Past Events

  • Now Friday, June 5!

    Join us at 12 PM for a videoconference discussion of COVID-19 data.

    We will also use a chat system called Babylon House for facilitating the discussion. You can go ahead and join that classroom here:

    https://babylon.house/projects/9282c066-ff77-46d2-8a63-394af6ff5105/join

    If you’d like a very short introduction to using Babylon House as a meeting participant, check out this video: https://youtu.be/RZB2W1R3t3c

    Last time, we explored publicly available data sets and discussed some of the challenges inherent in drawing inferences and making predictions. You can find information from that session (including a Jupyter notebook) here: https://browndsi.github.io/covid19/

    This time we’ll explore methods for estimating the crucially important quantity Rₜ (the average number of new infections generated by each infectious individual, at time t). The discussion will be accessible, introducing the data analysis tools we’ll use along the way.

    Hosted by Samuel Watson, Director of Graduate Studies, Data Science Initiative.

     

    Please sign up with the ‘Register Here’ link above to indicate that you are participating.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Social Sciences, Teaching & Learning
  • May
    29
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • Starting on Thursday, May 28 at 12 PM noon Eastern Time, we’ll begin holding live sessions to review content from Data Gymnasia:

    https://mathigon.org/data-gymnasia

    These sessions are intended to help incoming DSI students prepare for the program, but they are open to anyone who is interested in the learning content. They are free of charge.

    For the first session, we will treat the first four sections of the Data Science Pipeline course:

    https://mathigon.org/course/intro-data-pipeline/introduction

    We recommend that you work through those sections prior to class, but you are welcome to participate whether you do or not. If you don’t have experience with Python, or if you want a refresher, you might also complete some of the sections in the Intro to Python course:

    https://mathigon.org/course/programming-in-python/introduction

    The class session will be facilitated using Babylon House:

    https://babylon.house/projects/a5543fce-71d1-4256-89cd-70845ee2cafb/join

    You can see a video on how Babylon House works on the landing page (https://babylon.house ), and you can see a shorter student guide at https://youtu.be/RZB2W1R3t3c

    Hosted by Samuel Watson, Director of Graduate Studies, Data Science Initiative.

     

    Please sign up with the ‘Register Here’ link above to indicate that you are participating.

  • DeepLabCut chief developer Q and A


    Mackenzie Mathis, Ph.D. 

    Assistant ProfessorEPFL, Switzerland
    Bertarelli Foundation Chair of Integrative Neuroscience
    European Laboratory for Learning and Intelligent Systems (ELLIS) Scholar

    Hosted by Jason Ritt, Ph.D.

    Please join an open question and answer session with Dr. Mathis, for anyone at Brown that uses or is interested in using the open source, 3D markerless motion tracking tool DeepLabCut, or the DLC Model Zoo. Developed in the last few years by her lab, and quickly adopted by a wide array of labs throughout neuroscience and beyond, DLC applies partially pretrained deep neural networks to video to perform pose estimation and similar analyses, with low requirements for manually labelled training data. For more information on DLC, visit https://www.mousemotorlab.org/deeplabcut or visit http://www.mousemotorlab.org/dlc-modelzoo .

  • Spring 2020 RCR training is now available. The course content and discussion topics are designed for faculty in the biomedical and clinical sciences and fulfill the NIH requirements for training in RCR.

    This month: “Data Management, Ownership, and Record Keeping”

    Led by: Neil Sarkar, PhD and Andrew Creamer, MLIS

    Session Description: Learn about good data management practices from faculty, as well as emerging services and infrastructure at Brown University for supporting faculty with data management plans and archiving/sharing of data.

    Please Note: Faculty must complete 8 hours of RCR training within one 12-month period to receive a certificate of completion. Sessions that are required for meeting the RCR requirements are marked. All faculty are eligible to register for the sessions, but priority will be given to those who are working toward completing their grant RCR requirements. Please contact [email protected] with any questions.

    All faculty from Brown, URI, and the affiliated hospital systems are eligible to enroll in the series.

    Registration is required as space is limited. Register now .

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • May
    27

    Speaker: Gregory Dachner, Brown University

    Title: “A visual model of collective behavior in crowds”

    Advisor: Bill Warren

    ~ link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Carney Methods Meetups

    Join the Carney Institute for a weekly informal gathering on methods for brain science, featuring rotating topics selected by you, the Brown brain science community! Please vote for next week’s topic using this form .

     

    This week’s topic is “Dynamical Models of Neural Systems”, presented by Bjorn Sandstede, Ph.D. Bjorn is a Professor of Applied Mathematics and is the Director of the Data Science Initiative .

     

    Please note, this workshop requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account. Click to learn more .

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Featuring Presenters 

    Julie Boergers, PhD

    Assoc Professor, Clinician Educator, DPHB

    Bradley/Hasbro Children’s Research Center

    Whitney Evans, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research), DPHB

    Weight Control & Diabetes Research Center, TMH

    Jessica Unick, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research), DPHB

    Weight Control & Diabetes Research Center, TMH

    Educational Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be better able to: 1) Demonstrate practical strategies for promoting physical activity and reducing sedentary time in the home-environment during the COVID-19 pandemic; 2) Demonstrate knowledge of evidence-based nutrition practices that support a healthy diet for patients and healthcare providers during COVID-19; and 3) Apply evidence-based sleep hygiene strategies to enhance patient and healthcare provider self-care during COVID-19.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, decodingcovid, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Natalie Dean, University of Florida

    In this talk, I provide an overview of the evaluation of candidate COVID-19 vaccines, with a focus on the design of large Phase III efficacy trials. In these trials, thousands of participants are individually randomized to investigational vaccine or placebo control. I discuss our group’s ongoing research into adaptive and flexible trial strategies tailored to the outbreak context, and describe how this work is influencing thinking about COVID-19 vaccine efficacy trials. Emphasis is on smart placement of clinical trial sites, which can be informed both by surveillance and ensemble forecast modeling, and on multi-country strategies that are robust to unpredictable epidemic dynamics.

    This event is part of the DSI’s Decoding Pandemic Data: A Series of Interactive Seminars .

    More about Natalie Dean

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • May
    22
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • Please join Contemplative Studies for our Virtual Open House on Thursday, May 21st from 4:30 - 6 pm. Students and faculty will be in attendance to discuss courses offered in the fall and to offer their insights into the concentration.  This is a Zoom Open House – so please RSVP to [email protected] for the link. 

  • Password Required 

    Please email [email protected] or [email protected]  

    In recent years, the rising popularity and availability of Virtual Reality (VR) systems has enabled the use of immersive display systems for scientific data exploration. This opened up a large design space for novel visualization techniques that needs to be thoroughly investigated in order to build practical software. This dissertation investigates aspects of creating effective VR visualizations from multiple angles: First, by analyzing how display fidelity affects user performance immersive data exploration situations. Here, results from a large scale study evaluating the factors of display resolution, field of view and display artifacts show their varying impact on user effectiveness depending on the exploration tasks presented.

    A second line of studies analyzed the limits of human perception within high-resolution VR environments, by evaluating the ability of users to identify minute details in immersive medical scan visualizations and their ability to read text within 3D environments containing visual obstructions. In an effort to obtain generalizable results, the experiments above were performed across multiple VR hardware systems, leading to recommendations about their effective uses.

    Finally, this dissertation provides insights into best practices for VR application development through a large-scale case study of the “Scientific Sketching” design methodology. A managed collaboration of biologists, art students and computer science students over the course of three years, resulted in a novel fluid-dynamics visualization application tailored to the specific needs of our biology collaborators. The information gathered alongside the development process built a strong basis for future VR application development. Together, the contributions of this work form a set of guidelines for the effective use of immersive visualizations in scientific settings.

    Host: Professor David Laidlaw

  • “Information and randomization in exploration and exploitation,” featuring:

    Robert Wilson, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor

    University of Arizona

    Abstract: The explore-exploit dilemma is a fundamental behavioral dilemma faced
    by any organism that can learn. Should we explore new options in the
    hopes of learning something new or exploit options we already know to
    be good. In this talk I will present evidence that people use two
    distinct strategies for solving the explore-exploit dilemma: directed
    exploration, in which information seeking drives exploration by
    choice, and random exploration, in which behavioral variability drives
    exploration by chance. In addition I will present initial evidence
    showing that these two types of exploration rely on dissociable neural
    systems.

    Contact [email protected] for the Zoom meeting password.

    CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • The Providence Sleep Research Interest Group (PSRIG) presents:

     

    Rebecca Robbins, Ph.D.

    Post Doctoral Fellow

    Brigham and Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical School

     

    “Applying health communication and marketing tools to improve population sleep outcomes”

     

    Abstract:The vast majority of us do not get enough of the sleep that fuels our waking success. In addition, among those at risk for sleep disorders, as many as 85% are untreated. In this talk you will learn about new and novel health communication and marketing tools, many of which are underutilized in sleep research, to craft behavioral interventions that nudge and navigate individuals toward improved awareness about sleep and sleep disorders.

     

    Join via Zoom . Please RSVP to Jared_Saletin  if you plan to attend. 

  • Designing Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still reserved for experts, and the existing design paradigm follows heuristic-guided ‘trial and error’: domain experts start with a hypothetical model, verify the model on some task-specific datasets to acquire performance metrics, then revise the model based on prior experiences in hoping to improve the model in the next loop. The goal of my research is to democratize AI, by seeking an AI that can design AIs for various tasks without human intervening. In this work, we first characterize the existing AI design process and formulate it as a computational model. Whereas this model assumes unlimited computing resources. Toward a practical solution, we have investigated issues from both the system design and algorithmic efficiency, ranging from improving the sample efficiency of Monte Carlo Tree Search (MCTS), enabling neural network design beyond the limited GPU DRAM, and the acceleration of neural network evaluations. Collectively, these results provide a partial path toward a practical MCTS based AI agent that efficiently designs complex AI for a variety of tasks using a reasonable amount of computing resources. Finally, we show models designed by our AI have achieved SToA results in several competitive tasks, including reaching 98% top-1 accuracy on CIFAR-10 in a few GPU days.

    Host: Professor Rodrigo Fonseca

  • The Biology of Human Aging Colloquium will be held on Tuesday, May 19, 2020  9:00 AM - 4:00 PM.  Guest Speakers for the event are: Isabel Beerman (NIA); Gerard Karsenty (Columbia University); Joshua Shulman (Baylor College of Medicine); Dario Valenzano (Max Planck Institute); Meng Wang (Baylor College of Medicine). REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED 

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering
  • Decoding COVID Virtual Seminar Series presents

    Greg Roth ’97 MD’02
    Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
    Associate Professor, Division of Cardiology, University of Washington School of Medicine

    Dr. Roth’s research focuses on global cardiovascular health surveillance, population health, and quality of care and outcomes for cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, coronary heart disease, and pulmonary hypertension. At IHME, he leads cardiovascular disease modeling for the institute’s landmark Global Burden of Disease Study.

    decodingcovid
  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about the roots of addiction with Karla Kaun, Robert and Nancy Carney Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at Brown University.

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, Carney’s associate director.

  • May
    18

    An introduction to using Matlab on OSCAR. Topics covered include: working with Matlab interactively on OSCAR, using the Matlab GUI, using Matlab in batch jobs, and working with Parallel Toolbox.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the morning of the workshop.

    Registration: Google Forms

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • May
    15

    Psychological First Aid-Based Telephone Support for Frontline Providers During COVID-19

    Featuring Presenters: 

    Kristy Dalrymple, PhD

    Assoc Professor, Clinical Educator, DPHB

    Director of Adult Psychology, LPG

    Carly Goldstein, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research), DPHB

    Weight Control & Diabetes Rsch Ctr, TMH

    Tracie Shea, PhD

    Professor, DPHB

    Trauma Recovery Svcs Clinic, P-VAMC

    Lisa Uebelacker, PhD

    Professor, DPHB

    Psychosocial Research, Butler

    Deanna Kaplan, MA

    Clinical Psychology Resident, DPHB

    Zoom Webcast Instructions:

    1. Join the Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcrfuigrTosHdNgAf0FDctqnXmUWc93KgRy
    2. Use your computer audio or dial into: 1-877-369-0926
    3. Enter Meeting ID: 936-9183-1677
    4. Meeting Password: 138288
    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, decodingcovid, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • May
    15
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about cognitive development in adolescence with Beatriz Luna, Staunton Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh. 

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, Carney’s associate director.

  • May
    11

    An introduction to OSCAR, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to OSCAR (ssh, VNC), how to navigate OSCAR’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on OSCAR.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the morning of the workshop.

    Registration: Google Forms

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • Featuring Presenters

    Catherine D’Avanzato, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, DPHB

    ACT Partial Program, RIH 

    Jane Hesser, MFA, MSW, LICSW

    Teaching Associate, DPHB

    Providence Women’s Therapy, LLC

    Barbara Jandasek, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, DPHB

    Pediatric Heart Center, Hasbro 

    Ben Johnson, PhD, ABPP

    Clinical Associate Professor, DPHB

    Director, RICBT

    Emily Katz, MD

    Associate Professor, Clinician Educator, DPHB & Pediatrics

    Director, Hasbro Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Service

    Zoom Webcast Instructions:

    1. Join the Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYld-ihqz0qHNGjVdndsX4emWPoaT-loZTU
    2. Use your computer audio or dial into: 1-877-369-0926
    3. Enter Meeting ID: 928-0195-6065
    4. Meeting Password: 109007
    • You will be muted upon entry into the webcast.
    • A quick tutorial on the user interface will be given at the beginning of the live webcast.
    • For additional details on how to access the live webcast, please go to: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362193-Joining-a-Meeting
    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, decodingcovid, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • May
    8
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    CCV Office Hours

    Drop in on the Zoom meeting to ask members of CCV’s High-Performance Computing (HPC) team your questions about using Oscar or any other research computing topics you are interested in.

    Computing, HPC, Research
  • May
    6
    10:00am

    CCBS Seminar

     

    Anna Schapiro, Ph.D.

    University of Pennsylvania

    “Learning distributed representations in the human brain”

     Join via Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/95275026350

    Please note, this seminar requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account. Click to learn more .

    Abstract: The remarkable success of neural network models in machine learning has relied on the use of distributed representations — activity patterns that overlap across related inputs. Under what conditions does the brain also rely on distributed representations for learning? There are benefits and costs to this form of representation: it allows rapid, efficient learning and generalization, but is highly susceptible to interference. We recently developed a neural network model of the hippocampus that proposes that one subregion (CA1) may employ this form of representation, complementing known pattern-separated representations in other subregions. This provides an exciting domain to test ideas about learning with distributed representations, as the hippocampus learns much more quickly than the neocortical areas that have often been proposed to contain these representations. I will present modeling and empirical work that provide support for the idea that parts of the hippocampus do indeed learn using distributed representations. I will also present ideas about how hippocampal and neocortical areas may interact during sleep to further transform these representations over time.

    CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    5
    5:00pm - 6:00pm

    GSOCnSTEM virtual Happy Hour

    via Zoom

    Stick around after the talk with Dr. Butts at 4, to catch up with friends in our virtual Happy Hour. For more information and the link to join, RSVP here: https://forms.gle/KT8YWXmET1PkgGf18

  • May
    5
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    GSOCnSTEM presents Colors of STEM

    via Zoom

    GSOCnSTEM presents Virtual Colors of STEM, a talk by Cherie Butts, Ph.D., Medical Director and Head of Human Biology Research, Digital and Quantitative Medicine at Biogen.

    “Experiences in Government and Industry”

    RSVP for zoom Link: https://forms.gle/KT8YWXmET1PkgGf18

    Biography: Cherié Butts is Medical Director and Head of Human Biology Research – Digital & Quantitative Medicine at Biogen (Cambridge, MA). She obtained undergraduate and graduate degrees from The Johns Hopkins University. Her pre-doctoral studies at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center characterized anti-tumor immune responses in ovarian cancer patients and postdoctoral studies at the National Institutes of Health examined neuroendocrine regulation of innate immunity. She continued this work at the US Food & Drug Administration, taking on additional responsibilities of evaluating drug and biologics applications. At Biogen, she has held various roles while continuing to conduct research. She delved into program and portfolio management – helping scientists and clinicians understand how potential new therapies address a specific unmet medical need for patients. She served on the Portfolio Transformation team, leading the Probability of Success theme and Team Learning & Health initiative. Most recently, she was responsible for clinical trials in multiple sclerosis before moving into her current role that focuses on use of clinical measurement tools as a mechanism for better understanding disease biology, reducing trial burden, and ensuring trials better represent those afflicted with disease.

     Dr. Butts is passionate about ensuring individuals from all backgrounds contribute to biomedical research. She works with scientific professional societies and related organizations to help scientists and clinicians learn about roles in government and industry – at and away from the bench or clinic. She currently serves on the Leadership Board and Research Affairs Oversight Committee of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Board of Directors of Keystone Symposia; Board of Trustees at Salem State University; Council of the Society of Leukocyte Biology; Endocrine Society Nominating Committee (chair); Massachusetts Economic Development Planning Council; and is Adjunct Professor at University of Maryland.

  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a conversation about how rule-breaking and innovation push the boundaries of knowledge, featuring Stefan McDonough, Ph.D., a 1990 graduate of Brown and executive director of genetics at Pfizer World R&D and Medical. 

    This event will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, Carney’s associate director.

  • May
    5
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Noontime Knowledge: NIH K (Career) Awards

    South Street Landing

    This workshop will offer an in-depth overview of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Career Development Awards. It will define and review the various NIH K Award Application requirements as well as provide tips and experience entering the proposals in Coeus. Participants will become familiar with the key components of a Career Development application (e.g. eligibility, content, forms, budget requirements, etc.) and with Coeus K-Award specific requirements. The training is intended for individuals with Coeus proposal preparation experience; however those without experience are welcomed to attend as well.

    OVPR, Research, Training, Professional Development