Past Events

  • Jul
    16
    1:00pm EDT

    MCBGP Thesis Defense: Jane Abolafia

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220 (Marcuvitz Auditorium)

    MCB Graduate Student Ph.D. Dissertation Defense: Jane Abolafia

    Dissertation: “Gene expression programs underlying spinal commissural neuron differentiation and midline axon guidance”

    Advisor: Alexander Jaworski

    This thesis presentation is open to all persons; MCB graduate students and faculty are particularly encouraged to attend.

     

    Please contact Anna Sophia Boyd for Zoom link

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Jul
    16
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Advance RI-CTR NVivo Drop-In Session (PC Based)

    Join us for the Advance RI-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop-In Session (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Ryan Lantini, MA.

    This drop-in session will be on Tuesday, July 16th, 2024 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM ET. This is an open session where you may ask specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study.

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others. 

    Learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, at the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form on our website.

    If you have a question, please contact: [email protected].

    Register NowMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Jul
    15
    3:00pm EDT

    Mahalia Prater Fahey Dissertation Defense

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 101

    Speaker: Mahalia Prater Fahey
    Title: Considering the Context: How Context Provides Insight into how the Components of Motivation are Shaped
    Advisor: Amitai Shenhav

    Location: Friedman Auditorium and via Zoom, https://brown.zoom.us/j/91065622462

    More Information 
  • Jul
    12
    10:00am EDT

    Alana Jaskir Dissertation Defense

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 101

    Speaker: Alana Jaskir
    Title: Adaptive mechanisms support expediency and generalization in human reinforcement learning
    Advisor: Michael J. Frank

    Location: Friedman Auditorium and via Zoom, https://brown.zoom.us/j/92459147148

    More Information 
  • Jul
    8
    9:00am - 3:00pm EDT

    Carney Computational Modelling Workshop

    TBD

    The Carney Center for Computational Brain Science and the BRAINSTORM Program is organizing a two-week computational modeling workshop with a focus on computational modeling of cognition, behavior, and brain/behavior relationships. Workshop attendees will learn the basic tools for understanding, developing, and applying models to brain science questions, and have the opportunity to apply these techniques in a novel behavioral dataset.

    Week 1 will consist of workshops and live tutorials, including daily lectures spanning basic to advanced topics, accompanied by hands-on coding tutorials. Attendees will learn the basic tools for understanding, developing and applying computational models, with a focus on hypothesis testing, quantitative fitting, Bayesian methods, and model checks and comparisons. Additionally, advanced modeling sessions will provide a deeper theoretical understanding and application of complex modeling techniques.

    During Week 2, participants will have the opportunity to work in teams to apply these skills to analyze a real dataset provided by the organizers, with potential for novel discoveries. Prizes will be awarded for models with the most predictive power, rigor, creativity, and innovation.

    For details on last years’ workshops and modeling competition, visit the Center for Computational Brain Science website. Previous syllabi are available here. We will cover most of the same basic topics, with a few tweaks and additions (based on participant input and guest speakers).

     

    Note: The organizers will host a follow-up workshop on an advanced topic “Automated Scientific Discovery” from July 29 - August 2 at the Institute of Cognitive Science in Osnabrück, Germany. You get more information and sign up for this workshop here.

     

    Intended Audience: This workshop is open to the members of the Brown community, and is designed for researchers across fields, backgrounds and levels of experience: computation “novices” with no experience and those with more computational experience who may want to augment their toolkit with advanced approaches to parameter estimation or specific classes of models. Although there is no computational experience required, those with modeling backgrounds will still benefit from the advanced modules, and will have the opportunity to learn new skills and state-of-the-art computational approaches.

    Maximum number of participants: Participation is limited to 20, but we do keep a waitlist.

    Organizers: Sebastian Musslick, Younes Strittmatter, Michael J. Frank

    Contact: Please reach out to Sebastian Musslick ([email protected]) with any questions.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Jun
    27
    12:00pm EDT

    Carney Institute BBQ

    Pembroke Green, Rm North

    The Carney Institute for Brain Science invites you to our Summer BBQ on Thursday, June 27, from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM. Weather permitting, the event will take place on Pembroke Green North, in between Alumnae Hall and Smith-Buonanno Hall. Join us for an afternoon of grilling, ice cream and lawn games!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jun
    26

    Join us for the Advance RI-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop-In Session (Mac Based) with Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Ryan Lantini, MA and Grace Smith, MA.

    The drop-in session will be on Wednesday, June 26th, 2024 from 12:00 - 1:00 PM ET. This is an open session where you may ask specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study.

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others. 

    Learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, at the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form on our website.

    If you have a question, please contact: [email protected].

    Register NowMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Jun
    18
    1:00pm EDT

    BRAINSTORM Challenge Ceremony

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Hall

    Please join us for the official award ceremony for this year’s BRAINSTORM Challenge on Tuesday, June 18th at 1:00 p.m. in the Marcuvitz Hall in Sidney Frank. The winners will present their approaches and results, and we’ll have the opportunity to learn more about their work and celebrate their success.

    This year’s winners are:

    Grand Prize

    • Alana Jaskir, Joshua Hewson, Michael Freund, and Daniel Scott

    We will provide refreshments. For those who’d like to attend virtually, please use this Zoom link.

    Join Zoom HereMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, BRAINSTORM, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (Mac Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Grace Smith, MA.

    This workshop will be on Monday, June 17th, 2024 (12:00 - 1:00 PM ET) with an optional Q&A from 1:00 PM to 1:30 PM. This workshop will be a general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses. 

    Learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, at the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form on our website.

    If you have a question, please contact: [email protected].

    Register NowMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Jun
    14
    2:00pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Guillaume Pagnier

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm., 220/Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Mechanistic and population-based insights from computationally modeling effortful cost/benefit decision making

    Advisors:  Dr. Michael Frank & Dr. Wael Asaad

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jun
    13
    1:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Spring Retreat: Center for Translational Neuroscience

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    We hope that you will join us for our annual Spring Retreat on Thursday, June 13th, from 1PM-5PM in LMM 107 at 70 Ship Street. The full schedule will be posted as we get closer to the retreat. Social to follow in the Ship Street Courtyard. 

    Eric Morrow, MD/PhD, Director
    Judy Liu, MD/PhD, Associate Director
    More Information CTN
  • Jun
    11
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Advancing Research Careers (ARC) Program Open House

    164 Angell Street, Rm 4th Floor, Innovation Zone

    Please join us for an in-person open house for the Advancing Research Careers (ARC) program. Come learn about the structure of the program and resources available to ARC scholars. We’ll hear from program leadership and current ARC scholars will share about their experience with plenty of time for questions.

    A two-year, NINDS-funded program, ARC seeks to promote the research careers of women and persons historically excluded due to ethnicity and race (PEERs) in brain sciences. Participants benefit from financial support, mentorship and professional development tailored specifically to each person. 

    For a full description of the ARC program, including how to apply, click here. Applications are due on or before July 1, 2024.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    6

    Sixth Annual Dr. Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars

    June 6-7, 2024
    Brown University
    Providence, RI

    The 2024 Dr. Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars (June 6-7) will showcase the research achievements of outstanding molecular life scientists from historically underrepresented groups.

    The conference is free and in person, hosted by the Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry Department at Brown University.

    Conference Keynote Speakers

    Keynote speakers for the conference will be Dr. Sherilynn Black, PhD (Duke University), and Dr. Blanton Tolbert, PhD (University of Pennsylvania).

    Sherilynn Black, PhD

    Sherilynn Black, PhD

    Blanton S. Tolbert, PhD

    Blanton S. Tolbert, PhD

    The conference program will open Thursday afternoon June 6 and close Friday evening June 7. It will feature short talks by invited early career scholars, panel events focusing on identity and professional development, and a poster session.

    This will be an inclusive event, drawing attendees from the Brown BioMed community (including undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, staff and campus organizations) as well as registered participants from across the US. The conference has been named in honor of Dr. Samuel Milton Nabrit, Brown’s first African-American PhD recipient and a marine biologist with a distinguished international career.

    For questions about the 2024 Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars, please contact [email protected].

    Learn MoreMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    31
    2:00pm EDT

    Dissertation Defense: Taylor Wise

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220
    CLPS Dissertation Defense
    Speaker: Taylor Wise
    Title: Spatial and social processing in the rat posterior parietal cortex
    Advisor: Rebecca Burwell
    More Information 
  • May
    30
    3:30pm - 5:00pm EDT

    A conversation for faculty about STEM graduate students & mental health

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    We invite faculty to join us for a conversation about mental health and graduate students in STEM featuring:

    • Alycia Mosley Austin, Associate Dean of Diversity and Inclusion, Graduate School
    • Corey Fitzgerald, Psychotherapist and Outreach Coordinator, Counseling and Psychological Services
    • Logan Gin, Assistant Director for STEM, Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning

    The goal of the session is to learn about the common mental health challenges reported by graduate students at Brown, review evidence-based best practices for mentors that promote mental health and support productivity in trainees in a lab environment, and identify institutional resources available to support faculty and graduate students.

    This event is for faculty only. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Large Language Models vs Human Brain: mapping and decoding the language code in neural systems

    Jean-Rémi King, Ph.D.

    While deep learning has made major progress in natural language processing, these algorithms fall short of the compute and data efficiency of the human brain. Here, we here systematically evaluate the similarities and differences between these two systems. For this, we collect, gather and analyze large-scale datasets of magneto/electro-encephalography (M/EEG), functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), and intracranial recordings. After investigating where and when deep language algorithms function similarly to the brain, we show that long-range forecasts make them more similar to it. This systematic comparison provides an operational foundation to decode language and semantics from brain responses to speech listening, images, videos, reading and text typing. Overall, these findings underscore the potential of integrating AI and neuroscience to unify cognitive tasks within a common computational framework.
    More Information CCBS, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • May
    13
    1:00pm EDT

    GPP Thesis Defense: Mor Alkaslasi

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Transcriptional Responses to Neuronal Stress in Disease and Injury

    Advisor:  Dr. Claire LePichon, NIH

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    13
    9:00am - 10:00am EDT

    18th Annual Melvyn M. Gelch, MD Lecture

    Rhode Island Hospital, Rm George Auditorium

    Please join us for the 18th Annual Melvyn M. Gelch, MD Lecture.

    Genomic Landscapes at Single-Cell Resolution: Deciphering the Molecular Complexity of Brain Tumors and Aneurysms

    Murat Gunel, MD, FACS, FAHA, FAANS Sterling Professor of Neurosurgery and Professor of Genetics and of Neuroscience; Chair, Neurosurgery; Physician-in-Chief, Neurosurgery, Yale New Haven Health System; Member, National Academy of Medicine; Co- Director, Yale Program on Neurogenetics

     

    This event will also be available via Zoom. Please contact [email protected] for the event link.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • May
    10
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Semir Tatlidil

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Location: Dome Room and Zoom (https://brown.zoom.us/j/95166664847)

    Speaker: Semir Tatlidil, Grad Student, CLPS

    Title: How do people create abstract representations of causal events?

    Abstract: TBA

    More Information 
  • May
    9
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Elias Aizenman; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    Sidney E. Frank Hall, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz

    Title:  From the Chick Retina to CM-EA1 and CM-EA2:  A Neuroprotection Story

    Host:  Dr. Carlos Aizenman

    Seminar sponsorship provided by the Frank Invitational Seminar Fund,
    made possible by a 2006 endowment gift from the Sidney E. Frank Foundation

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    9
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series: Sabine Kastner

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    Speaker: Sabine Kastner (Princeton)

    Title: Attention Control in the Primate Brain

    Abstract: The selection of information from our cluttered sensory environments is one of the most fundamental cognitive operations performed by the primate brain. In the visual domain, the selection process is thought to be mediated by a static spatial mechanism – a ‘spotlight’ that can be flexibly shifted around the visual scene. This spatial search mechanism has been associated with a large-scale network that consists of multiple nodes distributed across all major cortical lobes and includes also subcortical regions. To identify the specific functions of each network node and their functional interactions is a major goal for the field of cognitive neuroscience. In my lecture, I will give an overview on the neural basis of this fundamental cognitive function and its development. I will also discuss recently discovered rhythmic properties that set up alternating attentional states.

    More Information 
  • May
    8

    BioCON is hosting Dr. La’Nissa Brown-Baker, an Associate Director for Science Staffing at the FDA. Dr. Brown-Baker will come in-person and provide an overview of the FDA and HHS and discuss MS and PhD-level FDA career opportunities in the regulatory review process.

    Register HERE

    Zoom linkMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • May
    8
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Scaling Single Session Interventions to Bridge Gaps in Mental Health Ecosystems
    Jessica L. Schleider, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, Departments of Medical Social Sciences, Pediatrics and Psychology
    Northwestern University
    Wednesday, May 8, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Understand the concept of ‘single-session interventions’ (SSIs) for youth mental health
    • Describe state-of-the-art research on how, why, and for whom SSIs can reduce mental health problems
    • Identify tools and create an implementation plan for using evidence-based SSIs in real-world practice
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Schleider has the following financial relationships to disclose: Research Funding: Kooth LLC, Founder: Single Session Support Solutions 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • We are pleased to invite you to a virtual workshop on the Human Neocortical Neurosolver (HNN), jointly organized by the Stephanie Jones Lab and MetaCell, scheduled for May 8th. The workshop is aimed at researchers and clinicians with an interest in neuroscience but without formal computational modeling or coding experience. It will offer a detailed exploration of HNN, a tool designed to interpret the neural origins of human MEG/EEG data.

    Workshop Highlights:

    • Comprehensive Overview: The workshop will begin with a didactic presentation on the background and development of HNN, providing a foundation for its application in neuroscience research.
    • Practical Application: Participants will learn how to utilize the HNN graphical user interface (GUI) to investigate the circuit origins of commonly measured signals, including event-related potentials (ERPs) and low-frequency brain rhythms.
    • Advanced Interface Training: Discover how to use the HNN-core Python interface.

    Workshops Hosts:

    • Stephanie Jones, PhD
    • Mainak Jas, PhD
    • Nicholas Tolley
    • Ryan Thorpe
    • Dylan Daniels

    About the Workshop Content:

    MEG/EEG signals are correlated with several healthy and pathological brain functions. However, it is still extremely difficult to infer their underlying cellular and circuit level origins. This limits the translation of MEG/EEG signals into novel principles of information processing, or into new treatment methods for pathologies. To address this limitation, we have built the Human Neocortical Neurosolver (HNN): an open-source software tool to help researchers and clinicians without formal computational modeling or coding experience interpret the neural origin of their human MEG/EEG data.

    HNN provides a graphical user interface (GUI) and a programmable Python interface to an anatomically and biophysically detailed model of a neocortical circuit, with layer specific thalamocortical and cortical-cortical drives. Tutorials are provided to teach users how to begin to study the cell and circuit level origin of sensory event related potentials (ERPs) and low frequency rhythms in the alpha, beta and gamma band, based on our prior publications.

    Unique to HNN is an underlying neural model that accounts for the biophysics generating the primary electric currents underlying EEG/MEG signals, enabling visual and statistical comparison of model output to source localized data from a single brain area (in nAm). Users can change model parameters in the GUI for testing hypotheses on signal differences under varied experimental conditions. Further, visualizations are shown of detailed circuit activity including layer-specific responses, cell spiking activity, and membrane voltages.

    We look forward to introducing you to our one-of-a-kind tool for cell and circuit interpretation of MEG/EEG!

    Registration Information:

    The workshop will take place online on Wednesday, May 8th from 9am to noon ET. It is limited to 20 participants to ensure a productive learning environment. Given the specialized nature of this workshop, we anticipate high interest. To secure your participation, we recommend registering as soon as possible. A registration fee of $25.00 is required to help us cover the costs of organizing the event.

     

     

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • May
    4
    11:00am - 1:00pm EDT

    PhD Career Beyond Academia Series: Career Journey as an International Student

    167 Angell Street, Rm 1st Floor Conference Room

     

    Join us to meet our exceptional Brown international PhD alumni who are currently excelling in various industries!

    At this in-person event, you will:

    •  Explore different career options that are available for international PhD students
    • Hear alumni’s stories of career transition from academia to industries and the challenges that international students may face during the process
    • Learn more about the skills you can gain at Brown for different types of careers

    Our Ph.D. alumni speakers are:

    • Jiuyang (Joey) Bai, PhD in Cognitive Science, Senior Machine Learning Engineer at CVS Health
    • Isabella Gama, PhD in Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, Associate at McKinsey & Company
    • Youngmin Lee, PhD in Chemistry, Patent Agent at Cantor Colburn LLP
    • Asli Sahin, PhD in Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Director of Search and Evaluation Neuroscience at Abbvie
    • Shubham Sharma, PhD in Chemical Engineering, Senior Scientist at Pfizer
    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships
  • May
    3
    8:00pm - 11:30pm EDT

    Verano Vibes: Latinx Grad/Med Mixer (LGC x SACNAS)

    Graduate Center C, Rm Graduate Student Lounge

    All Brown University graduate, medical, and post-doctoral students are invited to join the celebration at the Graduate Student Lounge on May 3rd, where they will welcome the summer and say farewell to the semester!

    Event Date /Time: May 3rd, 2024 (8:00 pm - 12:00 am)
    Event Address: Graduate Student Lounge, 90 Thayer St, Providence

    RSVP is required for all participants and guests, and drink tickets will be provided upon entry. Please note that this event is exclusively for Brown University graduate, medical, and post-doctoral students. Valid legal ID (21+) and Brown Student ID are required for entry, and Brown students are permitted to bring one registered guest (non-Brown student). Don’t miss out on this opportunity to unwind and enjoy the company of fellow peers and student leaders.

    Register to eventMore Information Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • May
    3
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Amit Goldenberg

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Location: Dome Room and Zoom (https://brown.zoom.us/j/95166664847)

    Speaker: Amit Goldenberg, Asst. Prof., Harvard University

    Title: Homophily and Acrophily as Drivers of Political Segregation

    Abstract: Political segregation is a significant social problem in the U.S., increasing polarization, sowing division and discord, and impeding effective governance. Most prior work views the central driver of political segregation to be political homophily, the tendency to associate with others with similar political views. Here, however, we propose that in addition to being driven by political homophily, people’s decisions about who to affiliate with are also driven by political acrophily, the tendency to associate with others with more extreme (rather than more moderate) political views than one’s own. We evaluated our homophily and acrophily predictions using both an experimental tie-selection paradigm and analysis of social media data. We found that both liberal and conservative participants’ decisions reflected a mix of homophily and acrophily. These studies identify a previously overlooked tendency in political tie formation, uncover a mechanism driving that tendency, and model how this tendency may increase levels of segregation in political networks.

    More Information 
  • May
    3
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CAAS Rounds: Dr. Tara White - Dignity Neuroscience: Application to Addiction

    121 South Main Street, Rm Room 245

    CAAS Rounds presents: Dr. Tara White - Dignity Neuroscience: Application to Addiction

    More Information 
  • May
    2
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Bench to Bedside Series Presents: Towards Gene Modulation Therapy in Neurodegeneration: Lessons from ALS

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Maruvitz Auditorium

    Robert H. Brown, Jr., DPhil, MD
    Donna M and Robert J Manning Chair in Neurosciences
    Professor of Neurology
    UMass Chan Medical School

    Host:  Dr. Gregorio Valdez

    Organized by the Brown University Center for Translational Neuroscience

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    2
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Empowering Career Growth and Professional Resilience Through Strategic Networking

    Carney Institute for Brain Science (164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Providence, RI 02906), Rm Innovation Zone

    “Empowering Career Growth and Professional Resilience Through Strategic Networking” is a workshop facilitated by Mari Anne Snow, CEO/Founder, Sophaya and the Remote Nation Institute (RNI) and Dr. Katherine M. Sharkey, Associate Professor, Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry & Human Behavior and Associate Dean for Gender Equity, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. In this interactive, open discussion forum, participants will examine the nature of career paths in today’s workplace and examine new techniques for building professional networks to foster resilience and lifelong professional meaning and relevance. After completing this session, participants will leave with:

    • A pragmatic understanding of the workplace today.
    • Novel approaches for cultivating and maintaining a vibrant and supportive network.
    • Techniques for building a meaningful career life.
    • Concrete action steps to create forward momentum.

    This event will take place in person on Thursday, May 2, 2024, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM at the Innovation Zone inside the Carney Institute for Brain Science (164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Providence, RI 02906).

    Light refreshments will be provided, and the event will last about 90 minutes.

    The Carney Institute’s Advancing Research Careers (ARC) program aims to advance the research careers of women and persons historically excluded due to ethnicity and race (PEERs) in brain sciences at the level of advanced postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty. ARC is funded by an R25 award from NINDS to support an annual cohort of highly qualified participants through structured mentorship, research support, and activities that contribute to successful neuroscience research careers

    Target Audience: This event is designed for early career scholars, including Carney ARC scholars, senior postdoctoral scholars at Brown, and junior faculty members at Brown who have recently transitioned from postdoctoral appointments.

    Registration is required.

    Questions? Please email [email protected]

    Mari Anne Snow, CEO, Sophaya and the Remote Nation Institute: With over 20+ years’ experience leading remote teams, Mari Anne is a recognized remote work thought leader. Her company, Sophaya, helps organizations optimize remote work programs and her Remote Nation Institute is re-writing leadership best practices and standardizing remote work business training to educate today’s remote/distributed professionals. Her book, The Remote Work Handbook, provides practical, real-world advice for achieving success with remote/distributed teams.

    Katie Sharkey, MD, PhD: As director of the Office of Women in Medicine and Science in the Division of Biology and Medicine, Katie develops programming aimed at fostering academic achievement and professional development of women faculty, house officers, students, and trainees. She chaired the Mentoring Committee of the American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA) from 2019-2023 and now represents AMWA on the steering committee of the Women’s Wellness through Equity and Leadership (WEL) leadership training program. Katie is also a past chair of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) Young Investigator Research Forum, which aims to position early-career investigators for a successful research career.

    Register to AttendMore Information 
  • May
    2

    Speaker: Miranda Scolari (Texas Tech University)

    Title: From Sensory Processing to Decision Making: Exploring the Role of Selective Attention

    Abstract: Selective attention prioritizes a subset of visual input in service of behavioral goals, such that responses to attended information are faster and/or more accurate compared to the unattended. This selection can occur based on several external properties, such as a relevant object’s expected location (space-based selection) or an expected feature (e.g., color; feature-based selection). Space- and feature-based attention are regularly treated as separable mechanisms that can be deployed simultaneously when unique and relevant information from both dimensions is known in advance to the observer. However, research findings have been mixed as to whether these should be ascribed to common or independent sources. In a series of experiments from my lab (Liang & Scolari, 2020; Liang, Poquiz, & Scolari, 2023), we modeled latent components of perceptual decision making during a visual search task, which points to a dual processing approach: Selection mechanisms behave independently within sensory processing but interactively within higher-order processes. Furthermore, this interaction is task dependent. The onset time of perceptual evidence accumulation (non-decision time) and the amount of information required before generating a response (response caution) are modulated by the reliability of the multidimensional pre-cue. Post hoc analyses of the pupillometry data collected during each experiment consistently revealed a similar relationship between whole pre-cue reliability and changes in pupil size, and in turn, changes in pupil size reliably predicted response caution across experiments (Liang & Scolari, in preparation). Together, this line of research provides converging evidence for a dual process model of selective attention, while also offering insight into the specific cognitive processes that may be tracked with pupillometry.

    More Information 
  • Neuroscience Special Seminar - Leveraging Circuit Architecture and Cell Identification to Understand the Neural Control of Movement

    David Herzfeld
    Duke University

    Abstract: 

    Even the simplest behaviors require the coordinated activity of multiple brain areas, each with recurrently connected neural populations. The challenge of relating neural activity to behavior thus requires a fundamental understanding of how circuits transform their inputs to drive downstream population activity. The cerebellum provides an ideal brain region to link circuit-level processing with behavior. Across modalities, the cerebellum plays a critical role in shaping motor output to drive accurate movements. In addition, the architecture of the cerebellar circuit has been well-characterized, featuring discrete neural populations in a highly conserved circuit motif. Using large-scale electrophysiological recordings in the cerebellum of monkeys, I will describe our efforts to understand how the cerebellar circuit transforms its inputs to ultimately drive two oculomotor behaviors: saccades and smooth pursuit. Crucial to this endeavor is the ability to establish the identities of a subset of recorded units, allowing us to track and infer computations at various points in the circuit.

    More Information 
  • May
    1
    5:00pm - 6:30pm EDT

    BioCON Intro Into Networking Social

    164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone, 4th floor

    This is an Intro Into Networking Workshop and Social Event for Graduate Students and Postdocs in biology-related fields.

    RSVPMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • May
    1
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    MCBGP Seminar Series: Christopher W. Cowan, PhD

    70 Ship Street, Rm LMM107

    MCB Graduate Program Seminar

     

    Christopher W. Cowan, PhD

     

    Professor and Chair, Department of Neuroscience

    SmartState Endowed Chair in Brain Imaging

     

    Medical University of South Carolina



    Transcriptional regulation of cortical development in a syndromic form of autism




    Hosted by: Sofia Lizarraga

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • May
    1
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Clinical Psychology Training Programs at Brown: A Consortium of the Providence VA Medical Center, Lifespan,
    and Care New England
    Cultural Adaptation of Evidence-Based Interventions
    Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez, PhD, ABPP
    Department of Psychology
    Utah State University

    Wednesday, May 1, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Define cultural adaptation
    • Differentiate cultural adaptation from cultural competence
    • Identify multiple models of cultural adaptation
    • Explain the effects of cultural adaptation on treatment outcomes
    • Describe specific examples of cultural adaptations

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Domenech has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    30
    4:00pm EDT

    John Mislow Memorial Lecture

    85 Waterman Street, Rm Room 130

    John Mislow Memorial Lecture

    Stanislas Dehaene, Professor, Collège de France

    “Understanding the neural code for conscious symbolic thought:
    A challenge for human cognitive neuroscience”

    Tuesday, April 30, 2024 | 4:00 p.m.
    Reception to follow

    Stanislas DehaeneAccording to the global neural workspace hypothesis, the mechanisms of conscious access are similar in human and non-human species. Wherein, then, lies the singularity of the human brain? In this talk, I will propose that the contents of consciousness became markedly richer in humans as our brains acquired a capacity for compositional thought using discrete symbols. Recent comparative data from my lab show that humans possess unique abilities for symbolic learning and a mathematical “language of thought”. Even the mere perception of a square or a zig-zag involves a short mental program that captures the observed data in an internal language of geometry. Behavioral and brain- imaging experiments indicate that the perception of geometric shapes is poorly captured by current convolutional neural network models of the ventral visual pathway, but involves a symbolic geometrical description within the dorsal parieto-prefrontal network. I will argue that existing connectionist models do not suffice to account for even elementary human perceptual data, and that neural codes for symbols and syntax remain to be discovered.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    29
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series: Justin Parent

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Justin Parent, Brown/URI

    Title: The Impact of Enhancing Parenting on Child DNA Methylation

    Abstract: Research with rodents, non-human primates, and children demonstrates that the early caregiving environment plays a critical role in the development of physiological systems involved in regulating stress-reactivity. A key process by which experiences of early environmental adversity might influence risk for the development of later psychopathology is through biological embedding of adversity exposure via epigenetic changes (i.e., DNA methylation - DNAm). Despite the promise and progress of social epigenomic research on risk processes (e.g., maltreatment), a significant limitation of the extant literature is that a basic understanding of how biological embedding of adversity can be prevented or reversed has yet to be achieved, with little understanding of the role of protective factors that impact these developmental trajectories. This presentation will highlight early findings on how enhancing parenting alters the epigenome among at-risk preschoolers and establishes a biological foundation that promotes resiliency and prevents the development of psychopathology.

    More Information 
  • Brown University’s Fluid Biomarkers Laboratory & Meso Scale Discovery invite you to join us for a lunch and learn to explore:

    MSD Solutions for:

    • Personalized Multiplexing
    • Ultrasensitive Detection
    • Assay Development

    Focus: Biomarker detection in blood, CSF, exosomes, + extracellular vesicles (EVs)

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    26
    3:00pm - 4:30pm EDT

    A Carney Career Conversation with Sam Reiter, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone, 4th floor

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a Career Conversation with Sam Reiter, Ph.D., as he shares his personal academic journey and career trajectory. The event will be followed by a discussion and Q&A session, moderated by Kristin Webster, the Carney Institute’s Associate Director for Training and Development.

    Dr. Reiter will also be presenting a Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits Special Seminar discussing the Cephalopod skin patterns as windows into brain dynamics on April 26 at 12:00 p.m. in the Carney Innovation Zone. 

    Sam Reiter is currently an assistant professor and leader of the Computational Neuroethology Unit at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology. His background is in experimental neuroscience, where he has studied diverse topics in a range of model organisms. After studying neuroscience at Brown University as an undergraduate, he continued graduate school in neuroscience at Brown and the US National Institutes of Health and trained as a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research.

    Please RSVP by April 24 and reach out to [email protected] with any questions.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Carney Conversations, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Apr
    26
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Linda Zou

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Location: Dome Room and Zoom (https://brown.zoom.us/j/95166664847)

    Speaker: Linda Zou, University of Maryland

    Title: Two Axes of Racial Subordination

    Abstract: The United States’ racial and ethnic landscape continues to undergo transformative shifts, with post-1960s immigration playing a large role. The expanded presence of Latino Americans, Asian Americans, and other racial and ethnic minority groups has underscored the need to better incorporate these groups’ experiences into social psychological scholarship and research. In this talk, I will first provide support for a two-dimensional Racial Position Model that goes beyond the traditional racial hierarchy to explore how the two axes of perceived inferiority and cultural foreignness together shape racial and ethnic minority groups’ distinct experiences in the U.S. Next, I will present recent findings exploring the implications of groups’ two-dimensional racial positioning for building intra-minority solidarity across different racial and ethnic minority groups.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    26
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    The Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits Special Seminar: Sam Reiter, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone

    Join The Carney Institute for Brain Science as we host The Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits Special Seminar with Sam Reiter, Ph.D., where he will discuss the Cephalopod skin patterns as windows into brain dynamics.

    Dr. Reiter is currently an assistant professor and leader of the computational neuroethology unit at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology. His background is in experimental neuroscience, where he has studied diverse topics in a range of model organisms. After studying neuroscience at Brown University, he continued graduate school in neuroscience at Brown and the US. National Institutes of Health, and most recently worked as a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Carney Conversations, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Apr
    25

    Speaker: Mary Hegarty (UCSB)

    Title: Individual Differences in Navigation

    Abstract: In this talk, I will review evidence for large individual differences in human navigation ability, or what is commonly referred to as the “sense of direction”. I will review how we study individual differences in navigation in both real and virtual environments, and what we know so far about the variation in navigation abilities and strategies. Finally I will review some current directions of research on this topic, including questions of how we should measure individual differences in navigation and research on how GPS use might be affecting our navigation abilities.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    25

    The Neural Mechanisms and Circuits for Flexible Decision-Making

    NaYoung So
    Colombia University

    A hallmark of cognition lies in the ability to process and combine information in a flexible manner. To identify the mechanisms and circuits underlying this computation, I study the neurobiology of decision-making. Humans and other primates predominantly use vision to gather information, and therefore, I use nonhuman primates as a model for studying the neural correlates of decisions communicated by eye movements. I designed novel tasks that deconstruct the decision process to understand (i) how the decision can be paused and resumed after interruptions and (ii) how the decision can be terminated to be reported later. While the monkey was engaged in these tasks, I recorded tens to hundreds of neurons simultaneously from the parietal cortex. When a decision is interrupted by intervening eye movements and needs to be updated, I demonstrated the population of parietal neurons represents the decision continuously without interruption—by transferring decision-related activity from neuron to neuron across intervening eye movements.
    Furthermore, I showed that if the termination of a decision is separate from the expression of the decision, different groups of parietal neurons represent the When and What of the decision. Yet, these representations are correlated on single trials, suggesting the When and What of a decision remain coupled via a single evidence accumulation process. Together, my results reveal the building blocks of the decision process and how these units are put together to guide flexible behavior. Based on my findings, I hypothesize that behavioral flexibility can be explained by the many ways neurons can communicate within and across brain areas to cater to various task demands. My future research will test this hypothesis by probing hundreds of neurons simultaneously from the parietal and frontal areas while the monkey makes decisions under varying task demands:
    1. Different information types (i.e., value and sensory).
    2. Different rules or contexts.
    3. Different ways to gather information.
    My research benefits from the latest innovation in neurotechnology for probing neural populations and the set of sophisticated analyses and models to identify neural mechanisms and circuits for decision-making. Through this approach, my research aims to uncover the general principles governing cognition.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    24
    5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    BioCON Presents: Bioimaging careers and microscopy as a common thread

    164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone

    Bioimaging careers and microscopy as a common thread 

    Dr. Lylah Deady, Ph.D.

    Biosystems Sales Specialist / Account Manage at Nikon Instruments

     

    BioCON is excited to welcome Dr. Lylah Deady who will be joining us in person at Brown University! Dr. Lylah Deady is a Biosystems Sales Specialist and Account Manager at Nikon Instruments. She will come and discuss her experiences of working for a global microscope company and broadly speak about opportunities for bioimaging careers post-Ph.D.

    This event will be catered by Poke Works!

    Sign UpMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Apr
    23

    Opposing Roles of VTA Co-Transmitters in Reward and Aversion

    Shelley Warlow
    University of California, San Diego

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) controls motivation most notably through its dense dopaminergic projections to various limbic and forebrain sites. However, the VTA is heterogeneous and some VTA neurons have the surprising capacity to co-release multiple neurotransmitters when activated. For example, a subset of VTA glutamate neurons co-release dopamine in the nucleus accumbens medial shell (NAc), and a separate subset co-release GABA in sites such as lateral habenula (LHb) and ventral pallidum. Optogenetic stimulation of VTA glutamate projections promotes positive reinforcement in mice in some assays, yet in other assays can promote aversion, making it difficult to reconcile how the same neurons can promote opposing motivations. Here, I present findings from experiments that dissect the distinct contribution that individual co-transmitters from VTA glutamate neurons make to reinforcement and avoidance behaviors. Overall, our results suggest that distinct neurotransmitters co-released from VTA contribute to motivation in an opposing manner, and highlight mesolimbic contributions to reinforcement that are dopamine-independent.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    23
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Cognitive Systems Journal Club

    164 Angell Street, Rm 4th floor - 429

    Join us for our weekly interdepartmental journal club to discuss recent work in cognitive, computational, and systems neuroscience. For more info, contact Kati Conen ([email protected])

    More Information CCBS, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    23

    ShiNung Ching,Associate Professor Electrical & Systems Engineering,
    Washington University in St. Louis

    A fundamental challenge in computational neuroscience has been the translation of multimodal data into formal mathematical and computational models that can reveal biophysical mechanisms in neural circuits and their connection to behavior. In this presentation, I will describe our recent efforts in this domain, focusing on extracting from data the generative dynamics that give rise to overt observations of brain activity. Specifically, I will describe how we have adapted tools from Bayesian filtering and algorithmic optimization toward the problem of parametrically learning high-dimensional, biophysically interpretable models of network interactions involving hundreds to thousands of neural populations. These techniques place a particular emphasis on model-building at the level of individuals, which in turn provides leverage on revealing idiosyncrasies in brain mechanisms. In this regard, I will highlight two ways in which we are leveraging the obtained models. First, I will discuss our newly developed methods to directly interrogate the intrinsic dynamics within models, toward assessing topological similarity across individual (brain) dynamics and the functional salience thereof. Second, I will describe how we are using models to predict input-output relationships within brain networks and their responses to exogenous, causal perturbations. In addition to basic mechanistic insights, these approaches enable us to design brain stimulation protocols that are tailored to individuals and defined in terms of dynamical targets that can be linked to specific functional endpoints; to conclude I will briefly describe ongoing work to validate this latter premise.

    More Information CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Apr
    22
    4:30pm - 5:30pm EDT

    Turning Your PhD into a Job Series: Acing an Interview

    167 Angell Street, Rm 1st Floor Conference Room

    During this workshop, we will focus on how to prepare for your next interview.

    This includes:

    • General rules of an interview and how to prepare for it
    • Common interview questions and the frameworks to structure your thoughts and answers
    • Tips on how to answer the tough questions (with examples) 
    • Resources for preparation and practice

    This program is open to all Brown PhD students and Postdocs.

    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships
  • Apr
    22
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Electrical and Computer Engineering Seminar: Saransh Sharma, MIT

    Barus and Holley, Rm 190

    Saransh Sharma, MIT, will present a talk, “Miniaturized biomedical devices for navigation, sensing and stimulation.”

    Abstract: Medical electronic devices are an integral part of the healthcare system today and are used in a variety of applications around us. The design of such devices has several stringent requirements, the key being miniaturization, low power operation, and wireless functionality. In this talk, I will present CMOS-based miniaturized, low-power and wireless biomedical devices in three broad domains: (a) in-vivo navigation and tracking, (b) in-vivo sensing of biomarkers and physiological signals, and (c) in-vivo stimulation and drug delivery. For the first part, I will talk about ingestible and implantable devices that can be used to achieve sub-mm tracking accuracy in 3D and in real time inside the human body, which is very useful for localizing devices in the GI tract, during precision surgeries and minimally invasive procedures. In the second part, I will present the design of a novel on-chip 3D magnetic sensor that is highly miniaturized and low-power, thus making it suitable for many biomedical applications. In the last part, I will briefly talk about my recent work on a wearable device for multi-modal sensing from sweat, followed by ongoing work on devices for stimulation and drug-delivery. I will end the talk with a glimpse of my future research direction. 

    Bio: Saransh Sharma received the B.Tech. degree in Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering from IIT Kharagpur, India, in 2017 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Caltech, Pasadena, CA, USA, in 2018 and 2023 respectively. He is currently a post-doctoral scholar at MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. His research is on integrated circuits and systems design, with special emphasis on low-power biomedical applications. He was a recipient of the Demetriades-Tsafka-Kokkalis award for best PhD thesis at Caltech in biotechnology and related fields, the Jakob van Zyl Predoctoral Research award at Caltech, Lewis Winner Award for Outstanding Paper at ISSCC 2024, Charles Lee Powell Fellowship at Caltech, and Excellence in Mentorship award at Caltech for mentoring undergraduate and graduate research students.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    19
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Vivienne Chi

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Vivienne Chi, Brown University

    Title: Human-Robot Trust during Interactive Teaching

    Abstract: Building and maintaining trust is critically important for continued human-robot interaction and the prospect of robots learning social skills from social environments. While prior work explored ways for artificial agents to learn norms from human users, a psychological analysis of the human teacher has been largely overlooked. To gain insight into how humans would teach robots to master social and moral norms and update their trust, I will present a novel paradigm in which participants interactively teach a simulated robot to behave appropriately in a healthcare setting. In this talk, I will show that human teachers are highly responsive to the robot’s local and cumulative performance. I will discuss my efforts to measure trust dynamics as teaching and learning progress and to examine how human teachers’ choice of teaching method and their perceived contribution to the robot’s learning play a role in these trust dynamics.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    18
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Maryam Shanechi; Univ. of Southern CA

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title:  Dynamical modeling, decoding, and control of brain network activity 

    Host:  Nicholas Tolley, Neurscience Graduate Student

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    18
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series: Stefan Uddenberg

    Carney Innovation Zone (164 Angell Street 4th floor), Rm 305

    Speaker: Stefan Uddenberg (University of Chicago)
    Title: Hyper-realistic reverse correlation reveals a novel gender bias in representations of leadership across political orientation

    Abstract: Appearance influences election outcomes via leadership stereotypes – past work has shown that adults and even children can predict real-world elections solely on the basis of perceived competence judgments via photographs with relatively high accuracy. What are our visual stereotypes of leadership? And how do they differ according to political orientation? Here we explored this question using a novel reverse correlation technique powered by hyper-realistic generative face models (Albohn et al., 2022). Participants (N=300) viewed generated faces one at a time and judged whether they looked like a “good leader”, a “bad leader”, or “not sure”. Applying a simple algorithm to the aggregated choices yielded visually compelling and interpretable mental representations at both individual and group levels. While political group-averaged representations were similar along many subjective attributes (e.g., perceived “trustworthiness”, “attractiveness”; Peterson et al., 2022), they revealed a novel gender bias: right-leaning participants’ “good leaders” were more masculine than those of left-leaning participants. We directly replicated this result using richer latent face representations (N=300). We then validated individual participant models on new observers (N=150), probing their willingness to vote for different faces generated by past participants in an imaginary election. As predicted, participants were not only more willing to vote for “good” leader faces, but were most willing for faces generated by participants sharing their political orientation. Taken together, our results demonstrate how political orientation is linked to a novel gender bias in leadership representations, showcasing the utility of our reverse correlation technique.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    18
    12:00pm EDT

    Marissa Schafer, PhD., Mayo Clinic

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Unraveling Experience-Dependent Cortical Plasticity That Sculpts Taste Perception: From Synapses to Ensembles

    Chi-Hong Wu
    Brandeis University

    Sensory experiences shape our perception of the world by altering cortical synaptic functions, resulting in the adaptation of subsequent related behaviors. Yet, the precise mechanisms orchestrating experience-dependent modifications of cortical synapses remain incompletely understood. To address this gap, my research focuses on conditioned taste aversion – a robust associative learning paradigm known to alter rodents’ taste perception following adverse experiences. Specifically, I seek to identify the synaptic plasticity mechanism pivotal for regulating the specificity and generalization of associative taste memory.


    Using ex vivo physiology and activity-dependent genetic labeling methods, I uncovered that homeostatic synaptic scaling plays a crucial role in constraining postsynaptic weights in excitatory neurons within the gustatory cortex during memory consolidation. I demonstrated that this homeostatic regulation via
    synaptic scaling is key to ensuring the specificity of associative taste memory. Intriguingly, I found that sensory experiences associated with strongly negative consequences can override synaptic scaling, resulting in pervasive increases in postsynaptic strengths within the cortical network and the generalization of learned taste aversion. Collectively, my work unveiled a novel mechanism whereby
    homeostatic synaptic scaling shapes the specificity of associative taste memory while laying the groundwork for elucidating the synaptic underpinnings of memory overgeneralization in mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    In an ongoing work, I also established a two-photon in vivo calcium imaging method to longitudinally track taste-evoked activities in cortical neurons. This novel approach will further propel me to delineate how synaptic scaling—and other forms of synaptic plasticity—guides the transition in neuronal representations of taste in the gustatory cortex during taste learning.

    In the future, I plan to elucidate how the interplay between cortical excitatory and inhibitory synaptic
    plasticity modifies the functions of taste circuitry and shapes familiar taste perception. I will then examine the mechanism by which cortical inhibitory drives gate the interaction between current and future taste experiences. By leveraging interdisciplinary strategies from cellular and behavioral neuroscience, my
    research will advance our understanding of how synaptic computation at the cellular level systematically instructs taste coding in the cortex, ultimately providing insight into how such neural adaptability fails in animal models of psychiatric disorders.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    17
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    MCBGP Seminar Series: Thomas A. Reh, PhD

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    MCB Graduate Program Seminar

     

    Thomas A. Reh, PhD

     

    Professor of Biological Structure

     

    Institute for Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine

    University of Washington



    Stimulating neurogenesis in glial cells; never too late to change their fate.




    Hosted by: Robert Louis Hastings

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Apr
    16
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    DSCoV Workshop: JavaScript for JsPsych

    164 Angell Street, Rm 4th floor

    DSCoV (Data Science, Computation, and Visualization) workshops are lunchtime introductions to basic data science and programming skills and tools, offered by and for Brown staff, faculty, and students (with occasional presenters from outside Brown). The workshops are interactive, so bring a laptop. All are welcome, and pizza is usually served.

    JavaScript for JsPsych

    Presenter: Robert Gemma, Research Software Engineer (Graphics), OIT

    Learn JavaScript fundamentals with an emphasis on working with JsPsych. Familiarity with jsPsych and Honeycomb is useful but not necessary. 

    The workshops can also be attended on Zoom.

    Zoom linkMore Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Apr
    15
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series: Matthew Gingo

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Matthew Gingo, Wheaton College
    Title: Moral Resistance and Social Opposition in the Family: Children’s Evaluations of Legitimate Norms and Lies


    Abstract: When children and their parents disagree, it is often the parents who have the final say. It is not the case, however, that children have no recourse against parental control or prohibitions when negotiations fail. One of the ways that children exercise their agency is by engaging in subtle but powerful forms of everyday resistance when they judge that parents have overstepped the legitimate bounds of their authority. This talk is focused on children’s use of covert defiance and deception as modes of resisting parental directives that restrict children’s desired actions. We will discuss the age-related and domain-specific reasoning that children bring to bear when assessing the legitimacy of parental prohibitions and children’s defiance and deception in several social-cognitive domains and what this tells us about social and moral development.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    15
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Neuroscience Special Seminar - Multiregional Mechanisms of Cognitive Control

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz

    Multiregional Mechanisms of Cognitive Control

    Agrita Dubey, Ph.D
    University of Pennsylvania

    Sensory distractions impede our ability to finish tasks and achieve our goals. The successful execution of goal-driven behavior depends on our ability to control the influence of distractors. The prefrontal cortex (PFC)- a brain region most advanced in primates- is central to cognitive control mechanisms. Investigating the neural mechanisms of cognitive control is crucial to our understanding of mental health disorders. In my talk, I will discuss our recent findings elucidating the role of PFC beta activity in mediating top-down control of sensory information. Drawing from my research, I will propose a conceptual framework that emphasizes a multiregional communication approach to uncover the cognitive control mechanisms. Additionally, I will discuss our efforts in utilizing state-of-the-art high-density neural recording techniques, enabling recording from multiple brain areas and providing new insights into neural mechanisms.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    12
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Electrical and Computer Engineering Seminar: Peiyan Dong, Northeastern

    Barus and Holley, Rm 190

    Peiyan Dong, Northeastern University, will present a talk, “Towards Ultimate Efficiency in Ubiquitous ML Powered Intelligence and Green AI.”

    Abstract: As AI techniques continue to advance, the efficient deployment of deep neural networks on resource-constrained devices becomes increasingly appealing yet challenging. Simultaneously, the proliferation of powerful AI technologies has raised significant concerns about sustainability and fairness, demanding increased attention from the community. This talk presents two novel software-hardware co-designs for improving the efficiency and sustainability of deep learning models. The first part introduces a hardware-efficient adaptive token pruning framework for Vision Transformers (ViTs) on embedded FPGA, HeatViT, which achieves significant speedup under similar model accuracy compared to the state-of-the-art. HeatViT is the first end-to-end accelerator for ViT on embedded FPGA and also achieve practical speedup by data-level compression for the first time. The second presents PackQViT and Agile Quant, a paradigm of the efficient implementation for transformer-based models by sub-8-bit packed quantization and SIMD-based optimization for computing kernels. Our framework can achieve better task performance than state-of-the-art ViTs and LLMs with significant acceleration and power saving on edge processors, such as mobile CPU, Raspberry Pi and RISC V. This work not only marks the first successful implementation of the LLM on the edge but also addresses the previous limitation where edge processors struggled to efficiently handle sub-8-bit computations. At the conclusion of the presentation, the speaker will discuss today’s challenges related to AI sustainability and fairness and outline her research plans aimed at addressing these issues.

    Bio: Peiyan (Peggie) Dong is a final-year Ph.D. Student at Northeastern University, Boston, advised by Prof. Yanzhi Wang. Her research area is the intersection of Software-Hardware Co-design, Hardware Architecture, and Efficient Emerging Devices, such as superconducting devices and quantum circuits. Her work has been published broadly in top conference and journal venues (e.g., DAC, ICCAD, MICRO, HPCA, ICS, ISSCC, AAAI, ICML, NeurIPS, CVPR, IJCAI, ECCV, RTAS, TCAS-I, TCAD, etc.) She has received Rising Star Award in EECS 2023, three Oral Paper Awards, one Spotlight Paper Award, and also the inventor of one U.S. patent.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    12
    11:00am EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Simon Alexandre Daste

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Room 220/Marcuvitz

    Title:  Olfactory information coding and routing in cortical neural circuits

    Advisor:  Dr. Alexander Fleischmann

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    9:00am - 10:30am EDT

    Thesis Defense: Aaron Traylor (“The Emergence of Symbolic Structure from Data in Prototype Neural Networks”)

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 477

    The Emergence of Symbolic Structure from Data in Prototype Neural Networks

    Neural network models have grown in popularity to be the dominant artificial intelligence paradigm of our time, succeeding across a variety of challenging tasks despite largely receiving unstructured sequential input. Despite this broad success, it is a classically open question whether they can represent and generalize symbolic structure; in which there are entities which are represented as atomic symbols (CAT, MUFFIN), and there are abstract content-independent functions that operate over those symbols (e.g. NOT, AND, OR). In principle, neural networks are universal function approximators and can learn any function, but in practice, learning symbolic structure from data without the use of architecture specific to symbolic structure has proven challenging. However, modern neural models (e.g. large language models) are able to learn extremely powerful representations over the course of their training, which calls into question whether learning representations of symbolic structure is within their capacity.

    In this thesis, we explore the hypothesis that representations of symbolic structure can emerge during training in prototypical neural sequence models. We evaluate LSTM- and Transformer-based neural network models with low inductive biases and without extensive architectural engineering on symbolic tasks borrowed from developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. We focus on carefully controlled experimental paradigms and small models in order to yield interpretable results. In the first chapter, we evaluate whether neural network language models can differentiate logical operators in a symbolic reasoning task within a propositional logic setting, and find that models’ performance relies on the degree to which the operators are separable given their distribution in the data. In the second chapter, we evaluate object-tracking models from computational vision at a task from the developmental psychology literature which tests reasoning by exclusion within a visual setting, and find that models do not generalize to the logical inference when it is not explicitly featured in their training data. Finally, within a computational cognitive neuroscience setting, we find that Transformer models trained on a working memory task mimic biological functionality for storing and recalling items within working memory, despite not having an explicit “memory” component themselves. Overall, our results provide insight into the conditions within the training data and architecture of neural models which are necessary for representations of symbolic structure to arise, which can inform evaluation of neural models across the field of artificial intelligence.

    Host: Professor Ellie Pavlick

    More Information 
  • Apr
    11
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Suzanne Haber; University of Rochester Medical Center

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title:  Circuits linking reward, cognition, and decision-making: From primate anatomy to human neuroimaging, disease, andneuromodulation

    Host:  Dr. Darcy Diesburg

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Neural and Molecular Pain Processing in the Spinal Cord and Brain of Awake, Behaving Animals

    Biafra Ahanonu, Ph.D
    University of California, San Francisco

    Pain is a complex, multidimensional percept that initiates appropriate protective behaviors by integrating sensory information from the spinal cord with ongoing brain states. Yet, many questions remain about spinal sensorimotor transformations, in part because most “pain processing” spinal cord studies used anesthetized or semi-intact preparations. I will discuss our methodological innovations that enabled longitudinal in vivospinal cord imaging in behaving and freely moving animals for months to over a year. We monitored individual axons, identified a spinal somatotopic map, simultaneously imaged stimulus-provoked dynamics of projection neurons on both sides of the spinal cord in behaving animals, and observed months-long microglial changes after nerve injury (https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.05.22.541477). Our studies underscore the significance of recording spinal cord activity in the behaving animal.

    In parallel, to understand molecular changes that occur in chronic pain states and identify novel therapeutic targets, we created post-injury proteomes at each node in the pain neuroaxis—the sensory ganglia, spinal cord, and brain. I will discuss how our recent findings and new techniques integrate with our prior pain-related brain imaging studies (e.g. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aap8586) and computational pipelines (e.g. CIAtah, https://git.io/ciatah), that together define a theoretical and experimental framework to understand pain-related sensorimotor transformations and may identify novel pain-relief strategies.

    More Information 
  • The Advance RI-CTR Clinical and Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. This series features outstanding science from expert investigators alternating with Advance RI-CTR Pilot Projects awardees sharing their early research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Thursday, April 11, 2024 (12:00pm-12:30pm)

    Christine Clarkin, PT, DPT, PhD: “EMPOWER PD: An integrated, person-centered model of health care delivery from community inspiration to clinic implementation”

    Brain health and healthy aging are important for everyone across the lifespan, but even more critical if one has been diagnosed with a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). Data from a pilot study assessing community need, recommendations, and implementation of a new model of care for people living with PD will be presented. First, qualitative data collected during a series of focus groups with people living with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD) and their care partners (CPs) and individual health provider interviews will be discussed. Second, those recommendations characterizing an efficient and effective model of support that meet the healthcare needs of PwPD were implemented as the EMPOWER PD Clinic pilot study. Data presented will reveal a novel approach to improve the lives of PwPD and their caregivers and supports the clinic as a model that would empower PwPD to more fully participate in decision making and management of their health.

    About Dr. Clarkin

    Christine Clarkin, PT, DPT, PhD received her B.S. degree in Physical Therapy from the University of Vermont in 1987, her DPT from Simmons University in Boston in 2010, and her PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Rhode Island in 2020. She has worked as a physical therapist, senior therapist, clinical education coordinator, and clinic director in a variety of settings including acute care, acute rehab, and home health care settings for more than 35 years. Her experience has been across all diagnoses with a focus on neurologic impairments, amputee, and burn and wound care and has been LSVT BIG certified since 2013. She began her academic career as an assistant professor in 2019 in the Physical Therapy Department at the University of Rhode Island and has focused on clinical translational research related to neuroplasticity and Parkinson’s disease. 

    Thursday, April 11, 2024 (12:30pm-1:00pm)

    Gisela Jimenez-Colon, PhD: “Transgenerational Trauma in Latinx Families: Impact on parenting, child suicidality, and access to mental health services”

    In Dr. Jimenez-Colon’s presentation, preliminary findings from interviews with Latinx/ Hispanic caregivers will shed light on the transgenerational transmission of trauma’s impact on parenting and youth suicidality. Additionally, the challenges surrounding access to mental and health care services in Rhode Island will be presented, along with their potential influence on parenting practices in caregivers. This captivating talk promises valuable insights into these crucial issues.

    About Dr. Jimenez-Colon

    Dr. Gisela Jimenez-Colon completed her bachelor’s degree Suma Cum Laude in psychology with a minor in social research from the University of Puerto Rico in 2013. She obtained her PhD with Suma Cum Laude in clinical psychology in 2019 from Albizu University, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Her clinical psychology pre-doctoral internship was completed at the Children’s Institute in Los Angeles, on the trauma track, where she became certified in TF-CBT. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship within the Research Fellowship Program at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Bradley Hospital. Since her postdoctoral training, she has been the project coordinator of an NIMHD funded R01 for Latinx youth with suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Dr. Jimenez-Colon was awarded with a Pilot Grant from the Advance RI-CTR that focuses on assessing how trauma may impact Latinx parenting practices. Gisela presently is a faculty member in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and a licensed clinical psychologist with the Lifespan Physician Group practicing in Gateway Healthcare in the new Mi Gente Program focused on serving Latinx youth with mood disorders and trauma.

    Register NowMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Apr
    11

    Speaker: Johannes Burge (University of Pennsylvania
    Title: Perceptual consequences of processing dynamics in human vision

    Abstract: I will discuss recent results demonstrating striking perceptual consequences when different visual features and different visual locations are processed with millisecond-scale differences in timing. Certain image differences between the eyes cause dramatic misperceptions of where in 3D space a target is and in what 3D direction it is moving; and these effects are modulated by where in the visual field a target is located. I will explain the temporal processing and stereo-geometry underlying these misperceptions. The fact that substantial perceptual errors are caused by millisecond differences in processing speed highlights the exquisite temporal calibration required for accurate perceptual estimation. The fact that these misperceptions are rare in natural viewing indicates how well the visual system is calibrated in normal circumstances. Ongoing and future work on a range of related topics with clinical and scientific import will be discussed.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    10
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Harold Schlosberg Colloquium: Susan Gelman

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    Speaker: Susan Gelman

    Title: “How children look beyond the obvious”

    Abstract: A hallmark of human cognition is the capacity to think about observable experience in ways that are non-obvious – from scientific concepts (genes, molecules) to everyday understandings (germs, soul). Where does this capacity come from, and how does it develop? I argue that, contrary to what is classically assumed, young children often extend beyond the tangible “here-and-now” to think about hidden, invisible, abstract entities. I give examples from three lines of research: essentialism, generics, and object history.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    10
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds
    Teen stress, trauma, and transition: Considering biology and social context
    Nicole R. Nugent, PhD
    Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Brown University
    Wednesday, April 10 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to identify and become familiar with the following concepts:
    • Describe how stressful and traumatic life experiences may impact teen mental health
    • Characterize the role of social environmental, including digital interactions (i.e., text messaging, social media communication, etc.), for adolescents during times of transition and stress
    • Consider the ways that experiences may impact adolescent biology

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Nugent has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Apr
    9
    4:00pm EDT

    Providence Area Aging Forum (PAARF)

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107
  • Apr
    9
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    MCBGP Seminar Series: Aron Lukacher, MD, PhD

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    MCB Graduate Program Seminar

    Aron Lukacher, MD, PhD

    Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology and Immunology

    Penn State College of Medicine



    Polyomavirus Wakes Up and Chooses Neurovirulence

     

    Hosted by: Walter Atwood

    Tuesday, April 9, 2024

    12:00 pm

    70 Ship Street, Room 107

     

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Apr
    8
    10:00am EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Sinda Fekir

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm Rm. 202

    Title:  Ventral Tegmental Area Regulation of Dynamic Blood Brain Barrier Permeability

    Advisor:  Dr. Christopher Moore

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    5
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Jae-Young Son

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Jae-Young Son, Brown University

    Title:

    Abstract:

    More Information 
  • Apr
    5
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Engineering Seminar: Neuromorphic Technology to enable Closed-loop Interactions

    Page-Robinson Hall, Rm B&H 190

    Elisa Donati, Ph.D.

    The emergence of neuromorphic electronic circuits has the potential to revolutionize the field of bioelectronic medicine, enabling the development of highly accurate and targeted solutions for treating chronic diseases. By mimicking the structure and function of the nervous system, neuromorphic circuits can effectively interface with real neural processing systems, paving the way for real-time closed-loop interactions with biological tissues. This talk will delve into the key characteristics of neuromorphic circuits that make them ideal for interfacing with the nervous system. It will also showcase the design and implementation of closed-loop hybrid artificial and biological neural processing systems, demonstrating their potential in various healthcare applications. ​

    Elisa Donati received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees (cum laude) in biomedical engineering from the University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, and the Ph.D. degree in Biorobotics from the Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy. She is currently a Research Fellow with the Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Group Leader at ZNZ Center of Neuroscience in Zurich, and Dozentin, D-ITET, ETHZ. She was also an affiliated researcher in the iCub facility at the Italian Institute of Technology, Italy. Her research activities include the interface of neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering for building innovative human-machine interactions. She is interested in building bioinspired hardware, based on neural coding, to develop innovative solutions for wearable always-on devices. Elisa is also involved in the Technical Committee of IEEE Transaction on Biomedical Engineering and Neural Network and AI Technical. She is also the editor of IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems and IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers.

    More Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Apr
    5
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    Thesis Defense: Thao Nguyen (“Human-guided Robot Object Search”)

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 115

    Human-guided Robot Object Search

    Object search is a central problem for human-robot interaction, as finding, localizing, and then grasping an object is a first step for almost anything a person would want the robot to do in the physical world. Additionally, natural language and gesture are the two most popular communication modalities due to the familiarity and comfort they afford the majority of human users. Human-guided object search is a difficult problem as the robot must identify objects based on the natural language and gesture specifications, which might lack information and be ambiguous. Furthermore, object detection accuracy can suffer from sensor noise and the robot’s partial observation of the environment.

    This thesis integrates language-conditioned visual models with a model-based decision-theoretic framework to enable effective robotic object search with complex natural language and gesture specifications. I will first present our research on affordance-based object retrieval which learns to encode language and visual inputs into a joint embedding space. Next, I will discuss our work on incorporating the language-conditioned visual detector’s uncertainty into the planner’s observation model for improved state estimation and object search. Lastly, I will describe our project on utilizing pointing gesture information in robot object search and my future research directions.

    Host: Professor Stefanie Tellex

    More Information 
  • Apr
    5
    11:00am EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Doruk Savas

    Sidney E. Frank Hall, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title: Differential control of Drosophila feeding behavior via co-transmission of acetylcholine and leucokinin

    Advisor:  Dr. Gilad Barnea

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    5
    9:30am - 10:30am EDT

    Faculty Entrepreneur Connect

    Barus and Holley, Rm 190

    Register Now

    Is your lab developing the next great innovation to solve an unmet need? Are you curious about how to create a start-up? Brown Technology Innovations, Advance RI-CTR and the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship present Faculty Entrepreneur Connect, a new group designed to allow faculty inventors to meet and network with other entrepreneurially-minded faculty at Brown. If you have started a company, are thinking about starting a company, or just want to learn about entrepreneurship at Brown, we encourage you to attend!

    Friday, April 5, 2024, 9:30AM

    Jules Blyth, Senior Director in Brown’s Office of Research Integrity and Kieran Rock, Compliance Analyst for Brown’s Conflict of Interest Program present: “Managing Conflict of Interest with Startups”

    Are you thinking about starting a company based on your research? Have you heard confusing or conflicting rumors about all of the things you “cannot” do with a startup because of conflict of interest? Jules Blyth and Kieran Rock from Brown’s Office of Research Integrity will lay out conflict of interest considerations for faculty who are thinking of starting a company, and provide examples of how Brown faculty have appropriately managed conflict of interest while still pursuing their startup interests.

    Register NowMore Information 
  • Apr
    4
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Lauren Sergio; York University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title:  The Wounded Brain: Assessing Function Pre-dementia and Post-concussion

    Host:  Dr. Joo-Hyun Song

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    4
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Fueling Your Passion: Preventing Burnout in Academic Research

    Carney Institute for Brain Science (164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Providence, RI 02906), Rm Innovation Zone

    “Fueling Your Passion: Preventing Burnout in Academic Research” is a workshop intended to help early-career academic researchers learn how to identify and prevent burnout. Kelly Holder, PhD, Chief Wellness Officer, Warren Alpert Medical School, will lead the workshop. This event is co-sponsored by the Office of University Postdoctoral Affairs (OUPA) and the Carney Institute for Brain Science as part of The Carney Institute’s Advancing Research Careers Program (R25NS124530).

    This event will take place in person on Thursday, April 4, 2024, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM at the Innovation Zone inside the Carney Institute for Brain Science (164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Providence, RI 02906).

    Light refreshments will be provided, and the event will last about 90 minutes.

    The Carney Institute’s Advancing Research Careers (ARC) program aims to advance the research careers of women and persons historically excluded due to ethnicity and race (PEERs) in brain sciences at the level of advanced postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty. ARC is funded by an R25 award from NINDS to support an annual cohort of highly qualified participants through structured mentorship, research support, and activities that contribute to successful neuroscience research careers

    Target Audience: This event is designed for early career scholars, including Carney ARC scholars, senior postdoctoral scholars at Brown, and junior faculty members at Brown who have recently transitioned from postdoctoral appointments.

    Registration is required.

    Questions? Please email [email protected]

    Register to AttendMore Information 
  • Apr
    3
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Neuroscience Special Seminar - Subcortical Organization of the Somatosensory System

    BioMed Center, Rm 202 - Purple Palace

    Subcortical Organization of the Somatosensory System

    Anda Chirila, Ph.D.
    Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School

    While the encoding of touch is extensively investigated in the somatosensory cortex, how tactile stimuli are represented atfirstsynapse in the somatosensory pathway, in the spinal cord dorsal horn, is largely unexplored. To fill this gap, I developed a preparation for large-scale in vivo spinal cord electrophysiology, in combination with well-controlled mechanical stimuli, computational analyses and a range of genetic manipulations. This approach revealed six principal dorsal horn
    response profiles to light touch stimuli, reflecting extensive convergence and nonlinear transformation of signals from both low-threshold and high-threshold mechanoreceptor subtypes. Genetically defined dorsal horn interneuron populations map onto distinct functional profiles, and genetic manipulations of select interneuron subtypes revealed a highly interconnected dorsal horn
    network architecture, with individual dorsal horn interneurons exerting broad influence over all other subtypes. In addition, we found that dorsal horn interneuron subtypes flexibly shape a range of postsynaptic dorsal column (PSDC) projection neuron signals to the somatosensory cortex. In fact, PSDC output neurons exhibit highly heterogeneous responses to tactile stimuli, and this functional diversity virtually collapses in the absence of distinct dorsal horn inhibitory circuit motifs. Finally, cortical responses to light touch, as well somatosensory behaviors are impaired in the absence of diverse dorsal horn output streams. Thus, extensive mechanoreceptor subtype convergence and nonlinear transformations at the first stage in the somatosensory hierarchy shape how touch of the skin is represented in the brain. Future directions include exploring how sensory processing in the spinal cord and its flexible, modifiable ascending signaling streams are altered in disorders associated with dysfunctions of the somatosensory system, such as autism spectrum disorders and neuropathic pain.

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  • Cortical Computations Underlying the Integration of Perceptual Priors and Sensory Processing

    Tahereh Toosi, Ph.D.

    Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University

    The ability of the visual system to store and use learned information, or perceptual priors, is essential for interpreting complex visual scenes, such as identifying obscured objects or imagining scenes not currently visible. This process relies on the interaction between processing incoming sensory data and existing knowledge stored in the synaptic strengths throughout the brain. Although the importance of top-down and bottom-up integration is recognized, the precise ways in which they enable the brain to piece together information from different sources remain largely unknown.

    My research aims to reveal the mechanisms underlying these processes by demonstrating how the brain’s need to function reliably in noisy environments influences the development of these pathways, enabling visual processing abilities like resolving visual occlusion and visual imagination. The phenomenon of illusory contours and shapes, exemplified by the Kanizsa optical illusion and Rubin’s face-vase illusion, serves as an ideal case study for how the brain combines sensory input with past experiences to create a coherent perception. Previous studies have shown that such illusory contours invoke activation in specific layers (L2/3) of the early visual cortex but not in others (L4). I will demonstrate the recapitulation of these findings within a deep convolutional model optimized for object recognition, powered by a theory-grounded, biologically plausible algorithm that processes activations through forward and feedback pathways iteratively. This represents the first instance of a large-scale, image-computable model that, while primarily optimized for recognizing objects, also explains how illusions are perceived in the visual cortex as a result of integrating sensory data with learned information.

    Zooming out, the insights from this computational modeling suggest a resolution to the debate over whether the brain functions primarily as a generative or a pattern recognition neural network, and explaining a number of experimental findings regarding specificity of computations in cortical layers.

    More Information BrainExPo, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    3

    Abstract: Proper regulation of gene expression is a crucial component of life, yet remains poorly understood despite a recent explosion in the quality and availability of genomic measurements. A paradigm that has emerged involves training neural networks that take in genomic sequences and predict these measurements directly. Far from being uninterpretable, these models can be paired with feature attribution algorithms to discover building blocks of the regulatory code. In this talk, I will introduce our ongoing work on a neural network called DragoNNFruit that extends this paradigm to modern data sets where measurements are available for each of many individual cells. A distinguishing feature of DragoNNFruit is that the parameters of this method are dynamically generated for each cell in the experiment based on properties of the cell, rephrasing the learning task as that of learning how to process genomic sequence in a cell-specific manner. When applied to data from cells that are slowly transitioning across types, DragoNNFruit uncovers the regulatory code of both endpoints but also how this code gets rewritten as cells alter their identity, and even how individual nucleotides can be involved in different regulatory programs in different cell types. Afterwards, I will briefly discuss pitfalls that one can encounter when applying machine learning to genomics data, and introduce my vision for new directions that these machine learning models can take.

    Bio: Dr. Jacob Schreiber is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University, where he develops machine learning-based methods for studying the genome. Previously, he did his Ph.D. at the University of Washington. In parallel to his research, he has contributed to the Python open-source ecosystem as a core developer for scikit-learn and the author of pomegranate, a package for probabilistic modeling, apricot, a package for submodular optimization, and ledidi, a method for designing biological sequence edits that exhibit desired characteristics, among others.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    2
    2:30pm EDT

    GPP Thesis Defense: Benjamin Thomas Jung

    Smith-Buonanno Hall, Rm Room 106

    Title:  The role of rare copy number variants in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Advisor:  Dr. Philip Shaw, NIH

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    2
    1:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Public Health Research Day 2024

    Alumnae Hall

    Public Health Research Day is an annual conference hosted by Brown University’s School of Public Health that highlights the research accomplishments of our students, trainees, and partners. All members of the Brown community are welcome to visit the poster session to learn more about Brown students’ high-impact public health work!

    The conference, held in Alumnae Hall, is one of several events held to commemorate National Public Health Week, April 1-7, 2024. Visitors are encouraged to discuss posters with students, fellows, staff, faculty, and affiliates.

    Posters will be reviewed by a panel of judges. Prizes will be awarded for posters judged to be the best in the following categories:

    • undergraduate student
    • master’s student
    • doctoral student

    Winners will be announced by the School of Public Health in mid-April.

    Learn more!More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    2
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    EEOB Tuesday Seminar Series

    Biomed, Rm 291

    Title: Hanging in the balance: homeostasis in hibernation

     Speaker: Dr. Ni Feng  Assistant Professor, Biology Department
    Program in Neuroscience and Behavior
    Wesleyan University

    Learn MoreMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Learn from Brown engineering alums and others about their careers using engineering skills.  

    Robert Langer, Sc.D., Professor and Cofounder of Moderna, received his Bachelor’s Degree from Cornell University in 1970 and his Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974, both in Chemical Engineering.  Currently holding the esteemed title of Institute Professor at MIT, Dr. Langer oversees a cutting-edge biomedical engineering lab comprising over 100 researchers. In 2010, Dr. Langer co-founded Moderna, where his groundbreaking innovations span a spectrum of over 100 products, ranging from artificial skin to revolutionary mRNA vaccines. Beyond his entrepreneurial endeavors, Dr. Langer has a staggering portfolio of more than 1,570 articles and over 1,400 issued and pending patents worldwide. Beyond academia, Dr. Langer’s influence is further highlighted by his role in founding more than 40 companies and receiving over 200 awards, including the prestigious Queen Elizabeth prize. In essence, Dr. Langer’s multifaceted contributions form a towering legacy in the realms of research, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

    Please register below and you will receive the Zoom link shortly before the event.

    Register hereMore Information 
  • Apr
    1
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Dissertation Defense: Jason Leng

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Auditorium

    Title: Cognitive Control under Reward and Penalty: Mechanisms Underlying Variability within and across Individuals

    All are encouraged to attend!

    More Information 
  • Apr
    1
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series: Junyi Chu

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Dr. Junyi Chu, MIT
    Title: The puzzle and promise of play


    Abstract: Few phenomena in childhood are as compelling or mystifying as play. While many animals play, human play is distinguished by the sheer diversity of goals that we pursue, even as adults. Yet the seeming inutility of play belies one of the hallmarks of intelligence: a remarkably flexible ability to reason and plan in novel situations. What kind of mind generates and pursues so many goals, and has so much fun in the process? I suggest that answering this question takes us beyond current accounts of rational action and exploration. In this talk, I will present three lines of work on reasoning and decision-making in (mostly) playful contexts. I will begin with a case study of goal-directed reasoning: how children assess speculative conjectures in the absence of any evidence. Then, I will discuss the proposal that play in humans reflects a novel kind of exploration, in which players are trying to figure out what problems they can pose and solve. I will present a number of empirical studies – spanning exploratory play to rule-based games and imaginative pretense – illustrating how children and adults choose goals and actions when trying to have fun, compared with under other objectives. This research suggests that inventing and pursuing novel goals is an intrinsically rewarding activity, and I will speculate on why that might be valuable for human cognition. I will end by briefly discussing ongoing research on goal generation and creativity, in both humans and machines. By paying attention to the goals we adopt and the problems we make for ourselves, I aim to explain the richness and flexibility of the human mind.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    1
    12:00pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Kelvin Ariel DeLeon

    LMM, 70 Ship Street, Rm Room 107

    Title:  Phenotypic Distinction Between Missense and Loss of Function Mutations in SLC13A5 Epilepsy

    Advisor:  Dr. Judy Liu

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Yang Yang, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor with Tenure
    Borch Department of Medicinal Chemistry
    and Molecular Pharmacology
    Purdue University College of Pharmacy &
    Purdue Institute for Integrative Neuroscience
    Purdue University

     

    Host: Judy Liu, MD, Ph.D.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • Mar
    28
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Christina Kim; University of CA, Davis

    Sidney E. Frank Hall, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title:  Molecular circuits for probing activated neuronal ensembles

    Host:  Dr. Ahmed Abdelfattah

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    28
    11:00am - 3:00pm EDT

    Mind Brain Research Day

    Sayles Hall & MacMillan Hall Rm 117

    Get ready for a half-day of neural networking: The 26th Annual Mind Brain Research Day features a research poster session, bag lunch, and keynote address, “Deep Brain Stimulation for Intractable OCD,” by Wayne Goodman, M.D., of Baylor College of Medicine.

    Be sure to register by March 14!

    Schedule of events:

    Poster Session
    11 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
    Sayles Hall

    Lunch
    11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
    Sayles Hall
    *You must RSVP by March 14 to reserve a lunch.*

    Keynote Address & Poster Awards
    1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
    MacMillan Hall Room 117

    Keynote Address: “Deep Brain Stimulation for Intractable OCD”
    Wayne Goodman, M.D.
    D.C and Irene Ellwood Professor and Chair
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Baylor College of Medicine

    Register by March 14More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Don’t want CME credit? Email [email protected] and we can send you the zoom link separately.

    Dayna Johnson, PhD, MPH, MSW, MS
    Assistant Professor
    Emory University

    Dr. Johnson will utilize a socioecological framework to discuss sleep health and sleep health disparities across the life course. Using data from large epidemiologic studies, she will present empirical research on the determinants of sleep health disparities. Dr. Johnson will discuss the current evidence supporting sleep as a strategy to improve cardiovascular health and health disparities.

    RegisterMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    25
    1:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    2024 Brown Postdoctoral Research Symposium

    Sayles Hall & Salomon Center for Teaching

    The Office of University Postdoctoral Affairs (OUPA) at Brown University is pleased to announce the second annual postdoctoral research symposium on Monday, March 25, 2024 in the Salomon Center and Sayles Hall. This symposium will feature the innovative research being conducted by postdoctoral scholars at Brown and include the following:

    • A keynote address from Randall Ribaudo, Co-founder of SciPhD.com, and research presentations from the recipients of the 2024 Postdoctoral Excellence Awards, followed by an awards ceremony in the Salomon Center from 1:30 pm to 3:45 pm. 
    • A poster session accompanied by a reception with appetizers as well as alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages in Sayles Hall from 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm.

    Details, including information about the keynote address, instructions for how to participate in the poster session, and the event schedule, are available on the official symposium website.

    Please note, only individuals with a current appointment at Brown University as a postdoctoral research associate, postdoctoral fellow, or an equivalent postdoctoral appointment at a Brown-affiliated hospital may present their research during the poster session in Sayles Hall. However, all members of the Brown community are welcome to attend the programming in the Salomon Center and poster session in Sayles Hall to network and learn about the research being conducted by postdocs at Brown.

    Learn more about the symposium at the official website here.

    2024 Brown University Postdoctoral Research Symposium keynote speaker, Randall Ribaudo, Ph.D.2024 Brown University Postdoctoral Research Symposium keynote speaker, Randall Ribaudo, Ph.D.

    Learn MoreMore Information 
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual and In Person
    9:00am EDT

    CCMB/BCBI Dissertation Defense: Katherine Brown

    Warren Alpert Medical School, Rm CSR280

    “Piecing the Puzzle Together: Building a Bridge to Discovery Using Health Informatics Approaches for Autism Spectrum Disorder”
    Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Chen

    Children with high-needs, including those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), require extensive medical, behavioral, and educational support due to their complex conditions. These challenges necessitate innovative data-driven approaches to inform decision-making and improve care. The Learning Health System (LHS) framework systematically incorporates data-driven insights and evidence-based knowledge into healthcare practice to enhance patient outcomes.

    This dissertation focuses on the knowledge discovery aspect of LHS by using a mixed methods approach, combining qualitative insights and computational findings to inform a tailored healthcare intervention. The three aims are to: (1) Conduct an in-depth qualitative study with caregivers of children with high-needs to examine unmet needs, social challenges, emotional impacts, and essential resources; (2) Use computational methods to study the ASD population and associated comorbidities using statewide clinical data; and, (3) Integrate the qualitative and computational findings to create a comprehensive strategy for a technology-based application that addresses the identified needs. This overall approach not only strengthens the basis for more informed healthcare technologies but also supports the LHS principle of continuous, evidence-based improvement.

    The findings highlight the need for enhanced mental health support and personalized care plans, specifically focusing on the increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in individuals with ASD. The combined research findings further inform a concept and wireframe prototype for a digital safety plan application that addresses mental health safety and provides customized resources, aiming to improve access to necessary services for high-needs children and ASD. By integrating diverse research outputs, design and functionality of targeted technological solutions can be improved, leading to more effective and personalized health interventions.

    The components of this dissertation introduce a nested framework within the larger LHS paradigm for knowledge discovery in healthcare, emphasizing the bridge of qualitative insights and computational findings. The proposed Bridge to Discovery in Learning Health Systems (BD- LHS) framework showcases an integrated approach, leveraging the combination of stakeholder insights and computational data analysis to drive evidence-based interventions. This holistic approach aims to generate a responsive, adaptive healthcare system that meets community needs and sets a new standard for interdisciplinary collaboration in health informatics, fostering continuous improvement in health outcomes.

    More Information 
  • Mar
    22
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Hannah Snyder

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Friday, March 22nd, 2024

    2 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Dome Room (Metcalf 305)

     

    Speaker: Hannah Snyder, Brandeis University

    Title: Cognitive risk mechanisms for depression and anxiety in adolescence and emerging adulthood

     

    Abstract: Adolescence and emerging adulthood is a key risk period for depression and anxiety, potentially in part because still-developing executive function is not adequate to fully cope with new roles and demands, increasing stress. I will discuss two lines of research which seek to better understand these risk factors. The first tests a risk pathway linking poor executive function to psychopathology via stress generation and repetitive negative thinking. The second further probes links between stress and psychopathology risk, focusing on the role of stressor controllability appraisals. Finally, I’ll briefly highlight our ongoing research (a) testing how risk factors interact to predict depression and anxiety symptom trajectories during the transition to college, and (b) testing a classroom intervention aimed at reducing academic stress.

    If you are interested in having lunch with Dr. Snyder and/or meeting with her one-on-one, please sign up here: https://shorturl.at/yCFT9

    More Information 
  • Mar
    22
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CAAS Rounds: Dr. Jody Rich - Addressing the Opioid and Overdose Crisis

    121 South Main Street, Rm Room 245

    CAAS Rounds presents: Dr. Jody Rich - Addressing the Opioid and Overdose Crisis

    More Information 
  • Mar
    22
    12:00pm EDT

    Fergus Imrie: Transforming medicine and healthcare with machine learning

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    Abstract: Healthcare faces numerous ongoing challenges with substantial disparities in access to care and health outcomes, while an aging population and increased prevalence of chronic conditions place further strain on healthcare systems. Machine learning has the potential to revolutionize medicine and transform healthcare delivery. However, several diverse challenges are impeding routine and widespread adoption. In this talk, I will outline these challenges and present recent advances in machine learning that can help overcome them. First, I will present an automated machine learning approach that addresses technical challenges in developing, understanding, and deploying ML systems that currently render them largely inaccessible for medical practitioners. I will describe applications of this methodology to develop powerful prognostic models in cancer and cardiovascular disease that can inform clinical decision-making. Second, I will explore how machine learning can drive scientific discovery with advances in feature selection, explainable AI, and causal reasoning. Finally, I will explain how these approaches form part of a broader vision for machine learning in healthcare.

    Bio: Fergus Imrie is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of California Los Angeles in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Visiting Researcher at the Cambridge Centre for AI in Medicine at the University of Cambridge, hosted by Mihaela van der Schaar. He received his D.Phil. from the Department of Statistics at the University of Oxford in 2021 under the guidance of Charlotte Deane. His research interests concern the development and application of new methods in machine learning and artificial intelligence for healthcare, medicine, and drug discovery. His work has been published both at leading machine learning conferences (e.g. NeurIPS, ICML, ICLR, AISTATS) and in scientific and medical journals (e.g. Nature Machine Intelligence, PLOS Medicine, Bioinformatics).
    More Information 
  • Mar
    21
    6:00pm - 7:00pm EDT

    Turning Your PhD into a Job Series: Marketing Yourself on LinkedIn

    167 Angell Street, Rm 1st Floor Conference Room

    The workshop will discuss how you can utilize LinkedIn to market yourself, make connection with professionals, and increase the chances of finding jobs.

    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships
  • Mar
    21
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Murali Prakriya; Northwestern University,

    Sidney E. Frank Hall, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Title:  Regulation of astrocyte reactivity and affective behaviors by astrocyte calcium signaling

    Host:  Dr. Elena Oancea

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    21
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    CCBS Special Seminar: Network Cognition in a Curious World

    MacMillan Hall, Rm 115

    Network Cognition in a Curious World

    Dani Bassett, Ph.D. |J. Peter Skirkanich Professor at the University of Pennsylvania 

    In this talk, I will describe a notion of network cognition that manifests in how we engage with the curious world around us. To do so, I will draw together three lines of inquiry in mind, brain, and computation. I’ll begin with a line of inquiry into connective curiosity (“How do we connect bits of information as we walk about the world?”), then move into graph learning (“How do we build larger network models from those connections?”), and finally end in network control theory (“How is that model building constrained by the brain’s own connective structure?”). The studies discussed will span experiment, model, and theory, and bridge human behavior, neural representations, and computational science. Together they frame a formal investigation into network cognition and motivate future inquiry. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    21

    Speaker: Wayne Mackey (Statespace/Aimlabs)

    Title: Entrepreneurship and Science in the Wild

    Abstract:  How different is it, really, to do research in academia vs industry? Why would one choose one over the other? What if you want to commercialize your academic research? In this talk I will share experiences, challenges, and insights on my journey from industry to academia to entrepreneurship - and possibly back to academia again. I’ll discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly of founding my startup, Statespace, at the intersection of cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and video games. I’ll introduce our video game platform (Aimlabs) that acts both as our core product and our primary research tool, as well as how we are opening it up to researchers at scale to more easily allow academic researchers to conduct engaging experiments “in the wild”.

    More Information 
  • Mar
    21
    12:00pm EDT

    Andrew Pickering, PhD., UTHealth Houston

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Mar
    19
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CCBS Special Seminar: “Deconstructing human reinforcement learning”

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Auditorium

    Deconstructing human reinforcement learning

    Anne Collins, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley

    Reinforcement learning frameworks have contributed tremendously to our better understanding of learning processes in brain and behavior. However, this remarkable success obscures the reality of multiple underlying processes that support humans’ unique flexibility and adaptability. In this talk, I will show that not accounting for such underlying processes in computational cognitive modeling weakens the generalizability and interpretability of findings, with important consequences in neuroscience, developmental, clinical research. I will present multiple approaches to disentangle the multiple processes that support flexible learning, including episodic and working memory processes. This works highlights the importance of studying learning as a multi-dimensional phenomenon that relies on multiple separable but inter-dependent computational mechanisms. Insights from how the brain implements learning is essential to informing generalizable, interpretable cognitive modeling. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • DSCoV (Data Science, Computation, and Visualization) workshops are lunchtime introductions to basic data science and programming skills and tools, offered by and for Brown staff, faculty, and students (with occasional presenters from outside Brown). The workshops are interactive, so bring a laptop. All are welcome, and pizza is usually served. 

    Flux to Flow: A Clearer View of Earth’s Water Cycle via Neural Networks and Satellite Data

    Presenter: Albert Larson, Research Associate in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, EEPS

    Holistic Water Cycle Analysis via the Confluence of Climate Model, Satellite, Ground Truth, and Machine Learning Signal Processing Technologies.

    The workshops can also be attended on Zoom.

    Zoom linkMore Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Mar
    18

    Building Performant and Brain-Like Recurrent Models from Neurons and Astrocytes

    Leo Kozachkov, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Associate, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, MIT

    The brain’s ability to perform challenging tasks is facilitated by its many inductive biases—hardwired biological features that predispose it to process information in certain ways over others. These features include anatomically distinct brain areas, as well as specialized cell types such as neurons and glia. Inductive biases grant the brain computational powers that currently surpass artificial intelligence systems in many domains. In this seminar, I will cover two recent avenues of research that leverage the brain’s inductive biases to build highly performant, recurrent artificial networks.

    In the first half of my talk, I will discuss recent progress in understanding the computational role of different cell types. I will focus on neuron-glial interactions. An intriguing fact is that most human brain cells are not neurons, but rather glia. There is mounting experimental evidence suggesting that astrocytes, a specialized type of glial cell, play a significant role in learning, memory, and behavior. However, our theoretical understanding is lagging far behind. I will cover recent work that aims to bridge this gap by relating dynamical, energy-based neuron-astrocyte networks to powerful AI models such as Modern Hopfield Networks and transformers.

    In the second half of my talk, I will discuss how and why the brain maintains a balance between flexibility and stability through “dynamic attractors”, which are reproducible patterns of neural activity in response to (potentially time-varying) stimuli. This work reveals an unexpected and useful theoretical link between dynamic attractors and modularity. Specifically, recurrent neural networks with dynamic attractors can be combined into large, modular “networks of networks”, reminiscent of the brain’s macroscopic organization, in ways that provably preserve stability. These higher-order, stable networks can then be optimized for state-of-the-art performance on benchmark sequential processing tasks, demonstrating that dynamic stability is a useful inductive bias for building brain-like performant recurrent models.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Speaker: Konrad Kording, University of Pennsylvania
    Title: Causality in neuroscience: why we want it? How to get it?
    Abstract: As scientists, we often ask how something works. What we usually mean with that is that we want to know how one aspect of the world (say, one neuron) affects another aspect of the world (say, another neuron). I will give an intuition of the relevant problems and approaches. Focusing on quasi-experimental approaches and machine learning, I will give an overview of how to broaden the scope of meaningful causal techniques in neuroscience and beyond.

    More Information 
  • Mar
    15
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CAAS Rounds: Dr. Kasey Creswell - How Social Context Shapes Alcohol Use Disorder Risk

    121 South Main Street, Rm Room 245

    CAAS Rounds presents: Dr. Kasey Creswell - How Social Context Shapes Alcohol Use Disorder Risk

    More Information 
  • Mar
    15
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Biomarker detection using the Ultra-sensitive Quanterix Simoa Technology

    Sidney Frank Hall, Marcuvitz Auditorium, Rm 220

    Brown University’s Fluid Biomarkers Laboratory & Quanterix invite you to join us for a lunch and learn to take a look at:

    Biomarker detection using the Ultra-sensitive Quanterix Simoa Technology

    • Sensitivity and precision well beyond a standard ELISA
    • Introduction to how the instrument works and what the workflow looks like
    • Application across the multiple diseases; Neurology, Oncology & Inflammation
    • Discover how this technology may be utilized for your research interests!

    Lab tour to follow

    Hybrid Option Available. RSVP Required

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • Mar
    14
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Fan Wang; Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Touch, Pain, and Body Schema 

    Host:  Dr. Alexander Fleischmann

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • The Advance RI-CTR Clinical and Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. This series features outstanding science from expert investigators alternating with Advance RI-CTR Pilot Projects awardees sharing their early research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Thursday, March 14, 2024

    Josiah Rich, MD, MPH: “The Opioid and Overdose Crisis in Rhode Island and Beyond: An Update”

    At the peak of the AIDS epidemic, 50,000 Americans died in a single year. For two years in a row now, over 100,000 Americans have died each year from overdose. If not for the COVID pandemic, this would be the worst health crisis in the US in a century. This talk will review research strategiesto address the opioid and overdose crisis.

    About the Speaker

    Josiah D. Rich, MD, MPH is professor of medicine and epidemiology at Brown University and attending physician at The Miriam and Rhode Island Hospitals. He is a clinical researcher with over 25 years of continuous federal research funding and a board certified infectious disease and addiction specialist with over 30 years of clinical experience. He is a consultant to the Rhode Island Department of Corrections where he has provided weekly clinical care since 1994. He has testified in the US Congress, is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, has presented at conferences across the country and has authored over 250 peer reviewed publications in academic journals.

    He earned his undergraduate degree at Columbia college, his medical degree from the University of Massachusetts and a master’s degree in public health from Harvard University. He completed his internship and residency at Emory University Affiliated Hospitals, and fellowship in infectious diseases at the Harvard combined program.

    Register HereMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    14
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CCBS Special Seminar: Bridging scales in intelligent systems– from octopus skin to mouse brain

    164 Angell Street, Rm 402, Innovation Zone

    “Bridging scales in intelligent systems– from octopus skin to mouse brain”

    Leenoy Meshulam Ph.D.

    Swartz Theory Fellow, University of Washington

    For an animal to perform any function, millions of neurons in its nervous system furiously interact with each other. Be it a simple computation or a complex behavior, all biological functions involve many individual units. A theory of function must specify how to bridge different levels of description at different scales. For example, to predict the weather, it is irrelevant to follow the velocities of every molecule of air. Instead, we use coarser quantities of aggregated motion of many molecules, e.g., pressure fields. Statistical physics provides us with a theoretical framework to specify principled methods to systematically ‘move’ between descriptions of microscale quantities (air molecules) to macroscale ones (pressure fields). Can we hypothesize equivalent frameworks in the nervous system? How can we use descriptions at the level of neurons and synapses to make precise predictions of activity and behavior? My research group will develop theory, modeling, and machine learning tools to discover generalizable forms of scale bridging across species and behavioral functions. In this talk, I will present lines of previous, ongoing, and proposed research that highlight the potential of this vision. I shall focus on two seemingly very different systems: mouse brain neural activity patterns, and octopus skin cells activity patterns. In the mouse, we reveal striking scaling behavior and hallmarks of a renormalization group- like fixed point governing the system. In the octopus, camouflage skin pattern activity is reliably confined to a (quasi-) defined dynamical space. Finally, I will touch upon the benefits of comparing across animals to extract principles of multiscale function in the nervous system, and propose future directions to investigate how macroscale properties, such as memory or camouflage, emerge from microscale level activity of individual cells. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    14
    11:00am EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Kimberly Rose Madhwani

    Biomedical Center (BMC), Rm Room 291

    Title: Neurodevelopmental role of a tRNA methyltransferase linked to intellectual disability

    Advisor:  Dr. Kate O’Connor-Giles

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    13
    5:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    BioCON Seminar: Dr. Melissa Simon

    171 Meeting St, Rm BioMed 291, Eddy Auditorium

    BioCON is excited to be hosting Dr. Melissa Simon, Director of Business Development at Brown Technology Innovations. Dr. Simon works at Brown University’s Tech Transfer Office and has over 15 years of experience in biotechnology research, development, and commercialization. She will be discussing her experience working in consulting as well as opportunities available for students at Brown Technology Innovations. This event will be catered by Poke Works!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    13
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm EDT

    Computational Biology Seminar: Jie Liu, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Rm 302

    Computational Infrastructures for Consolidating our Knowledge regarding the Human Genome

     

    Jie Liu, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan

    Our knowledge regarding the human genome has been exponentially increasing. The knowledge presents in different formats, including direct measurements of genomic entities with the ever-evolving biotechnologies, annotations by groups of experts from different consortia, discoveries from individual studies published as free text in biomedical literature, and insights learned from computational models trained on large-scale genomic datasets. However, we currently do not have an infrastructure to consolidate these heterogeneous knowledge sources. As a result, genomic researchers nowadays spend increasingly more time searching for relevant datasets and literature for scientific discoveries, annotations and conclusions, and unfortunately they do not have AI-powered tools to navigate existing knowledge and prioritize their hypotheses and research activities. In this talk, I will describe two computational infrastructures from my lab for consolidating our knowledge regarding the human genome. The first one is a genomic knowledge graph — GenomicKB, which consolidates 347 million genomic entities, 1.36 billion relations, and 3.9 billion entity and relation properties from over 30 consortia. The second one is a generalizable framework to comprehensively predict epigenome, chromatin organization, and transcriptome. Our works not only have an enormous positive impact on sharing genomic knowledge and facilitating new genomic knowledge discovery, they would also help to promote open science, inclusivity and fairness in the areas of computational genomics and data science.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Mar
    13
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Mental Health of Children and Families in Humanitarian Settings 
    Suzan Song, MD, MPH, PhD
    Director, Global Child & Family Mental Health
    Boston Children’s Hospital
    Visiting Professor, Harvard Medical School
    Professor of Psychiatry
    George Washington University
    Wednesday, March 13, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to identify and become familiar with the following concepts:
    • Identify common mental health issues affecting children and families in humanitarian settings
    • Describe multi-disciplinary responses to meeting the mental health needs of these youth
    • Evaluate strategies and interventions for assessing and working with youth and families in humanitarian settings
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Song, reports the following financial relationships: Royalties: Penguin Random House

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    12
    4:30pm - 5:30pm EDT

    Turning Your PhD into a Job Series: Converting a CV to a Resume

    167 Angell Street, Rm 1st Floor Conference Room

    This workshop is geared toward PhD students and Postdocs who are seeking non-faculty jobs.

    It will discuss:

    • The differences between a CV and a resume
    • How to use common terms on your resume that are used outside of academia
    • Tips on highlighting your PhD skills to position you as a competitive candidate

      This workshop is open to all Brown Ph.D. students and Postdocs.
    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships
  • Mar
    12
    4:00pm EDT

    Providence Area Aging Research Forum (PAARF)

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Mar
    11
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series: Maddie Pelgrim

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Maddie Pelgrim, Brown University

    Title:

    Abstract:

    More Information 
  • Mar
    11
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    CCBS Special Seminar: Successes and failures of machine learning models of sensory systems

    164 Angell Street, Rm 402 - Innovation Zone

    “Successes and failures of machine learning models of sensory systems”

     

    Jenelle Feather, Ph.D. 

    Flatiron Research Fellow at the Center for Computational Neuroscience

    The environment is full of rich sensory information. Our brain can parse this input, understand a scene, and learn from the resulting representations. The past decade has given rise to computational models that transform sensory inputs into representations useful for complex behaviors such as speech recognition or image classification. These models can improve our understanding of biological sensory systems and may provide a test bed for technology that aids sensory impairments, provided that model representations resemble those in the brain. In this talk, I will discuss my research program, which aims to develop methods to compare model representations with those of biological systems and to use insights from these methods to better understand perception and cognition. I will cover experiments in both the auditory and visual domains that bridge between neuroscience, cognitive science, and machine learning. By investigating the similarities and differences between computational model representations and those present in biological systems, we can use these insights to improve current computational models and better explain how our brain utilizes robust representations for perception and cognition. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    8
    3:00pm EST

    MCBGP Thesis Defense: Brendan McCarthy-Sinclair

    70 Ship Street, Rm LMM 107

    MCB Graduate Student Ph.D. Dissertation Defense: Brendan McCarthy-Sinclair

    Advisor: Judy Liu, PhD

    Dissertation: The role of Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) in epilepsy progression.

     

    This thesis presentation is open to all persons; MCB graduate students and faculty are particularly encouraged to attend.

     

    Please contact Anna Sophia Boyd for zoom link

    More Information 
  • Please join us for the CADRE sponsored Distinguished Visiting Scholar Series (DVSS) with Dr. Julie Poehlmann from University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    Dr. Poehlmann is a highly recognized child clinical psychologist specializing in children with incarcerated parents. Her research focuses on promoting social justice for young children and families by understanding and fostering resilience processes while mitigating risks and trauma exposure. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, she investigates the intergenerational transmission of risk, trauma, resilience, and healing, particularly in high-risk infants and young children. She has designed and evaluated interventions, including interdisciplinary approaches for the criminal justice system and contemplative practices to enhance well-being. Currently, Dr. Poehlmann is engaged in the HEALthy Brain and Child Development Study (HBCD) and the Enhanced Visits Program for children with incarcerated parents. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    7
    Virtual and In Person
    5:00pm - 6:00pm EST

    BioCON Seminar Series: From Brown University to Industry

    TBA

    Dr. Ayed Allawzi

    Senior Scientist in Pharmacology at Pioneering Medicine

    BioCON and SACNAS are excited to welcome our second speaker Dr. Ayed Allawzi, who will be joining us in person at Brown University! Dr. Allawzi is a Senior Scientist in Pharmacology at Pioneering Medicine, within the Flagship Pioneering ecosystem. Dr. Allawzi is a Brown alumnus and graduated with his Ph.D. in Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology and will be discussing his current role at Pioneering Medicine and the trajectory he took to secure his position following his Ph.D. at Brown. Additionally, Dr. Allawzi will be discussing strategies to identify careers outside of academia and how underrepresented students throughout science can make the leap into a career within the biotechnology space.

     

    Please RSVP here: https://forms.gle/dmVLhhzo15sJSo1A7

    Zoom link for remote participants: https://brown.zoom.us/j/99767702373

    (Meeting ID: 997 6770 2373)

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Mar
    7
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Laura Cocas; Santa Clara University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  The Role of Neuronal Activity in Glial Development, Circuitry, and Myelination 

    Host: Dr. Sonya Mayoral

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    CCBS Special Seminar: The Relational Bottleneck and the Emergence of Cognitive Abstractions

    164 Angell Street, Rm 402, Innovation Zone

    “The Relational Bottleneck and the Emergence of Cognitive Abstractions”

    Taylor Webb, Ph.D.

    Human cognition is characterized by a remarkable ability to transcend the specifics of limited experience to entertain highly general, abstract ideas. Efforts to explain this capacity have long fueled debates between proponents of symbol systems and statistical approaches. In this talk, I will present an approach that suggests a novel reconciliation to this long-standing debate, by exploiting an inductive bias that I term the relational bottleneck. This approach imbues neural networks with key properties of traditional symbol systems, thereby enabling the data-efficient acquisition of cognitive abstractions, without the need for pre-specified symbolic representations. I will also discuss studies of perceptual decision confidence that illustrate the need to ground cognitive theories in the statistics of real-world data, and present evidence for the presence of emergent reasoning capabilities in large-scale deep neural networks (albeit requiring far more training data than is developmentally plausible). Finally, I will discuss the relationship of the relational bottleneck to other inductive biases, such as object-centric visual processing, and consider the potential mechanisms through which this approach may be implemented in the human brain.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series: Nora Newcombe

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Perception & Action Seminar

    Thursday, March 7, 2024

    12 noon - 1 p.m., Dome Room (Metcalf 305)

     

    Speaker: Nora Newcombe

    Title: Mental Rotation: Development, Assessment and Real-World Relevance


    Abstract: Humans manipulate objects physically, starting in early infancy, and they also perform such manipulations mentally. How do such abilities develop, why are there individual differences, can we assess variability, and what consequences does variability have? This talk will discuss these questions focusing on the best studied skill, mental rotation, and its consequences for mathematical and scientific reasoning.

    More Information 
  • Mar
    6
    4:30pm - 5:30pm EST

    Turning Your Ph.D. into a Job Series: Exploring Your Career Options

    167 Angell Street, Rm 1st Floor Conference Room

     

    This program will teach you how to explore your career options.

    By the end of the workshop, you will learn:

    • How to start the process of Career Exploration
    • Where you can get the information/resources you need for career exploration
    • What you can do to increase your career readiness at Graduate School
    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships
  • Mar
    6
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB March Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Sleep Health Disparities in Children and Adolescents: A Way Forward
    Judith Owens, MD, MPH
    Boston Children’s Hospital
    Professor of Neurology
    Harvard Medical School;
    Wednesday, March 6, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Describe the B-SATED model of pediatric sleep health
    • List three sleep parameters and/or disorders impacted by sleep health disparities in children from socioeconomically disadvantaged and historically marginalized groups
    • Give examples of a) a focus on education and awareness, b) a research goal, and c) a targeted public health policy with the potential to reduce sleep health disparities

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Owens reports the following financial relationships: Consultant- ApniMed;
    Data Safety Monitoring Board member- Idorsia Pharmaceuticals; and Scientific Advisory Board member -Sleep Number

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    5
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    DSCoV Workshop: Introduction to the Rust Programming Language

    164 Angell Street, Rm 4th floor

    DSCoV (Data Science, Computation, and Visualization) workshops are lunchtime introductions to basic data science and programming skills and tools, offered by and for Brown staff, faculty, and students (with occasional presenters from outside Brown). The workshops are interactive, so bring a laptop. All are welcome, and pizza is usually served.

    Introduction to the Rust Programming Language

    Presenter: Paul Stey, Assistant CIO, Research Software Engineering and Data Science, OIT

    This workshop is intended to serve as an introduction to the Rust programming language. It will cover the basic variable types, functions, control flow, ownership, the type system, and generics. We will assume no prior knowledge of Rust.

    The workshops can also be attended on Zoom.

    Zoom linkMore Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Mar
    1
    1:00pm - 2:30pm EST

    Science communication workshop

    92 Thayer St, Providence, RI, Rm GSC Lounge
    Graduate Students of Color in STEM (GSOCnSTEM) is hosting a science communication workshop. Interested in communicating science to different audiences? Join us for an interactive science communication panel & workshop hosted by two current science communicators! Hear our panelists experiences promoting science in other languages and across wide audiences. There will also be a workshop component where they will help you practice sharing your science or give feedback on your current sci-comm works! Lunch will be provided!
     
    Our panelists:
    Dr. Lina Pérez- Angel is a Voss Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society at Brown University. Originally from Colombia, Lina did her Bachelor at Universidad de Los Andes and her PhD at the University of Colorado Boulder in Geological Sciences. Lina’s research in paleoclimatology has contemporary relevance. During the Pliocene, between 5 and 2.5 million years ago, Earth’s atmosphere had about 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide—pretty similar to what we have now. She uses bacterial lipids and other biomarkers on rocks to see how ancient rains, droughts, and temperatures affected the environment then and compares the results to recent data to see how these processes were different from what is happening now. In addition to research, Lina is an educator and a science communicator. She is the co-founder of GeoLchat, a science communication project in Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary sciences in English and Spanish using social media. Currently, Lina is also the Sustainability Chair of GeoLatinas Excecutive Committee, a world organization dedicated to empower Latinas in the geosciences.
     
    Mel Ortiz Alvarez de la Campa is currently a third year PhD candidate in Pathobiology at Brown and co-founder of Ciencia Pa’ Todes, a Caribbean sci-comm initiative. In their free time, they are a freelance author and digital artist. See their work: https://lnk.bio/7Vdw
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  • Mar
    1
    10:00am - 11:00am EST

    Faculty Entrepreneur Connect

    Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship, 1 Euclid Avenue, Rm Liz Lange Lecture Hall

    Is your lab developing the next great innovation to solve an unmet need? Are you curious about how to create a start-up? Brown Technology Innovations, Advance RI-CTR and the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship present Faculty Entrepreneur Connect, a new group designed to allow faculty inventors to meet and network with other entrepreneurially-minded faculty at Brown. If you have started a company, are thinking about starting a company, or just want to learn about entrepreneurship at Brown, we encourage you to attend!

    Friday, March 1, 2024, 10AM

    Danny Warshay, MBA: “The See Solve Scale Entrepreneurial Process”

    Join Danny Warshay, Executive Director of the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship and Professor of the Practice of Engineering at Brown University, and learn about the process covered in his popular ENGN1010 course and his book See-Solve-Scale: How Anyone Can Turn an Unsolved Problem into a Breakthrough Success.

    Topics include the definition of entrepreneurship + the three steps of the structured entrepreneurial process;

    1. how can scarce resources be a benefit and abundant resources a burden;
    2. the sweet spot for forming a successful venture team;
    3. and how you can use the Japanese term Ikigai as a guide for entrepreneurship success.
    Register NowMore Information 
  • Feb
    29
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Bench to Bedside: Neural circuits for finding your way home in health & Alzheimer’s disease

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Aud.

    Omar J. Ahmed, PhD
    Associate Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience & Biomedical Engineering
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Feb
    29
    3:00pm - 4:30pm EST

    CCBS Seminar: “What do neurons want? So many images, so little time”

    164 Angell Street, Rm 402, Innovation Zone

    Gabriel Kreiman, Ph.D.

    Professor, Harvard University, Children’s Hospital Boston

    What information do neurons along the ventral visual cortex represent? Exhaustively examining all possible images is empirically impossible. Therefore, to investigate stimulus preferences, investigators have used a combination of intuitions derived from previous studies, natural stimulus statistics, and serendipitous findings. Here I will describe an approach to uncover what neurons want using a real-time, unbiased, systematic algorithm based on computational models of the ventral visual cortex. We use a generative deep neural network as a vast and diverse hypothesis space. A genetic algorithm searches this space for stimuli guided by neuron preferences. We show that this approach can rapidly generate synthetic images that trigger high activations, both in model units as well as in real neurons, in many cases even higher activations than those elicited by large numbers of hand-picked natural stimuli or images derived from conventional approaches. This approach forces us to revisit how we think about neural coding in the ventral visual cortex. I will also show the results of psychophysics experiments where humans are asked to describe the images that trigger high activation patterns in inferior temporal cortex neurons, reinforcing the notion that neurons in the ventral visual cortex represent complex visual features but not semantic categories. Finally, I will show that similar conclusions can be drawn by scrutinizing the representations in artificial neural networks as coarse approximations to the processing steps along the ventral stream.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    29
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EST

    Neuroengineering Special Seminar - Jonathan Viventi, Duke University

    Barus and Holley, Rm 190

    Jonathan Viventi, Associate Professor in Duke University’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, will present a talk entitled, “Flexibile electronics for neural interfaces.”

    Right now, all of the tools that interface with our brains face a fundamental trade-off. We can either sample with low resolution, over large areas of the brain, or we can sample with fine resolution, over very small areas of the brain. This doesn’t fit with the way our brains are structured. With over 12 million neurons in each square cm of brain surface, we need to sample with high resolution over large areas in order to understand the way the brain works. The limitation is wiring. Every contact we put in the brain requires an individual wire and we can’t fit more than about 100 wires inside our heads. Using the same electronics that enable a digital camera to have millions of pixels without millions of wires, we can move some of the signal processing right to the sensors, allowing us to overcome the wiring bottleneck. The challenge is that traditional electronics are rigid and brittle. They are not compatible with the soft, curved surfaces of the brain. The solution is to make electronics that are flexible. Think of a piece of 2x4 lumber and a sheet of paper, they’re both made out of the same material, but have dramatically different physical properties. Leveraging that idea, we can make electronics that are extremely flexible, by making them very thin. Using these flexible electronics, we have developed high-density electrode arrays with thousands of electrodes that do not require thousands of external wires.

    This technology has enabled extremely flexible arrays of 1,024 electrodes and soon, thousands of multiplexed and amplified sensors spaced as closely as 25 µm apart, which are connected using just a few wires. These devices yield an unprecedented level of spatial and temporal micro-electrocorticographic (µECoG) resolution for recording and stimulating distributed neural networks. I will present the development of this technology and data from in vivo recordings. I will also discuss how we are translating this technology for human clinical use.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Feb
    28
    4:00pm EST

    Providence Area Aging Research Forum (PAARF)

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Feb
    27
    4:30pm - 5:30pm EST

    Turning Your PhD into a Job Series: How to Choose A Postdoc That Is Right For Your Career

    167 Angell Street, Rm 1st Floor Conference Room

    Whether you want to work in academia or beyond, choosing a right postdoc could be a crucial step in shaping your future career. In this workshop, we will discuss some important factors that can easily be overlooked when you are planning to do a postdoc.

    More Information Careers, Recruiting, Internships
  • Feb
    26
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series: Lena Luchkina

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Lena Luchkina, Harvard University
    Title: Learning to talk about the absent, the abstract, and the unobservable

    Abstract: How do we begin to learn about things we have never seen, such as people we have never met (‘Napoleon’), time that has not passed (‘tomorrow’), or ideas that have no stable perceptual form (’same’ vs. ‘different’ or ‘square root of negative one’)? To address this question, my research explores the development of a referential link between words and mental representations and the role of this link in shaping our ability to learn and reason about things we do not witness directly. I will first talk about my experimental investigations of young infants’ ability to create mental representations of something they have never seen and to connect such representations to words. I will then discuss learning mechanisms that enable this connection. Finally, I will talk about infants’ and young children’s ability to leverage this connection to make inferences about others’ knowledge based on language.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    23
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Stefano Anzellotti

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Stefano Anzellotti, Boston College

    Title: What drives the organization of social perception?

    Abstract: The neural mechanisms that enable us to see faces, expressions, bodies and actions are organized into multiple distinct brain regions and subdivided into different processing streams. What drives this complex organization? Recent work has introduced unsupervised models driven by constraints at the level of the inputs, that successfully account for key aspects of the neural architecture of vision. However, other findings are difficult to reconcile with the view that the organization of social perception is exclusively driven by bottom-up constraints. As an alternative, constraints at the level of the outputs might play a central role. I will share the results from a series of studies that test predictions that derive from this alternative hypothesis, and discuss its potential to account for the architecture of social perception.

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  • Feb
    22
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Anne West; Duke Medical School

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Room 220/Marcuvitz

    Title: From chromatin regulation to synapse development in autism and intellectual disability

    Host:  Dr. Sofia Lizarraga 

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  • Feb
    22
    3:00pm EST

    CCBS Seminar: Larry F. Abbott, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Rm 402: Innovation Zone

    Please join us for a seminar with Larry F. Abbott, Ph.D.


    William Bloor Professor of Theoretical Neuroscience and Professor of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics (in Biological Sciences)

    Principal Investigator at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute

    Co-director of Columbia’s Kavli Institute for Brain Science

     

    Title: “Modeling the Navigational Circuitry of the Fly”

    Abstract: Navigation requires orienting oneself relative to landmarks in the environment, evaluating relevant sensory data, remembering goals, and convert all this information into motor commands that direct locomotion. I will present models, highly constrained by connectomic, physiological and behavioral data, for how these functions are accomplished in the fly brain.

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  • Feb
    22
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series: Leyla Isik

    Speaker: Leyla Isik (Johns Hopkins University)
    Title: The neural computations underlying human social interaction perception

    Abstract: Humans perceive the world in rich social detail. We effortlessly recognize not only objects and people in our environment, but also social interactions between people. The ability to perceive and understand social interactions is critical for functioning in our social world, but despite its importance, the underlying neural computations remain poorly understood. In this talk, I will start by outlining a framework for studying social interaction perception as a computational vision problem. Then I will discuss new research using a largescale, naturalistic video dataset and condition-rich fMRI experiment to show that social interaction information is extracted hierarchically by the visual system, along the recently proposed lateral visual pathway. In the final part of my talk, I will discuss the computational implications of visual social interaction processing, and present a novel graph neural network model, SocialGNN, that instantiates these insights. SocialGNN reproduces human social interaction judgements in both controlled and natural videos using only visual information, without any explicit model of agents’ minds or the physical world, but requires relational, graph structure and processing to do so. Together, this work suggests that social interaction recognition is a core human ability that relies on specialized, structured visual representations.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    5:00pm - 6:00pm EST

    BioCON Seminar: From Grad School to Industry with Dr.Liliana De La Paz

    TBD
    BioCON is hosting Dr. Liliana De La Paz, Associate Director of Drug Development at Jazz Pharmaceuticals, where she works on the discovery and development of life-changing medicines for people with serious diseases. Dr. De La Paz will discuss how she managed to get into the biotech field after completing her Ph.D. and her current line of work.
    More Information Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Feb
    20
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    DSCoV Workshop: Introduction to Programming in Python

    164 Angell Street, Rm 4th floor

    DSCoV (Data Science, Computation, and Visualization) workshops are lunchtime introductions to basic data science and programming skills and tools, offered by and for Brown staff, faculty, and students (with occasional presenters from outside Brown). The workshops are interactive, so bring a laptop. All are welcome, and pizza is usually served.

    Introduction to Programming in Python

    Presenter: Ellen Duong, Lead Research Software Engineer, OIT

    Ever wanted to learn how to code, but found it daunting? In this session, we will be learning the basics of coding in Python. We’ll work on the beginnings of creating a game like Wordle, where players have six attempts to guess a five-letter word. No experience necessary! 

    The workshops can also be attended on Zoom.

    Zoom linkMore Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Jiho Shin, Research Scientist, Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, will present a talk, “Next-generation bioelectronics enabled by inorganic single-crystalline semiconductor membranes.”

    Abstract: Inorganic single-crystalline semiconductors such as Si, GaN, and GaAs form the basis of essentially all modern electronic devices, including various implantable and wearable systems that directly interface with the human body for disease diagnosis and neuroengineering applications. However, the bulkiness, rigidity, and non-resorbable nature of conventional semiconductor materials have long been associated with various medical complications. In this talk, I will introduce emerging classes of bioelectronic systems that have addressed these limitations by employing single-crystalline semiconductor membranes that are peeled off from their epitaxial wafers through Layer Transfer techniques. The layer-transferred semiconductor devices are ultrathin, flexible, stackable, and/or bioresorbable and can thereby enable minimally invasive human-device interfaces. I will discuss mainly my research on bioresorbable implantable sensors, stackable optoelectronic-based neural interfaces, and flexible wearable devices.

    Bio: Dr. Shin is currently a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has a broad research background in micro/nanofabrication, electronic/ optoelectronic/ photonic/MEMS devices, IV/III-V/III-N semiconductor materials, and implantable/wearable sensors. As a research scientist in the Jeehwan Kim group at MIT, he is leading projects in three-dimensional heterogeneous integration of single-crystalline III-V/III-N compound semiconductor membranes for brain-machine interface and display applications. Before joining MIT, he received his B.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), respectively. During his Ph.D. study in John Rogers group at UIUC, he developed bioresorbable intracranial MEMS/optical/photonic sensors using single-crystalline silicon nanomembranes. He has published 21 peer-reviewed articles including 6 first-authored papers in journals such as Nature, Science, Nature Nanotechnology, and Nature Biomedical Engineering.

    Host: David Borton, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Engineering, Neurosurgery and Brain Science

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  • Daphne Martschenko, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics. Her work advocates for and facilitates research efforts that promote the socially and ethically responsible conduct and communication of and public engagement with human genetics and genomics. She is currently co-writing a book (under contract with Princeton University Press) with Sam Trejo, a quantitative sociologist who uses genomic data in his research. The book, titled “The Acid We Inherit,” is an adversarial collaboration that delves into the debates and controversies surrounding research connecting DNA to social and behavioral outcomes. 

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

    • Analyze existing mechanisms and incentives for identifying the risks and benefits of scientific research

    • Identify the role of social responsibility and challenges to its practice

    • Describe how to elicit and engage public perspectives to produce socially and ethically informed decisions

    RegisterMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    16
    Virtual
    8:00am - 9:00am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    February 16, 2024

    ZOOM ONLY

    Speaker:

    Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology

    Director, Movement Disorders Program

    Boston Children’s Hospital

    Topic:

    “Pediatric Movement Disorders – From Genes, to Circuits, to Clinical Care”

     

    Objectives

    • Recognize that movement disorders can be symptoms of common and rare disorders.
    • Name treatable movement disorder that should never be missed.
    • Recognize the first line agents for symptomatic treatment – their indication and side-effect profiles
    • Review movement disorder emergencies and emerging therapies
    CME CREDIT SURVEYMore Information 
  • Feb
    15
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Francisco Alvarez; Emory University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Room 220, Marcuvitz

    Title: The development of walking: a spinal interneuron perspective

    Host:  Dr. Gregorio Valdez

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Feb
    14
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Emotion dysregulation and mental health in autism 

    Carla A. Mazefsky, PhD

    Nancy J. Minshew Endowed Chair in Autism Research and

    Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Clinical and Translational Science,

    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

    Wednesday, February 14, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to identify and become familiar with the following concepts:

    • Explain how emotion dysregulation can alter the course of autism spectrum disorder
    • Become familiar with the Emotion Dysregulation Inventory as a tool for research and practice
    • Identify key elements of a promising new intervention for emotion regulation for autistic teens and young adults called the Emotion Awareness and Skills Enhancement Program

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Mazefsky, has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    13
    4:00pm EST

    Providence Area Aging Research Forum (PAARF)

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Student Publications
  • More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Training, Professional Development
  • Feb
    9
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Emily Finn

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Emily Finn, Dartmouth College

    Title:

    Abstract:

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  • Feb
    9
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    CAAS Rounds: Dr. Christy Capone - Psychedelics for AUD and Co-morbid PTSD

    121 South Main Street, Rm Room 245

    CAAS Rounds presents: Dr. Christy Capone - Psychedelics for AUD and Co-morbid PTSD

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Please register via Eventbrite and you will be sent the Zoom link.

    Join us to hear from a panel of experts on how to incorporate wearable technology into your research!

     

    Moderated by Jared Saletin, Ph.D.; Panelists: Stephanie Goldstein, Ph.D., David Barker, Ph.D., Nicole Nugent, Ph.D., and Shira Dunsiger, Ph.D.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    9
    9:00am - 10:00am EST

    Faculty Entrepreneur Connect

    Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship, 1 Euclid Avenue, Rm Liz Lange Lecture Hall

    Is your lab developing the next great innovation to solve an unmet need? Are you curious about how to create a start-up? Brown Technology Innovations, Advance RI-CTR and the Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship present Faculty Entrepreneur Connect, a new group designed to allow faculty inventors to meet and network with other entrepreneurially-minded faculty at Brown. If you have started a company, are thinking about starting a company, or just want to learn about entrepreneurship at Brown, we encourage you to attend!

    Friday, February 9, 2024

    Jason Harry, PhD: “Exploring roles for faculty in academic spin-out companies”

    While faculty often have made significant contributions to the intellectual property that forms the basis of an academic startup, the role of faculty in the startup exists along a spectrum of options. At one end is “no involvement whatsoever.” At the other end is “I’ll be the CEO.” There are many options between these, many of which do not require leaving your academic position. Jason Harry, a recovering technology entrepreneur and faculty member in Engineering, will review different ways that faculty can engage with a spin-out from their lab and how these engagement strategies may be reflected in the company’s corporate and financial structure. A panel of current Brown faculty members will discuss the range of roles they have had in academic startups.

    Register NowMore Information Entrepreneurship
  • Feb
    8
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Kari Hoffman; Vanderbilt University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Room 220/Marcuvitz

    Title:  Neural circuit dynamics of ‘in situ’ memory in monkeys

    Host:  Dr. Theresa Desrochers

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Feb
    8

    Speaker: Kathryn Bonnen (Indiana University)

    Title: Visuomotor control of walking in real-world environments

    Abstract: Coordination between visual and motor processes is critical for the selection of stable footholds when walking in rough terrains. In our work we collect eye and body movement data while people walk over complex natural terrains The resulting integrated visuomotor dataset is valuable for interrogating how vision supports locomotion in real-world environments and observing the sensorimotor loop for vision and full-body movement. Here we focus on two aspects of these data: (i) Gaze strategies. Average gaze location was highly sensitive to the complexity of the terrain, with more fixations dedicated to foothold selection as the terrain became more difficult. Gaze sequences were stereotyped, following forward and backward in order along upcoming footholds. These findings suggest a predictive control strategy aimed at anticipating/adjusting to maintain gait efficiency while also finding good footholds. (ii) Binocular Vision. We found a relationship between the participant’s stereo acuity (a measure of binocular depth perception) and their gaze strategy. Furthermore, disrupting binocular vision led to a tendency to focus on closer footholds. These findings suggest that this loss of visual information places more pressure on the visuomotor control process.  

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  • The Advance RI-CTR Clinical and Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. This series features outstanding science from expert investigators alternating with Advance RI-CTR Pilot Projects awardees sharing their early research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Thursday, February 8, 2024 (12:00 - 12:30 PM)

    Tayla von Ash, PhD: “Pilot testing an innovative physical activity intervention for parents attending their children’s sport practices”

    Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an innovative physical activity intervention delivered to mothers during their children’s sports practice. Women with racial and ethnic minority identities, specifically Hispanic and Black women exhibit suboptimal physical activity-related behaviors and are disproportionately burdened by obesity and physical-activity related chronic diseases. Mothers often report too many responsibilities and prioritizing their children’s needs and extracurricular activities as barriers to engaging in more physical activity. Drs. Tayla von Ash and Bess Marcus designed an intervention to promote physical activity among mothers in a community setting they regularly spend time for their children’s extracurricular activities, circumventing this barrier. Moms on the Move is the first physical activity intervention delivered to mothers during their children’s sports practices, and additionally circumvents transportation and childcare barriers, which are also commonly cited, especially by low-income and racial and ethnic minority mothers. During this talk, Dr. von Ash will provide an overview of the intervention and present preliminary findings regarding feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy

    About Dr. von Ash

    Tayla von Ash is an Assistant Professor of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Center for Health Promotion and Health Equity at the Brown University School of Public Health. She initially joined Brown as Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in 2018 after having received her ScD in social behavioral sciences and public health nutrition from Harvard University. She did her MPH training at Yale University and undergraduate training at UCLA. Dr. von Ash’s research focuses on obesity prevention in racial and ethnic minority and low income families. Most of her research has focused on parenting behaviors and child health outcomes, but her recent work, which she will present on today, additionally targets parents own health behaviors. Dr. von Ash utilizes both qualitative and quantitative data to better understand the contextual factors that contribute to health disparities and design innovative intervention approaches to address them.

    Thursday, February 8, 2024 (12:30 - 1:00 PM)

    Louisa Thompson, PhD: “Digital Approaches to Detecting Cognitive Decline Among Older Adults in Primary Care Settings

    Growing rates of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and greater awareness of its symptoms should translate into earlier diagnosis. However, there is a shortage of specialists with expertise in dementia diagnosis and care, and also a shortage of efficient and accurate tools to assist with screening in general medical settings. Novel methods of assessing AD risk and detecting preclinical disease are in development and are beginning to be used in prevention-focused clinical drug trials. These methods also have the potential to inform screening for cognitive decline and other early markers of AD in clinical practice. Some of these methods include digital tools for detecting subtle cognitive decline, quantification of AD biomarkers in the blood and retina, and AD risk genotyping. This talk will focus on describing some of the latest research on these new approaches to early detection and discuss what next steps are needed to move them toward clinical implementation. 

    About Dr. Thompson

    Louisa Thompson, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a Neuropsychologist in the Memory and Aging Program at Butler Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. Her research aims to use smartphone apps and other novel digital tools to improve cognitive screening methods for use in older adult populations. In particular, she seeks to validate and implement digital assessment approaches that are feasible for use in primary care settings and are sensitive to the subtle cognitive and neuropathological changes associated with ADRD. Dr. Thompson’s research is funded by grants from the Alzheimer’s Association, National Institute on Aging, and Advance-CTR (IDeA-CTR/NIGMS) pilot funds. Additionally, she serves as a co-investigator on several NIH-funded studies investigating other cost-effective and minimally-invasive methods for the early detection of ADRD, including the use of retinal imaging and plasma biomarkers. Dr. Thompson’s long-term research objective is to inform changes in clinical care that will lead to earlier ADRD diagnosis and ultimately better health outcomes for patients living with dementia. 

    Register HereMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    7
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    The Responsible Use and Measurement of Race in Medicine and Public Health

    Lorraine T. Dean, ScD

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Wednesday, February 7, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:

    • Explain the origins of race measurement in the US
    • Review methods for collecting and analyzing data on race and racism
    • Provide examples of how to be anti-racist in writing about race in scientific studies

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Dean has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    6
    12:00pm EST

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Anne-Mary N.R. Salib

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Room 220 Marcuvitz

    Title:  Neuroimmune crosstalk underlying adaptive and maladaptive sensitization of sensory neurons in skin

    Advisor:  Dr. Diane Lipscombe

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Indie C. Garwood, Postdoctoral Researcher, Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department, MIT, will present a talk, “Neural interfaces for controlling dynamic brain states: From anesthesia to psychiatry.”

    Abstract: Innovations in the interrelated fields of anesthesia and psychiatry demand improved approaches for controlling dynamic brain states. Studying the brain’s functional equilibrium, and how it can be disrupted, has motivated increasingly high resolution and multifunctional neurotechnology. Inferring the dynamic structure of neuronal signaling from high dimensional data requires concomitant computational advances. In this seminar, I will present my work developing multiregional and multifunctional neural interfaces for characterizing altered states of consciousness during ketamine anesthesia. I will discuss how we can extend these principles to develop psychiatric brain machine interfaces informed by detailed systems neuroscience experiments. At the intersection of technology development, data science, and cognitive neuroscience, my research focuses on engineering solutions to improve mental health outcomes. 

    Bio: Dr. Garwood is a postdoc in the Brain and Cognitive Science Department at MIT, working in the labs of Profs. Polina Anikeeva, Emery Brown, and Earl Miller. She completed her PhD in the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Program. 

    Host: David Borton, Associate Professor of Engineering, Neurosurgery and Brain Science.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    2
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Samuel Murray

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Samuel Murray, Providence College

    Title: Imperative and aspiration: An empirical case for two kinds of moral norms

    Abstract: Moral norms are usually considered imperative: we must never steal or murder. But not every moral norm is an imperative; some norms, such as reducing waste, are aspirational. Across five preregistered studies (N = 839), we identified differences between imperatival and aspirational moral norms. In Study 1, participants judged that complying with aspirational norms was more conditional on expected community compliance relative to imperatival norms, but less conditional than social norms, while compliance with social norms was more a matter of personal preference than compliance with aspirational norms. In Study 2, participants judged that violating imperatival and aspirational norms was both wrong and blameworthy, though people have a right to violate aspirational, but not imperatival, norms. In Study 3, participants judged that complying with aspirational norms was more praiseworthy than complying with imperatives, even though compliance with imperatival norms is considered equally right and socially desirable. In Study 4, participants judged aspirational norm violations to cause some degree of harm. In Study 5, we found that aspirational and imperatival norms differentially regulate intra- and interpersonal relationships. Complying with aspirational norms impacts self-image more positively than complying with imperatival norms. The opposite pattern is observed for violations. Likewise, compliance with the aspirational is better associated with dispositions to befriend, while violations of imperatival norms is better associated with dispositions to avoid. Our results suggest that aspirational norms play an important role in different cognitive processes related to moral judgment and stem from the way individual rights are represented in moral thinking.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    1
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series: Zhenyu Zhu

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Zhenyu Zhu (CLPS)

    Title: Toward a neural model of visually-guided locomotion
    Abstract: Visually-guided locomotion is one of the most important ecological tasks for the survival of organisms. Understanding its neural mechanism could also potentially be helpful for the development of more robust and efficient assistive technologies such as self-driving cars. In my talk, I will first present experiments that delineate the influence of different motion information in humans’ locomotor control. With these experiments as benchmarks, I will discuss the ongoing work of building a deep-learning-based neural model to explain the human trajectories in these experiments. 

    More Information 
  • Feb
    1
    12:00pm EST

    Knowledge Augmentation for Language Models

    Watson Center for Information Technology (CIT), Rm 368

    Eunsol Choi
    Computer Science Department
    University of Texas at Austin
    Thursday, February 1, 2024 at Noon
    Room 368 (CIT - 3rd floor)

    Modern language models (LMs) store and use immense amounts of knowledge about the real world. However, their knowledge, acquired during pre-training on web corpora, can be incorrect, misleading or outdated. In this talk, I will discuss two complementary avenues for augmenting knowledge in LMs. First, I will present a modular, retrieval-based approach which provides new information in-context at inference time. We improve in-context retrieval augmentation by learning a compressor which summarizes retrieved documents into textual summaries, enabling adaptive and efficient augmentation. In the second half of the talk, I will present a parameter updating approach which aims to enable models to internalize new information. Our distillation-based approach outperforms existing approaches in propagating injected knowledge to enable broader inferences. Together, this talk outlines the challenges and progresses of knowledge augmentation for LMs.

    Eunsol Choi is an assistant professor in the Computer Science department at the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to UT, she spent a year at Google AI as a visiting researcher. She received a Ph.D. from University of Washington and B.A from Cornell University. Her research area spans natural language processing and machine learning. She is particularly interested in interpreting and reasoning about text in a dynamic real world context. She is a recipient of a Facebook research fellowship, Google faculty research award, Sony faculty award, and an outstanding paper award at EMNLP.

    Host: Professor Ellie Pavlick

    More Information 
  • Feb
    1
    12:00pm EST

    MCB Special Seminar with Gaëlle Talross, Ph.D.

    Eddy Auditorium, Rm BMC291

    “Neuronal lncRNAs: insights from the fly olfactory system”

    MCB Special Seminar
    Presented by
    Gaëlle Talross, Ph.D.
    Yale University

    Thursday, February 1, 2024
    12:00 pm
    Eddy Auditorium, BMC291
    171 Meeting Street

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Daniel O’Shea, postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University, will present a talk, “Distributed neural computations supporting motor intelligence and dexterity.”

    Abstract: Smooth, coordinated movement is the foundation of human expression. Our versatile motor faculties enable us to interact skillfully with hundreds of objects, tools, and engineered devices. Each of these motor skills engages tailored neural computations to perform skill-specific pattern generation, predictive feedforward coordination, and reactive feedback control. In this seminar, I will discuss two studies that investigate the neural population dynamics in the motor cortex that enable skilled movement. First, I will present evidence of a precise, predictable geometry organizing motor cortical activity that serves to index motor memories, facilitating the acquisition, retention, and retrieval of a broad motor repertoire. Second, I will present evidence from direct neural perturbations of the motor cortex, using optogenetic and electrical stimulation alongside Neuropixels recordings. These experiments and associated computational modeling demonstrate that the motor cortex isolates neural computations needed for a specific behavioral context within a “self-contained” neural subspace, suggesting a neural basis for compartmentalizing neural computations associated with specific motor skills. Lastly, I will conclude with my future plans to understand how the motor system orchestrates skill-specific control. These efforts, at the interface of neuroscience and engineering, will help to establish a neural computational basis for motor intelligence, through which humans solve complex problems via motor behavior creatively and efficiently.

    Bio: Daniel J. O’Shea is a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University. He received his B.S.E. in electrical engineering from Princeton University and Ph.D. in neuroscience from Stanford University. He completed his doctorate in the laboratory of Krishna V. Shenoy, where he studied the neural population dynamics that establish robust and flexible feedback control in macaques. In his postdoctoral research with Shenoy and Karl Deisseroth, O’Shea has used electrophysiology, optogenetic and electrical perturbations, two-photon imaging, and computational techniques to dissect the neural computations that support the acquisition, execution and maintenance of a broad repertoire of motor skills.

    Host: David Borton, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Engineering and Brain Science

    More Information 
  • Jan
    31
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    MCBGP Seminar Series: Ying Ma, PhD

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220 (Marcuvitz Auditorium)

    MCB Graduate Program Seminar

     

    Ying Ma, PhD

     

    Assistant Professor, Department of Biostatistics and the Center for Computational Molecular Biology

    Brown University



    Statistical and computational methods for spatial transcriptomics data analysis




    Hosted by: MCB Graduate Program


    Wednesday, January 31, 2024

    12:00 pm

    Sidney Frank Hall, Marcuvitz Auditorium

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Jan
    30

    “Minimally invasive neuroelectronics”

    Neuroengineering Special Seminar

    Anqi Zhang, Ph.D.
    Stanford University

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Jan
    29
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Seminar Series: Irene Pepperberg

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Speaker: Irene Pepperberg, Boston University
    Title: Science as a Self-Correcting Mechanism …. Examples from Avian Cognition
    Abstract: I have examined the cognitive and communicative abilities of Grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) for over 45 years. My students and I have trained these birds to use English speech to identify objects, attributes, the categorical labels for these attributes, and numerical sets; we then use this communication code to test them as one might test young children. My talk will focus on numerical concepts and inference by exclusion. I will use these studies to illustrate how ‘science is a self-correcting mechanism’, showing how the research in each of these areas evolved to examine more complex issues over time.

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  • Dr. Linda Resnik presents, “Advancing access to and quality of rehabilitation services through learning health systems research.”

    Dr. Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, FAPTA is a Professor in the Department of Health Services, Policy and Practice, Brown University and a VA RR&D funded Research Career Scientist at the Providence VA Medical Center. She is the Principal Investigator of LeaRRn, the Learning health System Rehabilitation Research Network, and has directed the Center on Health Services Research and Training (CoHSTAR) since 2015.

     

    At the Providence VA she is the leader of the research focus area on Restoring Limb Function of the VA Rehabilitation Research Center of Excellence, the Center for Neurorestoration and Neurotechnology (CfNN).

    Register nowMore Information 
  • Jan
    25

    Title:  Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias: Cellular Themes Informing New Therapies

    Host:  Eric Morrow, MD PhD

    Organized by the Brown University Center for Translational Neuroscience

    More Information 
  • Jan
    24
    4:00pm - 6:00pm EST

    How does the generative AI revolution remind us that medicine, at its core, is a knowledge processing discipline?

    The Warren Alpert Medical School, Rm Lecture Hall 160

    How does the generative AI revolution remind us that medicine, at its core, is a knowledge processing discipline?

    Presented by Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD

    A reception will immediately follow the lecture. Both are free and open to the public.

    To request accessibility accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    About the Speaker

    Isaac “Zak” Kohane, MD, PhD, ’81, P’25 is the inaugural chair of Harvard Medical School’s Department of Biomedical Informatics, whose mission is to develop the methods, tools, and infrastructure required for a new generation of scientists and care providers to move biomedicine rapidly forward by taking advantage of the insight and precision offered by big data. Zak develops and applies computational techniques to address disease at multiple scales, from whole health care systems to the functional genomics of neurodevelopment.

    He also has worked on AI applications in medicine since the 1990s, including automated ventilator control, pediatric growth monitoring, detection of domestic abuse, diagnosing autism from multimodal data and most recently assisting clinicians using whole genome sequence and clinical histories to diagnose rare or unknown disease patients. He is the inaugural editor-in-chief of NEJM AI and co-author of a recent book,The AI Revolution in Medicine.

    Zak completed a fellowship and residency in pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, where he has since worked as a pediatric endocrinologist. His current clinical focus is undiagnosed diseases. He completed a PhD in Computer Science during an earlier heyday of AI in medicine. Zak has published over five hundred papers in the medical literature and authored a widely used book on Microarrays for an Integrative Genomics. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the American College of Medical Informatics.

    About the Lecture

    The Paul Levinger Professorship Pro Tem in the Economics of Health Care was endowed in 1987 to honor the memory of Paul Levinger by his wife, the late Ruth N. Levinger, and his daughter and son-in-law, Bette Levinger Cohen and the late John M. Cohen, MD. ’59.

    Watch the livestream!More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Don’t want CME credit? Email [email protected] and we can send you the zoom link separately.

    As both sleep and social media gain attention in adolescent suicide prevention, it is critical to better understand how these processes work together to confer risk and protection in suicidal thinking among adolescents.

    Jessica L. Hamilton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Rutgers University, will present ongoing research leveraging technology (e.g., ecological momentary assessment, smartphone sensing, and actigraphy) to better understand how risk unfolds in real time, and actionable steps we can take to improve sleep and promote adolescent mental health.

    RegisterMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    16
    12:00pm EST

    MCB Special Seminar with Weihan Li, Ph.D.

    Eddy Auditorium, Rm BMC291

    “Imaging a single mRNA molecule throughout its life cycle”

    MCB Special Seminar

    Presented by

    Weihan Li, Ph.D.

    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Tuesday, January 16, 2024

    12:00 pm

    Eddy Auditorium, BMC291

    171 Meeting Street

    and via Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/95770970553

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Jan
    16
    8:30am - 5:30pm EST

    Brainstorm Challenge

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm Carney Innovation Zone, 4th Floor

    The Carney Institute offers an Advanced SEEG Analysis Workshop alongside this Data Challenge (Jan 16th - Jan 19th, 2024). This is a week of tutorials on how to conduct computational analyses of SEEG signals offered by world leaders on these topics. Some topics. include preprocessing SEEG data, identifying sharp wave ripples, detecting replay, visual encoding and more! If you are interested in joining the workshop, you can indicate this in the Registration form. Please read this attachment.

    More Information CCBS
  • Jan
    12
    10:00am - 1:00pm EST

    MCBGP Thesis Defense: Anthony Crown

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220 (Marcuvitz Auditorium)

    MCB Graduate Student Ph.D. Dissertation Defense: Anthony Crown

    Advisor: Gilad Barnea, PhD

    Dissertation: Neural circuits for controlling Drosophila locomotion.

     

    This thesis presentation is open to all persons; MCB graduate students and faculty are particularly encouraged to attend.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Jan
    11
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series: Vanessa Ruta, PhD; Rockefeller University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Circuit Mechanisms of Adaptive Behavior

    Host:  Doruk Savas, Neuroscience Graduate Student

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jan
    10
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    The Organization of Neural Representations for Cognitive Control
    David Badre, Ph.D.
    Professor and Chair
    Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences
    Brown University
    Wednesday, January 10, 2024◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Introduce the topic of cognitive control as approached from a cognitive neuroscience perspective
    • Introduce the concept of neural representational geometry as a crucial factor in cognitive control performance
    • Present evidence from EEG and fMRI experiments in our lab that show how the brain organizes neural representations of tasks for effective controlled behavior
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Badre has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Don’t want CME credit? Email [email protected] and we can send you the zoom link separately.

    Stephen P. Becker, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, will review the current science on sleep problems in adolescents with ADHD, summarize recent research in this area, and describe important directions for future research and clinical care.

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  • Dec
    15
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Institute Holiday Party!

    164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone

    Join us for the Carney Institute Holiday Party, featuring a cookie decorating station!

    Please RSVP below.

    More Information 
  • Dec
    14
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Ellie Heckscher; University of Chicago

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Rm. 220

    Title:  How to build motor circuits starting from stem cells

    Host:  Tariq Brown, Neuroscience Graduate Student

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dec
    13
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Advance RI-CTR NVivo Drop-In Session (Mac Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop In Session (Mac Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Grace Smith.

    The drop-in session will be on Wednesday, December 13th from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. This is an open session where you may ask Dr. Rosen or Grace Smith specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study.

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    Please contact [email protected] with questions

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Teaching & Learning
  • Dec
    13
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Child & Adolescent Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy for the Treatment of Catatonia
    Neera Ghziuddin, MD, MRCPsych (UK)
    Professor, Department of Psychiatry
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Section
    Director, Treatment Resistant Disorders and Pediatric ECT
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    Wednesday, December 13, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to identify and become familiar with the following concepts:
    • Use of ECT
    • Diagnosing and managing catatonia
    • When and how to optimize the use of ECT
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Ghziuddin has no financial relationships to disclose

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences
  • Dec
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm EST

    CCMB Seminar Series: Mike Levine (Princeton)

    Kassar Fox Auditorium

    Ultra-Long-Range Enhancer-Promoter Interactions in the Drosophila Brain

    Michael Levine

    Professor of Molecular Biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics
    Anthony B. Evnin ’62 Professor in Genomics
    Princeton University

    High-resolution 3D maps identified a specialized class of regulatory DNAs termed “tethering elements” in the Drosophila genome. In embryos, tether-tether interactions accelerate Hox gene activation by distal enhancers, and coordinate transcription among duplicated genes (paralogs) through promoter promoter associations. In the brain, tethering elements engage in ultra-long-range enhancer-promoter and promoter-promoter interactions spanning entire chromosome arms (meta-loops). An in-depth analysis of one of these meta-loops provides evidence for an enhancer-promoter interaction spanning ~6.2 megabases, the longest regulatory interaction documented to date. I will discuss different mechanisms and models for such interactions.

    Michael Levine’s lab has studied mechanisms responsible for switching genes on and off in the early Drosophila embryo for over 30 years. These studies led to the characterization of the eve stripe 2 enhancer, short-range repression, and the regulation of long-range enhancer-promoter interactions.

    For nearly 20 years the Levine lab has also studied the gene networks underlying the development of a simple protovertebrate, the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. These studies led to the identification of rudimentary tissues for key innovations of the vertebrate “new head”, including the cranial neural crest, neurogenic placodes, and the second heart field.

    Dr. Michael Levine will begin his new post as Director of the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University in July 2015. He is currently Professor of Genetics at UC Berkeley (since 1996) and Chairman of the Chancellor’s Advisory Council for Biology since 2012. Dr. Levine was Head of the Division of Genetics, Genomics and Development from 2007-2011 and served as Acting Director of the Functional Genomics Program at the Joint Genome Institute (DOE) in 2001. Prior to that he held faculty positions at Columbia University and UCSD and was a Visiting Professor of Zoology at the University of Zurich from 1999-2000.

    Dr. Levine obtained a BA in Genetics from UC Berkeley in 1976 and a PhD in Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry from Yale in 1981. He was a postdoc in Basel, Switzerland from 1982 to 1983 where he was a co-discoverer of the homeobox (with Bill McGinnis). Dr. Levine was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1998. He received the Molecular Biology Award from the National Academy of Sciences in 1996, the Wilbur Cross Medal from Yale University in 2009, and the EG Conklin Medal from the Society of Development Biology in 2015.

    More Information 
  • Dec
    7
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. James Simmons; Brown University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Rm. 220

    Title:  Where is the pilot: perception from its neural representation

    Host:  Neuroscience Graduate Program

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dec
    7

    Please join us for visiting scholar, Takahisa Furukawa, MD PhD, Distinguised Professor from Osaka University, give a seminar on: 

     

    “The molecular mechanisms of ciliopathy from the perspective of protein transport”

     

    Hosted by Eric Morrow, MD PhD

    Director, Center for Translational Neuroscience

    More Information CTN
  • Dec
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action: Wilson S Geisler

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series
    Co-sponsored by the Center for Computational Brain Science
    Perception & Action Seminar

    Speaker: Wilson S Geisler III, University of Texas at Austin
    Title: Visual Search in Natural and Other Complex Backgrounds

    Abstract: Visually searching for specific objects is a fundamental task that humans and other animals are performing almost continuously. Over the past 5-6 years we have been measuring and modeling the factors that determine human search performance in natural and other complex backgrounds. Our goal is to develop a general theory that can quantitatively predict visual search performance and guide studies of the underlying neural circuitry. We are taking a systematic three step approach. The first step is to measure and model the scene and sensory factors that determine the identifiability of specific targets at known locations across the visual field, in arbitrary scenes. The second step is to measure and model covert search where the specific target can appear at random locations within the visual scene with some prior probability distribution, and the observer’s task is to report the location of the target or that it is absent. In the covert search task, the stimulus is presented for the duration of a typical fixation during overt search. The third step is to measure and model overt search, which can be regarded as a sequence of covert searches where information is extracted and combined over the series of fixation locations selected by the observer. To obtain principled biologically plausible hypotheses for the decision processes in covert and overt search we have been using “Bayesian Heuristic Decision Analysis”, where we derive the Bayesian ideal searcher and use it as the benchmark for systematically evaluating heuristic decision processes. This talk will summarize our progress in this three-step approach, including a number of rather surprising discoveries.

    More Information 
  • Dec
    6

    Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (Mac Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Gracie Smith.

    This workshop will be on Wednesday, December 6th from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM with an optional Q&A from 2:00 PM to 2:30 PM. This workshop will be a general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainers: Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Grace Smith, MA

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Dec
    6
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Welcome to Equity in Implementation Science! Reflection from a Learner
    Ana A. Baumann, PhD
    Associate Professor of Surgery
    Division of Public Health Sciences | Department of Surgery
    Washington University School of Medicine
    Wednesday, December 6, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Identify what is NOT equity
    • Define equity-centered implementation science
    • Identify actions to center equity in implementation science

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Baumann has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Social Cognitive Science Seminar

    Location: Zoom, https://brown.zoom.us/j/95166664847 

    Speaker: Aaron Bornstein, Asst. Prof., UC Irvine
    Title: Suboptimal or locally rational? Foraging as a window onto the mechanisms of decisions under uncertainty

    Abstract: Humans and animals are often maligned as being bad (“suboptimal”) at making decisions, especially decisions under uncertainty. But is this allegation justified? In this talk, I will present recent findings in the domain of patch foraging. Foraging requires individuals to compare a local option to the distribution of alternatives across the environment. Foragers, across a range of species, have been observed to systematically deviate from exogenous notions of optimality by “overharvesting”—staying too long in a patch. I introduce a computational model that explains the appearance of overharvesting as a by-product of two mechanisms: 1) statistically rational learning about the distribution of alternatives and 2) planning that adapts to the uncertainty of these distributions - looking ahead farther when more sure about the options available. I test this model using a variant of a serial stay-leave task and find that human foragers’ behavior is consistent with both mechanisms. Our findings suggest that overharvesting, rather than reflecting a deviation from optimal decision-making, is instead a consequence of optimal learning and adaptation. I then present new theoretical work that builds on these findings to rationalize seemingly maladaptive decision behaviors, including those used to assess transdiagnostic clinical symptoms like anhedonia, explaining them as adaptive responses to unpredictability in the early-life environment. I close with preliminary experimental findings in support of the predictions of the new model.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    30
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Bench to Bedside: Dr. Edward D. Huey, MD; Brown University, Butler Hospital

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Room 220

    Title:  Clinical Presentation of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    Host:  Eric Morrow, MD PhD

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    30
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action: Adrian Haith

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Perception & Action Seminar

    Speaker: Adrian Haith, Johns Hopkins University
    Title: How Cognitive is Motor Skill Learning?

    Abstract: 

    Learning new motor skills is often assumed to be a highly cognitive process. In the context of simple learning tasks, like adapting to a visuomotor rotation, it is well established that cognitive processes play a key role in learning. I will argue, however, that the role of cognition may not be so central when learning more complex motor skills. We have studied a challenging motor learning task in which participants control an on-screen cursor using planar movements of both arms, through a very non-intuitive mapping. We find that people can easily perform this skill concurrently with a cognitively challenging dual task, even in the early stages of learning. Furthermore, we find that people are unable to exploit obvious task structure in order to accelerate learning. I will discuss the implications of these findings for how we should think about the role of cognition in motor skill learning.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    28

    “Identifying, Mapping and Clearing Senescent Brain Cells in Aging and Neurodegeneration”

     

    MCB Special Seminar

    Presented by Miranda Orr, Ph.D.

    Wake Forest University School of Medicine

    Tuesday, November 28, 2023

    12:00 pm

    LMM107

     

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    27

    “Genetic drivers of microglia dysfunction in dementias”

     

    MCB Special Seminar

    Presented by Celeste Karch, Ph.D.

    Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

    Monday, November 27, 2023

    4:00 pm

    SFH220

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    27
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Nicolò Cesana-Arlotti

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Nicolò Cesana-Arlotti
    Title: Foundations of logical thought in human infants

    Abstract: Humans’ disposition for rational learning, planning, and decision-making is unparalleled in the natural world. Foundational views in the cognitive sciences hold that to learn, think and talk as we do, we rely upon a “language of thought” – a capacity to frame ideas in abstract logical structures and draw the inferences they support. Yet, we know little about the foundations of logical cognition in the ontogeny of the mind: are learning, education, or the mastery of language required for logical cognition? In this talk, I will present my attempt to answer this question. First, I discuss a developmental primitive of logical reasoning: infants make inferences by contrasting and eliminating alternatives. Through a series of studies, I will examine the nature of this preverbal logical capacity and its function in knowledge acquisition. Next, I will present newer work investigating the breadth of infants’ and children’s uncharted logical resources: (i) the presence of other fundamental logical representations, (ii) their abstractness and domain-generality, and (iii) the capacity to integrate distinct logical operations. My goal will be to share with you works that aim to shed light on the developmental foundations upon which thought is built and made possible.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    21
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    The Roles of Sleep in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Don’t want CME credit? Email [email protected] and we can send you the zoom link separately.

    A.J. Schwichtenberg, PhD
    Associate Professor & Dean’s Fellow
    College of Health and Human Services
    Purdue University

    Sleep problems are a common comorbidity for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and research in this area has a relatively long history. This presentation will first outline historic patterns in the field of sleep and ASD. Research on ASD and sleep over the past two decades has primarily focused on four principal areas: (1) documenting the prevalence and types of sleep problems; (2) sleep problem treatment options and efficacy; (3) how sleep problems are associated with other behavioral, contextual, or biological elements; and (4) the impact of child sleep problems on families and care providers. Within a recent systematic update/review, most of the reviewed studies fit the historic patterns noted above. Recent differences included more global representation in study samples, studies on the impacts of COVID-19, and a growing body of work on sleep problems as an early marker of ASD. The majority of recent studies focus on correlates of sleep problems, noting that less optimal behavioral, contextual, and biological elements are associated with sleep problems across development for children with ASD. Contributing to and building on this amassed research, Dr. Schwichtenberg will outline how sleep dysregulation in ASD could inform early autism diagnoses, phenotype profiles, and potential mechanistic pathways.

    RegisterMore Information 
  • Nov
    20
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Brian Leahy

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Brian Leahy, Brown University
    Title: Evidence that children appreciate possibilities emerges in parallel in language and behavior

    Abstract: When we speak, words like ‘maybe’ and ‘might’ can be used to mark a sentence as merely possible, as one member of a range of competing alternatives for a single reality. These words allow us to coherently describe incompatible possibilities in a single, coherent sentence. It’s incoherent to say that Jim is in Paris and Jim in Rome, but there’s nothing incoherent about saying that Jim might be in Paris and might be in Rome. Cognition has elements that perform this function as well, flagging propositions as merely possible, enabling us to store information about multiple incompatible possibilities in a coherent model that supports effective action. I call any element that has this function a “possibility concept”. How do possibility concepts support reasoning and decision-making, and how do they develop? In this talk I will show curious lapses in preschoolers’ decision-making when they are faced with multiple incompatible possibilities. These lapses indicate that they are not deploying possibility concepts. Then I will show that these lapses are related to language comprehension. Many children have mastered parts of the English modal auxiliary system by 36 months of age. But mastering the full system takes much longer; many 4-year-olds still have not mastered the full system. But those 4-year-olds who have mastered the full system do not show these curious
    lapses in their decision-making. Four-year-olds who have not yet mastered the auxiliary system show the same curious lapses as much younger children. These data prompt a challenging question: does learning to talk about possibilities play a role in the development of concepts for thinking about possibilities?

    More Information 
  • Nov
    20
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Advance RI-CTR NVivo Drop-In Session (PC Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop In Session (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Ryan Lantini.

    The drop-in session will be on Monday, November 20th from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. This is an open session where you may ask Dr. Rosen or Ryan Lantini specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study.

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources. 

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainers: Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Ryan Lantini, MA

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • NetPyNE provides programmatic and graphical interfaces to develop data-driven multiscale brain neural circuit models using Python and NEURON. Users can define models using a standardised JSON-compatible rule-based declarative format. Based on these specifications, NetPyNE will generate the network in NEURON, enabling users to run parallel simulations, optimize and explore network parameters through automated batch runs, and use built-in functions for visualization and analysis. NetPyNE also facilitates model sharing by exporting and importing standardized formats: NeuroML and SONATA.

    To participate in the hands-on portion of the workshop attendees will need to register with Open Source Brain https://www.opensourcebrain.org/. It is a one-click registration using email, github account or ORCID.

    More Information CCBS
  • Nov
    17
    Virtual and In Person
    9:00am - 10:00am EST

    Tomocube Brunch and Learn at Brown

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 318
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 968 8500 3196

    Passcode: 978341

    Label-Free Live Cell Imaging Dive deep into the world of intracellular processes and unveil the mysteries within. Discover how innovative technologies are shedding (non-toxic) light on the inner workings of cells. We’ll discuss the range of applications from the Tomocube HTX1 finding hidden cell behavior and intracellular dynamics. Ready for a detox? Learn how the combination of gentle technology and automated analyses could catalyze your research.

    Speakers: Dr. Yongkeun (Paul) Park and Dr. Molly Clemens

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    16
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Dario Bonanomi; IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele

    Sidney E. Frank Hall, Rm Rm. 220/Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Neurovascular crosstalk in nerve development and repair 

    Host:  Dr. Alexander Jaworski

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EST

    Worth the Effort: Transdiagnostic Research of Effort in Psychiatry – Noham Wolpe, Ph.D.

    164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm Innovation Zone (4th Floor)

    Speaker: Noham Wolpe, Ph.D., Tel Aviv University

    Title: Worth the Effort: Transdiagnostic Research of Effort in Psychiatry

    Abstract: Over the last decade, there has been a significant surge in research on effort-reward decision-making models within the field of psychiatry. These studies often explore individuals’ willingness to expend effort for potential rewards. They have highlighted distinct variations in people’s sensitivity to changing effort levels, revealing that heightened effort sensitivity is prevalent in many psychiatry conditions, such as depression and schizophrenia. However, we are still not closer to translating these findings into clinical practice. To address this gap, we need to 1) understand what the ‘work’ leading to the perception of effort is, and how best to measure it; 2) clarify the relationship between actual work and its perceived effort, along with the different factors influencing this connection across individuals; 3) better measure how individuals experience the consequences of their effortful actions. In this presentation, I will share our findings that address these key challenges.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    “Finding meaning in brain networks: Simple models and applications to psychiatric disorders”- Luke Hearne, Ph.D.

    Butler Campus, Rm Weld building, Room 212

    Summary: Brain imaging is a powerful tool for describing differences in task-evoked brain activations (~fMRI tasks), functional networks (~fMRI resting-state) structural networks (~DWI) in clinical populations. Often these observations are treated independently, but they are highly interrelated. For example, disrupted functional networks likely result in abnormal task-evoked activations, and vice versa. To make sense of this, we can use a number of modeling approaches. I’m going to present a series of studies from my work where I’ve attempted to unpack neural differences in clinical populations across multiple modalities using simple modeling approaches.

     

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  • Nov
    16
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action: Daniel Dilks

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Perception & Action Seminar

    Speaker: Daniel Dilks, Emory University 
    Title: Three scene systems: neural, causal, and developmental evidence

    Abstract: The human ability to recognize a place (or “scene”) forms the bedrock for many of our essential everyday behaviors. In a brief glance, we extract a wealth of information from scenes, such as the category of the scene (e.g., a kitchen), and other critical properties such as what behavior is appropriate for the current context (e.g., cooking). At the same time, we extract information that is vital for navigation, allowing us to effortlessly find our way through the local environment without running into the kitchen walls or banging into the kitchen table, for example. What’s more, we can situate the local environment within a broader spatial map, allowing us, for instance, to know where our favorite restaurant is relative to our house. But how do we accomplish these remarkable feats? One promising strategy for attempting to understand human visual scene processing is to characterize the neural systems that accomplish it. Cognitive neuroscience of the past three decades has revealed a set of three cortical regions that together make up the human visual scene processing system: the parahippocampal place area (PPA), the occipital place area (OPA), and the retrosplenial complex (RSC). However, beyond establishing the general involvement of these regions in scene processing (i.e., responding more to images of scenes than to images of everyday objects or faces in human neuroimaging experiments), a fundamental and yet unanswered question remains: What precise role does each region play within the broad domain of human visual scene processing? In this talk, I will provide converging neural, causal, and developmental evidence that human visual scene processing is composed of three distinct systems: one we call the “scene categorization” system (including PPA), which is involved in recognizing a scene as a kind of place (e.g., a kitchen); another we call the “visually-guided navigation” (including OPA), which is involved in finding our way through the local environment, avoiding boundaries and obstacles; and a third we call the “map-based navigation” system (including RSC), which is involved in making our way from a specific place to some distant, out-of-sight place.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    15
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    “The importance of phenotyping in frontotemporal lobar degeneration”- Megan Barker, Ph.D.

    Butler Campus, Rm Weld building, Room 212

    Summary: Disorders that fall on the frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) spectrum are clinically and pathologically heterogeneous. The development of disease-modifying drug therapies is underway – these drugs are designed to target the underlying pathology, and henceforth improve clinical symptoms. However, clinical symptoms are not perfectly aligned with pathology; individuals with the same pathology might have entirely different clinical manifestations, and, conversely, multiple different pathologies can cause a single clinical presentation. One relatively overlooked issue is that of detailed phenotyping, and how a deeper understanding of the clinical presentations (i.e. cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms) may improve clinicopathological mapping, facilitate diagnosis, and optimize treatment strategies. In this talk I will discuss barriers present in phenotyping research, and will present a selection of studies from my own research that demonstrate the importance of phenotyping.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    13
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Jennifer Gomez

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Jennifer Gómez, Boston University
    Title: Cultural Betrayal, Sexual Abuse, & Healing: Implications for the Family

    Abstract: The impact of child sexual abuse (CSA) on adult survivors is affected by the interpersonal and societal contexts in which the abuse occurs. According to betrayal trauma theory (Freyd, 1996), CSA perpetrated by someone close, like a parent, is classified as a high betrayal trauma because the abuse violates the child’s trust and/or dependence on the parent. Such high betrayal traumas are associated with costly mental, physical, and behavioral health outcomes (e.g., Adams-Clark et al., 2020). Moreover, family betrayal, such as family members’ unsupportive responses to a child’s CSA victimization, is further linked with dissociation and PTSD (Delker et al., 2018). In addition to this interpersonal context, structural racism (Mills, 1997) and intersectional oppression (e.g., interlocking racism and sexism; Collins, 1991) further impact Black female survivors. Specifically, cultural betrayal trauma theory (Gómez, 2012, 2023) proposes that if a Black father sexually abuses his Black daughter, the girl’s outcomes are impacted by both people experiencing discrimination in society. Specifically, because of structural racism, within-group violence–Black perpetrator, Black victim–includes a cultural betrayal harm because it violates the solidarity, or (intra)cultural trust, developed within the Black community that protects against the racism. Cultural betrayal trauma is associated with a range of outcomes, including dissociation, PTSD, and internalized prejudice (Gómez, 2023). Taken together, CSA that occurs within a Black family can include high betrayal (Freyd, 1996), family betrayal (Delker et al., 2018), and cultural betrayal (Gómez, 2023). Despite often being the site of intimate terrorism via male-perpetrated CSA and other violence in the home (United Nations General Assembly, 1993), the family unit can alternatively provide a haven for healing. In this talk, Dr. Gómez will review the literature on betrayal trauma theory (Freyd, 1996), family betrayal (Delker et al., 2018), structural racism (Buggs et al., 2020), intersectional oppression (Crenshaw, 1991), sexual violence (Gómez & Johnson, 2022), and cultural betrayal trauma theory (Gómez, 2023). She then will detail the strengths found in many Black families, including extended networks of support from elders, parents, siblings, children, other relatives, loved ones, and friends (McAdoo & Younge, 2009), who provide connection, cultural identity, safety, protection, and solidarity against oppression (e.g., hooks, 1984; Zinzow et al., 2021). Taken her from book, The Cultural Betrayal of Black Women & Girls: A Black Feminist Approach to Healing from Sexual Abuse (Gómez, 2023; American Psychological Association), she will then discuss avenues for Black women’s healing from CSA both within and outside of the family. Lastly, Dr. Gómez will close with hope for creating a world in which violence and inequality no longer exist. 

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  • Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series

    Location: Zoom, https://brown.zoom.us/j/95166664847

    Speaker: Joseph Barnby, PhD, Royal Holloway University of London
    Title:
     Between prudence and paranoia: The computational and biological mechanisms of adaptive and maladaptive social strategy

    Abstract: Interpersonal relationships are a central feature of what it is to be human. Theory of Mind (ToM), or mentalising, is the ability to represent the hidden thoughts and beliefs of the self and others to navigate these relationships. This can be formalised as a set of computational processes involving learning, strategy, and self-other belief integration. When these processes go awry it can cause a rupture in close relationships, increasing psychiatric risk. Here I show how we can use computational models of social behaviour as assays to detect, test, and predict the psychological mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive social strategy. I will present behavioural, pharmacological, and in silico data predicting and testing when sophisticated social strategy can be a boon or a curse; helping humans to navigate competitive contexts or exaggerate false threat beliefs. I discuss the utility of this computational framework and its relevance to the field of computational psychiatry.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    9
    4:00pm EST

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Erika Holzbaur; University of Pennsylvania

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  TBA

    Host: Dr. Rajan Thakur

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    9
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Perception & Action: Sean O’Bryan

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Perception & Action Seminar

    Speaker: Sean O’Bryan, Brown University

    Speaker: Sean O’Bryan, Brown University
    Title: Spatial working memory capacity and pupil diameter track learning dynamics in visuomotor adaptation

    Abstract: Visuomotor adaptation (VMA) is a critical process that enables people to recalibrate their sensorimotor mappings to overcome unexpected perturbations. However, the mechanisms underlying substantial individual differences in VMA learning outcomes remain unclear. Typically, VMA is accomplished through an interplay of explicit and implicit learning: effortful, explicit processes that emerge early in learning are later complemented by slower, implicit processes driven by sensorimotor error. In a series of experiments, we first examined whether VMA is supported by domain-specific or general working memory capacity (WMc). After obtaining independent measures of spatial- and object-based WMc, participants completed visuomotor rotation tasks using a stylus and touch surface to reach for targets while the direction of the cursor was rotated 45° relative to the hand under conditions of continuous feedback (Exp. 1), delayed endpoint feedback (Exp. 2), or clamped feedback offset 45° relative to the target (Exp. 3). Our results revealed a domain-specific effect of WMc, such that higher spatial WMc predicted faster adaptation in explicit contexts (Exp. 1-2) and slower adaptation in implicit contexts (Exp. 3). Conversely, the association between object WMc and adaptation was largely weak or absent. In a second analysis, we computed task-evoked pupil diameter (PD) to test whether differences in internal cognitive states could further delineate VMA outcomes, predicting that PD could index variability in the effort exerted to overcome perturbations. We found that PD tracked learning, such that the initial exposure to the 45° rotation was accompanied by a period of relatively large PD across participants which decreased as learning progressed. More interestingly, analyses revealed a consistent association between larger PD and faster adaptation at the subject level, but only when explicit strategies were beneficial. Taken together, our results demonstrate a clear domain-specific contribution of spatial WMc to sensorimotor learning, and further suggest that PD may reflect the cognitive effort associated with different error reduction strategies in VMA.

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  • Nov
    9

    Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Ryan Lantini.

    This workshop will be on Thursday, November 9th from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM with an optional Q&A from 12:00 PM to 12:30 PM. This workshop will be a general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact AdvanceRI@brown.edu.

    Trainers: Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Ryan Lantini, MA

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Nov
    9
    Virtual and In Person
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    BME Seminar Speaker: Dr. Jiayi (Joanna) Zhang

    Barus and Holley, Rm 190

    BME Seminar with Jiayi Joanna Zhang (Fudan University, Shanghai)

    Title: Titanium nanowire arrays as artificial photoreceptors: from non-human primates to first-in-human clinical trials

    Abstract: Retinal prostheses could restore image-forming vision in conditions of photoreceptor degeneration. However, contrast sensitivity and visual acuity are often insufficient. In this talk, we will report the performance, in mice and monkeys with induced photoreceptor degeneration, of subretinally implanted gold-nanoparticle-coated titania nanowire arrays providing a spatial resolution of 77.5 μm and a temporal resolution of 3.92 Hz in ex vivo retinas (as determined by patch-clamp recording of retinal ganglion cells). In blind mice, the arrays allowed for the detection of drifting gratings and flashing objects at light-intensity thresholds of 15.70–18.09 μW mm–2, and offered visual acuities of 0.3–0.4 cycles per degree, as determined by recordings of visually evoked potentials and optomotor-response tests. In monkeys, the arrays were stable for 54 weeks, allowed for the detection of a 10 μW mm–2 beam of light (0.5o in beam angle) in visually guided saccade
    experiments, and induced plastic changes in the primary visual cortex, as indicated by long-term in vivo calcium imaging. We also demonstrated that nanomaterials as artificial photoreceptors ameliorate visual deficits in patients with photoreceptor degeneration.

    Bio: Dr. Jiayi Zhang received her B. Sc. Degree from Hong Kong Baptist University and Ph.D. degree from Brown University. She was a Brown-Coxe postdoctoral fellow in Yale University and joined Institutes of BrainScience at Fudan University in 2012. She is currently the vice director of State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology and vice dean of Institute for Medical and Engineering Innovation at Fudan affiliated Eye & ENT Hospital. Her recent work focused on the decoding and restoration of vision. Her work was published in journals including Nature Biomedical Engineering, Neuron, Advanced Materials and Nature Communications. She got the Young Innovative Woman Award in Shanghai in 2020. She serves as the Vice chairman of the Young Scholar Panel and fellow for Chinese Association for Physiological Sciences (CAPS) as well as the Vice chairman of the Sensory and Motor Panel, Chinese Neuroscience Society (CNS).

    More Information 
  • Nov
    8
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EST

    The Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium: Betsy Levy Paluck

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium

    CLPS Colloquium Series: Betsy Levy Paluck (Professor of Psychology and Public and International Affairs, Princeton University)

    Title: “Engineering Social Change Using Social Norms”

    Abstract: Behavioral interventions have embraced social norms as information that can be communicated in simple messages to motivate behavior change. Work from my lab argues for the value and necessity of recognizing that social norm interventions are grounded in group and collective processes. This approach has three major benefits that more than offset the costs of its greater theoretical and practical complexity. One, it improves the effectiveness of existing interventions, including those that target the normative beliefs of individuals. Two, it opens up new intervention strategies that broaden the range of mechanisms used to change behavior. Three, it connects research on social-norm interventions with theories and research on collective phenomena like social movements and institutional culture change.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Nov
    8
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    DPHB Child & Adolescent Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Food for your Mood: Insights from Nutritional Psychiatry
    Christine Farag, MD
    Fellow, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    Tower Health, Phoenixville Hospital
    Wednesday, November 8, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Discuss the science and research behind nutritional recommendations for mental health
    • Identify the role of nutritional psychiatry
    • Recognize how modifications in diet can play a role in psychiatric treatment
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Farag has no financial relationships to disclose

    More Information 
  • Nov
    3
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: First Year Talks

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Social Cognitive Science Seminar

    Location: Dome Room, Metcalf 305 and via Zoom, https://brown.zoom.us/j/95166664847

    First Year Talks

     

    Speaker: Laila Johnston
    Title: Reasoning with Compositional Concepts in the Probabilistic Language of Thought

    Abstract: Humans organize the world using concepts: we say that people run, and we generate and understand novel concepts, like running unicorns. How do we understand the meaning of these concepts? Past theories usually approached the study of concepts in one of two ways. Symbolic approaches directly specify conceptual meaning; running is an action with a defined, discrete set of properties. Symbols naturally compose to form complex novel concepts, but don’t allow for uncertainty in learning, representation, and reasoning. Statistical approaches learn from data and represent concepts probabilistically. These allow for uncertainty but lack the formal compositionality key to symbolic approaches; new concepts must be learned from scratch. Here we investigate the probabilistic language of thought hypothesis (PLoT), which expresses the compositional and probabilistic nature of concepts in a unified computational framework. We evaluate PLoT in an intuitive “tug-of-war” tournament scenario in which uncertainty and compositionality play key roles. For example, winner is defined as the team that most strongly pulls the rope, where team, pulling, and strength are also concepts in the model. PLoT model predictions closely track human judgements and compare favorably with alternative models, including large language models, demonstrating the viability of PLoT as a framework for how humans learn, represent, and reason with concepts.

     

    Speaker: Ziwei Cheng
    Title: Reward Processing in Depression: Insights from Complementary Computational Analyses

    Abstract: Depression is a prevalent and disabling psychiatric condition that commonly emerges in adolescence and young adulthood and is associated with reward processing abnormalities. However, findings are mixed regarding the specific dimensions of reward processing that are altered in depression. In 726 adolescents and young adults varying in depressive symptoms and diagnoses, this study evaluated depression-related abnormalities in reward processing using the Probabilistic Reward Task (PRT) and complementary computational models. Analyses showed that both reinforcement learning and drift diffusion models explained reward-seeking behavior. Individuals with depressive disorders showed lower response bias compared to youth with no history of psychopathology, and higher levels of anhedonia were associated with slower evidence accumulation during decision-making. Parameters varied in reliability, and depression-related effects showed fair to adequate replication in cross-fold validation. Complementary modeling approaches provide insight into reward processes in depression, but results underscore the importance of evaluating parameter psychometrics and replicability of clinical effects.

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  • Nov
    2
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Niccolo Zampieri; Max-Delbrueck Center of Berlin

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Room 220

    Title:  Spinal circuits for postural control

    Host: Dr. Alexander Jaworski

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Nov
    2
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action: Alan Stocker

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Perception & Action Seminar

     

    Speaker: Alan A Stocker, University of Pennsylvania
    Title: The holistic nature of sensory perception

    Abstract: Perception of a stimulus feature (e.g. the orientation of a Gabor patch) is commonly viewed as the result of an inference process of this feature. In this talk I challenge this widely established, reductionist view. I propose that perception rather emerges from a holistic inference process that operates not only at the feature but across all levels of a representational hierarchy. I present recent results from my laboratory testing this hypothesis in the context of a commonly used psychophysical matching task in which subjects are asked to report their perceived visual orientation of a test stimulus by adjusting a probe stimulus (method-of-adjustment). We derived a holistic matching model that assumes that subjects’ reports reflect an optimal match between the test and probe stimulus, both in terms of their inferred feature (orientation) but also their higher-level representation (orientation category). Validation of our model against five existing datasets demonstrates that the model accurately and comprehensively predicts subjects’ response behavior, and outperforms previous models both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results suggest that categorical effects in perceptual judgments are ubiquitous and can be parsimoniously explained as optimal behavior based on holistic sensory representations. These findings have substantial implications for our understanding of the neural information pathways and mechanisms underlying perceptual judgments.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    1
    1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Fundamentals of MRI Physics and Technology - Part 2

    Carney Innovation Zone, 4th Floor, 164 Angell St.

    The Behavior and Neurodata Core invites you to join MRI Research Facility Associate Director of Research and Carney Associate Professor of Brain Science Michael Worden for the second of a two-part lecture series on the Fundamentals of MRI Physics and Technology.

    Part 1 - Wednesday, Oct. 25, 1p - 3p
    Part 2 - Wednesday, Nov. 1, 1p - 3p

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important scientific technique in the life sciences and in brain science, in particular. Researchers and other consumers of the scientific literature often struggle to understand the fundamentals of this technology and how the compelling images are related to underlying physical and physiological factors. This two-part lecture will explain at an intuitive level the basic functioning of the MRI scanner; the source of the MRI signal; the meaning of common MRI parameters (such as T1, T2, TR and TE) and how those parameters relate to image contrast; how images are created; and factors that influence image or data quality.

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  • Nov
    1
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Improving Perinatal Mental Health Care: A Mother-Baby Psychiatric Day Hospital
    Margaret Howard, PhD
    Clinical Psychologist and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Medicine
    Clinician Educator - Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Division Director for Women’s Behavioral Health
    Executive Director for Women’s Mental Health at Care New England
    Wednesday, November 1, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:

    • Describe mental health conditions that predominately impact perinatal individuals
    • Describe impact of perinatal depression on infant development
    • Describe WIH/Brown University Postpartum Depression Day Hospital Program
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Howard discloses the following financial relationships: Advisory board and Speakers Bureau – Sage Therapeutics

    More Information 
  • Oct
    30
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Michelle Leichtman

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Michelle Leichtman, University of New Hampshire 
    Title: Memory for Educational Episodes: A Developmental Perspective 

    Abstract: Memory in educational contexts typically connotes semantic processes required to learn facts and concepts. But episodic memories of one-point-in-time events may also play a deceptively important role in academic performance. In this talk, I explore the nature of specific memories of learning events, how they are scaffolded across early development, and the characteristics that may play a role in their persistence over time.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    27
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social & Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Series: Jason Leng

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Social Cognitive Science Seminar

    Speaker: Jason Leng, Shenhav Lab
    Title: Mutual inclusivity improves decision-making by smoothing out choice’s competitive edge

    Abstract: Decision-making forms a central bottleneck to most of our tasks, one that people often experience as costly. To mitigate these costs, previous work has proposed adjusting one’s threshold for deciding (e.g., satisficing) to avoid over-deliberating. Here, we test an alternative solution to these costs, one that targets the basis for most choice costs: the fact that choosing one option sacrifices others (mutual exclusivity). Across 4 studies (N = 385), we test whether this tension can be relieved by framing choices as inclusive (allowing more than one option from a set, similar to a buffet), and whether doing so improves decision-making and the experience thereof. We find that inclusivity makes choices more efficient, because of its unique impact on the level of competition between potential responses as participants accumulate information for each of their options (resulting in a more “race”-like decision process). We find that inclusivity also reduces the subjective costs associated with choice, making people feel less conflicted in conditions where it was hard to choose which good option to acquire or which bad option to get rid of. These inclusivity benefits were distinct from those achieved when trying to merely reduce deliberation (e.g., tightening one’s deadline), which we show can in some cases lead to similar increases in efficiency but only carry the potential to diminish not improve the experience of choosing. This work collectively provides key mechanistic insights into the conditions under which decision making is most costly, and a novel approach aimed at mitigating those costs.

    More Information SCSBB
  • Oct
    26
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Ishmail Abdus-Saboor; Columbia University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Room 220

    Title:   Behaviors and Neural Circuits for pleasure and pain mice

    Host: Dr. Gilad Barnea

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    26
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Advance RI-CTR NVivo Drop-In Session (Mac Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Advance RI-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop In Session (Mac Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Grace Smith.

    The drop-in session will be on Thursday, October 26th from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM. This is an open session where you may ask Dr. Rosen or Grace Smith specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study. 

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainers: Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Grace Smith, MA

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • It’s an understatement to say that brain science at Brown is a popular field of study. On average, 20-30% of undergraduate students — totaling 7,222 degree seeking individuals in fall 2022 — take Introduction to Neuroscience or Introduction to Cognitive Science during their time at Brown. In 2023, 22% of the funded summer Undergraduate Teaching and Research Awards (UTRAs) went to students conducting research in a brain science lab at Brown.

    On Wednesday, October 25, join a virtual Carney Conversation with three spectacular Brown undergraduate students - Flavia Maria Galeazzi (’26), Liana Lewis (’25) and Nikolai Rogalinski (’24). We’ll talk with them about what sparked their interest in brain science, how they found their way into research labs, what they are working on, and what they think the big breakthroughs will be in brain science in the next decade.

    RSVP here!More Information Carney Conversations
  • Oct
    25
    1:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Fundamentals of MRI Physics and Technology - Part 1

    Carney Innovation Zone, 4th Floor, 164 Angell St.

    The Behavior and Neurodata Core invites you to join MRI Research Facility Associate Director of Research and Carney Associate Professor of Brain Science Michael Worden for the first of a two-part lecture series on the Fundamentals of MRI Physics and Technology.

    Part 1 - Wednesday, Oct. 25, 1p - 3p
    Part 2 - Wednesday, Nov. 1, 1p - 3p

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important scientific technique in the life sciences and in brain science, in particular. Researchers and other consumers of the scientific literature often struggle to understand the fundamentals of this technology and how the compelling images are related to underlying physical and physiological factors. This two-part lecture will explain at an intuitive level the basic functioning of the MRI scanner; the source of the MRI signal; the meaning of common MRI parameters (such as T1, T2, TR and TE) and how those parameters relate to image contrast; how images are created; and factors that influence image or data quality.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    23
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Liran Samuni

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Liran Samuni, Harvard University

    Title: Cooperation and competition in chimpanzees and bonobos

    Abstract: More than any other species, humans exhibit an extraordinary capacity for cooperation that transcends social boundaries, spanning from close relationships with family and friends to extensive networks that include distant acquaintances and even strangers. Cooperation and our tendency for mutual reliance are thought to support our prolonged life-histories to allow humans to expand across the globe. However, the same capacity for cooperation can also fuel intergroup conflict and violence, resulting in discriminatory and prejudicial behavior. Studying the evolutionary roots of the interplay between cooperation and competition is key to understand the social dynamics of current human societies.
    In this talk I will present some of my research on the mechanisms underlying violence and cooperation among our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, as a window into our evolutionary past. These two species share similar life-histories and social environments but exhibit significant differences in patterns of dominance, social relationships, and out-group attitudes. By leveraging and evaluating the similarities and differences between them, I will present some work on the role of social relationships and mutual reliance in informing cooperation and competition in the two species.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    23
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Statistics Seminar Series | Xinghua (Mindy) Shi, Ph.D.

    School of Public Health at Brown University, 121 South Main Street, Providence, RI 02912, Rm 245

    Xinghua Mindy Shi, Ph.D.,
    Associate Professor, Department of Computer and
    Information Sciences
    Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine at Temple University.

    Talk Title: Trustworthy Machine Learning for Biomedicine

    Abstract: Recent biomedical data deluge has fundamentally transformed biomedical research into a data science frontier. The unprecedented accumulation of biomedical data presents a unique yet challenging opportunity to develop novel methods leveraging artificial intelligence and machine learning to further our understanding of biology and advance medicine. In this talk, I will first introduce the cutting-edge research in characterizing human genetic variation and its functional impact within the scope of the Human Genome Structural Variation Consortium. I will then present recent development in trustworthy machine learning including our work on secure and privacy preserving machine learning for biomedicine.

    Light refreshments will be provided. *

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    23
    11:00am - 1:00pm EDT

    XNAT Workshop: Overview and New Features

    164 Angell St., 4th Floor, Rm Carney Innovation Zone

    Join us on Monday, October 23th, for a BNC workshop where we will provide a comprehensive overview of the XNAT neuroimaging data platform, in addition to showcasing the latest features in our data processing tools. During the workshop, we will guide you step-by-step through our documentation, while offering our best practices and demonstrating a live demo of our data processing pipeline alongside a new utility script for running on Oscar.

    Whether you’re new to XNAT or an experienced user, this workshop is designed to help you stay up-to-date with our most recent changes to xnat-tools and oscar-scripts, which are now available to your lab. You’ll walk away with a deeper understanding of our xnat2bids pipeline and be able to export your data onto Oscar.

    Here is a list of new features that we will cover:

    - Automatic Data Directory Sync on Oscar

    - New Configuration Options to Export By Project / Subject ID

    - Exporting EEG / Physio Data with BIDS Conversion

    At BNC, we place a high priority on community feedback and participation in shaping the development of our software tools. We recognize that users’ needs evolve over time and that continuous improvement requires ongoing engagement and dialogue. That’s why we encourage you to participate in this workshop and provide us with your feedback on how we can better align our software tools with your needs.

    Lunch will be provided.

    RSVP Link: https://forms.gle/uE6WxBoLE566vpp86

    ***IMPORTANT INFORMATION BELOW***

    -You will need to have an XNAT account to participate in this workshop. Please sign up using the following steps in our documentation: Accessing XNAT

    - You will also need to have an Oscar account to participate in this workshop. Please register for an account at the following link: https://brown.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0GtBE8kWJpmeG4B

    More Information 
  • Oct
    19
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Myriam Heiman; Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Room 220

    Title: Single-Cell Dissection of the Human Motor and Prefrontal Cortices in ALS and FTLD

    Host:  Dr. Anne Hart

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    19

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Perception & Action Seminar Series explores a wide range of research in the domain of human perception and controlling action.

    Speaker: Aarlenne Khan, Université de Montréal

    Title: The mechanisms of spatial and non-spatial inhibition

    Abstract: This talk investigates different kinds of spatial and non-spatial inhibition. We investigate commonalities and differences in spatial inhibition mechanisms in overt and covert attention, as well as the role of the posterior parietal in spatial and response inhibition. We show that during overt attention, spatial inhibition mechanisms are heightened compared to during covert attention. We also highlight the primary role of the posterior parietal cortex in spatial inhibition mechanisms, specifically in resolving spatial competition, e.g. during the execution of anti-saccades. Finally, we show evidence for the independence of spatial inhibition and response inhibition mechanisms.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    18
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCBS Special Seminar: “How Executive Functions Support Reinforcement Learning” - Anne Collins, Ph.D.

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Rm Innovation Zone

    Speaker: Anne Collins, Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley

    The importance of goals in human learning.

    Reinforcement learning frameworks have contributed tremendously to our better understanding of learning processes in brain and behavior. However, this remarkable success obscures the reality of multiple underlying processes, and in particular hides how executive functions set the stage over which reinforcement learning computations operate. In this talk, I will show that executive functions define the learning substrates for other learning mechanisms, setting the stage for what we learn about. Across multiple studies, we find that the goals humans set define their intrinsic motivations, as well as the states and actions over which they learn. Our results emphasize the blurry boundary between “fast” and “slow” processes and show that flexible human cognition can be supported by leveraging simple computational processes over internally defined inputs. Clarifying the contributions and interaction of different learning processes is essential to understanding individual learning differences, particularly in clinical populations and development. This work highlights the importance of studying learning as a multi-dimensional phenomenon that relies on multiple separable but inter-dependent computational mechanisms.

    Lunch will be provided after the seminar.

    More Information CCBS
  • Oct
    16
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Iris Berent

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Iris Berent, Northeastern University

    Title: Can We Get Human Nature Right?

    Abstract: Few questions in science are as controversial as human nature. At stake is whether our basic concepts and emotions are all learned from experience, or whether some are innate. Here, I demonstrate that reasoning about innateness is biased by the basic workings of the human mind.
    Psychological science suggests that newborns possess core concepts of “object” and “number”. Laypeople, however, believe that newborns are devoid of such notions, but that they can innately recognize emotions. Moreover, people presume that concepts are learned, whereas emotions (along with sensations and actions) are innate.
    I trace these beliefs to two tacit psychological principles: intuitive Dualism and Essentialism. Essentialism guides tacit reasoning about biological inheritance and suggests that innate traits reside in the body; per intuitive Dualism, however, the mind seems ethereal, distinct from the body. It thus follows that, in our intuitive psychology, concepts (which people falsely consider as disembodied) must be learned, whereas emotions, sensations and emotions (which are considered embodied) are likely innate; these predictions are in line with the experimental results.
    In this talk, I demonstrate how these intuitive biases taint our understanding of human nature, derail science, and quite possibly, give rise to the “hard problem” of consciousness.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    16
    12:00pm EDT

    MRF/BNC Users Meeting

    Carney Innovation Hub | 164 Angell St, 4th Floor

    Please mark your calendars for the next MRF/BNC Users meeting, which will be Monday, October 16th, at noon in the Carney Innovation Zone at 164 Angell St. We hope to see you in person but we will again have a Zoom option for those wishing to tune in remotely. Anterior Capsulotomy for Intractable OCD by Nicole McLaughlin, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior. 

    RSVPMore Information 
  • Oct
    16
    9:00am - 5:00pm EDT

    CTN Symposium on Autism and Rare Genetic Disorders

    70 Ship Street, Rm Room 107

    The Center for Translational Neuroscience at Brown University is organizing a symposium on autism and rare genetic disorders for October 16, 2023 (9AM-5PM) at 70 Ship Street.

    We have engaged an interdisciplinary group of national and international speakers who will participate in this in person long-day symposium. As a highlight of the program, we have assembled a panel of different stakeholders in ASD and Rare Genetic disorders to discuss key questions in the field. This symposium will have a broad appeal to the neuroscience community at large.  

    More information can be found at our website: here

    Please click the link to register below! 

    PLEASE REGISTER HEREMore Information 
  • Oct
    13
    4:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    State of BioMed Address

    The Warren Alpert Medical School

    Please join us for the 2023 State of BioMed Address. Dean Mukesh K. Jain, MD, will share updates on the Division of Biology and Medicine and outline his priorities for the coming year.

    A reception will follow. A livestream of the event will also be available. Please indicate on your registration whether you will attend in person or watch the livestream.

    RegisterMore Information 
  • Oct
    12

    Title: EEG; Past, Present and Future

    Host:  Eric Morrow, MD PhD

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Pathology & Laboratory Medicine: “Mechanisms of Age-Related Tauopathy”- John F. Crary, M.D., Ph.D.

    70 Ship Street, Rm Room 107

    Seminar Title: Mechanisms of Age-Related Tauopathy

    John F. Crary, MD-PhD
    Professor
    Director, Neuropathology Brain Bank & Research CoRE Director, Physician Scientist Track in Experimental Pathology Department of Pathology
    Nash Family Department of Neuroscience Department of Artificial Intelligence & Human Health Friedman Brain Institute
    Ronald M. Loeb Center for Alzheimer’s Disease
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

    More Information 
  • Oct
    12
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

    Carney Lunch: “Multimodality of Beliefs and Attention” - Spencer Kwon, Ph.D.

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone, 4th Floor

    Title: “Multimodality of Beliefs and Attention” - Spencer Kwon, Ph.D.

    Summary: We document two new facts about the distributions of answers in famous statistical problems: they are i) multi-modal and ii) unstable with respect to irrelevant changes in the problem. We offer a model in which, when solving a problem, people represent each hypothesis by attending “bottom up” to its salient features while neglecting other, potentially more relevant, ones. Only the statistics associated with salient features are used, others are neglected. The model unifies biases in judgments about i.i.d. draws, such as the Gambler’s Fallacy and insensitivity to sample size, with biases in inference such as under- and overreaction and insensitivity to the weight of evidence. The model makes predictions about how changes in the salience of specific features should jointly shape the prevalence of these biases and measured attention to features, but also create entirely new biases. We test and confirm these predictions experimentally. Bottom-up attention to features emerges as a unifying framework for biases conventionally explained using a variety of stable heuristics or distortions of the Bayes rule.

    Seating is limited! Please RSVP before 4:00 p.m. on October 4.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    12

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Perception & Action Seminar Series explores a wide range of research in the domain of human perception and controlling action.

    Speaker: Pieter R. Roelfsema (Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam; Institut de la Vision, Paris)
    Title: Visual binding and consciousness – and new approaches for restoration when the eyes fail
    Abstract: I will first give an overview of the functioning of the visual cortex, and its mechanisms for binding, which means determining which features are part of the same object. We find that all the image components that belong to the same perceptual object are incrementally labeled with enhanced neuronal activity and that the speed of incremental grouping decreases for narrow parts of objects. I will then discuss how these fundamental insights also help to fulfil a long-standing dream of scientists, which is is to be able to directly project images from the outside world onto the visual brain, bypassing the eyes. This method could provide a solution for blind and visually impaired patients. It is the only possible solution for patients in whom the connection between eye and brain is lost so that a prosthesis in the eye is not an option. The electrical stimulation of electrodes in the visual brain leads to artificial percepts called “phosphenes”. This method also works in patients who have been blind for decades. The goal of our own research is to bring a prosthesis for the visual brain closer. We implanted 1000 electrodes in the visual cortex to generate complex visual patterns. We demonstrated that this stimulation leads to interpretable images, in the same way that pixels form recognizable patterns on a screen. These new neurotechnological developments take important steps in the direction of prostheses that can restore a rudimentary form of vision.
    More Information 
  • Oct
    11

    Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (Mac Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen and Grace Smith.

    This workshop will be on Wednesday, October 11th from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM with an optional Q&A from 2:00 PM to 2:30 PM. This workshop will be a general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainers: Rochelle Rosen, PhD and Grace Smith, MA

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Oct
    11
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    DPHB Child & Adolescent Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds
    The Impact of Climate Change on Pediatric Mental Health
    Joshua Wortzel, MD, MPhil, MS(Ed)
    Brown University Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellow
    R-25 Research Track
    Wednesday, October 11, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Describe the relationship of temperature with the prevalence of mental health disorders
    • Review the neuropsychiatric sequelae of nutritional deficiencies and vector-borne illnesses secondary to climate change
    • Discuss the traumatic and existential impacts of climate change on pediatric mental health
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Wortzel has no financial relationships to disclose

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Speaker: Raghu Padinjat, MBBS, Ph.D, Professor & Dean of Research, National Centre for Biological Sciences-TIFR

    Dr. Padinjat has a long history of discoveries in phosphoinositide-lipid signaling in the nervous system working in Drosophila photoreceptors, where his lab focuses on conserved principles of PI signaling in the control of sub-cellular organization and and PLC based signal transduction. Dr. Padinjat also works on the cellular neuroscience aspects of rare genetic diseases of the brain using human patient cohorts, iPSC derived cultures and physiology — currently focusing on Lowe syndrome and bipolar disorder. His lab works in collaboration with clinicians at St. John’s Medical College, Bangalore, the Brain Development and Disease Mechanisms theme at Institute for Stem Cell Science and Regenerative Medicine, and the National Centre for Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, and participates in the Accelerator Program for Discovery in Brain disorders using stem cells.

    Summary: The ability to detect and respond to stimuli is a key feature of sensory systems. In order to do so, sensory neurons must tune their detection and transduction mechanisms to match environmental states. Drosophila photoreceptors are polarized sensory neurons in which the apical plasma membrane is expanded and specialised to optimize photon absorption leading to sensory transduction. Signal transduction is underpinned by G-protein coupled phospholipase C activation leading to the rapid hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) and ending with the activation of calcium permeable TRP channels. Following PIP hydrolysis, this lipid is resynthesized by a series of biochemical reactions that are distributed both on the apical plasma membrane as well as membranes in the photoreceptor cell body. The mechanism by which these two sets of reactions in physically distinct sub-cellular locations are coupled remains unresolved. Photoreceptors contain membrane contact sites (MCS), regions of close proximity between the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. I will describe our work, using genetic and physiological studies in Drosophila, on the structural organisation of these MCS, the function of several proteins localised to these and how MCS organisation is tuned to ongoing photoreceptor function in this specialised cell type.

    A reception with light refreshments will follow. 

    More Information 
  • While the invention of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) transformed medicine, entire regions of the US and the world still lack access to MRI. The technology exists in select hospitals, hemmed in by cement, steep learning curves, anxiety, and towering expense. Even in facilities that offer MRI, it can be resource-intensive and a lengthy, isolating, and stressful procedure for the patient. With the vision to democratize access to state- of-the-art diagnostics to all, Hyperfine, Inc.
    created the Swoop® Portable MR Imaging system, the world’s first MR system capable of providing brain imaging at the point of care. It can inform the timely diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions within a broad range of clinical settings. The Swoop ® system combines engineering innovations with artificial intelligence, targeting the limitations of current imaging technologies,
    intending to make MR imaging accessible nearly anytime and anywhere in a hospital setting.

    Dr. Teisseyre is the COO of Hyperfine, Inc., a medical technology company that created the world’s first FDA-cleared portable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system capable of providing brain imaging at the point of care. Formerly at Hyperfine, Inc., he also served as chief product officer. In previous roles, Dr. Teisseyre was the head of surgical and implantable devices of Verily Life Science, formerly Google Life Sciences. Tom has also held program and product positions at
    Google, Abbott Medical Optics, Proximie, and OptiMedica. He holds patents and has publications on medical imaging, medical image processing, intraoperative imaging, surgical technology, and surgical workflow optimization. Tom received his Ph.D. in bioengineering from UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco and a BS in biomedical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    5
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Stacey Glasgow; University of CA, San Diego

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium; Room 220

    Title:  Defining Transcriptional Parallels Between Gliogenesis and Gliomagenesis

    Host:  Dr. Judy Liu

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Oct
    5
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar: Peter Neri

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Perception & Action Seminar Series explores a wide range of research in the domain of human perception and controlling action.

    Speaker: Peter Neri, École Normale Supérieure (virtual)

    Title: The unreasonable recalcitrance of human vision to theoretical domestication

    Abstract: We can view cortex from two fundamentally different perspectives: a powerful device for performing optimal inference, or an assembly of biological components not built for achieving statistical optimality. The former approach is attractive thanks to its elegance and potentially wide applicability, however the basic facts of human pattern vision do not support it. Instead, they indicate that the idiosyncratic behaviour produced by visual cortex is largely dictated by its hardware components. The output of these components can be steered towards optimality by our cognitive apparatus, but only to a marginal extent. We conclude that current theories of visually-guided behaviour are at best inadequate, and we turn to neural networks in an attempt to establish whether the idiosyncratic character of human vision may be learnt from a larger repertoire of functional constraints, such as the statistics of the natural environment. We challenge deep convolutional networks with the same stimuli/tasks used with human observers and apply equivalent characterization of the stimulus–response coupling. For shallow depth of behavioural characterization, some variants of network-architecture/training-protocol produce human-like trends; however, more articulate empirical descriptors expose glaring discrepancies. Our results urge caution in assessing whether neural networks do or do not capture human behavior: ultimately, our ability to assess ‘‘success’’ in this area can only be as good as afforded by the depth of behavioral characterization against which the network is evaluated. More generally, our results provide a compelling demonstration of how far we still are from securing an adequate computational account of even the most basic operations carried out by human vision.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    4
    3:00pm - 4:30pm EDT

    Richard B. Millward Colloquium: Christopher Baldassano

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm Friedman Auditorium (101)

    Speaker: Christopher Baldassano (Columbia University)

    Title: Using prior knowledge to build neural representations, make predictions, and encode memories

    Abstract: Our everyday experiences consist of familiar sequences of events in familiar contexts, and we use our memories of the past to understand the present and make predictions about the future. This prior knowledge can consist of specific past episodes, multiple memories linked together, or schematic mental models that have been distilled from many past experiences. I will present recent work from my lab, using a combination of behavioral, eye-tracking, and neuroimaging methods, on the mechanisms by which we can use knowledge of temporal structure to generate predictions, organize experiences into events, and construct durable memories. Our studies employ stories, movies, virtual reality, and games, allowing participants to draw on their knowledge of the world or build detailed expertise in controlled yet naturalistic domains. These studies argue for a central role of top-down and anticipatory processes in constructing high-level representations of events in the brain and creating durable sequence memories.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    4
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB October Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    The Annual Dr. Henrietta Leonard Visiting Professor Academic Grand Rounds*
    Somos Esenciales/We are Essential: Community-led and Academic Partnered Research for Advancing Mental Health Equity
    Lisa R. Fortuna, MD, MPH, MDiv
    Professor and Chair of Psychiatry and Neurosciences
    University of California, Riverside
    School of Medicine
    Wednesday, October 4, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:

    • Consider increasing opportunities for engaging with community in mental health services research and for driving health equity policy
    • Describe principles for co-design of mental health innovations, including digital interventions aimed at improving mental health disparities
    • Discuss the health equity model for designing mental health services that consider social and structural determinants of mental health
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Fortuna has no financial relationships to disclose.
    This activity is not supported by a commercial entity ~ For more information, please contact [email protected]

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    2
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series: Ashley Thomas

    Metcalf Research Building, Rm 305

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

    Speaker: Ashley Thomas, Harvard University

    Title: Intuitive Theory of Social Relationships

    Abstract:

    Every day, we recognize social relationships and use knowledge about social relationships to inform our behavior. For example, we recognize that it is acceptable to eat off our spouse’s plate, but unacceptable to eat off our employer’s plate. We may laugh at our boss’s joke to maintain our deferential relationship or do a favor for a coworker to maintain a cooperative one. Previous research on social cognitive development has largely focused on infants’ and children’s social reasoning either at the microscale of an individual person’s actions, thoughts, and beliefs (e.g., ‘theory of mind’), or at the macroscale, of societal groups and social categories (e.g., ingroups and outgroups, gender, or race). My research program is situated between these scales, focusing on how humans think about relationships between individuals which we depend on for our survival and wellbeing. In this talk I will consider findings from developmental psychology and propose that throughout our lives, our representations of social relationships are intuitive theories. I propose three central components of this intuitive theory: evaluating whether a relationship exists; categorizing it into a model (i.e., type, schema, concept) and computing its strength (i.e., intensity, pull, or thickness). Following Relational Models Theory (Fiske, 1991, 2004), I propose that from infancy, humans recognize relationships that belong to three models: communal sharing (where people see themselves as one), authority ranking (where people see themselves as ranked), and equality matching (where people see themselves as separate and track reciprocity). A single relationship can be organized according to any of these models depending on the context, but relationships tend to use a dominant model. The other component is a relationship’s strength and can be thought of as a continuous representation of obligations (the extent to which certain actions are expected and morally evaluated), and commitment (the likelihood that people will continue the relationship). In communal sharing relationships this may be felt as attachment, in authority ranking relationships it may be felt as allegiance or loyalty, and in equality matching relationships it may be felt as trust. One hypothesis regarding strength is that the stronger a connection, the less interchangeable the person or people. These representations, and the assumption that others share them, allow us to form, maintain and change social relationships by informing how we interpret and evaluate the actions of others and plan our own.

    More Information 
  • Oct
    2
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Statistics Seminar and C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Series | Miguel Hernán, Ph.D.

    School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Rm 245

    Miguel Hernán, Ph.D.,
    Kolokotrones Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    Talk Title: AI for causal inference in health research. What can we learn from data and how much learning can we automate?

    Abstract: The tools now referred to as AI may assist, or replace, health researchers who learn from data. This talk describes a taxonomy of learning tasks in science and explores the relationship between two of them: prediction (pattern recognition) and counterfactual prediction (causal inference). Researchers predict counterfactually by using a combination of data and causal models of the world. In contrast, AI tools developed for prediction using only data are being increasingly used for counterfactual prediction. This raises questions about the meaning of the term AI, the origin of causal models, and the future of causal inference research in the health sciences.

    Light refreshments will be provided. *

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    4:30pm - 7:00pm EDT

    World Alzheimer’s Day: The Perspective from Rhode Island

    345 Blackstone Blvd, Providence, RI 02906, Rm Ray Hall on the Butler Hospital campus

    On World Alzheimer’s Day, Thursday, September 21st, join the Carney Institute for an interactive panel discussion with leading scientists, researchers and advocates about the latest advances in Alzheimer’s Disease research and treatment, and how Rhode Island is playing a pivotal role in the battle against the disease.

    David Shenk (’88), journalist and author of The Forgetting - “a literary portrait of Alzheimer’s disease perfectly balanced between sorrow and wonder, devastation and awe” - will facilitate this discussion with:

    • Jessica Alber, Ph.D, assistant professor of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences and Ryan Research Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Rhode Island

    • Maritza Ciliberto, member of the National Institutes of Health’s National Advisory Council on Aging, AD care partner/research advocate and participant

    • Edward (Ted) Huey, M.D., Director of the Memory and Aging Program at Butler Hospital, affiliate of The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University

    • Gregorio Valdez, Ph.D., GLF Translational Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry at Brown University

    Butler Hospital, the Rhode Island Department of Health, and the Rhode Island Alzheimer’s Association on-hand to share information, answer questions and connect attendees with relevant resources.

    —————————————————————————-

    Thursday, September 21st from 4:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

    Held virtually (Register here. NOTE: The online event will begin at 5:00 p.m.) and in-person (RSVP below) at Ray Hall on the campus of Butler Hospital (345 Blackstone Blvd, Providence, RI 02906). Park in Lot B and follow path 4 or 5.

    Free and open to the public, RSVP required (complete information below or call 401-863-7421).

    Refreshments will be served.

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Sep
    21
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Michelle Bridi; West Virginia University Medical School

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title: Sleep and synaptic(dys)regulation: Implications for autismspectrum disorder

    Host:  Dr. Matthew Nassar 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    19
    5:30pm - 7:00pm EDT

    Carney Network Event with ICERM Workshop on Mathematics and Neuroscience

    164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Rm Innovation Zone

    This Fall ICERM is hosting a semester-long program focusing on issues at the intersection between math and neuroscience. This program will bring in prominent computational and mathematical neuroscientists from abroad. The first of three weeklong workshops will be the week of Sept 18, focusing on Neuronal Network Dynamics.

    Please join us for an informal networking wine and cheese event sponsored by the Carney Center for Computational Brain Science with attendees of this workshop on Tues Sept 19 at 5:30pm-7:30pm, at 164 Angell St, 4th floor.

    Please note also that each workshop will define a set of “open questions” that will serve as problems for mathematicians to work on. We are hoping that some of these questions are inspired by problems defined by the Carney community, and reciprocally, that the open questions will inspire other work at Brown. Feel free to bring your ideas to this event and any other throughout the semester. We will host another wrap up event at the end of the semester to crystallize these discussions and inspire new collaborative work.

    More Information CCBS
  • Abstract: Across childhood and adolescence, sleep is influenced by a multitude of factors that are rooted in biological and social contexts. Sleep, in turn, is a driver of development, from mental health to cognitive functioning. Drawing on findings from a decade-long investigation, Dr. Mona El-Sheikh will present a developmental perspective for examining sleep in youth; discuss relations between family processes and sleep; and illustrate the role of sleep in the exacerbation and mitigation of health disparities.

    More Information 
  • Sep
    18
    Virtual
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EDT

    Advance RI-CTR NVivo Drop-In Session (PC Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Advance RI-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop In Session (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen.

    The drop-in session will be on Monday, September 18th from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM. This is an open session where you may ask Dr. Rosen specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study.

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance RI-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    Questions? Please contact [email protected].

    Trainer: Rochelle Rosen, PhD

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Sep
    18
    1:00pm EDT

    GPP Thesis Defense: Zoe Elizabeth Piccus

    Pembroke Hall, Rm Room 305

    Title:  Mouse models of motor neuron disease stemming from unrestrained sphingolipid synthesis

    Advisor:  Dr. Claire Le Pichon, NIH

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    18
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    MRF/BNC Users Meeting

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Rm Innovation Zone

    Please mark your calendars for the next MRF/BNC Users meeting, which will be Monday, Sep. 18th, at noon in the Carney Innovation Zone at 164 Angell St. We hope to see you in person but we will again have a Zoom option for those wishing to tune in remotely.

    This month, Gill LeBlanc will present past work from her master’s thesis: “The Sexually Dimorphic Brain: Variations in White Matter Integrity and Exercise-Induced Plasticity in a Rodent Model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders”

    Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP for this event to help us gauge attendance for our food order.

    RSVP: https://forms.gle/m9wM2vG1d8pZsMSd7

    More Information 
  • Please join The Center for Translational Neuroscience for a special seminar featuring Julie Kauer, PhD, Stanford University School of Medicine. 

    Somatodendritic release of neuropeptides
    from VTA dopamine neurons

    Hosted by Eric Morrow, MD PhD
    and the Center for Translational Neuroscience.

    Dr. Kauer’s talk will take place at 70 Ship St, Auditorium 107, at 11AM. 

    Additionally, please join Dr. Kauer and Carney Institute colleagues
    for refreshments in the SFH Atrium at 5pm in the evening. 

     

    More Information CTN
  • Sep
    14
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Alison Barth; Carnegie Mellon University

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title: Superstition, sensory learning, and inhibitory plasticity in the cerebral cortex

    Host:  Dr. Diane Lipscombe

    More Information 
  • The Advance RI-CTR Clinical and Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. This series features outstanding science from expert investigators alternating with Advance RI-CTR Pilot Projects awardees sharing their early research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Thursday, September 14, 2023:

    Caroline Richardson, MD: “New Approaches to Type 2 Diabetes” 

    New developments in Type 2 Diabetes Care have the potential to dramatically improve outcomes for this common and costly disease. However, the rapid pace of innovation in diabetes care has outpaced our ability to transform care delivery. The presentation will focus on pragmatic and implementation focused clinical trials of interventions to support patients and their primary care teams to incorporate new strategies to manage in Type 2 Diabetes including new medication classes, continuous glucose monitoring, and low carbohydrate diets.

    About the Speaker

    Dr. Richardson is the George A. and Marilyn M. Bray Professor and Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at Care New England and Brown. Her research is focused on improving the quality of care for Type 2 Diabetes in primary care. Prior to moving to Rhode Island in 2022, she was at the University of Michigan where she lead the state wide Michigan Collaborative for Type 2 Diabetes and she was the center director of the Veterans Administration Diabetes Quality Enhancement Research Initiative. She is an expert in pragmatic trial design and patient facing e-health research and leads the VA’s national Diabetes Prevention Clinical Demonstration Project.

    Register HereMore Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Sep
    13
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    DPHB Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    “Henrietta Leonard, A Triple Board Resident, and Delirium – A Long Story Not Yet Complete”
    Lara P. Nelson, MD
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
    Acting Chief, Critical Care Medicine
    Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
    Wednesday, September 13, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/2023-2024-Child-Adolescent
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Review what makes delirium so challenging to diagnose in children
    • Begin to consider longer term complications of delirium
    • Find opportunities for partnership between Pediatrics and Child Psychiatry
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Nelson has no financial relationships to disclose

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Sep
    7
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Dr. Moshe Parnas; University of Tel Aviv

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm 220 Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  A Paradigm Shift in GPCR Recruitment and Activity: GPCR Voltage Dependence Controls Neuronal Plasticity and Behavior

    Host:  Dr. Gilad Barnea

    More Information Research
  • Sep
    7

    Join us for the Virtual Advance RI-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen.

    This workshop will be on Thursday, September 7th from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM with an optional Q&A from 11:00 AM to 11:30 AM. This workshop will be a general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainer: Rochelle Rosen, PhD

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Sep
    6
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Emotional Changes with Aging and Neurodegenerative Illness: The False Divide Between Psychiatry and Neurology
    Edward (Ted) Huey, MD
    Director, Memory and Aging Program, Butler Hospital
    Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Associate Director for Clinical Research, Brown Center for AD Research
    Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Wednesday, September 6, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    • PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-23-24
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:

    • Understand recent developments in neurodegeneration and how they impact psychiatric practice
    • Understand what lesion studies teach us about the neuroanatomical bases of emotional processing
    • Understand how these findings above can impact the treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in neurodegenerative illness
    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Huey has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 987 3602 1213 | Passcode: 975255

    Please join us for a virtual open house for the Advancing Research Careers (ARC) program. Come learn about the structure of the program and resources available to ARC scholars. We’ll hear from program leadership and current ARC scholars will share about their experience with plenty of time for questions.

    A two-year, NINDS-funded program, ARC seeks to promote the research careers of women and persons historically excluded due to ethnicity and race (PEERs) in brain sciences. Participants benefit from financial support, mentorship and professional development tailored specifically to each person.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Aug
    16
    Virtual and In Person
    1:00pm EDT

    Pathobiology Thesis Defense: Shannon Paquette

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    Please join the Pathobiology Graduate Program for the final examination of Shannon Paquette for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The candidate will present herself for examination on the dissertation entitled “Loss of Irf8+ macrophages results in cardiac dysfunction and disrupts adult heart health in zebrafish”.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Aug
    10
    1:00pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Katie Susannah McCullar

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Exploring the effects of consecutive nights of pre-sleep alcohol on human sleep

    Advisor:  Dr. Mary Carskadon

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Aug
    9
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Advance-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (Mac Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Virtual Advance-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (Mac Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen.

    This workshop will be on Wednesday, August 9th from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM with an optional Q&A from 1:00 PM to 1:30 PM. A general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses will be shared. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form.

    Questions? Please contact [email protected].

    Trainer: Rochelle Rosen, PhD

    Register Here!More Information Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Aug
    7
    12:00pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Hala Haddad

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Characterization of non-visual Opsin 3 receptor signaling and function in the hypothalamus and beyond

    Advisor:  Dr. Elena Oancea

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Aug
    2
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB August Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Dispelling the Myths and Misinformation: What is Gender Affirmative Care?

    Jason Rafferty, MD, MPH, EdM
    Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Alpert Medical School at Brown University

    Wednesday, August 2, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-22-23
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:

    • Recognize the essential aspects of the gender affirmative care model and how it applies to youth and their families
    • Appreciate how cumulative trauma and stigma contributes to mental health disparities and ways providers can foster resiliency
    • Discuss the importance of family support and ways providers can foster parental understanding and acceptance

    Dr. Rafferty has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Aug
    2
    11:00am EDT

    Brown-NIH GPP Thesis Defense: Ruby Minh Lam

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  The Cells and Molecules Underlying Mechanosensation

    Advisor:  Dr. Alexander Chesler, NIH

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jul
    28
    2:00pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Meghan Anne Gonsalves

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220, Marcuvitz Aud.

    Thesis Title:  Elucidating rTMS-induced antidepressant efficacy as a function of neurometabolites: from clinical biomarkers to mechanisms

    Advisor:  Dr. Tara White

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jul
    25
    1:00pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Rachel McLaughlin

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Rm. 220 Marcuvitz Aud.

    Thesis Title:  Developing a Three-Dimensional Brain Microtissue Model of Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury

    Advisor:  Dr. Diane Hoffman-Kim

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jul
    24

    “Neuroscience careers in biotech: first principles and what to expect in making the transition from academia”

     Dr. Robert Thorne, Denali Fellow at Denali Therapeutics, an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota, and International Brain Barriers Society (IBBS) President.

    RSVP: https://forms.gle/CUw6JSNvyEJYqbHY7

    More Information 
  • “Leveraging physiology and engineering for drug delivery to the brain: taking antibodies, enzymes and other proteins to the final frontier.”

    Dr. Robert Thorne, Denali Fellow at Denali Therapeutics, an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota, and International Brain Barriers Society (IBBS) President.

    RSVP: https://forms.gle/CUw6JSNvyEJYqbHY7

    More Information 
  • Jul
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    1:30pm EDT

    Pathobiology Thesis Defense: Layra Cintrón-Rivera

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    Please join the Pathobiology Graduate Program for the final examination of Layra Cintrón-Rivera for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The candidate will present herself for examination on the dissertation entitled “Identification of novel cellular and molecular targets mediating 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced developmental toxicity”.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Jul
    18
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Advance-CTR NVivo Drop-In Session (PC Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Advance-CTR NVivo Virtual Drop In Session (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen.

    The drop-in session will be on Tuesday, July 18th from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM. This is an open session where you may ask Dr. Rosen specific questions about the NVivo software and its applications to your study. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    You can also join the drop-in session to learn from the questions asked by others.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainer: Rochelle Rosen, PhD

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Jul
    11
    1:30pm EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Luis Antonio Goicouria

    70 Ship Street, Rm Rm. 107

    Thesis Title: Contributions to the Relationship Between Circadian Rhythm Protein Dysfunction and Epilepsy–CLOCK and the PAR bZIP Transcription Factors

    Advisor: Dr. Judy Liu

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jul
    11
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Advance-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (PC Based)

    Zoom

    Join us for the Virtual Advance-CTR Introduction to NVivo Workshop (PC Based) with Dr. Rochelle Rosen.

    This workshop will be on Tuesday, July 11th from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM with an optional Q&A from 1:00 PM to 1:30 PM. This workshop will be a general overview and introduction on the NVivo software and its potential uses. To learn more about NVivo and other qualitative resources, please go to the Advance-CTR Qualitative Research Resources page: https://advancectr.brown.edu/resources/qualitative-research-resources.

    *Note: If you have confidential study questions, please complete a service request form at https://advancectr.brown.edu/schedule-service-consultation.

    If you have any questions contact [email protected].

    Trainer: Rochelle Rosen, PhD

    Register Here!More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Jul
    10
    Virtual
    1:30pm EDT

    GPP Thesis Defense: Kevin Michael Keary III - 7/10/23 at 1:30 p.m.

    NIH NIH Building 35A, Rm Room G620/630
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact Carol Viveiros at [email protected] for passcode.

    Thesis Title: Examining Subcellular Compartmentalization of Synaptic Plasticity in CA1 Apical Dendrites

    Advisor:  Dr. Zheng Li, NIH

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jul
    10
    9:00am - 3:30pm EDT

    Carney Computational Modelling Workshop

    Smith-Buonanno Hall, G-01; in-person, with Zoom option for non-local participants

    The Carney Center for Computational Brain Science and the Brainstorm Program is organizing a two-week computational modeling workshop with a focus on computational modeling of cognition, behavior, and brain/behavior relationships. Workshop attendees will learn the basic tools for understanding, developing, and applying models to brain science questions, and have the opportunity to apply these techniques in a novel dataset.

    Week 1 will consist of workshops and live tutorials, including daily lectures spanning basic to advanced topics, accompanied by hands-on coding tutorials. Attendees will learn the basic tools for understanding, developing and applying computational models, with a focus on hypothesis testing, quantitative fitting, bayesian methods, and model checks and comparisons. Additionally, advanced modeling sessions will provide a deeper theoretical understanding and application of complex modeling techniques.

    During Week 2, participants will have the opportunity to work in teams to apply these skills to analyze a real dataset provided by the organizers, with potential for novel discoveries. Prizes will be awarded for models with the most predictive power, rigor, creativity, and innovation.

    For details on last years’ workshops and modeling competition, visit the Center for Computational Brain Science website. Previous syllabi are available here. We will cover most of the same basic topics, with a few tweaks and additions (based on participant input and guest speakers).

    Intended Audience: This workshop is open to the members of the Brown community, and is designed for researchers across fields, backgrounds and levels of experience: computation “novices” with no experience and those with more computational experience who may want to augment their toolkit with advanced approaches to parameter estimation or specific classes of models. Although there is no computational experience required, those with modeling backgrounds will still benefit from the advanced modules, and will have the opportunity to learn new skills and state-of-the-art computational approaches.

    Maximum number of participants: Participation is limited to 20, but we do keep a waitlist.

    Register here.

    Organizers: Andra Geana, Debbie Yee, Alana Jaskir, Michael Frank

    More Information BRAINSTORM, CCBS
  • Jun
    29
    12:00pm EDT

    Neuropathology of Age-Related Tauopathy: Leveraging Genetics and Deep Learning - A talk by John Crary, M.D., Ph.D.

    Rhode Island Hospital, Rm APC building, Seminar Room 12-003  

    Please join the Carney Institute for a talk by John Crary, M.D., Ph.D.
    Professor, Department of Pathology,
    Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

    Neuropathology of Age-Related Tauopathy: Leveraging Genetics and Deep Learning”

    In person: Rhode Island Hospital
    APC building, Seminar Room 12-003

    Remotely: via Microsoft Teams
    Meeting ID: 220 396 061 184
    Passcode: XqgWUV

    Or call in (audio only): +1 401-226-0907
    Phone Conference ID: 737 423 820#

    More Information 
  • Jun
    21
    12:30pm - 2:00pm EDT

    2023 Carney Summer BBQ!

    Pembroke Green

    Please join us for the 2023

    Carney Summer BBQ!

    Pembroke Green (rain location: Crystal Room)

    June 21, 2023          12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

    Please RSVP by June 13th

    More Information 
  • Jun
    15
    1:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    Center for Translational Neuroscience Spring Retreat

    70 Ship Street, Rm 107

    Please join us for the Center for Translational Neuroscience 2023 Spring Retreat! 

    Opening Remarks: Mukesh K. Jain, MD, Dean of Medicine and Biological Sciences, Senior VP for Health Affairs

    Guest Speaker: Swetha Gowrishankar, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago: Neuronal lysosome transport and function: links to neurodegenerative diseases

    Faculty Speakers: Sonia Mayoral, PhD; Alexander Fleischmann, PhD; Kate O’Connor-Giles, PhD; Sofia Lizarraga, PhD

    Trainee Speakers: Eugene Lee, PhD; Robert Loius Hastings, PhD 

    Hosted by: Eric Morrow, MD PhD 

    Refreshments to Follow in the LMM Courtyard

     

     

     

     

    More Information CTN
  • Jun
    14
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Sensing Psychosis: Deep Phenotyping of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Justin T. Baker, MD, PhD
    Director, Laboratory for Functional Neuroimaging & Bioinformatics
    Scientific Director, Institute for Technology in Psychiatry
    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

    Wednesday, June 14, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/22-23-CAGR
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Describe three challenges faced by modern-day psychiatry that can be understood in a classic control systems framework
    • Compare “Big” (i.e. large-N) and “wide” (i.e. N-of-1 or single-case) approaches to studying neuropsychiatric disorders
    • List two challenges or potential pitfalls of deep phenotyping approaches as applied to neuropsychiatric disorders

    Financial Relationship Disclosure: Dr. Baker receives consulting fees from Healios Limited, Inc. and Niraxx Light Therapeutics, Inc.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    MRF/BNC Users Meeting

    Sciences Center, Rm 3rd Floor Meeting Room

    MRF/BNC Monthly Users Meeting. Meg Gonsalves: “From neurometabolites to functional circuitry: a multimodal investigation of the antidepressant mechanisms of rTMS”

    More Information 
  • Jun
    7
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Virtual

    Mental Health in the Aftermath of the Covid-19 Pandemic: Challenges and Opportunities

    Sandro Galea, MD, DrPH
    Dean
    Robert A Knox Professor
    School of Public Health - Boston University

    Wednesday, June 7, 2023◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-22-23
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to:
    • Discuss the mental health consequences of the Covid 19 Pandemic
    • Discuss what we have learned, and what we have yet to learn, about mental health post-pandemic
    • Articulate a plan for innovation in mental health scholarship in coming decades

    Dr. Galea has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    2
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Innovation Award Mini-Symposium

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell Street, 4th Floor, Rm Innovation Zone

    Please join the Carney Institute for a Mini-Symposium on the Zimmerman Innovation Awards in Brain Science. Previous awardees will share their projects, how they fit the goals of the program, and how the funding helped propel their science. The event will also include an overview of the application and review process as well as an open Q&A session.

    10:00 - Overview of the Innovation Awards Program
    10:25 - Greg Valdez / Lalit Beura - “Optimizing housing conditions to accelerate the translation of research using mouse models of Alzheimer’s Disease”
    10:50 - Kate O’Connor-Giles / Erica Larschan - “Identifying drivers of coordinated synaptic gene expression across neuronal subtypes”
    11:15 - Theresa Desrochers / Matthew Nassar - “Beyond Steady State: Mapping frontal representations onto sequential choices through reinforcement learning”
    11:40 - Q&A about the upcoming application cycle

    The 2023 call for applications is now open in UFunds and the application deadline is September 1.

    Refreshments will be served.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, BRAINSTORM, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    30
    10:00am EDT

    NSGP Thesis Defense: Sara Zeppilli

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium

    Title:  Olfactory circuits and emerging principles of cell type evolution

    Advisor:  Dr. Alexander Fleischmann

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    26
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    25
    4:00pm EDT

    NSGP Seminar Series Presents Amy Arnsten, PhD; Yale School of Medicine

    Sidney E. Frank Hall for Life Sciences, Rm Marcuvitz Auditorium, Rm. 220

    Title: Unique Molecular Regulation of Prefrontal Cortex Confers Vulnerability to Cognitive Disorders

    Host:  Dr. Matthew Nassar

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    25
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    BNC Special Seminar: “Empirical Effect Size Guidelines for Typical fMRI Studies”- Stephanie Noble, Ph.D.

    Carney Institute, 164 Angell Street, Rm Innovation Zone

    The Behavior and Neurodata Core presents a special seminar with Stephanie Noble, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Associate, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging, Yale University.

    “Empirical Effect Size Guidelines for Typical fMRI Studies”

    More Information