neural dynamics. The neurons in such networks exhibit intricate patterns of connectivity whose structure controls the allowed patterns of neural activity. In this work, we examine inhibitory threshold-linear networks (TLNs) whose dynamics are constrained by an underlying directed graph. We develop a set of parameter-independent graph rules that enable us to predict features of the dynamics, such as emergent sequences and dynamic attractors, from properties of the graph. These rules provide a direct link between the structure and function of inhibition-dominated networks, yielding new insights into how connectivity shapes dynamics in real neural circuits. Recently, we have used these ideas to classify dynamic attractors in a two-parameter family of TLNs spanning all 9608 directed graphs of size n=5. Remarkably, we find a striking modularity in the dynamic attractors, with identical or near-identical attractors arising in networks that are otherwise dynamically inequivalent. This suggests that, just as one can store multiple static patterns as stable fixed points in a Hopfield model, a variety of dynamic attractors can also be embedded in TLNs in a modular fashion.

    Access to zoom - https://brown.zoom.us/j/98845440335

    More Information 
  • Mar
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    Pathobiology Seminar: Alexander Jaworski, Ph.D.

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Associate Professor Alexander Jaworski from the Department of Neuroscience at Brown University will present “Understanding how neuronal connectivity is established during development and eroded in neurodegenerative disease”. This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Dr. Nicté Fuller Medina,Swarthmore College

    Title: Nation, State and Race: Multilingual Acts of Identity in Belize

    Abstract: Belize is the only country in Central America to have English as its official language yet only 63% of the population claim English as a language they speak. Another 57% of the population claims Spanish and 46% claim Belize Kriol, an English-lexified Creole (Statistical Institute of Belize 2013:21). English is the prestige language, while Spanish (the de facto official second language) has dual status as prestige and stigmatized language. Kriol, on the other hand, largely considered a lingua franca, has been recruited as a marker of pan-Belizean identity since the time of independence. Thus, is holds covert prestige but remains highly stigmatized (Young 1995; Le Page and Tabouret-Keller 1985). Speakers who use these languages in the same utterance in everyday speech as in (1) must navigate multiple grammatical systems as well the ideological landscape in which these languages are hierarchically positioned. 1. Tiene miedo que se haga drop su amiga. Have3PL.PRES fear that CL do3SG.SUBJ drop her friend ‘She is afraid that her friend will fall’ Drawing on data from language policies, language attitudes and a corpus of multilingual data from Belize, I examine how state ideologies, colonial raciolinguistic ideologies, and linguistic agency can be observed in the empirical practices of plurilingual Belizean Spanish speakers as they employ their linguistic resources to achieve communicative goals and project various acts of identity.

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Florencia Anggoro- Associate Professor - College of the Holy Cross
    Title: Designing Cognitive Supports for Children’s Science Learning
    Abstract: Understanding the structure of scientific theories (e.g., the heliocentric model of the solar system, evolution by natural selection, particle theory of matter) is fundamentally a process of relational learning: mapping the spatial, temporal, and causal relations between observations and their underlying explanation. In this talk, I will discuss the challenge of relational learning and how I have developed and tested a method to support elementary students’ understanding of space science. I will also discuss some implications of these findings for learning and instruction in other STEM domains.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Title: Machine Learning Powered Query Optimization
    Abstract: Database management systems (DBMSes) depend on query optimizers to transform a user’s declarative query into an efficient execution plan. Query optimizers are critical because a bad query plan can be orders of magnitude slower than the optimal plan. Modern query optimizers are complex and expensive to maintain, as they integrate a wide range of hand-tuned heuristics and manually-engineered cost models which must be updated for every new capability added to the DBMS. I will present two recent approaches to query optimization that leverage deep reinforcement learning to simultaneously improve query performance and decrease maintenance burden. The first approach, Neo (VLDB 19), combines tree convolution neural networks with a novel value iteration technique to fully replace a traditional query optimizer, yielding as much as 2x improvements after just 36 hours of training on stable workloads. The second approach, Bao (SIGMOD 21), targets dynamic workloads, and learns to “steer” an existing query optimizer by training an agent via a contextual multi-armed bandit framework. More broadly, both Neo and Bao highlight the huge potential impact of applying machine learning to systems problems, giving us a glimpse of what a fully learned system could do, as well as highlighting several potential pitfalls along the way.
    Ryan’s homepage: https://rmarcus.info
    Neo paper: https://rm.cab/neo
    Bao paper: https://rm.cab/bao
    Bio: Ryan Marcus is a postdoc at MIT, where he researches learned systems. Ryan focuses on the potential of machine learning to underpin the next generation of data management systems, especially query optimization, data storage, and indexing. Before MIT, Ryan received his PhD from Brandeis University, where he studied machine learning techniques for automating cloud data management systems. Ryan is also a scientist at Intel Labs, an avid World of Warcraft player, and generally amenable to every kind of snack you could imagine.
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  • Please join the Brown Contemplative Studies Initiative and the Department of Religious Studies for a lecture by Professor Sarah Mattice, University of North Florida, on “Exploring the Heart Sutra as a Chinese Text.” This in-person event will take place on March 18th in Smith-Buonanno, Rm. 106 from 5:30 - 7 pm. You can find an abstract of her talk on the Contemplative Studies website.
    As always, if you have any questions, please contact [email protected].
    More Information Faith, Spirituality, Worship, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Cristine Legare, Professor at UT Austin
    Title: The development and diversity of cumulative culture learning
    Abstract: Human culture is unique among animal species in its complexity, diversity, and variability. Children inhabit cultural ecologies that contain knowledge systems, beliefs, practices, artifacts, and technologies that are transmitted and modified over generations. In this talk I describe the development and diversity of cumulative cultural learning. I propose that the learning processes that enable cultural acquisition and transmission are universal but are sufficiently flexible to accommodate highly diverse cultural toolkits. Children learn culture in several complementary ways, including through exploration, observation, participation, imitation, and instruction. These methods of learning vary in frequency and kind within and between populations due to variation in socialization values and practices associated with specific educational institutions, skill sets, and knowledge systems. The processes by which children acquire and transmit the cumulative culture of their communities provide unique insight into the cognitive foundations of cumulative cultural transmission—the cornerstone of human cultural diversity.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • This Friday (3/18/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Allecia Reid will present, “Reducing peer influences on young adult alcohol use: Leveraging correlational and experimental data for intervention development” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

    More Information 
  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    17
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Carney Coffee Hour: Centers & Core Facilities

    Zoom
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 928 5235 1533
    Passcode: 782080

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a virtual Carney Coffee Hour to learn more about the institute’s centers and core facilities, featuring Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, the institute’s associate director.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    17
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

    Biology of Aging Seminar - Andrey Parkhitko

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm 202
  • Mar
    17
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jiuyang Bai - PhD student - Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences Department - Brown

    Title: Visual Control Laws for Collision Avoidance with Moving Obstacles

    Abstract: Despite years of studying collision avoidance in robotics, computer animation, and traffic engineering, there is still no biologically plausible model of how a human pedestrian avoids a moving obstacle. Most models are based on the physical 3D position and velocity of the object as input, rather than the visual information available to a moving observer. As a pedestrian approaches a moving obstacle, a collision is specified by a constant bearing direction together with optical expansion of the obstacle. We developed a series of dynamical models of collision avoidance that use changes in bearing direction, visual angle, or distance, and the participant’s preferred walking speed, to modulate control laws for heading and speed. We fit the models to human data and attempted to predict route selection (ahead or behind the obstacle) and the locomotor trajectory. Three experiments were conducted in VR, in which participants wore a wireless head-mounted display (101°H x 105°V, 90 Hz) and were asked to walk to a goal while avoiding a moving obstacle moving on linear trajectories. The heading angle, speed, and initial distance of the obstacle were manipulated. All four models were able to predict the locomotor trajectory with a small distance error (<20cm). Models use optical expansion (avoidance model 2, 3, and 4) matched and exceeded the model that uses distance (avoidance model 1). These studies show that it is possible to use visual variables instead of 3D distance to model pedestrian collision avoidance.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Wednesday, March 16 at 4:00 PM.

     

    NIKOS TAPINOS, MD, Ph.D.

    Brown University


    CANCER STEM CELL PLASTICITY: INTEGRATING COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY WITH THE BEDSIDE

    Dr. Nikos Tapinos will present the concept of cancer stem cell plasticity and why this is crucial for understanding the evolution of cancer and therapeutic resistance. He will present computational; biology projects that help discover molecular mechanisms that define cellular plasticity and finally, Dr. Tapinos will show examples of how this new information can be used for the benefit of cancer patients. 

     

    Learn more about Dr. Nikos Tapinos…

    More Information 
  • Mar
    16
    1:00pm - 1:50pm EDT

    Critical Computing Speaker Series: William Lockett

    Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Rm 110

    The Critical Computing Speaker Series presents William Lockett

    “Media Laboratory Classrooms for Human Model Organisms, 1952–1974”

    This presentation provides to the Digital Media students a way into the scientific and philosophical stakes of model mindsas they relate specifically to the pre-history of the personal computer. I show that model builders used modern logic and sensory deprivation architectures to transform classrooms into laboratory contexts designed for studies of the development in children of numerical and linguistic abilities. I argue that this background of “model work”—behind the foreground of networked personal devices—stabilizes a set of philosophical stakes that can guide the formation of a critical media history of computing in the present.

    Please be sure to RSVP using the form below.

    More Information Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Social Sciences
  • Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Dr. Rachel Steindel Burdin, University of New Hampshire

    Title: “But I don’t do that anymore, because I live in Maine”: Exploring language, place, and Jewish identity in New England and beyond

    Abstract: What does it mean to “sound Jewish”? What does it mean for a place to “be Jewish”? And how do the two interact? In this talk, I will explore the relationship between language, place, and Jewishness, focusing on two locations: New England, and Kazimierz, the Jewish quarter in Krakow, Poland. First, I will present research from New Hampshire and Southern Maine, which builds off previous work suggesting ideological links between “Jewishness” and “New Yorkness” as well as research on language change and urban/rural orientation in Northern New England (Nagy, 2001; Stanford et al., 2012). Jewish community members from the area appear to be leading a change away from some traditional Eastern New England dialect features, mirroring the situation in Boston (Laferriere, 1979; Stanford, 2019). In addition, Jewish community members from outside the area appear to maintain a LOT/THOUGHT distinction, and a distinctly New York City English raised THOUGHT vowel is noted by some speakers to be emblematic of “Jewish-sounding” speech, providing further evidence of an indexical link between New Yorkness and Jewishness. Next, I will present an analysis of the use of Hebrew and Yiddish in the linguistic landscape of Krakow’s Jewish quarter, Kazimierz. While some local businesses’ use of Hebrew and Yiddish ends up either displacing Jewishness in either time or space, reinforcing tourist narratives of Poland as a place devoid of Jews (Lehrer, 2013), the Jewish Community Center use of Hebrew and Yiddish situates the Jewishness of the quarter in the here and now, presenting a vibrant, growing community to visitors, and creating new narratives about Jewishness in Poland.

    Despite the varied methodologies employed (quantitative vs. qualitative), modalities (written vs. spoken language) and different locations (New England vs. Poland), both of these studies end up showing the impact of similar metalinguistic narratives and other ideologies. People’s ideas about where Jews live, the languages they speak, and what it means to “sound Jewish” end up shaping both the production and perception of Jewish language(s).

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Mar
    14
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Elizabeth Bonawitz - Associate Professor - Harvard Graduate School of Education
    Title: How Social Information Shapes Inferences in Early Childhood.
    Abstract: Learning does not occur in a vacuum; while children learn a great deal through formal and informal instruction, they also learn from less-obvious pedagogical social cues. In this talk, I will present work from the lab that demonstrates the power of “Pedagogical Questions”; by asking simple questions from the perspective of a knowledgeable teacher, we can increase children’s exploration, perseverance, memory, and learning. Beyond simply showing their benefits, formalizing the learning process using computational models can help explain “why” pedagogical questions work, and help us leverage this method to improve learning.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    14

    Dr. Nicholas Petrick, Deputy Director for the Division of Imaging, Diagnostics and Software Reliability at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration and member of the FDA Senior Biomedical Research Service

    Current regulatory validation methods for artificial intelligence models applied to medical imaging data

    Statical decision making, artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) methods have a long history being applied to digital medical image data with mammography computer-aided detection devices approved back in 1998 by FDA and other quantitative tools/measures approved or cleared even earlier. The number of AI/ML tools applied to medical image data remained relatively consistent until a few years ago. The FDA is currently seeing a substantial increase in the number of submitted AI/ML tools because of recent advances in deep learning methods in other commercial areas with the potential for these tools to have a much wider impact on clinical decision-making. Some newer medical AI/ML applications include detection and diagnostic tools to aid in disease detection and assessment, triage tools to aid in prioritizing time-sensitive imaging studies, quantitative measurement tools, structural segmentation tools, image reconstruction or denoising tools, and optimization tools to aid in image acquisition to name a few. In this talk, I will introduce the audience to FDA’s medical device regulatory processes with the goal of demystifying how medical devices are regulated in the U.S. The main focus of my talk will be on the validation methods currently being applied to AI/ML device assessment and a discussion of our ongoing regulatory research developing methods to potentially improve AI/ML algorithm generalizability, robustness analysis as well as AI/ML device performance assessment.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    5:00pm - 6:30pm EST

    Social Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Hema Preya Selvanathan- Lecturer- The University of Queensland, Australia
    Title: Collective action for and against social change
    Abstract:Throughout history and in many regions around the world, people have engaged in collective action and participated in social movements to demand social change. At the same time, there is often collective backlash against social change. In this talk, I will present an overview of how social identity and group processes shape mobilization towards greater equality and justice, as well as those that aim to defend the status quo and the current social hierarchy. I will examine societal attitudes toward social movements in diverse socio-political contexts, including the Black Lives Matter and Alt-Right movements in the United States, the Bersih pro-democracy movement in Malaysia, and the Invasion Day protests in Australia.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    Classic Psychedelics in Addiction Treatment

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Join the CADRE for an upcoming presentation in our Distinguished Visiting Scholar Series by Matthew W. Johnson, entitled “Classic Psychedelics in Addiction Treatment”!

    This presentation will review the treatment of substance use disorders with classic psychedelics (5HT2A agonists) including LSD and psilocybin. Early research from the 1950s to 1970s investigated classic psychedelics, primarily LSD, in the treatment of alcohol use disorder and cancer-related distress. Over the last 20 years, research has resumed investigating psychedelics in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, including tobacco and alcohol use disorders.

    Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D., is The Susan Hill Ward Endowed Professor of Psychedelics and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University. Working with psychedelics since 2004, he is one of the world’s most widely published experts on psychedelics. He has published research on psychedelics and mystical experience, personality change, tobacco smoking cessation, cancer distress treatment, and depression treatment. In 2021 he received as principal investigator the first grant in 50 years from the US government for a treatment study with a classic psychedelic, specifically psilocybin in treatment of tobacco addiction. He is also known for his expertise in behavioral economics, addiction, sexual risk behavior, and research with a wide variety of drug classes. He’s been interviewed by Anderson Cooper on 60 Minutes, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, CNN, NPR, Fox Business News, BBC and was featured in Michael Pollan’s book How to Change Your Mind.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Claire Gillan - Associate Professor - Trinity College Dublin
    Title: Getting personal with network theory of mental health and illness
    Abstract:Network theory of psychopathology posits that mental health disorders like depression might be better understood as complex systems defined by interacting elements, or ‘symptoms’, like low mood, excessive guilt and insomnia. This challenges the traditional view in psychiatry that disorders themselves are the latent cause of symptoms and offers an explanation as to why psychiatry has failed to find clear neurobiological, genetic, or environmental causes of specific DSM disorders. Though there is much excitement about the potential for network approaches to explain individual differences in clinical presentation, help us understand vulnerability, and potentially tailor treatments, there is snag; almost all of the empirical research supporting network theory rests on between-subject analyses in cross-sectional data. In this talk, I will stress the need for constructing and interrogating personalised within-subject networks to move this field forward. This allows us to ask not whether things like insomnia and guilt correlate across individuals, but how reliably guilt precedes insomnia within a person. Focusing on a core prediction of network theory, that more tightly connected networks of symptoms are associated with vulnerability, severity, and persistence of illness, I will describe some recent efforts in this area using a variety of data sources. These include clinical panel data from >65,000 patients followed through cognitive behavioural therapy, personalised networks constructed from depression-related language in Tweets (N=946), and twice-daily self-reported affect from an experience sampling study (N=208) via the neureka app (www.neureka.ie).

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Nura Sidarus, PhD - Lecturer - Royal Holloway University of London

    Title: Who’s in control? Prospective contributions to the sense of agency

    Abstract:
    Human voluntary action is typically accompanied by an experience of being in control of our actions and their consequences, referred to as sense of agency. Previous research has shown that the sense of agency relies on a retrospective comparison between expected and observed action outcomes. Our work has shown that there is also a prospective component to the sense of agency, related to the metacognitive monitoring of decision-making processes. Difficult decisions reduce our sense of agency over action outcomes. These effects generalise across tasks, from unconscious to conscious manipulations, in dynamic video games, and in social contexts. I will discuss the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying these prospective contributions to the sense of agency, and how they are integrated with outcome-related information. Furthermore, I will consider the implications of this work for understanding decision-making and learning processes, in both individual and social contexts.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Title: Bridging Safety and Learning in Human-Robot Interaction
    Abstract: From autonomous cars in cities to mobile manipulators at home, robots must interact with people. What makes this hard is that human behavior—especially when interacting with other agents—is vastly complex, varying between individuals, environments, and over time. Thus, robots rely on data and machine learning throughout the design process and during deployment to build and refine models of humans. However, by blindly trusting their data-driven human models, today’s robots confidently plan unsafe behaviors around people, resulting in anything from miscoordination to dangerous collisions.
    My research aims to ensure safety in human-robot interaction, particularly when robots learn from and about people. In this talk, I will discuss how treating robot learning algorithms as dynamical systems driven by human data enables safe human-robot interaction. I will first introduce a Bayesian monitor which infers online if the robot’s learned human model can evolve to well-explain observed human data. I will then discuss how a novel, control-theoretic problem formulation enables us to formally quantify what the robot could learn online from human data and how quickly it could learn it. Coupling these ideas with robot motion planning algorithms, I will demonstrate how robots can safely and automatically adapt their behavior based on how trustworthy their learned human models are. I will end this talk by taking a step back and raising the question: “What is the ‘right’ notion of safety when robots interact with people?” and discussing opportunities for how rethinking our notions of safety can capture more subtle aspects of human-robot interaction.
    Bio: Andrea Bajcsy is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, working with Professors Anca Dragan and Claire Tomlin. She studies safe human-robot interaction, particularly when robots learn from and about people. Her research unites traditionally disparate methods from control theory and machine learning to develop theoretical frameworks and practical algorithms for human-robot interaction in domains like assistive robotic arms, quadrotors, and autonomous cars. Prior to her Ph.D., she earned her B.S. at the University of Maryland, College Park in Computer Science in 2016. She is the recipient of an Honorable Mention for the T-RO Best Paper Award, the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Fellowship, and has worked at NVIDIA Research and Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems.
    More Information 
  • Mar
    10
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Biomedical Engineering Seminar: Jordan T. Moore, Ohio State

    Engineering Research Center, Rm 125

    Jordan T. Moore, Ph.D. candidate from the Daniel Gallego-Perez Lab, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, will present a talk: “Nanomedicine-Driven Strategies to Repair Peripheral Nerve Injuries.”

    Brief description: I will discuss the use of tissue nano-transfection interventions to aid in functional repair and recovery following crush and transections in a rodent sciatic nerve model. The crush model focuses on restoring vasculature to guide axonal regeneration and the transection model aims to locally induce neuronal conversions in the triceps surae to preserve neuromuscular junction health until full reinnervation can occur.

    Abstract: In this presentation I will discuss how we use an electroporation-based intervention known as tissue nano-transfection to locally deliver plasmid DNA to  aid functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury. Complete regeneration of peripheral nerves after injury is essential to maintaining a favorable quality of life and nerve injuries can be addressed at three levels: the soma (neuronal cell body), focal/local insult, and the innervated tissues downstream of the injury. Our current focus is on the local injury and downstream aspects using a crush and transection model, respectively. In the crush model, we demonstrated the ability to deliver cargos throughout the nerve bundle, induce endothelial cell reprogramming, and aid in more rapid functional recovery. Our studies in the transection model focus on neuronal induction in the muscle tissue. Continued research focuses on elucidating the induced cellular and molecular changes occurring in the denervated tissue following our intervention. Overall, these studies support the viability of targeted gene delivery and cell-based therapies to enhance recovery following a severe/chronic injury to that nerve.

    Bio: I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Biomedical Engineering at Ohio State University. I am originally from Springfield, OH and joined OSU when I transferred to complete my undergraduate studies in 2012. I received my BS in Applied Mathematics in 2015, MS in BME in December of 2020, and anticipate completing my Ph.D. in 2022. My thesis research focuses on cellular reprogramming and tissue engineering to repair peripheral nerve injuries. I have also worked on similar approaches for stroke, skin wounds, and cancer application. I am a past president of my department’s Graduate Student Association, Neuroscience Scholars Program Associate, Purdue Black Trailblazers in Engineering Fellow, and NIH D-SPAN Scholar. My long-term goal is to lead a research group developing cell and gene-based nanotherapeutics with a special interest in Cerebral Palsy and motoneuronrelated deficits. 

    More Information 
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:30pm EST

    CCBS Seminar: Carina Curto

    Zoom

    Center for Computational Brain Science Seminar Series: “Sequences and modularity of dynamic attractors in inhibition-dominated neural networks”

    Carina Curto, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Department of Mathematics
    Pennsylvania State University

    Abstract: Threshold-linear networks (TLNs) display a wide variety of nonlinear dynamics including multistability, limit cycles, quasiperiodic attractors, and chaos. Over the past few years, we have developed a detailed mathematical theory relating stable and unstable fixed points of TLNs to graph-theoretic properties of the underlying network. These results enable us to design networks that count stimulus pulses, track position, and encode multiple locomotive gaits in a single central pattern generator circuit.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Youtao Lu - PhD student - Cognitive, Linguists & Psychological Sciences Department - Brown University

    Talk: Exhaustive Access of Homophonous Words in Spoken Word Recognition: a Cross-Linguistic Comparison between English and Japanese

    Abstract: There has been prediction that lexical access of homophonous words can be more selective in languages with more homophonous words (Swinney, 1991). We tested this prediction by conducting identical cross-modal priming studies which examined lexical access of homophonous words in English and Japanese. While homophones are much more common in Japanese, evidence supporting exhaustive access of homophonous words in non-biased contexts was found in both languages. Some evidence even suggested that lexical access might be more exhaustive in Japanese. The conflict may be reconciled by positing an intuitive difference between the effect of contexts and the effect of relative dominance in ambiguity resolution.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Socio-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Latinx Youth with Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors
    Yovanska Duarte Velez, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor (Research)
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Bradley Hospital and Brown University
    Wednesday, March 9, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Describe the best available psychosocial treatments for Latinx youth with suicidal thoughts and behaviors, according to ethnic representation and cultural relevance; Explain the importance of tailoring treatments to Latinx youth with suicidal behaviors and their families; and Describe the distinct proposed mechanisms of action in Socio-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    8
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell St., Rm 475

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Sonia Mayoral, Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Assistant Professor of Brain Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  •  

    PSRIG Seminar Series: “Sleep, Toxic Stress, and Social Determinants of Health in Early Childhood”
    Monica Roosa Ordway, Ph.D., APRN, PPCNP-BC 

    There is emerging consensus that developmental and biological disruptions early in life are the roots of health disparities in adulthood. Developmentally, sleep inequities have been shown to occur as early as 12 months of age. This talk will focus on an overview of the evidence linking sleep, stress, and children’s health in the first 1000 days of life.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Mar
    7
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Carrie Palmquist- Associate Professor - Amherst College
    Title: Judging a book by its cover: Origins and implications of face-based inference-making.
    Abstract: Humans use many different cues to make inferences about one another. One important cue we rely upon is others’ facial features. In fact, people spend more time looking at faces than at any other type of object across their lifespans (Haxby, Hoffman, & Gobbini, 2000) and the inferences we draw from faces are made very quickly, within about 100-milliseconds (Willis & Todorov, 2006). The impressions we form from others’ faces have broad-reaching implications, predicting election outcomes (Todorov, et al., 2005) and criminal sentencing (Wilson & Rule, 2015). Interestingly, despite our reliance on others’ facial features as indicators of character, there is very little evidence that faces convey accurate information about a person’s personality and traits (Said, Sebe, & Todorov, 2009). Why then, do our judgments of others rely so heavily on facial features? This talk will explore this question by examining the developmental origins of our predisposition to make these kinds of face-based inferences, with a particular focus on work from my lab that investigates how children develop trust in others based on their facial features.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium: “The Long-Term Consequences of GABAergic Dysregulation Following Developmental Brain Injury”

    Raul Chavez-Valdez, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
    Attending Physician
    Johns Hopkins Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    4
    Virtual and In Person
    11:00am EST

    Pathobiology Thesis Defense: Nathan Martin

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    Please join the Pathobiology Graduate Program for the final examination of Nathan Martin for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The candidate will present himself for examination on the thesis entitled “Zebrafish as a Model for Studying the Developmental Neurotoxicity of Persistent and Emerging Environmental Contaminants”

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Mar
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    3
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar: Clotilde Lagier-Tourenne, MD PhD; Massachusetts General Hospital

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220, Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title: Emerging therapeutic targets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

    Host:  Dr. Anne Hart

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jacqueline Fulvio PhD - Research Scientist - University of Wisconsin - Madison

    Title: Serialdependence as a “post-perceptual” strategy for behavioral reliability

    Abstract: Serial dependence –the impact of recent stimulus history on current perceptual reports – is apervasive finding in many psychophysical domains, and has long been thought tobe an adaptive low-level mechanism that promotes perceptual stability acrossvisual inputs. However, recent studies suggest “post-perceptual” processes mayinstead be at play, calling into question the locus of serial dependence andthe nature of integration of past and present sensory inputs to guide currentresponses. To address these questions, I will draw upon results from two recentstudies. First, in the context of a 3D motion extrapolation task whereuncertainty in the sensory information varied from trial to trial, we show thatresponses were significantly more biased toward the previous reported 3Dmotion direction rather than the previous presented direction, with larger biason trials with greater uncertainty in the sensory input. For a subset ofparticipants who received visual and auditory feedback about their performanceon every trial, we observed an abolishment of bias toward the previouspresented direction and a significant reduction of, but lasting bias toward,the previous reported direction. This bias toward previous report persisteddespite participants having seen the target motion direction again during thefeedback stage, which provided them with an opportunity to update the percept.Next, in the context of a visual working memory task with an interleaved discriminationtask on a visual distractor during the delay period, we show significantattractive serial biases toward congruent distractors and repulsive biases fromincongruent distractors. Furthermore, such biases were modulated by therelevance of the distractor for behavior. Together, these results provide clearevidence for a decision-based “post-perceptual” locus of serial dependence andsupport the role of serial dependence as a strategy to improve the reliabilityof behavioral performance.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Humans spend about one third of their lives asleep. But what exactly happens in the brain while you sleep? What happens when you don’t get enough sleep? And could getting more high-quality sleep protect your brain?

    In recognition of Sleep Awareness Week this March, the Carney Institute is holding a conversation about the science of slumber featuring two Brown University researchers who study sleep biology, how sleep affects behavioral health and clinical sleep disorders:

    • Mary Carskadon, Ph.D. is a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown, director of chronobiology and sleep research at Bradley Hospital, and director of the hospital’s Center for Sleep and Circadian Rhythms in Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    • Richard Millman, M.D. is a professor of pediatrics and of medicine at Brown and director of the Sleep Disorders Center of Lifespan Hospitals.

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    2
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ailis Cournane - Assistant Professor - New York University

    Title: Dedicated markers for the hardest thoughts: learning epistemics and counterfactuals the “easy” way

    Abstract:Epistemic reasoning (thinking about possibilities from knowledge-based inferences) and counterfactual reasoning (thinking about possibilities from undoing facts) are among the most complex kinds of reasoning humans can do. The language that expresses these thoughts is likewise complex: e.g., modal verbs with polysemous meanings and functional syntax (like “must” or “could”), and conditional (“if…then”) constructions with “fake” past-tense markers (Iatridou 2000). But, it doesn’t have to be, those constructions are simply the canonical ones that have received the most attention in the linguistics and psychology literature. There are “easier” constructions out there…

    I’ll talk about two main case studies, primarily based on extensive corpus studies of English-learning children: (1) epistemic adverbs (“maybe”, “probably”) and (2) counterfactual propositional wish-es (“I wish I was a bar of soap” - Abe, age 4) (joint work with Maxime Tulling), both of which are common in the input to children and linguistically dedicated: they always express epistemicity or counterfactuality, respectively (unlike modal verbs and conditional constructions). We’ll see that children learn to talk about complex epistemic and counterfactual possibilities earlier with these more dedicated markers, updating our understanding of both language and reasoning development in these areas of possibility reasoning.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    2
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Why a Process-Based Approach is the Future of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology
    Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
    Foundation Professor of Psychology
    University of Nevada, Reno
    Wednesday, March 2, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Define biopsychosocial “processes of change” in psychiatry and clinical psychology; Be able to specify how the ergodic theorem requires methodological adjustment to psychiatric research that hopes to apply to processes of change to individuals; Be able to sort common mediators of psychotherapy outcomes into an extended evolutionary metamodel (EEMM) approach to processes of change; and Be able to relate common intervention kernels to processes of change thought of in terms of the EEMM.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    2
    11:00am EST

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Alastair John Tulloch

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title: “Diversity of spinal commissural neurons and their reliance on NELL2-Robo3 signaling during development”

    Advisor:  Dr.Alexander Jaworski

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    1
    12:00pm EST

    EEOB Tuesday Seminar Series

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm 291

    Dr. Bhart-Anjan Bhullar- Yale University

     

    Talk Title: “The origin of bird brains, behaviors, and bodies: evidence from fossils and embryos”

     

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98262752183

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  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

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  • Feb
    28
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 923 2807 3678
    Passcode: 957821

    Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Megha Sehgal, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles.

    Abstract

    Events occurring close in time are often linked in memory, providing an episodic timeline and a framework for those memories. Recent studies suggest that memories acquired close in time are encoded by overlapping neuronal ensembles, but whether dendritic plasticity plays a role in linking memories is unknown. Using activity-dependent labeling and manipulation, as well as longitudinal one- and two-photon imaging of RSC somatic and dendritic compartments, we show that memory linking is not only dependent on ensemble overlap in the retrosplenial cortex, but also on branch-specific dendritic allocation mechanisms. These results demonstrate a causal role for dendritic mechanisms in memory integration and reveal a novel set of rules that govern how linked, and independent memories are allocated to dendritic compartments.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    28
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Leonard - Assistant Professor - Yale University
    Title: Social influences on children’s persistence
    Abstract: Learning requires effort, yet children can’t try hard at everything. Every day children have to decide what’s worth their effort - when to persist through challenges versus when to give up and move on to a different endeavor. How do children make this decision? In this talk, I show how infants and children leverage social information to effectively allocate effort. First, I show that children are more likely to stick with a challenge when provided clear feedback that their performance is improving over time. Second, I demonstrate that infants can generalize the value of persistence to a novel task from watching how hard an adult tries to reach a goal. Children not only integrate information about adults’ actions, but also about their outcomes (success or failure) and testimony, to decide how hard to try. Third, I show correlational and causal evidence that the real-world parenting behavior of “taking over” (completing hard tasks for children) negatively impacts children’s persistence. Finally, I present data showing that day-to-day variation in parent praise correlates with fluctuations in children’s naturalistic persistent behavior. Collectively, this work elucidates the powerful effects of adults’ actions and words on children’s effort allocation and ultimately suggests adult behavior as an effective point of intervention for fostering children’s persistence.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Brown University and Lifespan junior faculty, postdocs, residents, medical students, and graduate students – Do you have an idea for a digital health innovation that will help solve a sticky public health challenge?

    Participate in the first ever Digital Health Pitch Competition! This is a program that encourages digital health innovation and rewards brilliant ideas with seed funding and mentorship. Complete the interest form and gain access to a network of innovators, mentors, and advisors, and be eligible to apply for the Digital Health Pitch Competition where your team could walk away with up to $25,000 in prize money.

    Complete the Interest Form More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    1:30pm - 2:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    Zoom
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium: “Immune Programming of Autism in the Mother’s Womb”

    Surendra Sharma, MD, Ph.D.
    Professor of Pediatrics
    Warren Alpert Medical School of
    Brown University
    DirectorCenter of Excellence for Reproductive Health
    Women and Infants Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • This Friday (2/25/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Rachel Cassidy will present, “Modeling the impact of transformative tobacco policy on youth: Insights from laboratory studies and clinical trials” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

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  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    February 25, 2022

    ZOOM only

     

    Speaker:

    Micaela Materne, MS & Child Life staff

    Manager, Child Life, Hasbro Children’s Hospital

    Brown University

     

    Topic:

    “Prescription for Play: The Role of the Child Life Specialist in Pediatric Health and Healing”

     

    Objectives:

    • Recognize the therapeutic role of the Child Life Specialist as a member of the interdisciplinary team
    • Utilize Child Life Services to provide developmentally appropriate preparation, education, & bedside support to enhance coping
    • Identify how to consult Child Life Services to reduce a child’s level of stress, minimize, or negate the need for anesthesia or narcotics, & hasten recovery times
    CME CREDIT SURVEY More Information 
  • Please join the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Series for a lecture by Dr. Byeongsang Oh, Associate Professor at the University of Sydney on Tai Chi and Qigong in Medicine: Opportunities and Challenges. This lecture and discussion will be held on February 24th from 7 - 8:30 pm, EST.

    This is a virtual event, so please register at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSehZ8wpVkeHK28B_xSc2EfjltcqOzzmsY5VjO9sCV3dCLPkkw/viewform in order to receive a Zoom link. You will also find an abstract of Dr. Oh’s lecture when you register.
    If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact our administrator, [email protected]. This event is free and open to the public. 
    More Information 
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    1:00pm EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Sara Ahmadian, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor Seminar Space
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Thursday, 2/24 at 1:00 PM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party at 1:00 PM on Thursday, 2/24 at 164 Angell Street.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Sara Ahmadian, Ph.D.

    Senior Research Scientist, Google

    Revising Traditional Algorithms and Devising New Algorithms to Factor in Fairness

    From digital assistants to movie recommendations and self-driving cars, machine learning is behind many day-to-day interactions with technology. While learning algorithms are not inherently biased, they may pick up and amplify the bias already present in the training data. Thus a recent line of work has emerged on revising traditional algorithms or devising new algorithms to factor in fairness. In this talk, I focus on adding fairness to clustering which is a fundamental problem in data mining and unsupervised machine learning. We introduce a notion of fairness that focuses on requiring a bounded representation of various groups of a sensitive feature, e.g. race, gender, etc., in each cluster. In clustering, the goal is to organize objects into clusters such that elements in the same clusters are “similar”. There are various ways to express the similarity of objects. In metric settings, we are given a distance measure for the objects, and in a non-metric setting, we are given labels in the form of for pairs of objects which identify whether two objects are similar (label +) or not (label -). We look at a fair k-center for the metric case and fair correlation clustering for the non-metric case. If time permits, I will talk about fairness in non-flat clustering, e.g., hierarchical clustering, and how the algorithms for such problems can be modified to accommodate fairness constraints.

    Biography

    Sara Ahmadian is a Senior Research Scientist in the Large-Scale Optimization research team, which is part of the broader NYC Algorithms and Optimization team at Google. Sara earned degrees in Combinatorics and Optimization (M.M. 2010, Ph.D. 2017) from the University of Waterloo, where she was advised by Chaitanya Swamy and supported by an NSERC Fellowship. Sara is a recipient of the 2017 University of Waterloo Outstanding Achievement in Graduate Studies (Ph.D.) designation for her Ph.D. thesis. She worked as a Software Developer for a start-up company in Waterloo after completing her Masters’s and before starting her Ph.D. Prior to that, she earned her BSc in Computer Engineering at Sharif University of Technology (Iran). Her research interests include diverse and fair sampling, data summarization, approximation algorithm, design and analysis of algorithms.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: James Wilmott - PhD student - CLPS - Brown

    Title: Learning processes for depth cue combination and sensorimotor adaptation during reach-to-grasp actions

    Abstract:An observer’s planned grip size during grasping is a function of a visually-derived estimate of depth and a sensorimotor transformation process that maps perception into action. Here, we investigate how sensorimotor learning mechanisms dynamically adjust grip size based on recent experience. Previous studies have identified two learning processes that update an observer’s grasping behavior based on recent experience: remapping of the perceptual estimation function (i.e., “learning perception”) and adaptation of the sensorimotor mapping (i.e., “learning action”). These processes have traditionally been studied in isolation. We propose a novel unified framework where both processes simultaneously operate to reduce sensorimotor prediction errors and present psychophysical evidence to support this account. Classic models of depth perception predict that perceptual remapping occurs when the visual system detects a mismatch between visual and haptic information (previously termed “cue reweighting”). According to these models, a conflict between visual estimates is required to determine which estimator (termed cue) should be adjusted so that the combined-cue estimate aligns with haptic feedback. A recently developed alternative model named Intrinsic Constraint proposes that cue combination is approximated as a vector sum, resulting in larger depth estimates for stimuli that have more cues (e.g., disparity only vs. disparity and texture). Across two experiments, we show that observers perceive objects with varying number of depth cues differently, that these differences have meaningful consequences for grasping, and observers learn to minimize grasping errors in a manner consistent with error-driven sensorimotor learning processes. I will discuss potential computational approaches to modeling these patterns of learning by simultaneously adjusting cue combination and adaptation based on the pattern of sensorimotor error signals obtained across grasps.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    Pathobiology Seminar: A. Sloan Devlin, Ph.D.

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    Assistant Professor Sloan Devlin from the Harvard Medical School will present “Causal links between human microbiome metabolites and host functions”.  This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    11:00am EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Cyrus Cousins, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor Seminar Space
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Thursday, 2/24 at 11:00 AM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party at 11:30 AM on Thursday, 2/24 at 164 Angell Street. Light refreshments will be offered.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Cyrus Cousins, Ph.D.

    Visiting Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Brown University

    Data Categorization and Welfare Outcomes in Machine Learning

    Data-quality issues often compound the unfairness, as majority groups are often well-studied, with copious high-quality data available, while marginalized or minority groups are understudied, and available data lack in quality. This work operates in the setting wherein only partial information is available on protected group membership. In particular, here data are triplets (x, y, z) ∈ (X × Y × Z), where Z is a finite space of g protected groups. Given m training points, we observe covariates x, and labels y, but not group identities zm. Instead, we are given a feasible set Z of group labelings. The task is then to perform (group-dependent) fair learning, with rigorous statistical guarantees. We show that learning approximately minimax-optimal egalitarian or utilitarian malware models in this setting is both statistically and computationally efficient. In particular, our bounds depend on how sharply the unknown group-membership labels are constrained, and thus degrade gracefully as less and less partial information about group membership is available. We also discuss methods by which to statistically constrain the feasible set Z of group membership and the fairness implications of generating such constraints.

    Biography

    Cyrus Cousins, Ph.D. is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Brown University where he also recently completed his doctorate. A perennial scholar of probability, Cyrus has worked in many areas ranging from statistical significance questions in data science and machine learning to econometrics and social justice, where he raises and attempts to answer fundamental questions of what it means to share, allocate and learn fairly. His signature is the application of techniques from statistical learning theory to study how quickly and under what conditions various quantities of interest can be estimated from data. He also works in the analysis of randomized algorithms, Markov chain Monte Carlo, statistical data science, and empirical game theory.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    10:30am EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Lachlan Kermode

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor Seminar Space
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Thursday, 2/24 at 10:30 AM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party on Thursday, 2/24 at 164 Angell Street. Light refreshments will be offered.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Lachlan Kermode

    Ph.D. Candidate, Modern Culture and Media, Brown University

    Software Research with Forensic Architecture

    Forensic Architecture (FA) is a research agency, based at Goldsmiths, University of London, investigating human rights violations including violence committed by states, police forces, militaries, and corporations. FA works in partnership with institutions across civil society, from grassroots activists to legal teams, to international NGOs and media organizations, to carry out investigations with and on behalf of communities and individuals affected by conflict, police brutality, border regimes, and environmental violence.

    This talk will speak to a selection of investigations conducted at and with Forensic Architecture that leverage skill sets associated with the computer and data sciences— such as machine learning and full-stack development— to indicate how interdisciplinary work might offer a critical way forward.

     

    Biography

    Lachlan Kermode is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University, and a Research Fellow at the research agency, Forensic Architecture (Goldsmiths, University of London). After receiving an undergraduate degree in Computer Science from Princeton University (2018), he worked for several years as a Software Researcher at Forensic Architecture and then as a Software Engineer, building cloud infrastructure for machine learning models. Kermode has also worked as a Mobile Developer and as a Full Stack Engineer. His current work is concerned with the political potential of open source and open hardware cultures, the history of computer science and software engineering as disciplinary practices, and the implications and impacts of computing as media at large.

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  • Feb
    23
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Lauren Klein, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 3rd Floor Seminar Space
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Wednesday, 2/23 at 2:00 PM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party at 2:00 PM on Wednesday, 2/23 at 164 Angell Street. Light refreshments will be offered.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Lauren Klein, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor, English, Quantitative Theory and Methods, Emory University

    What is Feminist Data Science?

    How is feminist thinking being incorporated into data-driven work? How are scholars in the humanities and social sciences bringing together data science and feminist theory into their research? Drawing from her recent book, Data Feminism (MIT Press), co-authored with Catherine D’Ignazio, Dr. Klein presents a set of principles for doing data science that is informed by the past several decades of intersectional feminist activism and critical thought. In order to illustrate these principles, as well as some of the ways that scholars and designers have begun to put them into action, she will discuss a range of recent projects including several of her own: 1) a thematic analysis of a large corpus of nineteenth-century newspapers that reveal the invisible labor of women newspaper editors; 2) the development of a model of lexical semantic change that, when combined with network analysis, tells a new story about Black activism in the nineteenth-century US; and 3) an interactive book on the history of data visualization that shows how questions of politics have been present in the field since its start. Taken together, these examples demonstrate how feminist thinking can be operationalized into more ethical, intentional, and capacious data practices in the digital humanities, computational social sciences, human-computer interactions, and beyond.

    Biography

    Lauren Klein is a Winship Distinguished Research Professor and Associate Professor in the Departments of English and Quantitative Theory and Methods at Emory University, where she also directs the Digital Humanities Lab. She is the author of An Archive of Taste: Race and Eating in the Early United States (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) and, with Catherine D’Ignazio, Data Feminism (MIT Press, 2020). With Matthew K. Gold, she edits Debates in the Digital Humanities, a hybrid print-digital publication stream that explores debates in the field as they emerge.

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  • Feb
    22
    Virtual
    5:00pm - 6:30pm EST

    Brown Contemplative Studies Spring Virtual Get-Together

    Virtual
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    To receive a Zoom link, please contact [email protected]

    Please join us for the Brown Contemplative Studies’ Spring Virtual Get-Together on February 22nd from 5 - 6:30 pm. Come meet faculty and concentrators, discuss past, current and future course offerings and upcoming events. Feel free to drop by any time and stay for a little or a long while!  To receive the Zoom link, please contact [email protected].
    More Information 
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

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  • Feb
    19
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Queer in Neuroscience Panel

    Zoom

    Join NeuroDug for a virtual event featuring a panel of scientists at varying levels in their careers who identify as queer. Panelists will speak on their experiences in the neuroscience field. The event will be moderated by Leona Hariharan, an undergraduate student at Brown University.

    Panelists include:

    • Talia Fernandez, undergraduate student, Brown University
    • Krisha Aghi, graduate student, University of California, Berkeley
    • Jess Sevetson, postdoctoral researcher, University of California, Santa Cruz
    • E. Javier López Soto, assistant professor, North Carolina State University
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Understanding and Reducing Gender Bias in STEM

    Despite efforts to recruit and retain more women, a stark gender disparity remains within STEM fields. This persistent underrepresentation speaks to the importance of identifying impediments to women’s full participation in STEM, as well as developing innovative and effective diversity interventions aimed at increasing the representation of women. In this talk, I will first present experimental evidence of gender bias within STEM, as well as its direct consequences for women’s STEM engagement and participation. I will then discuss a program of ongoing research testing evidence-based interventions aimed at increasing awareness of and reducing this gender bias. Throughout, I will highlight implications for academic meritocracy, diversity, and gender parity across STEM fields.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    18
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Room 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Minson - Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of government

    Title: Conversational Receptiveness: Improving Engagement with Opposing Views

    Abstract:We examine “conversational receptiveness” – the use of language to communicate one’s willingness to thoughtfully engage with opposing views. We develop an interpretable machine- learning algorithm to identify the linguistic profile of receptiveness (Studies 1A-B). We then show that in contentious policy discussions, government executives who were rated as more receptive - according to our algorithm and their partners, but not their own self-evaluations - were considered better teammates, advisors, and workplace representatives (Study 2). Furthermore, using field data from a setting where conflict management is endemic to productivity, we show that conversational receptiveness at the beginning of a conversation forestalls conflict escalation at the end. Specifically, Wikipedia editors who write more receptive posts are less prone to receiving personal attacks from disagreeing editors (Study 3). Finally, we develop a “receptiveness recipe” intervention based on our algorithm (Study 4).

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium:
    “The Power of Early Language Exposure”

    Betty R. Vohr, M.D.
    Professor of Pediatrics
    Warren Alpert Medical School
    Brown University
    Women & Infants Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • This Friday (2/18/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Abby Braitman will present, “Race moderates the impact of COVID-19 pandemic experiences on self-reported changes in college drinking” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!