Past Events

  • Jul
    1
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Emilia Favuzzi, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute.

    Abstract

    Microglia, the primary brain macrophages, regulate a plethora of events that impact the organization of neural circuits, including synapse fine-tuning. Neuronal synapses exhibit a striking diversity that reflects a specialized molecular architecture. I have explored whether the interactions between microglia and synapses are similarly specialized. Using inhibitory synapses as a point of comparison, I identified a subset of microglia that is receptive to GABA and selectively remodels inhibitory synapses. Perturbing these specialized microglia causes long-lasting defects in inhibitory connectivity that lead to behavioral abnormalities, without impacting excitatory synapses. These findings demonstrate that specialized microglia differentially engage with specific synapse types and highlight a critical function of the selective communication between neuronal and microglia types in brain wiring.
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Tyler Barnes-Diana

    All Are Welcome!

    Speaker: Tyler Barnes-Diana

    Title: Evaluating and improving models of visual perceptual learning

    Advisor: Takeo Watanabe

    Location: Hybrid
    Friedman Auditorium with zoom option

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend virtually, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours ahead of the event.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jun
    24
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Educators in academic medicine are driven to share their work, to disseminate ideas and findings, to influence practice, and to attain professional advancement. Workshops and didactic presentations are two common vehicles for spreading your message at conferences or here at your home institution. But a growing number of venues for giving local, regional, and national presentations means greater competition and higher standards for cross-institution collaboration and facilitation of active learning. As a presenter, you must be able to communicate your vision succinctly and compellingly to get your proposal accepted. We are all far too busy to keep writing proposals only to have them rejected time and time again! In this faculty development workshop, our education experts will identify the common required elements of calls for proposals, and discuss tips to make your proposal stand out from the crowd.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. By the end of this activity, participants will be able to…
    2. Identify common required elements of calls for proposals, possible presentation types, and venues to disseminate their education work.
    3. Recognize common mistakes in proposal submissions.
    4. Enact a variety of techniques to construct clear and compelling proposals to maximize the chances of acceptance.

    REGISTER HERE!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Jun
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    3:30pm EDT

    Ken Miller’s Retirement Celebration

    Please join us for Ken Miller's Retirement Celebration in honor of 42 years at Brown University!

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction
  • To watch virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/98393578960

    Abstract: Neural networks are typically considered black-boxes, but their deployments in high stakes scenarios require human understanding of their inner workings. Thus, many interpretability methods have been proposed to illustrate their reasoning process. Nonetheless, recent empirical evidence casts doubt on their effectiveness. In this talk, starting from this observed deficiency, I focus on two aspects that might explain it. First, I talk about the correctness of these methods, or whether the generated explanations can faithfully reflect the true model decision making process. Second, I talk about their understandability, or whether users can reliably understand the generated explanations, even if they are correct. On both fronts, I demonstrate how careful evaluations can reveal hidden properties about the interpretability methods and models themselves, which can further guide the efforts to improve them.

    Yilun Zhou is a fifth-year Ph.D. student at MIT EECS, advised by Prof. Julie Shah. His research broadly aims to help humans better understand machines that make important decisions in the world. Specifically, he develops models, algorithms and evaluations in interpretable machine learning, with particular preference on model agnosticity, and apply them in diverse domains including natural language processing, computer vision and robotics. Ultimately, he envisions a world where humans and machines can effortlessly communicate, coordinate and collaborate with each other.

    Host: George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • Jun
    17
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Register now for the Fourth Annual Dr. Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars, June 16-17, an inclusive in-person event showcasing the work of molecular life scientists from underrepresented groups. The conference will conclude with a joint afternoon session with the New England Regional Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Conference. 

    Download the full program.

    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Register now for the Fourth Annual Dr. Samuel M. Nabrit Conference for Early Career Scholars, June 16-17, an inclusive in-person event showcasing the work of molecular life scientists from underrepresented groups. The conference will conclude on June 17th with a joint session with the New England Regional Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Conference. 

    Download the full conference program.

    Register now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Jun
    15
    Virtual
    2:30pm - 4:00pm EDT

    COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    Walk-in office hours for the <a href=”https://cbc.brown.edu” id=”ow2878”>Computational Biology Core</a>.

    More Information 
  • Jun
    14
    12:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

    Carney Summer BBQ

    Save the Date

    Tuesday, June 14, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.

    Pembroke Green

    Please RSVP

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Jun
    14
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am EDT

    COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    Walk-in office hours for the <a href=”https://cbc.brown.edu” id=”ow2878”>Computational Biology Core</a>.

    More Information 
  • Jun
    13
    Virtual and In Person
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: James Wilmott III

    All Are Welcome!

    Speaker: James P. Wilmott III

    Title: Sensorimotor Learning of Depth Estimation for Perception and Action

    Advisor: Fulvio Domini

    Location: Hybrid
    Friedman Auditorium with zoom option

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend virtually, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours ahead of the event.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jun
    10
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Register now for our upcoming CRISP Symposium: Suicide Prevention: Connecting Research and Clinical Care in Rhode Island to be held on the Brown University campus on Friday, June 10th. Brian Ahmedani, Director of the Center for Health Policy & Health Services Research, Henry Ford Health, and Cheryl King, Professor, Director of the Youth and Young Adult Depression and Suicide Prevention Research Program at the University of Michigan will be joining us as our keynote speakers. The event is free, but will be limited to the first 100 to register. Click on the link to register.

    Suicide Prevention Symposium Tickets More Information 
  • The 2022 Emerging Areas of Science Symposium will be held at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University on June 10, 2022. This year’s event will be held in a hybrid format, allowing both virtual and in-person attendance.

    The theme of the 2022 symposium is “Health Disparities in Clinical and Translational Research”. The symposium aims to educate and engage biomedical investigators in RI regarding the importance of engaging diverse populations in the planning and the execution of clinical and translational research, with the ultimate goals to reduce health disparities in our state and to improve the health of all Rhode Islanders.

    For the past 15 years, the NIGMS-funded Innovation Development Awards (IDeA) programs in Rhode Island have joined together to hold a state-wide, day-long symposium that both celebrates successes and fosters collaborations among Rhode Island investigators. The symposium includes programs from Brown University, the University of Rhode Island, Lifespan Hospital System, Care New England Health System, and the VA Providence Health Care System.

    We are pleased to announce that the keynote speakers of this year’s Symposium are Dr. Clyde Yancy and Dr. Mariana C. Stern. We’re certain that both Drs. Yancy and Stern will provide investigators in attendance with engaging talks that will inspire their research. Additionally, we hope you will enjoy the science talks and additional sessions featuring investigators representing Rhode Island’s IDeA programs. Additional information about these speakers and their presentations can be found on the Symposium website. Please note that the schedule of the day is subject to change.

    Registration for the Symposium is now open. Please click here to indicate your interest in the virtual portions of the event. Zoom Information for those who have registered to attend the Symposium virtually is available now on the Symposium website. 

    Register Now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jun
    8
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Grand Rounds

    Finding the EHR Data to Tell Your Clinical Story: Early Experiences with Lifespan Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Services
    Kathleen R. Donise, MD
    Director, Lifespan Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Services
    Associate Professor, Clinician Educator, Dept. of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Brown University
    And
    Elizabeth S. Chen, PhD, FACMI
    Interim Director of the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics
    Associate Professor of Medical Science and Health Services, Policy & Practice
    Brown University
    Wednesday, June 8, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Summarize the current state of Pediatric Behavioral Health Emergency Services and need for data-driven approaches to improve services; Describe process and methods for identifying, extracting, managing, and analyzing data from electronic health record (EHR) systems; and Discuss the value of transdisciplinary teams and collaborations for conducting EHR-based projects to support clinical practice, quality improvement, research, and public health.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • The 5th Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM2022)

    Over the last few decades, reinforcement learning and decision making have been the focus of an incredible wealth of research spanning a wide variety of fields including psychology, artificial intelligence, machine learning, operations research, control theory, animal and human neuroscience, economics and ethology. Key to many developments in the field has been interdisciplinary sharing of ideas and findings. The goal of RLDM is to provide a platform for communication among all researchers interested in “learning and decision making over time to achieve a goal”. The meeting is characterized by the multidisciplinarity of the presenters and attendees, with cross-disciplinary conversations and teaching and learning being central objectives along with the dissemination of novel theoretical and experimental results. The main meeting will be single-track, consisting of a mixture of invited and contributed talks, tutorials, and poster sessions.

    Confirmed Speakers
    • Josh Tenenbaum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Yunzhe Liu, University College London
    • Jill O’Reilly, University of Oxford
    • Nao Uchida, Harvard University
    • Melissa Sharpe, University of California, Los Angeles
    • Alexandra Rosati, University of Michigan
    • Frederike Petzschner, Brown University
    • Oriel Feldman-Hall, Brown University
    • Scott Niekum, University of Texas at Austin
    • Satinder Singh Baveja, University of Michigan and DeepMind
    • Stephanie Tellex, Brown University
    • Martha White, University of Alberta
    • Sonia Chernova, Georgia Tech
    • Jeannette Bohg, Stanford University
    • Jakob Foerster, Facebook AI Research

    Stay tuned for updates as the conference gets closer.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, BRAINSTORM, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jun
    3
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Please join us for a half-day retreat, featuring faculty speakers from the Center for Translational Neuroscience. 

    Refreshments and Food to Follow.

    Speakers include: 

    Ashley Webb, PhD

    Justin Fallon, PhD

    Alvin Huang, MD PhD 

    Chun Geun Lee, PhD 

    Judy Liu, MD PhD

    Stephen Helfand, MD 

    Eric Morrow, MD PhD 

    Nicola Neretti, PhD 

    Gregorio Valdez, PhD

    Lalit Beura, PhD 

     

    More Information CTN
  • Social (In)Justice and Mental Health
    Ruth Shim, MD, MPH (she/her)
    Luke & Grace Kim Professor in Cultural Psychiatry
    Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
    Associate Dean of Diverse and Inclusive Education
    University of California, Davis School of Medicine
    Wednesday, June 1, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Define social justice, the social determinants of mental health, and mental health inequities; Consider how social injustice contributes to mental health inequities; and Examine the role of social injustice on the field of mental health.

    More Information 
  • Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is the most dramatic form of premature aging, and most cases are caused by a single nucleotide misspelling in the lamin A gene. An intense team effort to identify effective therapies has recently led to the first FDA-approved drug that provides significant benefit. But now greater promise is emerging in adapting RNA morpholino and DNA gene editing therapeutics.

    Speaker:
    Francis Collins, M.D.
    Acting Science Advisor to President Joe Biden; Former Director of the National Institutes of Health

    Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Watch the Livestream More Information 
  • Join us for a conversation about the evolution of the opioid crisis, evidence-based care that decreases mortality, and innovative community-based solutions to care for patients at high-risk for overdose death. A reception will immediately follow the lecture.

    Speaker:
    Kavita M. Babu ’96, ’00 M.D., ’04 RES
    Division Chief, Medical Toxicology and Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School

    Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Watch the Livestream More Information 
  • Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: James Howard- Assistant Professor - Brandeis
    Title: To be specific: neural mechanisms of reward identity learning inthe human brain
    Abstract:Research on the neuroscience of reward learning and decision making hastraditionally focused on characterizing representations of abstract value inthe brain. However, there is increasing appreciation of the broad range of task-relevantinformation contained in putative “value” regions, and how this information criticallyunderpins complex decision processes. In this talk I will present recentfindings suggesting that one such piece of information, the sensory identity ofexpected rewards, is represented at multiple stages in the mesocortical pathway.I will demonstrate how identity information carried in midbrain predictionerror signals directly relates to updating of identity information indownstream regions for later predictions. I will further present behavioralevidence that specific outcome expectations themselves may mediate experientiallearning in the absence of rewards, and speculate on the relevance of suchlearning for our understanding of certain aspects of psychosis. Together thesefindings motivate future studies aimed at more fully characterizing thedistributed networks that link sensation to prediction, and back again, in thehuman brain.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    27
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    26
    Virtual
    4:00pm EDT

    Neuroscience Special Seminar

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Email [email protected] for event passcode

    Department of Neuroscience Special Virtual Seminar:

    Elizabeth Ransey, Ph.D.
    Duke University

    “Dissecting Interaction Codes: Engineering connexins for neural circuit
    modulation and beyond”

    Host: Dr. Anne Hart

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Groops is an emotional wellness platform reinventing the group counseling model for the modern world to serve the millions of people who need and want mental wellness support and cannot get it from the limited resources available today. Groops brings small groups of people together virtually to have expert-guided conversations around the worries and wonders of modern life, from stress and anxiety, to relationships and parenting, to finding purpose in the everyday. The platform creates space for people to reflect, share and grow — together.

    In this session, the Groops leadership team will share how they are revolutionizing the world of mental wellness, get real about their startup highs and lows, share digital marketing strategies, and open up a dialogue around the power of infusing social connection into the world of mental wellness through deep conversations with strangers.

    Speaker Bio

    Dr. Bobbi Wegner is a clinical psychologist, lecturer at Harvard, author, advisor, writer, international speaker, and CEO/Founder of Groops: an online mental wellness platform that brings people together to talk about their real issues with the help of a trained facilitator. She works with individuals and organizations to promote mental wellness for everyone – everywhere.

    Dr. Bobbi writes and speaks internationally on modern mental health. She has a column in Psychology Today (“Perfectly Imperfect Parenting”), is a parenting expert on NBC News Learn, is on the Today Show parenting team, and has spoken on or written for numerous popular publications including NPR, Harvard Health Blog, The Associated Press, Mind Body Green, and Sunrise (Australia’s No. 1), to name a few. Her book, Raising Feminist Boys: How to Talk to Your Child about Gender, Consent, and Empathy, published in June 2021 with New Harbinger. She has given three TEDx talks on the subject.

    Given her interest in mental health, access, innovation, and entrepreneurship, Dr. Bobbi teaches Advocacy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and courses on Motivation and Groups & Culture at the Harvard Extension School in the Industrial Organizational Psychology Program.

    She is committed to furthering mental health access on the board of directors for USA for IOM (the UN Migration Agency) and the board of advisors for Ignite Mental Health, out of Harvard Innovation Lab. She is also a medical writer and reviewer for Buoy Health, a Harvard-Innovation Lab digital health company.


    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through the Center for Digital Health’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to CDH reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Micaela Chan, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas at Dallas.

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows us to examine patterns of large-scale brain network organization. Over the course of healthy adult aging, the functional brain network desegregates (i.e., fewer connections within a system, more connections between systems), which in turn, is predictive of poorer behavioral performance. Brain network segregation is also clinically relevant, providing prognostic value for dementia. We have found that this aging trajectory of brain network desegregation varies across individuals that are embedded in distinct environments. Measures of environment are typically coarse, based on individual-level variables (e.g., education, socioeconomic status). The next step in my research is focused on linking brain measures with a more comprehensive description of an individual by (1) collecting information on an individual’s life history and daily activities (e.g., activity tracking, ecological momentary assessment); and (2) linking neighborhood-level data such as Census data or other geographically anchored data back to the individual. Together, this will better capture how an individual’s environment impacts their brain network organization over the course of aging and disease such as dementia.

    Zoom More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    23
    Virtual and In Person
    9:00am - 5:00pm EDT

    Biology of Aging Colloquium

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Contact [email protected]  for passcode.

    Colloquium Program

    More Information 
  • May
    20
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • May
    20

    Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience

     

    Are you an undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoc interested in learning more about the Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging?

     

    Any early career researcher interested in aging neuroscience across a wide range of domains – including cognition, affect, memory, and everything in between – is invited to attend the Growing Up in Aging Neuroscience (GRAN) mini-symposium. Our objective is to provide a setting in which junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience can learn about the latest developments (and people behind it). We have brought together world-class researchers across a wide range of career stages to present their work as well as share their unique experiences relating to how they became investigators (inspired by the Growing Up in Science series), in hopes of encouraging junior researchers considering or pursuing a career in aging neuroscience. To make this event accessible to a broad audience and reduce financial barriers for trainees, the event registration will be free to all attendees.

    Confirmed Speakers:

    • Heidi Jacobs (Harvard)
    • Matthew Nassar (Brown)
    • Yakeel Quiroz (Harvard)
    • Michael Cole (Rutgers)
    • Ray Razlighi (Cornell)
    • Ifat Levy (Yale)

    More information on GRAN can be found on our website:

    For updates, please follow us on Twitter

    Please Register by Friday 5/6 Here

    If you have any questions about our current series, please feel free to email our organizers:

    Debbie Yee

    Hwamee Oh

    More Information 
  • Join us for a K99/R00 Grant Writing workshop on Thursday, May 19, 2022 from 9AM to 12PM EST. This workshop will bring together excellent sessions and Q&A with experts, current K99 and R00 awardees, and experienced grant review panelists from Brown.

    Interested postdocs are asked to RSVP by Friday May 13 to be part of this workshop! We plan on holding this workshop as a hybrid event, including the option to attend in-person or via Zoom. We ask that you RSVP early so that we can best accommodate all participants.

    RSVP for BPC K99-R00 grant writing workshop More Information 
  • You’re Invited: The Business of Innovation, Panel Discussion and Reception

    Brown Technology Innovations invites Faculty Researchers, Graduate Students
    and Postdocs Interested in Startups, Venture Capital and Finance to join us for panel discussions and an introduction to the new Brown Innovation Fellows
    program.


    When: Wednesday, May 18, 2022 at 3:00pm
    Location: 350 Eddy St, South Street Landing, 4th Floor, Multipurpose Room

    Agenda:
    3:00-3:05 Welcome Remarks
    3:05-3:20 Introduction to Brown Tech Innovations and Brown Innovation Fellows Program
    3:25-4:25 High Tech Startups - founders and funders speak out
    4:30-5:15 How to have fun and stay out of trouble!
    5:15-6:15 Reception

    How to get here: All Brown shuttles stop at South Street Landing; Street and garage parking are available for a fee - https://www.brown.edu/a-z/south-street-landing
    Once inside South Street Landing, take the East Elevators to the 4th floor. The room is behind the reception desk, to the left

    Register Here: The Business of Innovation More Information 
  • May
    18
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    MCB Faculty Seminar Presented by Ashley Webb, PhD

    ?Molecular mechanisms of brain aging and neurodegeneration?

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  •  

    Towards Mechanisms of Sleep Disruption Hyperalgesia

    Michael Smith, Ph.D.

    Director, Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Psychiatry

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

     

    This presentation will provide general background on the relationship sleep and chronic pain and discuss human experiments related to effects of sleep disruption on pain inhibition and morphine analgesia. Findings related to the effects of sleep disruption on central pain facilitatory phenomena, including: Temporal summation and Secondary Hyperalgesia (spinal sensitization) will be presented.

    More Information 
  • Please join the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Series for a workshop with Sifu Donald Wong  on A Taste of Qigong. This workshop will be held on May 14th from 10 am - 1 pm, EDT at the Brown/RISD Hillel (80 Brown St., Providence), Winnick Chapel.
    Please RSVP to [email protected] at your earliest possible convenience. If you do attend, wear loose fitting clothing, bring a bottle of water and a towel.
    More Information 
  • With the substantial recent progress in connectomics, the study of comprehensive maps of nervous systems much more is known about the connectivity structure of brains. This has led to a multitude of new questions about the relationship between connectivity patterns, neural dynamics, and brain function, many of which lead to new mathematical problems in graph theory and dynamics on graphs. The goal of this workshop is to bring together a broad range of researchers from neuroscience, physics, mathematics, and computer science to discuss new challenges in this emergent field and promote new collaborations.

    This workshop is fully funded by a Simons Foundation Targeted Grant to Institutes.

    Learn More More Information Mathematics, Technology, Engineering
  • May
    13
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  •  

    Barry Fest: A Celebration of the Scientific Career of Professor Barry Connors

     

    Please join us for a special symposium celebrating Professor Barry Connor’s career,  featuring talks from Connor’s lab alumni.

     

     
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Please join us for a bench to bedside seminar on “Epilepsy through the Lifepsan”, featuring Jennifer Kim, MD PhD, and Omar Ahmed, PhD.

    This special bench to bedside seminar is being held in honor of the career and science of Barry Connors, PhD. 

    Social event to follow. 

    Hosted by Judy Liu, MD PhD, Associate Director of the Center for Translational Neuroscience at Brown University.

    More Information CTN
  • Adam Brickman, Ph.D.

    Professor of Neuropsychology
    Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain
    Department of Neurology
    Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
    Columbia University
     


    Please note that this is a hybrid seminar in Smith-Buonanno room 106 and through Zoom (please email [email protected] for the link information).

     

    Bio:

    Adam M. Brickman, PhD is a tenured Professor in the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain and in the Department of Neurology at Columbia University. Dr. Brickman’s work primarily focuses on understanding the vascular contributions to cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease by integrating neuroimaging techniques with observational neuropsychological studies, basic neuroscience, and epidemiological approaches. He is also interested understanding sources of racial and ethnic disparity in Alzheimer’ disease, developing interventions for cognitive decline in aging, and designing neuropsychological instruments to assess cognition in older adults.

    Dr. Brickman leads neuroimaging efforts in several large community- and clinic-based observational studies, such as the Washington Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP), the WHICAP Offspring Study, the Alzheimer’s Biomarker Consortium-Down Syndrome (ABC-DS), and others. Dr. Brickman is the Core Leader of the Columbia Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Biomarker Core, which integrates fluid and neuroimaging based biomarkers into studies of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorder.

    Dr. Brickman completed his undergraduate studies in neuroscience and psychology at Oberlin College, his PhD in psychology/neuropsychology at the City University of New York, his clinical internship at Brown Medical School, and his postdoctoral training at Columbia University, where he has been on faculty since 2007.

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Join us for the 2022 Lewis Paeff Lipsitt and Edna Duchin Lipsitt Lecture in Child Behavior and Development featuring Rinad S. Beidas, PhD.

    “Harnessing Implementation Science to Achieve the Promise of Evidence-Based Practices in Pediatric Mental Health: Implications for School Settings”

    Rhode Island Convention Center - 5th Floor West Ballroom. Parking will be free. Please arrive 15 minutes early.

    Masks are required if you are not vaccinated and optional if you are vaccinated. Please do not come if you are experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 or if you have been recently exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

    Seating will be limited - so please return your ticket if you are unable to attend!

    Please register More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Lite

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Speaker: Bruno Ferenc Segedin_ PhD student - CLPS

    Title: Do languages overrepresent words with vowel harmony?

    Abstract: Some languages like Hungarian and Turkish have a rule known as ‘Vowel Harmony’, whereby all the vowels in a given word must share a particular feature like frontness or roundness. While most of the world’s languages do not have strict vowel harmony rules, it remains to be investigated whether there is evidence for a universal statistical bias in favor of keeping vowels within words similar. Such a bias might be rooted in, for example, the benefit of redundant linguistic properties to perception or production. Conversely, a language may prefer to allow vowels to freely combine in words in order to, for example, maximize the amount of lexical contrasts its vowel system can contribute to. This study of 201 languages’ lexicons examines whether a statistical bias favoring vowel harmony is universal among the world’s languages. Specifically, I test whether languages overrepresent words that contain only similar/identical vowels relative to random baseline lexicons. My current results point away from the existence of a universal bias for vowel harmony; in fact, nearly all lexicons appear to exhibit a bias maximizing entropy of vowel patterns and disfavoring any constraints on vowel co-occurrence within words.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • May
    11

    #TikTokTherapist: Understanding the role of social media in adolescent mental health
    Jacqueline Nesi, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Dept of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital
    Wednesday, May 11, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Describe current research on the role of social media use in adolescent mental health; Identify ways in which youths’ social experiences are transformed in the digital media context;
    and Discuss risks and benefits of social media use for adolescents at risk for suicidal thoughts and behavior.
    Disclosure: Dr. Nesi has no financial relationships to disclose.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Greek & Program Houses, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • May
    10
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Ahmed Abdelfattah, Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Assistant Professor of Brain Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • May
    10
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing

    The new NIH Policy on Data Management and Sharing goes into effect on January 25, 2023. How are the departments at Brown that support researchers preparing for this new policy? How should researchers prepare for changes in proposal development, data collection, and depositing data? How will the policy impact research, including new pre- and post-award engagement with NIH repositories, and updated timelines for data preparation and depositing? In this session, we will give an overview of the new policy and Brown resources such as templates to help researchers with writing plans, tools for managing their data throughout a project, and sharing data during and after a project closes. Discussion led by Arielle Nitenson and Andrew Creamer.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Dr. Yoav Benjamini, Professor Emeritus of Applied Statistics at the Department of Statistics and Operations Research at Tel Aviv University, and a member of the Sagol School of Neuroscience and the Edmond Safra Bioinformatics Center.

    Replicability Issues in Medical Research: Science and Politics

    Selective inference and irrelevant variability are two statistical issues hindering replicability across science. I will review the first in the context of secondary endpoint analysis in clinical and epidemiological research. This leads us to discuss the debate about p-values and statistical significance and the politics involved. I will present practical approaches that seem to accommodate the concerns of NEJM editors, as reflected in their guidelines.
    I shall discuss more briefly the issue of addressing the relevant variability, in the context of in preclinical animal experiments, and the implication of this work about assessing replicability in meta-analysis.

    Major parts of this work done jointly with Iman Jaljuli, Orestis Panagiotou and Ruth Heller.

    Dr. Yoav Benjamini

    Yoav Benjamini is Professor Emeritus of Applied Statistics at the Department of Statistics and Operations Research at Tel Aviv University, and a member of the Sagol School of Neuroscience and the Edmond Safra Bioinformatics Center. He was a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, University of California, Berkeley, Stanford, and Columbia Universities. Yoav is a co-developer of the widely used False Discovery Rate concept and methodology. His other research topics are replicability and reproducibility in science and data mining, with applications in Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, Animal Behavior, Geography, Meteorology, Brain Imaging and Health Informatics. He is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the US National Academy of Sciences, and received the Israel Prize in Statistics and Economics and the Founders of Statistics Prize of the International Statistical Institute.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • To watch virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97651541594
    Add to calendar

    Abstract: Many robotics problems have transition dynamics that are symmetric in SE(2) with respect to rotation, translation, scaling, reflection, and other transformations. In these situations, any optimal policy will also be symmetric over these transformations. In this talk, we leverage this insight to improve the sample efficiency of policy learning by encoding the symmetries directly into the neural network model using group invariant and equivariant layers. The result is that we can learn non-trivial visuomotor control policies with very little experience. In many cases, we can learn good policies from scratch by training directly on real robotic hardware in real time. We apply this idea both to reinforcement learning and behavior cloning and achieve state of the art results in both cases.

    Rob Platt is an Associate Professor in the Khoury College of Computer Sciences at Northeastern University. He is interested in developing robots that can perform complex manipulation tasks alongside humans in the uncertain everyday world. Much of his work is at the intersection of robotic policy learning, planning, and perception. Prior to coming to Northeastern, he was a Research Scientist at MIT and a technical lead at NASA Johnson Space Center.

    Host: George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • May
    6
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Title:  TBA

    Host:  Dr. Carlos Aizenman

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • May
    5
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Bart Anderson - Professor- University of Sydney

    Title: Mid-level vision: Understanding how the visual system extracts the causes of optical structure

    Abstract:
    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding both low level vision – the encoding of image properties – and ‘high level’ vision, such as object recognition. However, mid-level vision – extracting the properties of surfaces and materials that generate the optical structure that reaches our eyes – is comparatively poorly understood. The light reaching our eyes is a conflated mixture of different sources, such as 3D shape, reflectance, color, and the optical properties (defocus) of our eyes. In this talk, I will describe recent work in our lab on how the visual system extracts 3D shape, colour, and material; and the problems (and ‘illusions’) that arise when the visual system misattributes these causes to the wrong source.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • For machines to communicate naturally with humans in the real world, they need to connect the meaning of words to objects and actions in the world. This includes verbs like toss vs. throw and slide vs. roll, for which there is a nuanced difference in the physical mechanics of the verb. Ideally, in the future, a robot would be able to understand this difference, as a human would. So, to what extent do existing visually-grounded models capture this difference? What about models that learn from ground-truth trajectory data, i.e. the positions and rotations of objects over time? This thesis investigates these questions. The primary contributions of this work are 1) developing two virtual environments that allow parallel spatiotemporal and visual data collection, 2) building models that represent verbs in terms of spatiotemporal data, and 3) comparing these representations to existing visually-grounded representations, giving insight into how future models may understand physical nuances in verb meaning, which may then be applied to downstream tasks like instruction following.

    More Information 
  • May
    4
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series

    Speaker: Natalie Weber- Assistant Professor - Yale University

    Title: Late vocabulary insertion and even later metrification in Blackfoot

    Abstract: One aspect of the phonology-syntax interface concerns the timing of vocabulary insertion relative to other syntactic and phonological operations. This talk focuses on patterns of prosodically-conditioned allomorphy in Blackfoot (Algonquian; ISO-639-3: bla) and what this can tell us about the relative timing of operations. I argue that root exponence in Blackfoot must occur after linearization, because it is sensitive to the presence or absence of prefixes within a phrase. Root exponence is also post-syntactic and phonologically optimizing, because the distribution of allomorphs and regular phonological processes (epenthesis, deletion) both serve to avoid [+cons] segments at morphological junctures within a phrase. Finally, root exponence must occur before metrification (syllabification and stress assignment), because processes like vowel coalescence and vowel shortening in closed syllables interact opaquely with the constraint against [+cons] segments. Together, these show that post-syntactic operations must be ordered as follows: (1) linearization, (2) vocabulary insertion and certain morphophonological processes, (3) metrification. This architecture has further implications for interactions with phases or phonological cycles.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Psychological Flexibility: Building a Pragmatic Model and Method of Intentional Change
    Akihiko (Aki) Masuda, Ph.D.
    Professor of Psychology - Department of Psychology
    University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
    Wednesday, May 4, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Demonstrate knowledge of the philosophy (assumption), theory, and practice underlying “psychological flexibility model”; and Demonstrate knowledge of research development based on the perspective of functional contextualism.
    Disclosure: Dr. Masuda has no financial relationships to disclose.

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  • Join the provost as he introduces Dr. Mukesh K. Jain, the new dean of medicine and biological sciences, to staff.


    Aging and age-associated disorders constitute some of the greatest unmet medical challenges facing society today. Current paradigms suggest that dysfunction of the immune and metabolic systems contribute to aging and age-associated disorders, but the molecular underpinnings controlling these processes remain incompletely understood. Jain’s work has identified a family of genetic factors termed Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) as nodal regulators of immunity and metabolism. Studies in C. elegans demonstrate that KLFs are necessary and sufficient to control lifespan and healthspan. Mammalian studies demonstrate an essential role for KLFs in immunometabolism and the development of age-associated metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurocognitive dysfunction. Collectively these findings support an essential role for KLFs in aging and age-related disorders across metazoan phylogeny. Here these insights will be reviewed and therapeutic implications discussed.

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  • Apr
    29
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Harrison Ritz

    Speaker: Harrison Ritz , Brown University

    Title: Multivariate Cognitive Control

    Advisor: Amitai Shenhav

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • The human brain as it ages over time can follow a number of possible trajectories—some individuals age “abnormally” while others age “successfully”. My work integrates longitudinal clinical and neuropsychological information obtained during life with anatomic patterns of vulnerability, and microscopic pathology collected on the autopsied brain at death. The overarching theme is that the relationship between cognitive phenotype during life and underlying pathology at death is not absolute but probabilistic. In the clinic and in the laboratory, the neuropsychologist can benefit from a nuanced view of the postmortem factors that contribute to vulnerability versus resistance in the field of neurodegeneration. During this talk, I will highlight some exciting findings from my laboratory that contribute to understanding the neurobiology of dementia syndromes and “SuperAging”; I will also describe several creative “quality of life” initiatives that are taking place at the Northwestern Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center that have brought personal meaning and value to our patient population, scientists, clinicians, and students alike. Together, I hope to share insights into how the aging brain reflects the dynamic intersection of neuroanatomic structure and human behavior.

    Tamar Gefen, PhD is an academic clinical neuropsychologist with an interest in neurodegenerative disorders and trajectories of aging (both abnormal and successful). She directs the Laboratory for Translational Neuropsychology at Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern, which attempts to bridge antemortem clinical features of dementia with postmortem microscopic neuropathology found at autopsy. She co-Directs the Clinical Core of the NIH/NIA-funded (P30) Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) housed within the Mesulam Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease. Her clinical work is focused on the neuropsychological characterization of typical and atypical dementia syndromes (Alzheimer’s disease, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, etc.), and other age-related disorders. She is passionate about mentorship, teaching, and collaboration.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    29
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Apr
    28
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 6:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Youtao Lu

    Speaker: Youtao Lu , Brown University

    Title: Homophones: A Cross-Linguistic Perspective

    Advisor: James L. Morgan

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Title:  TBA

    Host: Dr. Ahmed Abdelfattah

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  • Please join the Carney Institute for a conversation with Colleen McKiernan, Ph.D., about her journey from earning a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology to working as a Senior Patent Agent at Intellia Therapeutics. Colleen will discuss what it’s like to work in patents and intellectual property with a background in science. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Apr
    28
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Howie N. Zelaznik - Purdue University

    Title: Timing with and without a central timekeeper, i.e. a clock, in motor behavior

    Abstract:
    Due to a good misfortune, Robertson, Zelaznik, Spencer, Doffin and Schneidt (1999) discovered that individual differences in timing precision in tapping did not predict individual differences in timing precision in circle drawing timing. Although this finding was unexpected, we realized it theoretical importance and began a 13 year research program developing the event-emergent framework for movement timing. In this framework we postulate that whether an individual utilizes a clock-like timing process (event timing) or an emergent timing operation depends on whether there are salient perceptual events that a person can time to. In the present presentation, I review the bulk of that evidence, and digress about the progress of science to propose that information processing (event timing) and dynamical system approaches (emergent timing) can exist in the same human being.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    27
    Virtual
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Faculty Grant Writing Workshop

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 995 4583 7173
    Passcode: 311907

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a virtual conversation on Grant Writing, featuring Christopher Moore, associate director of the institute. Topics covered include the difference between federal, foundation and university grants, how to craft a compelling scientific argument, and how to talk to program officers.

    Please note, this event is targeted to faculty, particularly those in the early stages of their career.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    27
    Join us to celebrate the CLPS honors students’ research efforts this past year.
    Students will be showcasing their work at an in-person Honors Poster Presentation session with light refreshments in the lounge areas outside of Rooms 230 and 330.
    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Julieta Lischinsky, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at New York University.

    Julieta Lischinsky’s research focuses on understanding the neuronal substrates and circuitry for the generation of innate social behaviors in the limbic system.

    Abstract: Innate social behaviors are crucial for survival, thus shared across animal species. In humans, psychiatric disorders with deficits in social interactions, e.g. autism spectrum disorders, can be observed during child development and have been associated with amygdala dysfunction. There is still a lack of understanding of the circuitry and developmental mechanisms for the generation of social behaviors. We have focused on the murine medial amygdala (MeA) as it receives conspecific pheromone inputs and projects to hypothalamic regions. The MeA GABAergic cells have been shown to be sufficient for the production of social behaviors including aggression and mating. Given that these diverse social behaviors differ in their sensory trigger and behavioral outcomes, can the neuronal substrates for these behaviors be distinct? Taking a developmental approach, we have previously characterized two MeA GABAergic neuronal subpopulations, marked by the expression of the transcription factors Foxp2 and Dbx1 which originate from the same embryonic region. The Foxp2+ and Dbx1-derived subpopulations are spatially, molecularly and physiologically distinct. Interestingly, I have now observed that these two subpopulations receive distinct inputs and differ in their processing of social conspecific information. Furthermore, I uncovered that these subpopulations differ in their functional roles during social behaviors. In addition, as the Foxp2+ cells respond to conspecific cues even with no/minimal social experience, I aimed to determine the extent to which these neuronal responses are hard-wired by investigating the social tuning of Foxp2+ cells across development. In conclusion, developmentally distinct MeA neuronal subpopulations differ in their anatomical circuitry, are differentially relevant for processing conspecific sensory cues and mediating social behaviors.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    25
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Working on the Command Line

    A practical introduction to the Linux operating system. Topics covered include: basic Linux commands for maneuvering within the file system and manipulating files, Unix shells, and working with environment variables and paths.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Todd Golde, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor, Department of Neuroscience
    Director, McKnight Brain Institute
    University of Florida
     


    Please note that this is a hybrid seminar, in Marcuvitz Auditorium in Sidney Frank Hall and through Zoom (please email [email protected] for the link information).

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Apr
    25
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Katherine Tillman - Assistant Professor - University of Texas at Austin

    Title: Children’s concepts of the past and future

    Abstract: Adults typically conceive of the past and future as fundamentally distinct. The past is fixed, knowable, and unalterable; while the future is open-ended, unknowable, and changeable. How do children acquire this way of thinking? In this talk I’ll discuss my research exploring three facets of this process, including the development of 3- to 6-year-old children’s causal reasoning about past and future events, their gradual acquisition of deictic time words like “tomorrow” and “yesterday,” and their beliefs about abstract concepts like “the future” and phenomena like time travel.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Please join us for a special seminar, organized by the Center for Translational Neuroscience and hosted by Dr. Judy Liu. 

    Dr. Sofia Lizarraga will be presenting her work in a talk titled Counteracting Epigenetic Mechanisms in AutismSpectrum Disorders. 

     

     

    More Information CTN
  • Apr
    22
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Rasha Abdel Rahman - Professor - Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

    Title: Face processing and social judgments in the context of emotional (mis)information: A neurocognitive perspective
    Abstract: Emotional information about other people’s social behaviour, transmitted during conversations, in the news or via social media, shapes our social judgments and prejudice social interactions. I will present experimental studies on the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the processing of person-related emotional information. We find influences on early processes related to face perception, on rapid brain responses related to emotional perception and arousal, and on slow and relatively controlled brain responses related to evaluations. These observations suggest that we perceive faces and expressions in light of the person-related information and that emotional information drives early and reflexive responses as well as more controlled evaluations, resulting in social judgments dominated by emotion. Crucially, we demonstrate that insight into the lack of credibility of the information or the credibility of the source of the information has little influence on these effects. Our brain responses and social judgments seem to be dominated by emotion even against better knowledge. These insights may shed light on the apparent “success” of social-emotional (mis)information and may guide the search for protective measures against their potentially detrimental effects.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    22
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Data Visualization Seminar

    Join Advance-CTR, S4, and the Brown Library for the first of this 2-part series exploring data visualization, its methodology, and application in biomedicine and health. The purpose of this series is to serve as a data visualization introduction for clinicians and others who may be interested in using these tools and methods in their research. 

    Friday, April 22, 2022 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
    “Data Visualization from 10,000 feet: A Quick Introduction to Visual Communication”
    Featuring E. Patrick Rashleigh
    The Center for Digital Scholarship, Brown University Library

    Poised to plunge into data visualization, making the latest-and-greatest fancy interactive extravaganzas? Well, hang on—before pulling out all the tools, let’s take a step back and think about some basic principles of visual perception, design and representation, and communicating to an audience.

    Register Now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Teaching & Learning
  • Apr
    22
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Title: Interneurons, inhibition, epilepsy and a sea lion

    Host:  Dr. Judy Liu

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  • Apr
    21
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Eero Simoncelli - Professor- FlatIron Institute and New York University

    Title: Metric properties of neural representations

    Abstract:
    Deep neural networks have demonstrated the remarkable potential of distributed cascaded computation with simple canonical elements. These systems were inspired by study of biological brains, and provide a substrate for their understanding. But biological systems have many additional properties, and although some of these are undoubtedly idiosyncracies of their implementation, others are likely to provide fundamental computational capabilities. Specifically, biological neural circuits adapt their response levels over multiple time scales. They are also quite noisy. Both attributes affect the metric properties of stimulus representation - that is, the effective distances between encoded stimuli. I’ll describe some of our recent efforts to assess these in the context of biological visual representations, and their effect on perceptual capabilities.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Title:  Elucidating the consequences of iron metabolism misregulation in the central nervous system

    Advisor:  Dr. Tracey Rouault, NIH

    More Information 
  • Apr
    20
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Non- Academic Career Panel

    CLPS, GPP, and NSGPP students are sponsoring a panel on careers outside of academia.

    Brown Alumni will discuss their non-academic career paths.

    Speakers:

    Jing Liang-Guallpa (she/her/hers)
    Field Scientific Consultant with Inscopix, Inc.
    Jing is a fellow NIH-Brown GPP alumnus who graduated with her PhD in Neuroscience in late 2020. In Spring of 2021, she transitioned to a field applications scientist position with Inscopix, a private biotech company, and has since consulted on over 80 unique scientific projects covering learning and memory, feeding and homeostatic drive, social behaviors and hierarchy, addiction, sleep, and translational research projects on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

    Mary Bates
    Freelance science writer
    Mary Bates is a freelance science writer who specializes in telling stories about the brains and behavior of humans and other animals. Her work has appeared in print and online publications including National Geographic news, Mongabay, The Scientist, and Muse magazine. She has written for such organizations as the Society for Neuroscience, American Society for Human Genetics, Alzheimer’s Association, and Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Mary is also the co-author of the 6th edition of Sensation and Perception, an undergraduate psychology textbook. She earned her PhD in psychology from Brown University, where she studied echolocation in bats. When not writing, she creates science- and nature-inspired embroidery for her shop, Historia Naturale. She lives outside Boston with her partner, two cats, and two guinea pigs.

    Organized by: Brown CLPS, GPP, and NSGPP Students

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: ID: 97689873127
    Passcode: 941676

    Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Sabriya Fisher, Wellesley College

    Title: Innovation and social stratification in AAE negation

    Abstract: This talk presents the results of a sociolinguistic investigation of variation in the use of negation in a corpus of naturalistic speech from 42 speakers of African American English in Philadelphia. Particular focus is placed on the use of ain’t in the past tense, where it varies with didn’t, which is a unique feature of AAE that may also be a recent innovation in the grammar (Fasold & Wolfram, 1970; Green, 2002; Howe, 2005; Labov et al., 1968; Loman, 1967; Weldon, 1994, 2021; Wolfram, 1969). Use ofain’tin the past tense is compared to its uses in other tense-aspect contexts whereain’thas been used for centuries (Anderwald, 2006; Jespersen, 1961). Results of apparent time comparisons reveal that past tense uses of ain’t increased over the course of the 20th century while uses in other contexts remained stable, aligning with the hypothesis that past tense uses ofain’t result from a recent change. Generalized linear models of variation between ain’t and other negated auxiliaries in past tense vs. other contexts support the recent change hypothesis and point toward innovation in Northern cities like Philadelphia following the Great Migration. Finally, these results are evaluated in light of the Divergence Hypothesis (Labov & Harris, 1986, Bailey & Maynor, 1987) as well as new insights on social stratification in the use of morphosyntactic features of AAE (Weldon, 2021).

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Apr
    18
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Slurm for Beginners

    A primer on submitting jobs to the job scheduler on Oscar. Some basic familiarity with Unix/Linux systems is assumed. Topics covered include: an overview of the use of Slurm for resource allocation, submitting jobs to Slurm, and using Bash scripts to configure and submit jobs to Slurm.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • *Co-sponsored by the Legorreta Cancer Center at Brown University

    This talk will discuss the role of nicotine products in the cigarette end-game, and the question of whether there should be a place for nicotine in society once cigarette smoking has been minimized or eliminated. Comparisons regarding benefit and harm will be made for nicotine, alcohol and cannabis.

    Zoom link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/94619986264

    Neal L. Benowitz, MD, is Emeritus Professor of Medicine in the Research Program in Clinical Pharmacology, Division of Cardiology, at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He was Chief of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at UCSF for 35 years. He received his medical degree from the University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1969, following which he served as a resident in internal medicine at the Bronx Municipal Hospital Center from 1969 to 1971. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical pharmacology at UCSF and joined the faculty in 1974. His research interests have focused primarily on the human pharmacology and toxicology of nicotine. He has published more than 700 research papers. Dr Benowitz maintains an active clinical practice in cardiovascular medicine and medical toxicology.


    Dr Benowitz was a scientific editor of the 1988 United States Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health: Nicotine Addiction; a scientific editor of the 2001 NCI Monograph 13 Report on Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine; and served as section editor for the 2010 Surgeon General’s Report on How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. He, has served as a member of the National Institutes of Health Pharmacology Study Section and the FDA Nonprescription Drug and Tobacco Products Science Advisory Committees. He has served as President of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and as President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Dr Benowitz has received the Ove Ferno, Alton Ochsner, and Rawls-Palmer Progress in Medicine awards, and the Oscar B. Hunter Memorial Award in Therapeutics for his research on nicotine, tobacco, and health, and was the 2002 UCSF Annual Distinguished Clinical Research Lecturer.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  •  

    This will be a hybrid talk. In-person attendance is encouraged. 

     

    IRENE KAPLOW

    Postdoctoral Researcher, Carnegie Mellon University

     

    Relating Enhancer Genetic Variation Across Mammals to Complex Phenotypes Using Machine Learning

    Advances in genome sequencing have provided a comprehensive view of cross-species conservation across small segments of nucleotides. These conservation measures have proven invaluable for associating phenotypic variation, both within and across species, to variation in genotype at protein-coding genes or very highly conserved enhancers. However, these approaches cannot be applied to the vast majority of enhancers, where the conservation levels of individual nucleotides are often low even when enhancer function is conserved and where activity is tissue- or cell-type-specific. To overcome these limitations, we developed the TACIT (Tissue-Aware Conservation Inference Toolkit) approach, in which convolutional neural network models learn the regulatory code connecting genome sequence to open chromatin in a tissue of interest, allowing us to accurately predict cases where differences in genotype are associated with differences in open chromatin in that tissue at enhancer regions. We established a new set of evaluation criteria for machine learning models developed for this task and used these criteria to compare our models to models trained using different negative sets and to conservation scores. We then developed a framework for connecting these predictions to phenotypes in a way that accounts for the phylogenetic tree. When applying our framework to the motor cortex and parvalbumin neurons, we identified dozens of new enhancers associated with the evolution of brain size and vocal learning.

     

    Learn more about Irene Kaplow…

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. 
  • Apr
    15
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Apr
    14
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Martin Wiener - Assistant Professor- George Mason University

    Title: How movements shape the perception of time

    Abstract:
    Movement and time are naturally intertwined. However, while it has long been known that our sense of time can affect our movements, relatively recent research has begun to also show the converse – that our movements can affect the sense of time. Here, I will present recent work that displays this relationship, in which movements, either performed, imagined, or observed, can influence the perception of time. Through this work, which relies on measuring precise kinematics of the observer, two phenomena are found: movements can both enhance our sense of time and bias it. To explain these effects, I will present a model of Bayesian cue combination, in which movements afford the most precise representation of temporal intervals. Further, two modes of neural instantiation will be presented, in which movements can influence time either through “active sensing”, in which they shape responses directly in sensory cortices, or “feedforward enhancement”, in which downstream activity in motor regions alters the memory for timed events. Evidence for both modes will additionally be presented. Further, cue combination provides several predictions of how movements should affect time estimates; a final series of experiments will be presented that address these predictions. Altogether, these results suggest that humans engage the motor system while measuring intervals of time, even when overt movements are not required for the task.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    14
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EDT

    Translational Research Seminar Series

    “Treatment of Anger Problems in OEF/OIF Veterans - Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial” with Tracie Shea, PhD - Co-Director, Advance-CTR Pilot Projects Program Core and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    Register Now! More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Teaching & Learning
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  Microglia regulate myelin health across the lifespan

    Host: Dr. Sonia Mayoral

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Robotic perception is a key step in any autonomous robotic task including manipulation, localization and planning. The more precise the perception system is, the more complicated and detailed tasks the robot can carry out. Since robots are operating in a dynamic environment, robot perception algorithms need to be robust to different interference. Development in perception algorithms requires increasingly complex algorithms, making real-time perception challenging on the robot computing platforms. Domain-specific hardware accelerators offer the opportunity for creating the optimal hardware design with low-power execution. Although such accelerators have been widely studied for neural networks inference, their applications in the field of robotics are limited.

    In this dissertation work, we create both software and hardware solutions for energy efficient robust robot perception systems. We focus on Monte-Carlo based generative algorithms for 6 DoF rigid and articulated object pose estimation. We show that by combining generative inference algorithm with neural network output as a prior distribution, we can perform efficient inference with robust performance and explainable results. In this work, we focus on algorithms of particle-filtering and belief propagation and accelerate the two algorithms on FPGA through optimized dataflow design, deep pipelined processing units, and concurrent memory access. We are able to achieve significant runtime, power and energy improvement compared to both high-performance and low-power embedded GPU implementation.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    13

     

    The Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the dissertation defense of Holly Boyle. 

    Simultaneous Alcohol and Cannabis Use Among Young Adults: A Mixed-Methods Exploration of Determinants, Mechanisms, and Consequences

    Alcohol and cannabis are two of the most commonly used substances among young adults, and most individuals who use both substances sometimes use them simultaneously, such that their effects overlap. This dissertation involved a mixed methods design to examine predictors and acute outcomes of simultaneous use. Qualitative interviews among young adults who engage in simultaneous use were conducted to understand intentions and willingness to engage in simultaneous use, contexts where simultaneous use occurs, and positive and negative consequences of simultaneous use. Informed by these findings, a daily survey study was developed and conducted to examine psychosocial predictors of simultaneous use and to examine the relationship between simultaneous use, alcohol quantity, and consequences among young adults. Together these findings provide insight into future directions for simultaneous use research and can inform intervention development.

    PhD Advisor: Jennifer Merrill, PhD

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through Brown University’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to Brown University reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    13
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Screen Media, Social Interaction and ASD: Connecting Theory and Research

    David Bennett, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Department of Psychiatry
    Drexel University College of Medicine

    And

    Karen F. Heffler, M.D.
    Associate Professor and Autism Researcher
    Department of Psychiatry
    Drexel University Colle of Medicine

    Wednesday, April 13, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to: Describe the visual brain hyper-connectivity found in autism spectrum disorder; Discuss evidence-based guidelines regarding screen viewing in infants and toddlers; and Review recent findings regarding the association between early-life digital screen exposure and autism symptoms and diagnosis.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Apr
    12
    5:30pm EDT

    Chasing Childhood

    In today’s world of structure, stranger danger, and helicopter parenting, free play and independence have virtually disappeared from childhood, giving way to unprecedented anxiety and depression (now compounded by two years of the COVID-19 pandemic). In Chasing Childhood, psychologists, activists, and leaders of the “free play” movement fight to bring back the untold benefits of a less curated childhood.

    Following the screening, the BAI hosts a panel featuring Yulia Chentsova Dutton, Cultural Psychologist and Associate Professor, Georgetown University; Dr. Bryant Ford, Director of Psychological Services, Brown University; Margaret Munzer Loeb ’94, Director/Executive Producer, Chasing Childhood; and Logan Powell, Dean of Admission, Brown University. Moderated by Lisa Eisenpresser ’89, Producer, Chasing Childhood.

    More Information Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Teaching & Learning
  • Apr
    12
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Biology of Aging PAARF

    Corinne Hutfilz, Tatar Lab
    Azu Rocha, Neretti Lab
    More Information 
  • Apr
    12
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Judy Liu, Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, associate professor of neurology, associate professor of molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a lively conversation about health disparities in brain-related disorders, featuring:

    • Monica Rivera-Mindt, Ph.D., president of the Hispanic Neuropsychological Society, a professor of psychology at Fordham University and a board-certified neuropsychologist. Rivera-Mindt’s research focuses on the intersection between cultural neuroscience, neuropsychology and health disparities utilizing a novel community-based approach.
    • Diana Grigsby, Ph.D., an associate professor of behavioral and social sciences and of epidemiology at Brown University. Grigsby’s research seeks to capture complex processes in the food, social and built environments to facilitate a better understanding of their influence on what has been coined the three pillars of health: diet, physical activity and sleep.

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • PSRIG Seminar: “Police Contact and Sleep Patterns During Adolescence and Adulthood”

     

    Dylan Jackson, Ph.D. & Alexander Testa, Ph.D.

     

    The current project assesses associations between police contact, its features and mental and/or physical health repercussions, and indicators of sleep quality and quantity in two national samples of adolescents and/or adults in the United States: The Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS) and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). Findings suggest that strategies may be needed among public health practitioners and law enforcement to mitigate the potential impacts of adverse police contact on sleep health.

    More Information 
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Apr
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    3:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    CLPS PhD Defense: Jiuyang Bai

    Speaker: Jiuyang Bai, Brown University

    Title: Visual control laws for collision avoidance with moving obstacles

    Advisor: William Warren

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    11
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - Getting Started on Oscar

    An introduction to Oscar, Brown’s research computing cluster, for new users. Participants will learn how to connect to Oscar (ssh, VNC), how to navigate Oscar’s filesystem, and how to use the module system to access software packages on Oscar.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Apr
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Marshall - Postdoctoral Fellow- Boston College
    Title: The Early Pursuit of Third-Party Punishment
    Abstract: Responding to wrongdoing is a central feature of our social lives. Indeed, a core assumption of modern institutional justice systems is that transgressors should be punished for their misdeeds. In the present talk, I argue that the pursuit of punishment by third-parties is anchored in human development, showing that the kinds of intervention that form the foundation of institutions of justice can be traced to judgments and behaviors present in early childhood. Specifically, I outline research showing that children are both assessors and agents of third-party punishment. With respect to assessment, children make specific predictions about the pursuit of punishment and also hold rich notions about the obligatory nature of third-party punishment. With respect to agency, children punish wrongdoing (even when doing so is costly), and their motives to do so are tethered to a variety of justice-related concerns (such as retribution and norm communication). My talk will showcase third-party punishment as a signature of children’s sophisticated toolkit for regulating social relationships and behavior.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Please join the Biotechnology Graduate Program for the final examination of Faith Keller for the degree of master of science.

    Advisor: Justin Fallon, PhD

    Title: Identification of exon-skipping antisense oligonucleotides that modulate alternative splicing of MuSK

    More Information 
  • Apr
    8
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Claudio Toro Serey, Postdoc - Haber Lab, Harvard Medical School
    Title: Evaluatingthe neural juxtaposition of value-related and introspective cognitive functionsin individuals
    Abstract: A diverseset of higher order psychological phenomena, including economic judgments,engage overlapping swaths of association cortex, prompting the question ofwhether these are truly distinguishable functions, or if they are subserved bya common cognitive operation. However, much work has highlighted the need toconsider how different sources of behavioral and neural variability can impactthe localization of function in the brain, and whether distinct cognitiveoperations are indeed juxtaposed at the neural level. In this talk I willdiscuss behavioral and neuroimaging studies in humans that leveraged individualvariability to evaluate the apparent overlap between decision-related corticalregions and the default network (a brain network commonly associated withintrospective processes). First, I will highlight the degree of topographicidiosyncrasy within medial cortical regions of the default network thatconsistently overlap with subjective value effects (an observation that isblurred by traditional group averages). Second,I will show how choices can fluctuate even in fully known environments, posinga potential problem for brain mapping. ThenI will explore the potential interaction of these types of variability todetermine whether value-sensitive regions could be disentangled from the defaultnetwork across multiple task contexts at the individual level. I will finish bypresenting preliminary work on how neuroanatomical tracing can shed light onthese neuroimaging findings.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • To watch virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/94484109789

    Add to calendar

    Abstract: Why is it so hard to deploy autonomous service mobile robots in unstructured human environments, and to keep them autonomous? In this talk, I will explain three key challenges, and our recent research in overcoming them: 1) ensuring robustness to environmental changes; 2) anticipating and overcoming failures; and 3) efficiently adapting to user needs.

    To remain robust to environmental changes, we build probabilistic perception models to explicitly reason about object permanence and distributions of semantically meaningful movable objects. By anticipating and accounting for changes in the environment, we are able to robustly deploy robots in challenging frequently changing environments. To anticipate and overcome failures, we introduce introspective perception to learn to predict and overcome perception errors. Introspective perception allows a robot to autonomously learn to identify causes of perception failure, how to avoid them, and how to learn context-aware noise models to overcome such failures.

    To adapt and correct behaviors of robots based on user preferences, or to handle unforeseen circumstances, we leverage representation learning and program synthesis. We introduce visual representation learning for preference-aware planning to identify and reason about novel terrain types from unlabelled human demonstrations. We further introduce physics-informed program synthesis to synthesize and repair programmatic action selection policies (ASPs) in a human-interpretable domain-specific language with several orders of magnitude fewer demonstrations than necessary for neural network ASPs of comparable performance. The combination of these research advances allows us to deploy a varied fleet of wheeled and legged autonomous mobile robots on the campus scale at UT Austin, performing tasks that require robust mobility both indoors and outdoors.

    Joydeep Biswas is an assistant professor in the department of computer science at the University of Texas at Austin. He earned his B.Tech in Engineering Physics from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in 2008, and M.S. and PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University in 2010 and 2014 respectively. From 2015 to 2019, he was assistant professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research spans perception and planning for long-term autonomy, with the ultimate goal of having service mobile robots deployed in human environments for years at a time, without the need for expert corrections or supervision. Prof. Biswas received the NSF CAREER award in 2021, an Amazon Research Award in 2018, and a JP Morgan Faculty Research Award in 2018.

    Host: George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • Apr
    8
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Title:  Neuromodulation and the balance between goal-directed and reactive behavior

    Host:  Dr. Theresa Desrochers

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Carney Institute Seminar: “Bridging the Gap: Engineering connexin proteins as novel tools for neural circuit modulation”

    Elizabeth Ransey, Ph.D.
    Postdoc
    Duke University

    The coordination of activity between brain cells is a key determinant of neural circuit function in both normal physiology and disease states; nevertheless, methodologies capable of selectively regulating distinct circuits without affecting the surrounding context of brain activity remain sparce. To address this limitation, we developed the components of a novel electrical synapse capable of synchronizing neurons by rationally engineering two gap junction proteins (connexins).

    Using protein mutagenesis, a novel in vitro assay of connexin docking, and computational modeling of connexin hemichannel interactions, we identified a pattern of structural motifs that define the connexin docking specificity of Morone americana (white perch fish) connexin34.7 (Cx34.7) and connexin35 (Cx35). We then utilized this knowledge to design Cx34.7 and Cx35 hemichannels that dock with each other, but not with themselves nor other major connexins expressed in the human central nervous system. We validated these hemichannels in vivo by demonstrating that they facilitate communication between two neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans (worms) and recode a learned behavioral preference. Additionally, we have recently demonstrated in vivo functionality in mice using two experimental paradigms: phase-amplitude coupling in a prelimbic microcircuit and the modulation of a stress adapted behavior via expression across a long-range monosynaptic projection. Thus, we establish a genetically encoded, translational approach, ‘Long-term integration of Circuits using connexins’ (LinCx), for context-precise circuit-editing with unprecedented spatiotemporal specificity

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Apr
    7
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    Pathobiology Seminar: Dorian McGavern, Ph.D.

    Senior Investigator Dorian McGavern from the Viral Immunology & Intravital Imaging Section at the NIH will present “Immune defense of CNS barriers against infections”. This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • PLM Seminar Series

    Dissecting Brain Tumors Biology by Single-Cell Genomics

    Zoom Link

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research
  • Apr
    6
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Lorna Quandt - Assistant Professor - Gallaudet University

    Title: Sign Language and Embodied Cognition: Bringing Together EEG, Behavior, and Emerging Technology

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • K.T. Ramesh, Decker Professor of Science & Engineering and Director, Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute, of the John Hopkins University, will present a talk: “The Mechanics of the Live Human Brain.”

    Abstract: Understanding traumatic brain injury in humans is very difficult in part because we cannot do controlled experiments that lead to injury (apart from the peculiar liberties that certain professional sports seem to be allowed to take). This seminar focuses on the mechanics of the living human brain, and on the likelihood of traumatic brain injury.
    We begin with a primer on brain anatomy and tissue properties. We then move on to consider the dynamics of the whole head, using experiments performed by human volunteers within an MRI. Next, the baseline tissue properties are established through a combination of in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Now that we have the anatomy and the tissue properties, we develop computational simulations of brain deformation for specific subjects, using their specific anatomy and the associated boundary conditions. The subject-specific computations are performed using the material point method so that we can simulate the 3D motions. We use one type of motion (the “no” shake of the head) to recalibrate the tissue properties for the live brain, and a second type of motion (the “yes” shake of the head) to validate the simulations.
    We show that incorporating the specific anatomy of the head (e.g., the falx and tentorum) is important if we are to capture the measured brain deformations in live humans. Using these validated simulations (validated at small deformations), we now run computational models of potentially injurious motions of the head, intending to address the when and where questions: establishing the onset of injury (for an axonal strain criterion), and the likely locations of injury within the brain. We also attempt to understand the mechanisms of injury through single-axon experiments and direct injury-causing experiments on laboratory mice. Finally, we use surrogate models to obtain some sense of the uncertainties associated with such simulation approaches for understanding injury in humans.

    Bio: K.T. Ramesh is the Alonzo G. Decker Jr. Professor of Science & Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, Director of the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute, and a Professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Earth & Planetary Sciences. His research interests are the broad areas of impact and failure of materials under extreme conditions, with specific interests in protection materials, the massive failure of brittle solids, impact processes in planetary science, and impact biomechanics. His work has applications in protecting people, structures, and the planet. Professor Ramesh also has a particular interest in the ways in which creativity can be integrated into the sciences, arts, and engineering.

    More Information 
  • Apr
    4
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - MATLAB: Improving Performance

    This workshop will cover basic performance optimization techniques using MATLAB, including: code profiling, pre-allocation, sequential memory access, vectorization, and efficient matrix-vector storage and operations. We will assume that participants have a basic understanding of the MATLAB programming language.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Apr
    4
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker:Shari Liu- PostDoc - MIT
    Title: Neural and developmental origins of social intelligence
    Abstract: From infancy we have expectations about the social and physical world - e.g. that objects are solid and people have goals. I propose that this understanding is organized as domain-specific intuitive theories of psychology and physics, that work together in our minds and brains starting early in life. In this talk, I will present past work showing that infants represent information about other people’s minds and actions in terms of their surrounding physical constraints. One future aspiration is to test this proposal further by comparing the predictions of formal computational models of these intuitive theories to infant behavior, when the same stimuli are shown to infants and the model. However, there are at least two challenges to this goal: (1) slow and laborious data acquisition, and (2) the ambiguity of the behavior (longer looking) to be modeled. Thus, I will spend the rest of the talk discussing progress on both fronts, including automated gaze annotation from video, and studies using cognitive neuroscience to disentangle sources of novelty in stimuli from developmental psychology. Together, these tools have the potential to enable high-powered, conceptually precise studies of the origins of the human mind.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Apr
    1
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    30
    Virtual
    12:30pm - 2:00pm EDT

    24th Annual Mind Brain Research Day

    Keynote Speaker – Lisa L. Barnes, Ph.D.

    Alla V. and Solomon Jesmer Professor of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, cognitive neuropsychologist within the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL

    “Epidemiology of Alzheimer’s Dementia and Cognitive Decline in Diverse Older Adults”

    12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

    (Zoom Webinar)

    Zoom Link More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Training, Professional Development
  • Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Danique Jeurissen, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University.

    Abstract

    Neural substrates of higher cognitive functions like decision-making are distributed across multiple brain areas. The flexibility afforded by such architecture renders some cognitive functions resilient to focal lesions. We used pharmacological and chemogenetic approaches to disrupt activity in the parietal cortex of monkeys performing two perceptual decision-making tasks. Inactivation initially disrupted decision-making in all four monkeys. This was followed by behavioral compensation occurring at two time scales: within experimental sessions and across sessions. Our results suggest that compensatory mechanisms can account for the disparate effects of causal manipulations on higher cognitive functions.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • “Instability with a purpose: an out-of-equilibrium neural mechanism for continuous decision-making in an unpredictable world”

    Jochen Braun, Ph.D.
    Cognitive Biology Group
    Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg

    Host: Professor Takeo Watanabe

    Abstract

    Visual perception continuously evaluates and chooses between alternative interpretations of changing visual scenes. Introspectively, this becomes evident under challenging conditions (e.g., when running in a fog). Here I present a new hypothesis on how human vision performs continuous inference. I propose that out-of-equilibrium processes accumulate competing evidence in discrete increments and that the accumulation is both terminated and restarted when a perceptual decision changes the dynamic equilibrium. This proposal reconciles “diffusion-to-bound accumulation” and “discrete attractor dynamics”, the main alternative theories of perceptual decision-making.

    In the first part of my talk, I explain how the reversal dynamics of multistable perception reveal many aspects of the inferential mechanism of perception, including its possible neural realization. Multistable perception exhibits quasi-universal statistical features, such as a scaling property, a peculiar input depencence (“Levelt’s propositions”), and positive sequential correlation. A hierarchical process comprising discretely stochastic elements, and operating out-of-equilibrium, would explain, and indeed guarantee, these features [1]. I also show how the elements in question could be realized with metastable cortical networks [2].

    In the last part of my talk, I consider the proposed mechanism from a normative perspective. I show that evidence accumulation is statistically efficient, that the initiation and termination of evidence accumulation approximate continuous inference [3], and that decisions are ‘robust’ with heavy-tailed input distributions [4]. I conclude that an out-of-equilibrium dynamic with discretely stochastic elements has surprising explanatory power in several respects: multistable perception, cortical activity dynamics, and optimal inference in a volatile and unpredictable world.

    [1] Cao, Pastukhov, Aleshin, Mattia, Braun (2021) Binocular rivalry reveals an out-of-equilibrium neural dynamics suited for decision-making. eLife, 10: e61581
    [2] Brinkman, Yan, Maffei, Park, Fontanini, Wang, La Camera (2021) Metastable dynamics of neural circuits and networks. arXiv: 2110.03025.
    [3] Veliz-Cuba, Kilpatrick, Josic (2015) Stochastic models of evidence accumulation in changing environments. SIAM Review, 58: 264-89.
    [4] De Menezes, Prata, Secchi, Pinto (2021) A review on robust M-estimators for regression analysis. Computers & Chemical Engineering, 147: 107254

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Charan Ranganath - Professor - UC Davis
    Title: Moments for memories
    Abstract:When we remember a past event, we use our prior knowledge, along with recovered details, to build rich narratives that can capture the essence of an extended sequence of events. This intuitive understanding of episodic memory is not captured by typical lab paradigms in which people memorize lists of unrelated words or pictures, nor is it captured by conventional theories in psychology and neuroscience which imply that the brain continuously encodes memories for every moment of experience. In research using controlled, naturalistic stimuli, we have found that the hippocampus–known to be critical for episodic memory–encodes snapshots of experience at specific moments of uncertainty, prediction error, or a change in one’s understanding of the current situation. From a computational perspective, this might be an optimal use of episodic memory, such that memory is optimized to provide the most useful information when we need it most.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Zoom Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Update on Mechanisms of the Pathophysiology of Neonatal Encephalopathy”


    Joanne Davidson, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Physiology
    The University of Auckland
    Fetal Physiology and Neuroscience Group

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • This Friday (3/25/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. John F. Kelly will present, “Addiction Recovery: From Culture to Science” for this week’s CAAS Rounds and The CAAS Colloquia Series!

    This talk will review the knowledge gained during the past 50 years about addiction recovery and describe how this has led to a new movement of addiction recovery science that promises to better inform the nature and scope of the type of clinical and public health infrastructure needed to address it. 

    More Information 
  • Mar
    25
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    24
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jonathan Victor - Professor - Weill Cornell Medical College

    Title:Information-theoretic analysis of sensing for olfactory navigation

    Abstract:
    A wide range of species rely on olfaction for life-critical functions, including navigation towards food sources or mates. Since odor environments are typically turbulent, olfactory navigation is a computationally-challenging task – yet successful organisms have evolved effective solutions. Thus, olfactory navigation is an excellent model system to test normative theories of sensory processing. Here, combining information-theoretic analyses and high-resolution spatiotemporal measurements of naturalistic odor environments, we investigate the utility of a range of sampling strategies. Several findings emerge. First, coarse resolution of odor concentration at multiple times and/or locations is a more efficient use of coding resources than fine resolution of a single sample. Second, the optimal coding strategy for navigation allocates greater resources to the upper end of the concentration range than the optimal coding strategy for plume reconstruction (i.e., histogram equalization). Interestingly, the nonlinear transformation of ligand binding closely approximates the performance of the theoretically-optimal encoding strategy for navigation. Finally, local mixing prior to sampling can improve efficiency, a result that suggests ways in which active sensing strategies could be tuned to the statistics of the odor environment.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Title: Dynamically relevant motifs in inhibition-dominated networks

    Abstract:  Many networks in the brain possess an abundance of inhibition, which serves to shape and stabilize neural dynamics. The neurons in such networks exhibit intricate patterns of connectivity whose structure controls the allowed patterns of neural activity. In this work, we examine inhibitory threshold-linear networks (TLNs) whose dynamics are constrained by an underlying directed graph. We develop a set of parameter-independent graph rules that enable us to predict features of the dynamics, such as emergent sequences and dynamic attractors, from properties of the graph. These rules provide a direct link between the structure and function of inhibition-dominated networks, yielding new insights into how connectivity shapes dynamics in real neural circuits. Recently, we have used these ideas to classify dynamic attractors in a two-parameter family of TLNs spanning all 9608 directed graphs of size n=5. Remarkably, we find a striking modularity in the dynamic attractors, with identical or near-identical attractors arising in networks that are otherwise dynamically inequivalent. This suggests that, just as one can store multiple static patterns as stable fixed points in a Hopfield model, a variety of dynamic attractors can also be embedded in TLNs in a modular fashion.

    Access to zoom - https://brown.zoom.us/j/98845440335

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  • Mar
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EDT

    Pathobiology Seminar: Alexander Jaworski, Ph.D.

    Associate Professor Alexander Jaworski from the Department of Neuroscience at Brown University will present “Understanding how neuronal connectivity is established during development and eroded in neurodegenerative disease”. This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Dr. Nicté Fuller Medina,Swarthmore College

    Title: Nation, State and Race: Multilingual Acts of Identity in Belize

    Abstract: Belize is the only country in Central America to have English as its official language yet only 63% of the population claim English as a language they speak. Another 57% of the population claims Spanish and 46% claim Belize Kriol, an English-lexified Creole (Statistical Institute of Belize 2013:21). English is the prestige language, while Spanish (the de facto official second language) has dual status as prestige and stigmatized language. Kriol, on the other hand, largely considered a lingua franca, has been recruited as a marker of pan-Belizean identity since the time of independence. Thus, is holds covert prestige but remains highly stigmatized (Young 1995; Le Page and Tabouret-Keller 1985). Speakers who use these languages in the same utterance in everyday speech as in (1) must navigate multiple grammatical systems as well the ideological landscape in which these languages are hierarchically positioned. 1. Tiene miedo que se haga drop su amiga. Have3PL.PRES fear that CL do3SG.SUBJ drop her friend ‘She is afraid that her friend will fall’ Drawing on data from language policies, language attitudes and a corpus of multilingual data from Belize, I examine how state ideologies, colonial raciolinguistic ideologies, and linguistic agency can be observed in the empirical practices of plurilingual Belizean Spanish speakers as they employ their linguistic resources to achieve communicative goals and project various acts of identity.

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

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  • Mar
    21
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Florencia Anggoro- Associate Professor - College of the Holy Cross
    Title: Designing Cognitive Supports for Children’s Science Learning
    Abstract: Understanding the structure of scientific theories (e.g., the heliocentric model of the solar system, evolution by natural selection, particle theory of matter) is fundamentally a process of relational learning: mapping the spatial, temporal, and causal relations between observations and their underlying explanation. In this talk, I will discuss the challenge of relational learning and how I have developed and tested a method to support elementary students’ understanding of space science. I will also discuss some implications of these findings for learning and instruction in other STEM domains.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Title: Machine Learning Powered Query Optimization
    Abstract: Database management systems (DBMSes) depend on query optimizers to transform a user’s declarative query into an efficient execution plan. Query optimizers are critical because a bad query plan can be orders of magnitude slower than the optimal plan. Modern query optimizers are complex and expensive to maintain, as they integrate a wide range of hand-tuned heuristics and manually-engineered cost models which must be updated for every new capability added to the DBMS. I will present two recent approaches to query optimization that leverage deep reinforcement learning to simultaneously improve query performance and decrease maintenance burden. The first approach, Neo (VLDB 19), combines tree convolution neural networks with a novel value iteration technique to fully replace a traditional query optimizer, yielding as much as 2x improvements after just 36 hours of training on stable workloads. The second approach, Bao (SIGMOD 21), targets dynamic workloads, and learns to “steer” an existing query optimizer by training an agent via a contextual multi-armed bandit framework. More broadly, both Neo and Bao highlight the huge potential impact of applying machine learning to systems problems, giving us a glimpse of what a fully learned system could do, as well as highlighting several potential pitfalls along the way.
    Ryan’s homepage: https://rmarcus.info
    Neo paper: https://rm.cab/neo
    Bao paper: https://rm.cab/bao
    Bio: Ryan Marcus is a postdoc at MIT, where he researches learned systems. Ryan focuses on the potential of machine learning to underpin the next generation of data management systems, especially query optimization, data storage, and indexing. Before MIT, Ryan received his PhD from Brandeis University, where he studied machine learning techniques for automating cloud data management systems. Ryan is also a scientist at Intel Labs, an avid World of Warcraft player, and generally amenable to every kind of snack you could imagine.
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  • Please join the Brown Contemplative Studies Initiative and the Department of Religious Studies for a lecture by Professor Sarah Mattice, University of North Florida, on “Exploring the Heart Sutra as a Chinese Text.” This in-person event will take place on March 18th in Smith-Buonanno, Rm. 106 from 5:30 - 7 pm. You can find an abstract of her talk on the Contemplative Studies website.
    As always, if you have any questions, please contact [email protected].
    More Information Faith, Spirituality, Worship, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Cristine Legare, Professor at UT Austin
    Title: The development and diversity of cumulative culture learning
    Abstract: Human culture is unique among animal species in its complexity, diversity, and variability. Children inhabit cultural ecologies that contain knowledge systems, beliefs, practices, artifacts, and technologies that are transmitted and modified over generations. In this talk I describe the development and diversity of cumulative cultural learning. I propose that the learning processes that enable cultural acquisition and transmission are universal but are sufficiently flexible to accommodate highly diverse cultural toolkits. Children learn culture in several complementary ways, including through exploration, observation, participation, imitation, and instruction. These methods of learning vary in frequency and kind within and between populations due to variation in socialization values and practices associated with specific educational institutions, skill sets, and knowledge systems. The processes by which children acquire and transmit the cumulative culture of their communities provide unique insight into the cognitive foundations of cumulative cultural transmission—the cornerstone of human cultural diversity.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • This Friday (3/18/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Allecia Reid will present, “Reducing peer influences on young adult alcohol use: Leveraging correlational and experimental data for intervention development” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

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  • Mar
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    17
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Carney Coffee Hour: Centers & Core Facilities

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 928 5235 1533
    Passcode: 782080

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for a virtual Carney Coffee Hour to learn more about the institute’s centers and core facilities, featuring Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, the institute’s associate director.

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  • Mar
    17
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jiuyang Bai - PhD student - Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences Department - Brown

    Title: Visual Control Laws for Collision Avoidance with Moving Obstacles

    Abstract: Despite years of studying collision avoidance in robotics, computer animation, and traffic engineering, there is still no biologically plausible model of how a human pedestrian avoids a moving obstacle. Most models are based on the physical 3D position and velocity of the object as input, rather than the visual information available to a moving observer. As a pedestrian approaches a moving obstacle, a collision is specified by a constant bearing direction together with optical expansion of the obstacle. We developed a series of dynamical models of collision avoidance that use changes in bearing direction, visual angle, or distance, and the participant’s preferred walking speed, to modulate control laws for heading and speed. We fit the models to human data and attempted to predict route selection (ahead or behind the obstacle) and the locomotor trajectory. Three experiments were conducted in VR, in which participants wore a wireless head-mounted display (101°H x 105°V, 90 Hz) and were asked to walk to a goal while avoiding a moving obstacle moving on linear trajectories. The heading angle, speed, and initial distance of the obstacle were manipulated. All four models were able to predict the locomotor trajectory with a small distance error (<20cm). Models use optical expansion (avoidance model 2, 3, and 4) matched and exceeded the model that uses distance (avoidance model 1). These studies show that it is possible to use visual variables instead of 3D distance to model pedestrian collision avoidance.

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  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Wednesday, March 16 at 4:00 PM.

     

    NIKOS TAPINOS, MD, Ph.D.

    Brown University


    CANCER STEM CELL PLASTICITY: INTEGRATING COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY WITH THE BEDSIDE

    Dr. Nikos Tapinos will present the concept of cancer stem cell plasticity and why this is crucial for understanding the evolution of cancer and therapeutic resistance. He will present computational; biology projects that help discover molecular mechanisms that define cellular plasticity and finally, Dr. Tapinos will show examples of how this new information can be used for the benefit of cancer patients. 

     

    Learn more about Dr. Nikos Tapinos…

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  • The Critical Computing Speaker Series presents William Lockett

    “Media Laboratory Classrooms for Human Model Organisms, 1952–1974”

    This presentation provides to the Digital Media students a way into the scientific and philosophical stakes of model mindsas they relate specifically to the pre-history of the personal computer. I show that model builders used modern logic and sensory deprivation architectures to transform classrooms into laboratory contexts designed for studies of the development in children of numerical and linguistic abilities. I argue that this background of “model work”—behind the foreground of networked personal devices—stabilizes a set of philosophical stakes that can guide the formation of a critical media history of computing in the present.

    Please be sure to RSVP using the form below.

    More Information Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Social Sciences
  • Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Dr. Rachel Steindel Burdin, University of New Hampshire

    Title: “But I don’t do that anymore, because I live in Maine”: Exploring language, place, and Jewish identity in New England and beyond

    Abstract: What does it mean to “sound Jewish”? What does it mean for a place to “be Jewish”? And how do the two interact? In this talk, I will explore the relationship between language, place, and Jewishness, focusing on two locations: New England, and Kazimierz, the Jewish quarter in Krakow, Poland. First, I will present research from New Hampshire and Southern Maine, which builds off previous work suggesting ideological links between “Jewishness” and “New Yorkness” as well as research on language change and urban/rural orientation in Northern New England (Nagy, 2001; Stanford et al., 2012). Jewish community members from the area appear to be leading a change away from some traditional Eastern New England dialect features, mirroring the situation in Boston (Laferriere, 1979; Stanford, 2019). In addition, Jewish community members from outside the area appear to maintain a LOT/THOUGHT distinction, and a distinctly New York City English raised THOUGHT vowel is noted by some speakers to be emblematic of “Jewish-sounding” speech, providing further evidence of an indexical link between New Yorkness and Jewishness. Next, I will present an analysis of the use of Hebrew and Yiddish in the linguistic landscape of Krakow’s Jewish quarter, Kazimierz. While some local businesses’ use of Hebrew and Yiddish ends up either displacing Jewishness in either time or space, reinforcing tourist narratives of Poland as a place devoid of Jews (Lehrer, 2013), the Jewish Community Center use of Hebrew and Yiddish situates the Jewishness of the quarter in the here and now, presenting a vibrant, growing community to visitors, and creating new narratives about Jewishness in Poland.

    Despite the varied methodologies employed (quantitative vs. qualitative), modalities (written vs. spoken language) and different locations (New England vs. Poland), both of these studies end up showing the impact of similar metalinguistic narratives and other ideologies. People’s ideas about where Jews live, the languages they speak, and what it means to “sound Jewish” end up shaping both the production and perception of Jewish language(s).

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

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  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

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  • Mar
    14
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Elizabeth Bonawitz - Associate Professor - Harvard Graduate School of Education
    Title: How Social Information Shapes Inferences in Early Childhood.
    Abstract: Learning does not occur in a vacuum; while children learn a great deal through formal and informal instruction, they also learn from less-obvious pedagogical social cues. In this talk, I will present work from the lab that demonstrates the power of “Pedagogical Questions”; by asking simple questions from the perspective of a knowledgeable teacher, we can increase children’s exploration, perseverance, memory, and learning. Beyond simply showing their benefits, formalizing the learning process using computational models can help explain “why” pedagogical questions work, and help us leverage this method to improve learning.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dr. Nicholas Petrick, Deputy Director for the Division of Imaging, Diagnostics and Software Reliability at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration and member of the FDA Senior Biomedical Research Service

    Current regulatory validation methods for artificial intelligence models applied to medical imaging data

    Statical decision making, artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) methods have a long history being applied to digital medical image data with mammography computer-aided detection devices approved back in 1998 by FDA and other quantitative tools/measures approved or cleared even earlier. The number of AI/ML tools applied to medical image data remained relatively consistent until a few years ago. The FDA is currently seeing a substantial increase in the number of submitted AI/ML tools because of recent advances in deep learning methods in other commercial areas with the potential for these tools to have a much wider impact on clinical decision-making. Some newer medical AI/ML applications include detection and diagnostic tools to aid in disease detection and assessment, triage tools to aid in prioritizing time-sensitive imaging studies, quantitative measurement tools, structural segmentation tools, image reconstruction or denoising tools, and optimization tools to aid in image acquisition to name a few. In this talk, I will introduce the audience to FDA’s medical device regulatory processes with the goal of demystifying how medical devices are regulated in the U.S. The main focus of my talk will be on the validation methods currently being applied to AI/ML device assessment and a discussion of our ongoing regulatory research developing methods to potentially improve AI/ML algorithm generalizability, robustness analysis as well as AI/ML device performance assessment.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    5:00pm - 6:30pm EST

    Social Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Hema Preya Selvanathan- Lecturer- The University of Queensland, Australia
    Title: Collective action for and against social change
    Abstract:Throughout history and in many regions around the world, people have engaged in collective action and participated in social movements to demand social change. At the same time, there is often collective backlash against social change. In this talk, I will present an overview of how social identity and group processes shape mobilization towards greater equality and justice, as well as those that aim to defend the status quo and the current social hierarchy. I will examine societal attitudes toward social movements in diverse socio-political contexts, including the Black Lives Matter and Alt-Right movements in the United States, the Bersih pro-democracy movement in Malaysia, and the Invasion Day protests in Australia.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    Classic Psychedelics in Addiction Treatment

    Join the CADRE for an upcoming presentation in our Distinguished Visiting Scholar Series by Matthew W. Johnson, entitled “Classic Psychedelics in Addiction Treatment”!

    This presentation will review the treatment of substance use disorders with classic psychedelics (5HT2A agonists) including LSD and psilocybin. Early research from the 1950s to 1970s investigated classic psychedelics, primarily LSD, in the treatment of alcohol use disorder and cancer-related distress. Over the last 20 years, research has resumed investigating psychedelics in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, including tobacco and alcohol use disorders.

    Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D., is The Susan Hill Ward Endowed Professor of Psychedelics and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University. Working with psychedelics since 2004, he is one of the world’s most widely published experts on psychedelics. He has published research on psychedelics and mystical experience, personality change, tobacco smoking cessation, cancer distress treatment, and depression treatment. In 2021 he received as principal investigator the first grant in 50 years from the US government for a treatment study with a classic psychedelic, specifically psilocybin in treatment of tobacco addiction. He is also known for his expertise in behavioral economics, addiction, sexual risk behavior, and research with a wide variety of drug classes. He’s been interviewed by Anderson Cooper on 60 Minutes, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, CNN, NPR, Fox Business News, BBC and was featured in Michael Pollan’s book How to Change Your Mind.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Mar
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Claire Gillan - Associate Professor - Trinity College Dublin
    Title: Getting personal with network theory of mental health and illness
    Abstract:Network theory of psychopathology posits that mental health disorders like depression might be better understood as complex systems defined by interacting elements, or ‘symptoms’, like low mood, excessive guilt and insomnia. This challenges the traditional view in psychiatry that disorders themselves are the latent cause of symptoms and offers an explanation as to why psychiatry has failed to find clear neurobiological, genetic, or environmental causes of specific DSM disorders. Though there is much excitement about the potential for network approaches to explain individual differences in clinical presentation, help us understand vulnerability, and potentially tailor treatments, there is snag; almost all of the empirical research supporting network theory rests on between-subject analyses in cross-sectional data. In this talk, I will stress the need for constructing and interrogating personalised within-subject networks to move this field forward. This allows us to ask not whether things like insomnia and guilt correlate across individuals, but how reliably guilt precedes insomnia within a person. Focusing on a core prediction of network theory, that more tightly connected networks of symptoms are associated with vulnerability, severity, and persistence of illness, I will describe some recent efforts in this area using a variety of data sources. These include clinical panel data from >65,000 patients followed through cognitive behavioural therapy, personalised networks constructed from depression-related language in Tweets (N=946), and twice-daily self-reported affect from an experience sampling study (N=208) via the neureka app (www.neureka.ie).

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Nura Sidarus, PhD - Lecturer - Royal Holloway University of London

    Title: Who’s in control? Prospective contributions to the sense of agency

    Abstract:
    Human voluntary action is typically accompanied by an experience of being in control of our actions and their consequences, referred to as sense of agency. Previous research has shown that the sense of agency relies on a retrospective comparison between expected and observed action outcomes. Our work has shown that there is also a prospective component to the sense of agency, related to the metacognitive monitoring of decision-making processes. Difficult decisions reduce our sense of agency over action outcomes. These effects generalise across tasks, from unconscious to conscious manipulations, in dynamic video games, and in social contexts. I will discuss the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying these prospective contributions to the sense of agency, and how they are integrated with outcome-related information. Furthermore, I will consider the implications of this work for understanding decision-making and learning processes, in both individual and social contexts.

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please Note: Brown Login Required For This Talk
    Title: Bridging Safety and Learning in Human-Robot Interaction
    Abstract: From autonomous cars in cities to mobile manipulators at home, robots must interact with people. What makes this hard is that human behavior—especially when interacting with other agents—is vastly complex, varying between individuals, environments, and over time. Thus, robots rely on data and machine learning throughout the design process and during deployment to build and refine models of humans. However, by blindly trusting their data-driven human models, today’s robots confidently plan unsafe behaviors around people, resulting in anything from miscoordination to dangerous collisions.
    My research aims to ensure safety in human-robot interaction, particularly when robots learn from and about people. In this talk, I will discuss how treating robot learning algorithms as dynamical systems driven by human data enables safe human-robot interaction. I will first introduce a Bayesian monitor which infers online if the robot’s learned human model can evolve to well-explain observed human data. I will then discuss how a novel, control-theoretic problem formulation enables us to formally quantify what the robot could learn online from human data and how quickly it could learn it. Coupling these ideas with robot motion planning algorithms, I will demonstrate how robots can safely and automatically adapt their behavior based on how trustworthy their learned human models are. I will end this talk by taking a step back and raising the question: “What is the ‘right’ notion of safety when robots interact with people?” and discussing opportunities for how rethinking our notions of safety can capture more subtle aspects of human-robot interaction.
    Bio: Andrea Bajcsy is a Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, working with Professors Anca Dragan and Claire Tomlin. She studies safe human-robot interaction, particularly when robots learn from and about people. Her research unites traditionally disparate methods from control theory and machine learning to develop theoretical frameworks and practical algorithms for human-robot interaction in domains like assistive robotic arms, quadrotors, and autonomous cars. Prior to her Ph.D., she earned her B.S. at the University of Maryland, College Park in Computer Science in 2016. She is the recipient of an Honorable Mention for the T-RO Best Paper Award, the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Fellowship, and has worked at NVIDIA Research and Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems.
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  • Jordan T. Moore, Ph.D. candidate from the Daniel Gallego-Perez Lab, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, will present a talk: “Nanomedicine-Driven Strategies to Repair Peripheral Nerve Injuries.”

    Brief description: I will discuss the use of tissue nano-transfection interventions to aid in functional repair and recovery following crush and transections in a rodent sciatic nerve model. The crush model focuses on restoring vasculature to guide axonal regeneration and the transection model aims to locally induce neuronal conversions in the triceps surae to preserve neuromuscular junction health until full reinnervation can occur.

    Abstract: In this presentation I will discuss how we use an electroporation-based intervention known as tissue nano-transfection to locally deliver plasmid DNA to  aid functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury. Complete regeneration of peripheral nerves after injury is essential to maintaining a favorable quality of life and nerve injuries can be addressed at three levels: the soma (neuronal cell body), focal/local insult, and the innervated tissues downstream of the injury. Our current focus is on the local injury and downstream aspects using a crush and transection model, respectively. In the crush model, we demonstrated the ability to deliver cargos throughout the nerve bundle, induce endothelial cell reprogramming, and aid in more rapid functional recovery. Our studies in the transection model focus on neuronal induction in the muscle tissue. Continued research focuses on elucidating the induced cellular and molecular changes occurring in the denervated tissue following our intervention. Overall, these studies support the viability of targeted gene delivery and cell-based therapies to enhance recovery following a severe/chronic injury to that nerve.

    Bio: I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Biomedical Engineering at Ohio State University. I am originally from Springfield, OH and joined OSU when I transferred to complete my undergraduate studies in 2012. I received my BS in Applied Mathematics in 2015, MS in BME in December of 2020, and anticipate completing my Ph.D. in 2022. My thesis research focuses on cellular reprogramming and tissue engineering to repair peripheral nerve injuries. I have also worked on similar approaches for stroke, skin wounds, and cancer application. I am a past president of my department’s Graduate Student Association, Neuroscience Scholars Program Associate, Purdue Black Trailblazers in Engineering Fellow, and NIH D-SPAN Scholar. My long-term goal is to lead a research group developing cell and gene-based nanotherapeutics with a special interest in Cerebral Palsy and motoneuronrelated deficits. 

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  • Mar
    9
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:30pm EST

    CCBS Seminar: Carina Curto

    Center for Computational Brain Science Seminar Series: “Sequences and modularity of dynamic attractors in inhibition-dominated neural networks”

    Carina Curto, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Department of Mathematics
    Pennsylvania State University

    Abstract: Threshold-linear networks (TLNs) display a wide variety of nonlinear dynamics including multistability, limit cycles, quasiperiodic attractors, and chaos. Over the past few years, we have developed a detailed mathematical theory relating stable and unstable fixed points of TLNs to graph-theoretic properties of the underlying network. These results enable us to design networks that count stimulus pulses, track position, and encode multiple locomotive gaits in a single central pattern generator circuit.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Youtao Lu - PhD student - Cognitive, Linguists & Psychological Sciences Department - Brown University

    Talk: Exhaustive Access of Homophonous Words in Spoken Word Recognition: a Cross-Linguistic Comparison between English and Japanese

    Abstract: There has been prediction that lexical access of homophonous words can be more selective in languages with more homophonous words (Swinney, 1991). We tested this prediction by conducting identical cross-modal priming studies which examined lexical access of homophonous words in English and Japanese. While homophones are much more common in Japanese, evidence supporting exhaustive access of homophonous words in non-biased contexts was found in both languages. Some evidence even suggested that lexical access might be more exhaustive in Japanese. The conflict may be reconciled by positing an intuitive difference between the effect of contexts and the effect of relative dominance in ambiguity resolution.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    9
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds

    Socio-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Latinx Youth with Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors
    Yovanska Duarte Velez, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor (Research)
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Bradley Hospital and Brown University
    Wednesday, March 9, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Describe the best available psychosocial treatments for Latinx youth with suicidal thoughts and behaviors, according to ethnic representation and cultural relevance; Explain the importance of tailoring treatments to Latinx youth with suicidal behaviors and their families; and Describe the distinct proposed mechanisms of action in Socio-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    8
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Sonia Mayoral, Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Assistant Professor of Brain Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

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  •  

    PSRIG Seminar Series: “Sleep, Toxic Stress, and Social Determinants of Health in Early Childhood”
    Monica Roosa Ordway, Ph.D., APRN, PPCNP-BC 

    There is emerging consensus that developmental and biological disruptions early in life are the roots of health disparities in adulthood. Developmentally, sleep inequities have been shown to occur as early as 12 months of age. This talk will focus on an overview of the evidence linking sleep, stress, and children’s health in the first 1000 days of life.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

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  • Mar
    7
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Carrie Palmquist- Associate Professor - Amherst College
    Title: Judging a book by its cover: Origins and implications of face-based inference-making.
    Abstract: Humans use many different cues to make inferences about one another. One important cue we rely upon is others’ facial features. In fact, people spend more time looking at faces than at any other type of object across their lifespans (Haxby, Hoffman, & Gobbini, 2000) and the inferences we draw from faces are made very quickly, within about 100-milliseconds (Willis & Todorov, 2006). The impressions we form from others’ faces have broad-reaching implications, predicting election outcomes (Todorov, et al., 2005) and criminal sentencing (Wilson & Rule, 2015). Interestingly, despite our reliance on others’ facial features as indicators of character, there is very little evidence that faces convey accurate information about a person’s personality and traits (Said, Sebe, & Todorov, 2009). Why then, do our judgments of others rely so heavily on facial features? This talk will explore this question by examining the developmental origins of our predisposition to make these kinds of face-based inferences, with a particular focus on work from my lab that investigates how children develop trust in others based on their facial features.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium: “The Long-Term Consequences of GABAergic Dysregulation Following Developmental Brain Injury”

    Raul Chavez-Valdez, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
    Attending Physician
    Johns Hopkins Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    4
    Virtual and In Person
    11:00am EST

    Pathobiology Thesis Defense: Nathan Martin

    Please join the Pathobiology Graduate Program for the final examination of Nathan Martin for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The candidate will present himself for examination on the thesis entitled “Zebrafish as a Model for Studying the Developmental Neurotoxicity of Persistent and Emerging Environmental Contaminants”

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Mar
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Title: Emerging therapeutic targets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

    Host:  Dr. Anne Hart

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    3
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Jacqueline Fulvio PhD - Research Scientist - University of Wisconsin - Madison

    Title: Serialdependence as a “post-perceptual” strategy for behavioral reliability

    Abstract: Serial dependence –the impact of recent stimulus history on current perceptual reports – is apervasive finding in many psychophysical domains, and has long been thought tobe an adaptive low-level mechanism that promotes perceptual stability acrossvisual inputs. However, recent studies suggest “post-perceptual” processes mayinstead be at play, calling into question the locus of serial dependence andthe nature of integration of past and present sensory inputs to guide currentresponses. To address these questions, I will draw upon results from two recentstudies. First, in the context of a 3D motion extrapolation task whereuncertainty in the sensory information varied from trial to trial, we show thatresponses were significantly more biased toward the previous reported 3Dmotion direction rather than the previous presented direction, with larger biason trials with greater uncertainty in the sensory input. For a subset ofparticipants who received visual and auditory feedback about their performanceon every trial, we observed an abolishment of bias toward the previouspresented direction and a significant reduction of, but lasting bias toward,the previous reported direction. This bias toward previous report persisteddespite participants having seen the target motion direction again during thefeedback stage, which provided them with an opportunity to update the percept.Next, in the context of a visual working memory task with an interleaved discriminationtask on a visual distractor during the delay period, we show significantattractive serial biases toward congruent distractors and repulsive biases fromincongruent distractors. Furthermore, such biases were modulated by therelevance of the distractor for behavior. Together, these results provide clearevidence for a decision-based “post-perceptual” locus of serial dependence andsupport the role of serial dependence as a strategy to improve the reliabilityof behavioral performance.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Humans spend about one third of their lives asleep. But what exactly happens in the brain while you sleep? What happens when you don’t get enough sleep? And could getting more high-quality sleep protect your brain?

    In recognition of Sleep Awareness Week this March, the Carney Institute is holding a conversation about the science of slumber featuring two Brown University researchers who study sleep biology, how sleep affects behavioral health and clinical sleep disorders:

    • Mary Carskadon, Ph.D. is a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown, director of chronobiology and sleep research at Bradley Hospital, and director of the hospital’s Center for Sleep and Circadian Rhythms in Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
    • Richard Millman, M.D. is a professor of pediatrics and of medicine at Brown and director of the Sleep Disorders Center of Lifespan Hospitals.

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Mar
    2
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ailis Cournane - Assistant Professor - New York University

    Title: Dedicated markers for the hardest thoughts: learning epistemics and counterfactuals the “easy” way

    Abstract:Epistemic reasoning (thinking about possibilities from knowledge-based inferences) and counterfactual reasoning (thinking about possibilities from undoing facts) are among the most complex kinds of reasoning humans can do. The language that expresses these thoughts is likewise complex: e.g., modal verbs with polysemous meanings and functional syntax (like “must” or “could”), and conditional (“if…then”) constructions with “fake” past-tense markers (Iatridou 2000). But, it doesn’t have to be, those constructions are simply the canonical ones that have received the most attention in the linguistics and psychology literature. There are “easier” constructions out there…

    I’ll talk about two main case studies, primarily based on extensive corpus studies of English-learning children: (1) epistemic adverbs (“maybe”, “probably”) and (2) counterfactual propositional wish-es (“I wish I was a bar of soap” - Abe, age 4) (joint work with Maxime Tulling), both of which are common in the input to children and linguistically dedicated: they always express epistemicity or counterfactuality, respectively (unlike modal verbs and conditional constructions). We’ll see that children learn to talk about complex epistemic and counterfactual possibilities earlier with these more dedicated markers, updating our understanding of both language and reasoning development in these areas of possibility reasoning.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Mar
    2
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB Academic Grand Rounds

    Why a Process-Based Approach is the Future of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology
    Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
    Foundation Professor of Psychology
    University of Nevada, Reno
    Wednesday, March 2, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Define biopsychosocial “processes of change” in psychiatry and clinical psychology; Be able to specify how the ergodic theorem requires methodological adjustment to psychiatric research that hopes to apply to processes of change to individuals; Be able to sort common mediators of psychotherapy outcomes into an extended evolutionary metamodel (EEMM) approach to processes of change; and Be able to relate common intervention kernels to processes of change thought of in terms of the EEMM.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Title: “Diversity of spinal commissural neurons and their reliance on NELL2-Robo3 signaling during development”

    Advisor:  Dr.Alexander Jaworski

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Mar
    1

    Dr. Bhart-Anjan Bhullar- Yale University

     

    Talk Title: “The origin of bird brains, behaviors, and bodies: evidence from fossils and embryos”

     

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98262752183

    More Information 
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 923 2807 3678
    Passcode: 957821

    Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Megha Sehgal, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles.

    Abstract

    Events occurring close in time are often linked in memory, providing an episodic timeline and a framework for those memories. Recent studies suggest that memories acquired close in time are encoded by overlapping neuronal ensembles, but whether dendritic plasticity plays a role in linking memories is unknown. Using activity-dependent labeling and manipulation, as well as longitudinal one- and two-photon imaging of RSC somatic and dendritic compartments, we show that memory linking is not only dependent on ensemble overlap in the retrosplenial cortex, but also on branch-specific dendritic allocation mechanisms. These results demonstrate a causal role for dendritic mechanisms in memory integration and reveal a novel set of rules that govern how linked, and independent memories are allocated to dendritic compartments.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    28
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Leonard - Assistant Professor - Yale University
    Title: Social influences on children’s persistence
    Abstract: Learning requires effort, yet children can’t try hard at everything. Every day children have to decide what’s worth their effort - when to persist through challenges versus when to give up and move on to a different endeavor. How do children make this decision? In this talk, I show how infants and children leverage social information to effectively allocate effort. First, I show that children are more likely to stick with a challenge when provided clear feedback that their performance is improving over time. Second, I demonstrate that infants can generalize the value of persistence to a novel task from watching how hard an adult tries to reach a goal. Children not only integrate information about adults’ actions, but also about their outcomes (success or failure) and testimony, to decide how hard to try. Third, I show correlational and causal evidence that the real-world parenting behavior of “taking over” (completing hard tasks for children) negatively impacts children’s persistence. Finally, I present data showing that day-to-day variation in parent praise correlates with fluctuations in children’s naturalistic persistent behavior. Collectively, this work elucidates the powerful effects of adults’ actions and words on children’s effort allocation and ultimately suggests adult behavior as an effective point of intervention for fostering children’s persistence.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Brown University and Lifespan junior faculty, postdocs, residents, medical students, and graduate students – Do you have an idea for a digital health innovation that will help solve a sticky public health challenge?

    Participate in the first ever Digital Health Pitch Competition! This is a program that encourages digital health innovation and rewards brilliant ideas with seed funding and mentorship. Complete the interest form and gain access to a network of innovators, mentors, and advisors, and be eligible to apply for the Digital Health Pitch Competition where your team could walk away with up to $25,000 in prize money.

    Complete the Interest Form More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    1:30pm - 2:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium: “Immune Programming of Autism in the Mother’s Womb”

    Surendra Sharma, MD, Ph.D.
    Professor of Pediatrics
    Warren Alpert Medical School of
    Brown University
    DirectorCenter of Excellence for Reproductive Health
    Women and Infants Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • This Friday (2/25/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Rachel Cassidy will present, “Modeling the impact of transformative tobacco policy on youth: Insights from laboratory studies and clinical trials” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

    More Information 
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    25
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    February 25, 2022

    ZOOM only

     

    Speaker:

    Micaela Materne, MS & Child Life staff

    Manager, Child Life, Hasbro Children’s Hospital

    Brown University

     

    Topic:

    “Prescription for Play: The Role of the Child Life Specialist in Pediatric Health and Healing”

     

    Objectives:

    • Recognize the therapeutic role of the Child Life Specialist as a member of the interdisciplinary team
    • Utilize Child Life Services to provide developmentally appropriate preparation, education, & bedside support to enhance coping
    • Identify how to consult Child Life Services to reduce a child’s level of stress, minimize, or negate the need for anesthesia or narcotics, & hasten recovery times
    CME CREDIT SURVEY More Information 
  • Please join the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Series for a lecture by Dr. Byeongsang Oh, Associate Professor at the University of Sydney on Tai Chi and Qigong in Medicine: Opportunities and Challenges. This lecture and discussion will be held on February 24th from 7 - 8:30 pm, EST.

    This is a virtual event, so please register at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSehZ8wpVkeHK28B_xSc2EfjltcqOzzmsY5VjO9sCV3dCLPkkw/viewform in order to receive a Zoom link. You will also find an abstract of Dr. Oh’s lecture when you register.
    If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact our administrator, [email protected]. This event is free and open to the public. 
    More Information 
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    1:00pm EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Sara Ahmadian, Ph.D.

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Thursday, 2/24 at 1:00 PM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party at 1:00 PM on Thursday, 2/24 at 164 Angell Street.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Sara Ahmadian, Ph.D.

    Senior Research Scientist, Google

    Revising Traditional Algorithms and Devising New Algorithms to Factor in Fairness

    From digital assistants to movie recommendations and self-driving cars, machine learning is behind many day-to-day interactions with technology. While learning algorithms are not inherently biased, they may pick up and amplify the bias already present in the training data. Thus a recent line of work has emerged on revising traditional algorithms or devising new algorithms to factor in fairness. In this talk, I focus on adding fairness to clustering which is a fundamental problem in data mining and unsupervised machine learning. We introduce a notion of fairness that focuses on requiring a bounded representation of various groups of a sensitive feature, e.g. race, gender, etc., in each cluster. In clustering, the goal is to organize objects into clusters such that elements in the same clusters are “similar”. There are various ways to express the similarity of objects. In metric settings, we are given a distance measure for the objects, and in a non-metric setting, we are given labels in the form of for pairs of objects which identify whether two objects are similar (label +) or not (label -). We look at a fair k-center for the metric case and fair correlation clustering for the non-metric case. If time permits, I will talk about fairness in non-flat clustering, e.g., hierarchical clustering, and how the algorithms for such problems can be modified to accommodate fairness constraints.

    Biography

    Sara Ahmadian is a Senior Research Scientist in the Large-Scale Optimization research team, which is part of the broader NYC Algorithms and Optimization team at Google. Sara earned degrees in Combinatorics and Optimization (M.M. 2010, Ph.D. 2017) from the University of Waterloo, where she was advised by Chaitanya Swamy and supported by an NSERC Fellowship. Sara is a recipient of the 2017 University of Waterloo Outstanding Achievement in Graduate Studies (Ph.D.) designation for her Ph.D. thesis. She worked as a Software Developer for a start-up company in Waterloo after completing her Masters’s and before starting her Ph.D. Prior to that, she earned her BSc in Computer Engineering at Sharif University of Technology (Iran). Her research interests include diverse and fair sampling, data summarization, approximation algorithm, design and analysis of algorithms.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: James Wilmott - PhD student - CLPS - Brown

    Title: Learning processes for depth cue combination and sensorimotor adaptation during reach-to-grasp actions

    Abstract:An observer’s planned grip size during grasping is a function of a visually-derived estimate of depth and a sensorimotor transformation process that maps perception into action. Here, we investigate how sensorimotor learning mechanisms dynamically adjust grip size based on recent experience. Previous studies have identified two learning processes that update an observer’s grasping behavior based on recent experience: remapping of the perceptual estimation function (i.e., “learning perception”) and adaptation of the sensorimotor mapping (i.e., “learning action”). These processes have traditionally been studied in isolation. We propose a novel unified framework where both processes simultaneously operate to reduce sensorimotor prediction errors and present psychophysical evidence to support this account. Classic models of depth perception predict that perceptual remapping occurs when the visual system detects a mismatch between visual and haptic information (previously termed “cue reweighting”). According to these models, a conflict between visual estimates is required to determine which estimator (termed cue) should be adjusted so that the combined-cue estimate aligns with haptic feedback. A recently developed alternative model named Intrinsic Constraint proposes that cue combination is approximated as a vector sum, resulting in larger depth estimates for stimuli that have more cues (e.g., disparity only vs. disparity and texture). Across two experiments, we show that observers perceive objects with varying number of depth cues differently, that these differences have meaningful consequences for grasping, and observers learn to minimize grasping errors in a manner consistent with error-driven sensorimotor learning processes. I will discuss potential computational approaches to modeling these patterns of learning by simultaneously adjusting cue combination and adaptation based on the pattern of sensorimotor error signals obtained across grasps.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    Pathobiology Seminar: A. Sloan Devlin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor Sloan Devlin from the Harvard Medical School will present “Causal links between human microbiome metabolites and host functions”.  This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    11:00am EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Cyrus Cousins, Ph.D.

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Thursday, 2/24 at 11:00 AM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party at 11:30 AM on Thursday, 2/24 at 164 Angell Street. Light refreshments will be offered.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Cyrus Cousins, Ph.D.

    Visiting Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Brown University

    Data Categorization and Welfare Outcomes in Machine Learning

    Data-quality issues often compound the unfairness, as majority groups are often well-studied, with copious high-quality data available, while marginalized or minority groups are understudied, and available data lack in quality. This work operates in the setting wherein only partial information is available on protected group membership. In particular, here data are triplets (x, y, z) ∈ (X × Y × Z), where Z is a finite space of g protected groups. Given m training points, we observe covariates x, and labels y, but not group identities zm. Instead, we are given a feasible set Z of group labelings. The task is then to perform (group-dependent) fair learning, with rigorous statistical guarantees. We show that learning approximately minimax-optimal egalitarian or utilitarian malware models in this setting is both statistically and computationally efficient. In particular, our bounds depend on how sharply the unknown group-membership labels are constrained, and thus degrade gracefully as less and less partial information about group membership is available. We also discuss methods by which to statistically constrain the feasible set Z of group membership and the fairness implications of generating such constraints.

    Biography

    Cyrus Cousins, Ph.D. is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Brown University where he also recently completed his doctorate. A perennial scholar of probability, Cyrus has worked in many areas ranging from statistical significance questions in data science and machine learning to econometrics and social justice, where he raises and attempts to answer fundamental questions of what it means to share, allocate and learn fairly. His signature is the application of techniques from statistical learning theory to study how quickly and under what conditions various quantities of interest can be estimated from data. He also works in the analysis of randomized algorithms, Markov chain Monte Carlo, statistical data science, and empirical game theory.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    24
    Virtual and In Person
    10:30am EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Lachlan Kermode

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Thursday, 2/24 at 10:30 AM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party on Thursday, 2/24 at 164 Angell Street. Light refreshments will be offered.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Lachlan Kermode

    Ph.D. Candidate, Modern Culture and Media, Brown University

    Software Research with Forensic Architecture

    Forensic Architecture (FA) is a research agency, based at Goldsmiths, University of London, investigating human rights violations including violence committed by states, police forces, militaries, and corporations. FA works in partnership with institutions across civil society, from grassroots activists to legal teams, to international NGOs and media organizations, to carry out investigations with and on behalf of communities and individuals affected by conflict, police brutality, border regimes, and environmental violence.

    This talk will speak to a selection of investigations conducted at and with Forensic Architecture that leverage skill sets associated with the computer and data sciences— such as machine learning and full-stack development— to indicate how interdisciplinary work might offer a critical way forward.

     

    Biography

    Lachlan Kermode is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University, and a Research Fellow at the research agency, Forensic Architecture (Goldsmiths, University of London). After receiving an undergraduate degree in Computer Science from Princeton University (2018), he worked for several years as a Software Researcher at Forensic Architecture and then as a Software Engineer, building cloud infrastructure for machine learning models. Kermode has also worked as a Mobile Developer and as a Full Stack Engineer. His current work is concerned with the political potential of open source and open hardware cultures, the history of computer science and software engineering as disciplinary practices, and the implications and impacts of computing as media at large.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    23
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm EST

    DSI’s Fair February: Lauren Klein, Ph.D.

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: This Zoom link will become available on Wednesday, 2/23 at 2:00 PM.

    DSI will also be hosting a viewing party at 2:00 PM on Wednesday, 2/23 at 164 Angell Street. Light refreshments will be offered.

     

    Fair February 2022

    Lauren Klein, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor, English, Quantitative Theory and Methods, Emory University

    What is Feminist Data Science?

    How is feminist thinking being incorporated into data-driven work? How are scholars in the humanities and social sciences bringing together data science and feminist theory into their research? Drawing from her recent book, Data Feminism (MIT Press), co-authored with Catherine D’Ignazio, Dr. Klein presents a set of principles for doing data science that is informed by the past several decades of intersectional feminist activism and critical thought. In order to illustrate these principles, as well as some of the ways that scholars and designers have begun to put them into action, she will discuss a range of recent projects including several of her own: 1) a thematic analysis of a large corpus of nineteenth-century newspapers that reveal the invisible labor of women newspaper editors; 2) the development of a model of lexical semantic change that, when combined with network analysis, tells a new story about Black activism in the nineteenth-century US; and 3) an interactive book on the history of data visualization that shows how questions of politics have been present in the field since its start. Taken together, these examples demonstrate how feminist thinking can be operationalized into more ethical, intentional, and capacious data practices in the digital humanities, computational social sciences, human-computer interactions, and beyond.

    Biography

    Lauren Klein is a Winship Distinguished Research Professor and Associate Professor in the Departments of English and Quantitative Theory and Methods at Emory University, where she also directs the Digital Humanities Lab. She is the author of An Archive of Taste: Race and Eating in the Early United States (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) and, with Catherine D’Ignazio, Data Feminism (MIT Press, 2020). With Matthew K. Gold, she edits Debates in the Digital Humanities, a hybrid print-digital publication stream that explores debates in the field as they emerge.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    22
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    To receive a Zoom link, please contact [email protected]

    Please join us for the Brown Contemplative Studies’ Spring Virtual Get-Together on February 22nd from 5 - 6:30 pm. Come meet faculty and concentrators, discuss past, current and future course offerings and upcoming events. Feel free to drop by any time and stay for a little or a long while!  To receive the Zoom link, please contact [email protected].
    More Information 
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Feb
    19
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Queer in Neuroscience Panel

    Join NeuroDug for a virtual event featuring a panel of scientists at varying levels in their careers who identify as queer. Panelists will speak on their experiences in the neuroscience field. The event will be moderated by Leona Hariharan, an undergraduate student at Brown University.

    Panelists include:

    • Talia Fernandez, undergraduate student, Brown University
    • Krisha Aghi, graduate student, University of California, Berkeley
    • Jess Sevetson, postdoctoral researcher, University of California, Santa Cruz
    • E. Javier López Soto, assistant professor, North Carolina State University
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Understanding and Reducing Gender Bias in STEM

    Despite efforts to recruit and retain more women, a stark gender disparity remains within STEM fields. This persistent underrepresentation speaks to the importance of identifying impediments to women’s full participation in STEM, as well as developing innovative and effective diversity interventions aimed at increasing the representation of women. In this talk, I will first present experimental evidence of gender bias within STEM, as well as its direct consequences for women’s STEM engagement and participation. I will then discuss a program of ongoing research testing evidence-based interventions aimed at increasing awareness of and reducing this gender bias. Throughout, I will highlight implications for academic meritocracy, diversity, and gender parity across STEM fields.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    18
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Minson - Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of government

    Title: Conversational Receptiveness: Improving Engagement with Opposing Views

    Abstract:We examine “conversational receptiveness” – the use of language to communicate one’s willingness to thoughtfully engage with opposing views. We develop an interpretable machine- learning algorithm to identify the linguistic profile of receptiveness (Studies 1A-B). We then show that in contentious policy discussions, government executives who were rated as more receptive - according to our algorithm and their partners, but not their own self-evaluations - were considered better teammates, advisors, and workplace representatives (Study 2). Furthermore, using field data from a setting where conflict management is endemic to productivity, we show that conversational receptiveness at the beginning of a conversation forestalls conflict escalation at the end. Specifically, Wikipedia editors who write more receptive posts are less prone to receiving personal attacks from disagreeing editors (Study 3). Finally, we develop a “receptiveness recipe” intervention based on our algorithm (Study 4).

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium:
    “The Power of Early Language Exposure”

    Betty R. Vohr, M.D.
    Professor of Pediatrics
    Warren Alpert Medical School
    Brown University
    Women & Infants Hospital

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • This Friday (2/18/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Abby Braitman will present, “Race moderates the impact of COVID-19 pandemic experiences on self-reported changes in college drinking” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

    More Information 
  • Speakers: Alana Chetlen, Vanessa Sherman, Sheila Vandal

    Don’t let the IRB submission and review process overwhelm you! Seasoned researchers or first time submitters, come learn about Brown’s human subject research policies, forms and procedures. Demystify the submission and review process with tips to a smoother approval and avoid frustrating delays.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Humanities, Libraries, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Feb
    18
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    17

    Speakers: Steven Sloman, Nat Rabb (Brown Policy Lab), Semir Tatlidil, Babak Hemmatian and Victoria Halewicz 

    Data from psychology labs suggests that human beings are ignorant, biased, overly emotional, suggestible, overconfident, poor at assessing their own knowledge, and only moderately good at assessing their own abilities. Yet we’ve sent robots to Mars, created vaccines, built spectacular buildings, sequenced the human genome, and generated a stupefying corpus of cultural works. How do we do it? One possibility is that the classic patterns of findings are incomplete or flawed, that people’s cognitive and emotional capacities have been unfairly maligned. We explore a different reason: Human beings do these incredible things through collaboration and outsourcing, thus overcoming individual shortcomings. Given our extraordinary success, individual cognition should be thought of as a component in a larger system of collective human activity rather than an end in itself. We discuss various forms of data that we have collected in pursuit of this hypothesis.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Government, Public & International Affairs, Humanities, International, Global Engagement, Libraries, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Teaching & Learning
  • Feb
    17
    Virtual and In Person
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EST

    Biology of Aging Seminar - Berenice Benayoun

  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 978 5998 6393
    Passcode: 451768
    Authenticated Brown IDs only

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science, in conjunction with Love Data Week, for a Carney Methods Meetup featuring Ani Eloyan, assistant professor of biostatistics at Brown, who will discuss methods for defining and estimating clinically relevant biomarkers, such as from longitudinal fMRI.

    Carney Methods Meetups are informal gatherings focused on methods for brain science, moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience. Videos and notes from previous Meetups are available on the Carney Institute website.

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    17
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Michaela Warnecke - Postdoctoral Research Scientist - Meta

    Title: Lessons from bats and humans: decoding acoustic scenes

    Abstract:
    In everyday listening, we must not only localize sounds, but also identify them. This talk will describe several scientific experiments in animals and humans whose results demonstrate the important distinction between the acoustic environment and the perception of that environment. More specifically, experiments with echolocating bats will describe how these nocturnal mammals utilize biosonar to decode and represent their surroundings, including how they avoid acoustic interference. Further, studies of human psychoacoustics will describe how the localization of dynamic sounds can be put into competition with their content, establishing a relationship between speech perception, auditory motion processing, and attention.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    17
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm EST

    Pathobiology Seminar: Donna L. Farber, Ph.D.

    Professor Donna Farber from the Columbia University Medical Center will present “Tissue-specific development and maintenance of immune memory in humans”. This lecture is part of the 2022 Pathobiology Graduate Program Spring Seminar Series. ​​

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education
  • Speaker: Lorin Crawford, Ph.D.

    Senior Researcher, Microsoft Research New England

    RGSS Assistant Professor of Biostatistics, Center for Computational Molecular Biology, Brown University

    Since 2005, genome-wide association (GWA) datasets have been largely biased toward sampling European ancestry individuals, and recent studies have shown that GWA results estimated from self-identified European individuals are not transferable to non-European individuals due to various confounding challenges. In this talk, we will demonstrate that enrichment analyses which aggregate SNP-level association statistics at multiple genomic scales—from genes to genomic regions and pathways—have been underutilized in the GWA era and can generate biologically interpretable hypotheses regarding the genetic basis of complex trait architecture. In the first half of the presentation, we illustrate examples of the robust associations generated by enrichment analyses while studying 25 continuous traits assayed in diverse self-identified human ancestries from the UK Biobank, the Biobank Japan, and the PAGE consortium. In the second half, we will present novel probabilistic machine learning frameworks which allow researchers to simultaneouslyperform (i) fine-mapping with SNPs and (ii) enrichment analyses with SNP-sets on complex traits. Using a subset of individuals from the UK Biobank, we show that these models can replicate known associations that previously required functional validation.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Faculty Governance, Government, Public & International Affairs, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Libraries, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Speakers: Taunton Paine and Cindy Danielson

    NIH has issued a new Final NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing, which expects NIH-funded researchers to prospectively submit a plan outlining how scientific data from their research will be managed and shared. On January 25, 2023, the new policy will come into effect for new and competing awards, and will replace the 2003 NIH Data Sharing Policy. Mr. Taunton Paine and Dr. Cindy Danielson from the NIH will explain this new Policy and answer any questions you may have. We recommend attending Wednesday’s “Preparing Researchers for the NIH Data Management & Sharing Policy: Putting Policy into Practice” session to continue the conversation of how Brown is planning to support researchers in the transition to the new Policy.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Government, Public & International Affairs, Libraries, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Providence Sleep Research Interest Group 2021-2022 Seminar Series: “How Poor Sleep Undermines the Socio-Emotional Competence of Youth: Filling in the Gaps”

    Candice A. Alfano, Ph.D.
    Professor of Psychology
    Director, Sleep and Anxiety Center of Houston (SACH)
    University of Houston

    Abstract: Sleep-wake regulation and emotional processing undergo constant, inter-dependent changes across development and pathways from inadequate sleep in childhood to subsequent affective disorders are particularly robust. Specific emotional and behavioral mechanisms that account for these relationships are poorly understood by comparison. This talk will present findings from several prospective and experimental studies in school-aged children and adolescents aimed at elucidating how early socio-emotional competence undermined when sleep is inadequate.

    Learn More More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116

    More Information 
  • Feb
    11
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Meghan Gallo, PhD Student - CLPS- Brown University

    Title: Exposure to early life adversity disrupts mechanisms of reward learning and decision making in mice

    Abstract: Exposure to early life adversity (ELA) is associated with heightened risk for the development of anhedonia, depression and substance use disorder. Adverse outcomes may reflect ELA-linked impacts on reward pursuit including blunted reward sensitivity, slower reward learning and alterations in reward-related neural activity. However, the effects of ELA on the development of reward motivated behavior and neural underpinnings that guide behavior remain poorly understood. Here, we used a mouse model of ELA to study sensitivity to reward and effort contingencies, and rate of adaptation to changing contingencies across reward rich and reward poor environments. Overall, ELA diminished reward sensitivity and disrupted reward-related learning and action selection. Importantly, we found evidence that mice exposed to ELA showed slower adaptation when contingencies changed and deficits in sensitivity to reward contingencies as a function of environmental richness. Ongoing work will explore the link between these outcomes and striatal dopamine function as well as computational modeling of behavior.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • This Friday (2/11/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Joseph Schacht will present, “Effects of pharmacological and genetic regulation of COMT signaling in Alcohol Use Disorder: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of tolcapone” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

    More Information 
  • Feb
    11
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Feb
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Dr. Ruth Rosenholtz - Principle Research Scientist - MIT

    Title: Demystifying the richness of visual perception

    Abstract:
    Human vision is full of puzzles. Observers can grasp the essence of a scene in an instant, yet when probed for details they are at a loss. People have trouble finding their keys, yet they may be quite visible once found. How does one explain this combination of marvelous successes with quirky failures? I will describe our attempts to develop a unifying theory that brings a satisfying order to multiple phenomena.

    One key is to understand peripheral vision. A visual system cannot process everything with full fidelity, and therefore must lose some information. Peripheral vision must condense a mass of information into a succinct representation that nonetheless carries the information needed for vision at a glance. We have proposed that the visual system deals with limited capacity in part by representing its input in terms of a rich set of local image statistics, where the local regions grow — and the representation becomes less precise — with distance from fixation. This scheme trades off computation of sophisticated image features at the expense of spatial localization of those features.

    What are the implications of such an encoding scheme? Critical to our understanding has been the use of methodologies for visualizing the equivalence classes of the model. These visualizations allow one to quickly see that many of the puzzles of human vision may arise from a single encoding mechanism. They have suggested new experiments and predicted unexpected phenomena. Furthermore, visualization of the equivalence classes has facilitated the generation of testable model predictions, allowing us to study the effects of this relatively low-level encoding on a wide range of higher-level tasks.

    Peripheral vision helps explain many of the puzzles of vision, but some remain. By examining the phenomena that cannot be explained by peripheral vision, we gain insight into the nature of additional capacity limits in vision. In particular, I will suggest that decision processes face general-purpose limits on the complexity of the tasks they can perform at a given time.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    10
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Translational Research Seminar Series

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    This month:

    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact Carol Viveiros at [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  Development and evolution of visual projections

    Host:  Dr. Alexander Jaworski, Neuroscience

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Feb
    9
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EST

    Carney Conversations: How we decide to love

    What does love do to our brains? Why do we fall in love? Why do we stay in love, and what makes us fall out of love?

    Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and to mark the occasion, the Carney Institute is holding a conversation about how the brain is affected by love, featuring two Brown University scientists who study emotion and motivation.

    Debbie Yee, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral fellow in cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences investigating the neural and computational mechanisms of interactions between motivation/affective processes, cognitive control and value-based decision-making.

     

    Joey Heffner is a Ph.D. candidate in psychology investigating emotions. He received a graduate award in 2020 from the Carney Institute for a project to understand when and how emotions facilitate or impair social decision-making.

     

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Project Sunshine is a 20+ year old international nonprofit that harnesses the healing power of play to serve children undergoing serious medical challenges. Before COVID, Project Sunshine’s trained volunteers would go into hospitals to engage children in collaborative games, imaginative crafts and activities to promote relaxation and mindfulness. In response to volunteer restrictions at hospitals beginning in March 2020, Project Sunshine developed a new program delivery method, TelePlay. TelePlay connects children and families through our trained volunteers, via a HIPPA-compliant Zoom platform. This new program has allowed Project Sunshine to reach new populations of children and families and has provided an opportunity to measure the health outcomes of our programs for the first time. Preliminary results show a reduction in anxiety for the participants involved and over the course of the next year we’re looking to demonstrate that TelePlay programming is effective in reaching this desired outcome.

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through the Center for Digital Health’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to CDH reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Social Sciences, Teaching & Learning
  • Feb
    9

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Grand Rounds*
    Parent-Based Treatment for Childhood Anxiety and OCD
    Eli R. Lebowitz, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor in the Yale Child Study Center
    Wednesday, February 9, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:
    Explain associations between family accommodation and child anxiety; Assess levels of family accommodation; and to Explain tools to reduce family accommodation and increase parental support.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    8
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Nicolas Fawzi, associate professor of molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Feb
    7
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Laurel Gabard-Durnam- Assistant Professor - Northeastern University
    Title: Sensitive periods in human neurodevelopment
    Abstract:
    Early experiences can have a profound influence on our brains, minds, and behavior across the lifespan. Which developmental experiences have these enduring effects, and how do they get embedded in our biology? My research program addresses these questions by focusing on sensitive periods of brain plasticity supporting development across domains of vision, language, and emotion regulation. In this talk I will illustrate how experiences in daily life, like music, can get embedded in the brain during sensitive periods of development with consequences for adult behavior and physiology. I will then provide evidence in the language and vision domains for brain mechanisms enabling sensitive periods in both healthy development and in clinical populations, including Autism Spectrum Disorder. Lastly, I will highlight ongoing work combining computational and brain imaging approaches to identify at-risk developmental trajectories, which can facilitate early interventions leveraging sensitive period neuroplasticity to achieve resilient outcomes.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    4
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Alexander Fengler - PhD student- CLPS - Brown University

    Title: Simulation Based Inference for Cognitive Process Models

    Abstract:Computational modeling has become a central aspect of research in the cognitive neurosciences. As the field matures, it becomes increasingly important to move beyond standard models to quantitatively assess models with richer dynamics that may better reflect underlying cognitive and neural processes. For example, sequential sampling models (SSMs) are a general class of models of decision making intended to capture processes jointly giving rise to reaction time distributions and choice data in n-alternative paradigms. A number of variations of these models are of theoretical interest to the research community, however empirical data analysis has historically been tied to a small subset for which likelihood functions are analytically tractable. Advances in methods designed for likelihood free inference have recently made it computationally feasible to consider a much larger spectrum of sequential sampling models. We will survey the landscape of this newly emerging technology and then focus on our own contribution to it (likelihood approximation networks), discussing the methodology as well as easily accessible software tools for the research community. Building on likelihood approximation networks we will provide some examples for how they can be used to generate scientific insights and provide some outlook on future developments.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Feb
    4
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Drew Jacoby-Senghor - Assistant Professor - UC Berkeley

    Title: Majority Members Misperceive Even ‘Win-Win’ Diversity Policies as Unbeneficial to Them

    Abstract:Six studies show that majority members misperceive diversity policies as unbeneficial to their ingroup, even when policies benefit them. Majority members perceived non-zero-sum university admission policies—policies that increase the acceptance of both URM (i.e., underrepresented minority) and non-URM applicants—as harmful to their ingroup when merely framed as “diversity” policies. Even for policies lacking a diversity framing (i.e., “leadership” policies), majority members misperceived that their ingroup would not benefit when policies provided relatively greater benefit to URMs, but not when they provided relatively greater benefit to non-URMs. No consistent evidence emerged that these effects were driven by ideological factors: Majority members’ misperceptions occurred even when accounting for self-reported beliefs around diversity, hierarchy, race, and politics. Instead, we find that majority group membership itself predicts misperceptions, such that both Black and White participants accurately perceive non-zero-sum diversity policies as also benefiting the majority when participants are represented as members of the minority group.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Theresa S. Betancourt is the inaugural Salem Professor in Global Practice at the Boston College School of Social Work and Director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her primary research interest is to understand the protective processes that contribute to risk and resilience in the mental health and development of children and adolescents facing adversity in a variety of cultures and settings. Dr. Betancourt has led several initiatives to adapt and test evidence-based behavioral and parenting interventions for children, youth, and families facing adversity due to poverty, illness, and violence. Dr. Betancourt additionally focuses on strategies for scaling out these interventions using implementation science approaches. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone (LSWAY). Dr. Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence that can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in Rwanda.

    In the US, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. through the collaborative development and evaluation of parenting programs led by refugees for refugees that can be linked to prevention services involving refugee community health workers.

    Dr. Betancourt will be co-presenting with Brown University MPH candidate, Lila Chamlagai.

    Lila K. Chamlagai was born and raised in a Bhutanese refugee camp in eastern Nepal. In the early 1990s, the Bhutanese regime expelled his parents and 100,000 other Nepali-speaking southern Bhutanese. Lila’s parents ended up in makeshift bamboo and plastic huts in the Goldhap refugee camp. After living in the camp for almost 17 years, Lila and his family were resettled in Springfield, MA, in 2011. Lila graduated from Springfield Central High School with a prestigious Bills and Melinda Gates Foundation’s: Gates Millennium Scholarship (GMS), a full-ride college scholarship. In addition, Lila is also the recipient of the Asian and Pacific Islander Scholarship (APIA), Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts Scholarship, and Elmira College Trustee Award. Currently, he serves as a Youth Community Advisory Board (CAB) member for the Refugee Behavioral Program at the Research Program on Children and Adversity at Boston College School of Social Work and an interviewer/ translator with the documentary project, “An untold story of Bhutanese American.”

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Feb
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 971 2856 9418

    Join the Carney Institute for its Brain Science External Postdoc Seminar Series (BrainExPo), featuring Carl Schoonover and Andrew Fink, postdoctoral fellows at Columbia University.

    The primary olfactory cortex has traditionally been hypothesized to establish the identity of odorants. Schoonover and Fink will discuss how their research has shown that after just a few weeks odor responses bear little resemblance to their original form, raising basic questions about the role of this brain region in olfactory perception.

    Abstract

    We have discovered that in the rodent primary olfactory cortex (piriform) the pattern of neural activity evoked by a smell changes with the passage of time. These changes, which unfold absent a task or learning paradigm, accumulate to such an extent that after just a few weeks odor responses bear little resemblance to their original form. The piriform has been traditionally hypothesized to establish the identity of odorants. Our observations have forced us to radically reconsider the role of this vast brain region in olfactory perception. We propose that the piriform operates instead as a flexible learning system, a ‘scratch pad’ that continually learns and continually overwrites itself. This poses the problem of how transient memory traces can subsequently be stored over long timescales.

    These results also raise the question of what the piriform learns. We have designed a behavioral assay that provides a sensitive readout of whether mice expect a given sensory event. Using this assay, we have demonstrated that mice learn the identity, order and precise timing of elements in a sequence of neutral odorants, A–>B, without reward or punishment. Simultaneous recordings in naïve primary olfactory cortex (piriform) show strong and distinct responses to both A and B. These diminish with experience in a manner that tracks these expectations: predictable cues, such as B in the A–>B sequence, evoke hardly any response in experienced animals. This does not reflect simple adaptation. When B is presented alone, it elicits robust activation. When B is omitted, and A is presented alone, piriform exhibits vigorous activity at the precise moment when the animal, expecting odor B, encounters nothing. Thus, when the external world conforms to expectation, piriform is relatively quiescent, but any departure from the expected results in vigorous activation. The biological learning mechanisms that generate this predictive activity, a feature more commonly encountered in higher order cortices, can be readily studied and probed in a circuit only two synapses from the sensory periphery.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • This Friday (1/28/22) at noon via Zoom, Dr. Lisa Marsch will present, “The application of digital health to the treatment of substance use disorders: State of the science and clinical practice” for this week’s CAAS Rounds!

    More Information 
  • Jan
    28
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Please join Brown University’s Contemplative Studies Initiative and the Carney Institute for Brain Science for the continuation of the Catherine Kerr Vital Energy in Health and Healing Lecture Series.  Dr. Julienne Bower, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry/Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA will speak on Mind-Body Interventions: Effects on Mental and Physical Health. The lecture and discussion will be held on January 27th from 7 - 8:30 pm, EST. This event is free and open to the public.
     
    This is a virtual event, so please register at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdOTM8GupqTpzJBCXOCbdzF_i8KJc1QtlOn4XJbwMKiEuoiVg/viewform in order to receive a Zoom link. You will also find an abstract of Dr. Bower’s lecture when you register.
     
     
    More Information 
  • Title:  The emergence and stability of working memory population representations

    Host:  Dr. Ahmed Abdelfattah

    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 

    Meeting ID: 567 679 7348

    Passcode: Pediatrics

    Pediatric Research Colloquium: “Dual Faces of Oxidative Stress: Lessons from Animal Models of Neonatal Brain Disease”
    Helen Parfenova, Ph.D.
    Professor of Physiology
    University of Tennessee Health Science Center
    Adjunct Member
    The Graduate Faculty in Biomedical Engineering
    University of Memphis
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    21
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Jan
    21
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    January 21, 2022

    ZOOM only

     

    Speaker:

    Yoav Dori, MD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics

    University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

    Topic:

    “Lymphatic Disorders in Pediatric Patients”

     

    Objectives:

    • Define basic lymphatic anatomy and physiology
    • Describe central lymphatic flow abnormalities in pediatric patients
    • Apply new imaging and treatment options for patients with lymphatic flow disorders
    CME Credit Survey link More Information 
  • Please join us for a virtual bench to bedside seminar. Eric Morrow, MD PhD, will lead this session on Christianson Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder with both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative components.

    This seminar will be conducted in collaboration with the Christianson Syndrome Association, a family-led non-profit organization whose mission is to advance the awareness and treatment of Christianson Syndrome through education and information, research, advocacy and support for individuals with Christianson Syndrome and their families.

    Please register to receive the Zoom link. 

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. CTN
  • NIA IMPACT Collaboratory Grand Rounds

    Thursday, January 20, 2022
    12:00 – 1:00 pm ET

    Healthcare-Generated Data to Identify People Living with Dementia for Embedded Pragmatic Trials

    Presented by:

    Julie Bynum, MD, MPH
    Margaret Terpenning Professor of Medicine, University of Michigan

    Zoom Conferencing
    Join from PC, Mac, iOS or Android:
    https://hebrewseniorlife.zoom.us/j/97344810673
    Dial
    In : +1 312 626 6799 (US or +1 470 250 9358 (US Toll)
    Meeting ID:
    973 4481 0673

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • The biggest threat to the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in healthcare is the concern that training algorithms on real world data will encrypt societal, institutional and individual biases, legitimize them and propagate them at scale. At present, the evaluation metric for machine learning in healthcare is accuracy. But just because an algorithm is accurate does not mean it should be implemented. If all that matters is accuracy, then algorithms developed using real-world data will encrypt the biases and prejudice that taint clinical decision-making. In an ideal world, only patient health and disease factors would determine — and guide the prediction of — clinical outcomes. However, studies have repeatedly demonstrated that this is far from the case. Women with heart attacks have worse outcomes when cared for by male cardiologists. Black newborns have better outcomes when their pediatricians are Black. Outcomes from sepsis are worse in hospitals that disproportionately treat minority patients after adjusting for illness severity and other confounders. To prevent AI from encoding social and cultural biases, we would like to predict an outcome if the world were fair, and the quality of care is the same across populations. We need algorithms that are better than humans - less prejudiced and more fair.

    Dr. Leo Celi is the clinical research director and principal research scientist at the MIT Laboratory for Computational Physiology (LCP), and a practicing intensive care unit (ICU) physician at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). In his work, Leo brings together clinicians and data scientists to support research using data routinely collected in the process of care. His group built and maintains the publicly-available Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care (MIMIC) database and the Philips-MIT eICU Collaborative Research Database, with more than 25,000 users from around the world. In addition, Leo is one of the course directors for HST.936 – global health informatics to improve quality of care, and HST.953 – collaborative data science in medicine, both at MIT. He is an editor of the textbook for each course, both released under an open access license. “Secondary Analysis of Electronic Health Records” has been downloaded more than a million times, and has been translated to Mandarin, Spanish, Korean and Portuguese. He is the inaugural editor of PLOS Digital Health.

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through the Center for Digital Health’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to CDH reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Entrepreneurship, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research
  • Providence Sleep Research Interest Group Seminar Series: Cannabis Use for Sleep Aid in College Students

    Patricia Goodhines, M.S.
    Clinical Psychology Resident, Brown University
    Doctoral Candidate in Clinical Psychology, Syracuse University

    Abstract: This talk will review the dynamic interplay of sleep problems and substance use among college students, with a specific emphasis on cannabis use for sleep aid. Recent work conducted by the investigator will be reviewed, including intensive longitudinal designs to elucidate proximal consequences and underlying mechanisms occurring in daily college life. The overall goals of this research program are to characterize cannabis sleep aid use and associated consequences among college students, as well as identify intervention targets to inform harm reduction efforts.


    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    14
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    January 14, 2022

    (TBD)IN-PERSON & Zoom

     

    Speaker:

    Brett Anderson, MD

    Florence Irving Assistant Professor

    Columbia University Irving Medical Ctr

    Topic:

    “Health Services Research: Assessing the System”

     

    Objectives:

    • Identify the potential data sources to assess health systems
    • Describe the procedure to leverage large data to address questions of outcomes and equity
    • Explain the power of individual, center, and neighborhood-level effects
    CME Credit Survey Link More Information 
  • Jan
    13
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Translational Research Seminar Series

    The Advance-CTR Translational Research Seminar Series showcases clinical and translational research from across Rhode Island. Presentations, followed by feedback, allow presenters the opportunity to refine and strengthen their research. Seminars are held virtually on the second Thursday of each month.

    This month:

    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Jan
    12
    Virtual
    11:00am - 12:00pm EST

    Child & Adolescent Grand Rounds

    School Mental Health, Suicide Prevention, and Wellbeing Promotion: Lessons from the last 10 years & Wisdom for the next 10
    Shashank V. Joshi, MD, FAAP, DFAACAP
    Professor of Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Education
    Director of Training in Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
    Stanford University Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
    Wednesday, January 12, 2022◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Jan
    11
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Karla Kaun, associate professor of neuroscience.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Jan
    7
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Jan
    7
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    January 7, 2022

    ZOOM only

     

    Speaker:

    Michelle Starr, MD

    Assistant Prof of Pediatrics

    Indiana Univ School of Medicine

    Topic:

    “Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury”

     

    Objectives:

    • Describe the principles of kidney function maturation in neonates and why defining AKI is challenging
    • Recognize the impact of acute kidney injury on short and long-term outcomes of patients, including babies and NICU graduates.
    • Examine the benefits of multidisciplinary collaborative neonatal nephrology care.
    CME Credit Survey link More Information 
  • Jan
    5
    11:00am - 12:30pm EST

    DPHB January Grand Rounds

    Leveraging Sleep and Circadian Science to Devise and Disseminate Novel Transdiagnostic Treatments to Improve Sleep Health
    Allison G. Harvey, PhD
    Professor of Psychology
    Director, The Golden Bear Sleep and Mood Research Clinic
    Licensed Clinical Psychologist
    Fellow, Association for Psychological Science (APS)
    Diplomate in Behavioral Sleep Medicine (DBSM)
    Certified in Behavioral Sleep Medicine (CBSM)
    Psychology Department, University of California, Berkeley

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Title:  “Molecular mechanisms of neural stem cell quiescence in aging and cancer”

    Advisor: Dr. Ashley Webb

    Also available via Zoom. Please contact Carol [email protected] for details/link

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Call for Applications! Apply for the Advance-CTR Mentored Research Awards. We’re funding two scholars for a two-year Mentored Research Award which includes the following benefits:

    1. Mentored Research Scholars receive up to 75% protected time up to $90,000 to conduct clinical or translational research projects for two years.
    2. Scholars are awarded an additional $25,000 each year for education or research supplies.
    3. The program provides mentoring and specialized training that prepare scholars to make significant advances in interdisciplinary strategies devoted to clinical and translational research.

    About the Mentored Research Awards

    The Mentored Research Awards target early-career investigators who are planning on applying for career-development awards (NIH K awards or equivalent) and launch independent research careers. Awardees receive protected time for research all within a structured, 2-year mentorship program.

    Key Dates & Deadlines

    • December 14, 2021: Last day to schedule calls with leadership
    • January 4, 2022: Preliminary applications due
    • March 10, 2022: Invited, full proposals due

    The anticipated performance period is August 1, 2022 to July 31, 2024.

    Application Resources

    Don’t go at it alone. Our Application Resources Page has information on scheduling a call with our program leadership to discuss your questions, two examples from investigators who have successfully applied to the program and other application resources.

    SEE THE RFA

    Learn More More Information 
  • Jan
    4
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title: “ds-Tango, a disynaptic tracing technique in Drosophila”

    Advisor: Dr. Gilad Barnea

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Jan
    4
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am EST

    CANCELED: COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    The Computational Biology Core holds open office hours from 10:00 - 11:30 AM every Tuesday and Thursday via Zoom. This is a drop-in session where CBC staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s biology and medical research computing resources at Brown.

    More Information 
  • There is a clear gap between what an autonomous robot can currently do and what it should be able to do to be competent in many complex, human-centered domains. One primary challenge is uncertainty, a constant factor that a robot must consider when deciding how to act, due to limited knowledge of the environment, noisy on-board sensors, and the unstructured nature of the human world. At the same time, humans can provide, conveniently through natural language, a powerful source of knowledge and feedback to the robot. However, natural language is inherently subjective and ambiguous. Furthermore, to make the most of the human’s presence, the robot should ideally be able to continuously interact with the human using natural language, a demanding yet necessary capability towards future collaborative robots.

    This thesis proposal bridges the gap by proposing an approach to robot acting and interacting in human environments based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDPs), which principally model both partial observability and perceptual uncertainty. We view natural language as an additional modality of stochastic perception as well as a type of action the robot can perform, which reduces the barrier of interfacing with humans. In support of our approach, we present research completed that progress from “act” to “interact,” using the POMDP framework. We focus our studies on object search, a practically valuable yet generally complex capability that encapsulates the key elements of uncertainty in human environments. On the end of “act,” we propose approaches for efficient object search in 3D human spaces that impose an octree-based structure over the environment as well as using the spatial correlation with other, non-target objects in the environment. Progressing towards “interact,” we propose an approach that enables robots to interpret possibly ambiguous spatial language (e.g. “The red car is in front of Chase Bank”) for urban object search that involves predicting the human’s latent frame of reference. Finally, on the end of “interact,” we present some preliminary work in enabling robots to engage in natural language dialogue with a human while searching for objects. We discuss a plan to complete this project, which completes this thesis.
    Host: Professor Stefanie Tellex
    More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Passcode: 581429

    Generally intelligent agents must learn and plan in complex environments. Often these environments have considerable structure, such as factored dynamics governed by Markov latent state information, that can be used to simplify decision making. But such structure is typically unknown to agents and must discovered before it can be exploited. I propose to study methods for building agents capable of autonomously constructing abstractions that accurately characterize the underlying structure of a complex environment while simplifying decision making within that environment. First, I will describe my recently-completed work on learning Markov state abstractions for efficient reinforcement learning. Next, I will describe my work on learning “focused” abstract actions for capitalizing on factored representations in planning tasks. Then I will propose to investigate how to learn such factored representations, given a Markov state abstraction as a starting point. Finally, I will outline a plan for a full system demonstration that incorporates all of these pieces to build a single, general-purpose agent.

    Host: Professor George Konidaris

    More Information 
  • Dec
    17
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Julia Minson - Associate Professor - Harvard University
    Title: Conversational Receptiveness: Improving Engagement with Opposing Views
    Abstract:We examine “conversational receptiveness” – the use of language to communicate one’s willingness to thoughtfully engage with opposing views. We develop an interpretable machine- learning algorithm to identify the linguistic profile of receptiveness (Studies 1A-B). We then show that in contentious policy discussions, government executives who were rated as more receptive - according to our algorithm and their partners, but not their own self-evaluations - were considered better teammates, advisors, and workplace representatives (Study 2). Furthermore, using field data from a setting where conflict management is endemic to productivity, we show that conversational receptiveness at the beginning of a conversation forestalls conflict escalation at the end. Specifically, Wikipedia editors who write more receptive posts are less prone to receiving personal attacks from disagreeing editors (Study 3). Finally, we develop a “receptiveness recipe” intervention based on our algorithm (Study 4).

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    17
    Virtual
    1:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Non-Invasive Monitoring of Gastrointestinal Development in Preterm Infants”

    Eric B. Ortigoza, M.D.
    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    Department of Pediatrics
    Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/7683282244

    Calendar link: Google Calendar

    Deep learning has elicited breakthrough successes on a wide array of machine learning tasks. Outside of the fully-supervised regime, however, many deep learning algorithms are brittle and unable to reliably perform across model architectures, dataset types, and optimization parameters. As a consequence, these algorithms are not easily usable by non-machine-learning experts, limiting their ability to meaningfully impact science and society. This talk addresses some nuanced pathologies around the use of deep learning for active and passive online learning. I’ll start by discussing how to perform practical active learning for neural networks in ways that are robust to environmental variables. Afterward, I will overview the deleterious generalization effects of warm-starting the optimization of neural networks in sequential environments, and why they present a major problem for deep learning. I close by introducing a simple method that remedies this problem, and by describing some important ramifications of its application.

    Host: Professor Michael Littman
    More Information 
  • Dec
    17
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Dec
    17
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds

    December 17, 2021

    ZOOM only

     

    Speaker:

    Jason Newland, MD

    Professor of Pediatrics, Washington Univ, St. Louis

    Children’s Hospital St. Louis, MO

     

    Topic:

    “Antimicrobial Stewardship: Everyone’s Responsibility”

     

    Objectives:

    • Discuss the history of antibiotics
    • List the impact of antibiotic resistance
    • List effective inpatient & outpatient antimicrobial stewardship strategies
    • Discuss the impact of antimicrobial stewardship on clinical outcomes

    Rhode Island Specific: This program qualifies for 1.0 hour CME Credit in Risk Management and Antimicrobial Stewardship, two of the required areas of section 6.0; 6.2.1 RI CME re-licensure requirements.

    CME CREDIT SURVEY More Information 
  • Title: “ Artificially manipulating positive and negative memory engrams”

    Host:  Olivia McKissick, NSGP Graduate Student

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Title:   Investigating lateral inhibition in the nucleus accumbens:  organization and modulation by monoamines

    Also available via Zoom.  Please contact Carol [email protected] for details/link

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Zoom: https://brown.zoom.us/j/5780073283?pwd=azloVHZOb1VDTkx4S0QyRmY3WldLdz09

    Meeting ID: 578 007 3283
    Passcode: 599248
    Grasping is one of the most important open problems in robotics; the very point of a robot is to exert force on the world to achieve a goal, and most such exertions require the robot to execute a grasp first. For a home robot to be effective, it must load a dishwasher with breakable plates; for a repair robot to be effective, it must operate tools; for a caretaker robot to be effective, it must perform chores for those with illnesses. All of these activities require manipulating objects, which in turn requires grasping them effectively. Additionally, to be useful, the robot must be able to perform these tasks on objects it has never seen before, in applications where manipulation failures can be very costly. Deploying a robot to such an environment, where exact operating conditions are unknown and vary between instances, is therefore challenging because systems and algorithms developed in a lab may perform poorly when introduced to a novel environment. A robot must quickly learn to manipulate new objects it encounters using limited prior knowledge.

    In this thesis, I examine robot grasping in three contexts. First, I propose a general grasp detection system that enables a multi-finger gripper to use multiple types of grasps to pick objects of varying sizes from dense clutter. For example, precision grasps are necessary for precisely picking small objects from the surface of a table using fingertips, while power grasps stably hold large objects by enveloping them with the gripper’s fingers. Given a visual representation of the scene, the system proposes a set of potential candidate grasp poses. These poses are evaluated using a neural network model that takes as input point clouds centered at a grasp pose and returns the probabilities that a grasp of each type would succeed at the given pose. This system is trained using a dataset generated in simulation and evaluated on a real robot. Explicitly modeling grasp type boosted the system’s object removal rate by 8.5% over the highest performing baseline.

    Next, I propose to define a framework for specializing a generic grasp detector to a task-oriented grasp detector. A task-oriented grasp detector is a classifier that predicts which grasp poses serve as initial states that enable a given manipulation controller to complete a task. As these classifiers are instance dependent, they cannot be trained in simulation and transferred to the real world. Instead, they must be trained directly in the task for which they are required. Since such manipulation data is costly to generate in the real world, semi-supervised learning, active learning, and a generic grasp quality prior are employed to minimize the amount of data necessary to achieve good performance. The learning potential of this framework will be demonstrated on a real robot.

    Finally, I propose a learning algorithm that learns a task-oriented grasp detector for a given task while simultaneously learning the manipulation policy that the grasp must enable. This joint learning problem is challenging due to the entanglement between the task-oriented grasp detector and the manipulation policy, which changes over time as it is learned; selecting different grasps changes the initial states of the manipulation policy, while a grasp pose that one policy fails the task from could enable an updated policy to complete the task. This system overcomes a key obstacle to robot learning with grasping, enabling a robot to quickly learn both how to manipulate an object and where to grasp the object to begin the manipulation. With this system, a robot could be deployed to a novel environment and learn to manipulate novel objects within a small number of attempts.
     
    Host: Professor George Konidaris
    More Information 
  • Dec
    15
    Please join us for a Brainstorming a trial design for studying the impact of Aduhelm: An Interactive Exchange
     
    Featuring: Maria Glymour, University of California, San Francisco and  Vince Mor, Brown University School of Public Health
    December 15 at 1 PM
     
    This interactive seminar will open with background on Aducanumab (brand name, Aduhelm), a new Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia medication that has generated controversy as a result of its risk-benefit profile and high price. Although the Federal Drug Administration recently approved it, Medicare’s determination regarding coverage is still pending. Participants will be asked to join in critiquing a series of pragmatic trial study designs, which must take into consideration Aducanumab’s administration (as an outpatient infusion) and the high rate of anticipated adverse events.
    The Joint Seminar Series on Clinical Trials in Aging is co-hosted by the Center for Long-Term Care Quality & Innovation (Q&I) at Brown University and the Interventional Studies in Aging Center (ISAC) in the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife. Lectures focus on issues in the design and execution of clinical trials, including trials currently in the field.
    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Humans naturally want to help each other, but modern society traps “mental health” behind expensive bureaucracies. Cheeseburger Therapy teaches ordinary people the skills of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and provides structured oversight to make it safe for them to help other humans through the internet—and get paid doing so.

    Cheeseburger Therapy began as research at the University of Washington but is now a functioning community that changes real human lives. In this talk we will show three innovations that make it possible:

    • A novel version of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, custom-designed for the internet, embedded in a User Interface that breaks the therapeutic process into a flowchart of steps that can be taught to ordinary humans, tracked by a computer, and evaluated as a reliable method for changing someone’s life.
    • A research platform for developing new therapeutic methods, by A/B testing them within practicing online community and evaluating results against a baseline. The platform features a novel design for text-chat that increases both empathy and anonymity, increasing signal and reducing noise within experiments.
    • A novel interactive peer-to-peer training system that can teach ordinary humans, in about 20 hours, to provide consistently helpful therapeutic conversations. Helpers improve their emotional listening, learn new thought skills, and gain the opportunity to graduate and make money helping people.

    Michael Toomim is a Computer Scientist trained at the University of Washington and the University of California at Berkeley, who currently works at the Invisible College in Berkeley. He has expertise in Human-Computer Interaction, and has worked in Cognitive Psychology, Social Computing, Data Synchronization, and Programming Tools. His PhD thesis defined the first measurable approach to Attention Economics. He currently co-leads the Cheeseburger Therapy and Braid projects.

    Please note that this virtual event, including attendees’ Zoom video, audio and screen name, and questions or chats, will be recorded. All or portions of the event recording may be shared through the Center for Digital Health’s digital channels. Individuals who do not want their identities to be captured are solely responsible for turning off their camera, muting their microphone and/or adjusting their screen name accordingly. By attending this event, you consent to your name, voice, and/or image being recorded and to CDH reproducing, distributing and otherwise displaying the recording, within its sole discretion.

    Register Here More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116
    Contact Elyse or Carol for passcode

    More Information 
  • Dec
    10
    Virtual
    1:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Maternal diet, offspring immunity and necrotizing enterocolitis”

    Julie Mirpuri, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
    Department of Pediatrics
    Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

     

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • To join virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/96004642268

    Abstract: Autonomous robots have the potential to transform our everyday lives, yet most of these systems struggle outside of the lab or carefully designed warehouses. This talk will first describe our work toward a new generation of robots that learn to handle the highly dynamic and uncertain nature of human environments. In particular, I will highlight the importance of obtaining accurate cost-to-go models, which we show can be learned from self-play or aerial imagery for a variety of applications, from navigation among pedestrians to last-mile delivery. The talk will then dive into the challenges of certifying the safety and robustness properties of machines that learn. I will describe our work that uses convex relaxations and set partitioning to simplify the analysis of highly nonlinear neural networks used across AI. These analysis tools led to the first framework for deep reinforcement learning that is certifiably robust to adversarial attacks and noisy sensor data. The tools also enable reachability analysis – the calculation of all states that a system could reach in the future – for systems that employ neural networks in the feedback loop, which provides another notion of safety for learning machines that interact with uncertain environments. Finally, I will highlight the challenges of high-speed, off-road autonomy deep in the woods, which is a focus of our recent work.

    Michael Everett is a Research Scientist in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received the S.B., S.M., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering in 2015, 2017, and 2020, respectively, at MIT. His research lies at the intersection of machine learning, robotics, and control theory. He was an author of a Featured Article in IEEE Access 2021 and works that won the Best Paper Award on Cognitive Robotics at IROS 2019, the Best Student Paper Award and a Finalist for the Best Paper Award on Cognitive Robotics at IROS 2017, and a Finalist for the Best Multi-Robot Systems Paper Award at ICRA 2017. He has been interviewed live on the air by BBC Radio and his team’s robots were featured by Today Show and the Boston Globe.

    Host: Michael Littman

    More Information 
  • Dec
    10
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Dec
    10
    Virtual
    8:30am - 9:30am EST

    Pediatric Grand Rounds - UPDATE

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Due to COVID RED status - this Grand Rounds has been changed to ZOOM ONLY 

    December 10, 2021

    CHANGED TO ZOOM ONLY

     

    Speaker:

    Anthony Flores, MD, MPH, PhD

    Associate Professor, Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases

    Health Sciences Center of Houston, Texas

     

    Topic:

    “Emergence and Increasing Frequency of Antimicrobial Resistance in Group A Streptococcus

     

    Objectives:

    • Describe the breadth of disease caused by group A Streptococcus (GAS)
    • Describe the epidemiology of GAS including factors associated with increased frequency of antimicrobial resistance
    • Discuss the importance of bacterial whole genome sequencing in GAS surveillance
    • Describe research aimed at understanding the impact of antimicrobial resistance on GAS disease

    Rhode Island Specific: This program qualifies for 1.0 hour CME Credit in Risk Management and Antimicrobial Stewardship, two of the required areas of section 6.0; 6.2.1 RI CME re-licensure requirements.

    CME CREDIT SURVEY More Information 
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: 
    Meeting ID: 962 3519 4892
    Passcode: 963454

    Brown Fly Club Seminar: “Complementary multisensory integration circuits in Drosophila”

    Andrew M. Dacks, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Department of Biology
    West Virginia University

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Drop-in at any time between 10:30am -12:30pm

    Need a fun and inspiring way to start off reading period this semester? Why not come by and give Virtual Reality a try! We will be demoing some popular VR applications in our Occulus Quest 2 headsets. No experience necessary. Just bring yourself and your imagination!  

    More Information 
  • Dec
    8
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Guillaume Thomas - Associate Professor - University of Toronto

    Title: Switch-reference, discourse coherence and centering

    Abstract: 
    Switch Reference (SR) is a family of grammatical devices whose primary function is to indicate whether two linked clauses have coreferential pivots, where the pivot is a prominent argument of some sort. We refer to the two clauses linked by a SR marker as the marked clause (which contains the SR marker) and the reference clause. In some languages, in addition to their function of reference tracking, SR markers can be used to indicate whether the events or situations described by the marked and reference clauses differ with respect to some parameter, such as time, place or actuality. This phenomenon is known as non-canonical switch ­reference. One of the open questions in studies of SR is whether canonical and non­canonical SR are different manifestations of a single process (Stirling, 1993), whether they are triggered by different configurations (McKenzie, 2012), or whether they are different phenomena altogether, with independent syntax and semantics (Weisser, 2012; Baker & Camargo Souza, 2019).

    This talk will discuss the relation between canonical and non­canonical SR in Mbyá, focusing on a construction that has received little attention in the literature, in which a pronoun is used in place of the marked clause. Crucially, we show that despite the availability of non­-canonical interpretations‚ most occur­rences of reduced SR (in a corpus of narratives) still track subject reference across sentences. In addition, we argue that non-canonical uses of SR marking are not associated with a set of necessary and sufficient conditions, but compete with canonical uses in the same contexts and configurations: speakers are more likely to use SR marking to indicate subject identity or difference, but may also use it to emphasize contrast or similarity between situations, although this use is less frequent.

    In light of these observations, we argue for a probabilistic analysis of SR in Mbyá. Besides its contribution to the typology of switch-­reference, this work also contributes to discussions of the probabilistic nature of linguistic knowledge, and illustrates the value of quantitative corpus studies for formal theories of syntax and semantics.

     

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Sarah Y. Vinson, MD
    Lorio Forensics
    Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Pediatrics
    Morehouse School of Medicine
    Wednesday, December 8, 2021◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/CA-21-22
    Join Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/91572597604
    Meeting ID: 915 7259 7604

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Dec
    7
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Alex Fleischmann, Provost’s Associate Professor of Brain Science. 

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • The Carney Institute for Brain Science is launching a new Advancing Research Careers Program for early career investigators at Brown University and its affiliated hospitals. Please join the program’s leadership team for a virtual open house on Tuesday, December 7, at 3 p.m. to learn about the program, its objectives and application process.

    Please see the attached Call for Applications for program details and application information.

    About the program

    The Carney Institute’s Advancing Research Careers (ARC) program aims to advance the research careers of women and persons historically excluded due to ethnicity and race in brain sciences at the level of advanced postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty. ARC is funded by an R25 award from NINDS and will support a cohort of up to six highly qualified participants each year through structured mentorship, research support and activities that contribute to successful neuroscience research careers. In this two-year program, selected ARC Scholars will advance a research project while expanding their mentorship network, meeting regularly with the ARC Scholar cohort, and attending professional development and quantitative skills training to advance their career goals.

    More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. Advising, Mentorship, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116
    Contact Elyse or Carol for passcode

    More Information 
  • Dec
    7

    Please join us for our Fall 2021 Implementation Science Seminar series, featuring speakers at Brown University, Providence VA and University of California San Diego, for presentations on sustainability, implementation strategies, hybrid trial designs, implementation blueprints and policy implementation. The sessions will run on Tuesdays from 10-11 am between November 2 and December 7, 2021.

    Tuesday, December 7

    Erika Crable, PhD: “Policy Implementation in the Criminal Justice Context”
    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Dec
    6
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Kelsey Lucca - Assistant Professor - Arizona State University
    Title: The building blocks of curiosity in infancy and early childhood
    Abstract: Young children are exceptionally curious. They want to know how and why things work the way they do. This drive to seek out information propels early learning: by the time children enter school they have an impressive understanding of how the world around them works. And critically, when children encounter information that contradicts what they already know, they actively work to update their knowledge. Despite the importance of early curiosity in learning, we know very little about how curiosity first develops in infancy, and what factors shape curiosity during the first five years of life, when individual differences are first emerging.

    In this talk, I will present a series of experiments aimed at exploring the developmental building blocks of early curiosity and the factors that shape them. In one experiment, I probe individual differences in curiosity by asking whether parental engagement in curiosity-promoting activities predicts infants’ curious tendencies in daily as well as their looking preferences for physically impossible events. In a second experiment, I examine what factors lead children to prioritize certain types of information over others when deciding what type of new information to learn. Finally, I will present a new method for measuring children’s exploration in a virtual environment.

    Together, this work provides new insights into the developmental building blocks of early curiosity, as well as new methodological tools that can be used to measure individual differences in curiosity – starting in infancy and extending into early childhood.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    6
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:00pm EST

    Statistics Seminar Series | Dr. Li-Xuan Qin

    Dr. Li-Xuan Qin, Associate Member in Biostatistics; PhD in biostatistics; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer

    Transcriptomics Data Normalization: Let’s Put It into Context
    This talk will describe an assessment of transcriptomics data normalization (for removing artifacts due to inconsistent experimental handling in data collection) in the context of downstream analysis. With robustly benchmarked data and novel re-sampling-based simulations, I will illustrate several caveats of data normalization for biomarker discovery, sample classification, and survival prediction. I will then discuss the underlying causes for these caveats and provide alternative approaches that are more effective for dealing with the data artifacts.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Dec
    3
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Apoorva Bhandari - Investigator -  CLPS - Brown University
    Title: Flexible representations for a nimble cognition
    Abstract: Human cognition is exquisitely flexible, enabling people to nimbly adapt to novel situations or altered circumstances. Two fundamental capacities lie at the heart of such flexible cognition. First, is the capacity for deliberate control of cognition to configure its repertoire to the demands of a new situation. Second is the capacity for effectively generalizing knowledge from past experiences to simplify learning in new situations. In this presentation, I will argue that the key to understanding these capacities lies in understanding the content and format of representations of task information and their underlying neural codes.
    I will begin by briefly describing two lines of research that demonstrate the value of a representational account of flexible cognition. Next, I will describe a theoretical framework for understanding task representations which highlights a crucial trade-off between their separability and generalizability, and motivates testable hypotheses about how the format of neural task representations will shape both cognitive control and generalization. Finally, I will summarize ongoing work that addresses methodological challenges in empirically measuring the structure of neural representations in humans, and future plans for testing these hypotheses.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    3
    Virtual
    1:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Exploring human brain glycan sulfation at the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer’s disease”

    Aric Logsdon, Ph.D.
    Acting Instructor of Medicine
    University of Washington
    Health Science Specialist
    Veterans Affairs/Research and Development
    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Chemical and Environmental Engineering Seminar Series

    Dr. Deisy Fernandes, Presidential Post-Doctoral Fellow at Brown University, will present a talk: “Scalable Assembly of 2D Materials into 3D Functional Devices.”

    Abstract: Two-dimensional nanomaterials such as graphene, boron nitride (BN), and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) have diverse chemical and physical properties leading to numerous applications of nanoelectronics biomedical applications such as biosensors, antibacterial, drug delivery, cell imaging tissue engineering, energy storage applications in batteries and lubricants. Democratizing these 2D nanomaterials, I have researched biosensing for cancer detection, 3D printing electronic devices, and the controlled release of intercalated molecules. Here I will show the electronic conduction mechanism, the capability of integration and intercalation, in addition to bioimaging and characterization.

    Bio: Deisy Fernandes began her undergraduate studies in Brazil at the
    University of Sao Paulo, and finished her B.S. and Ph.D in Chemical Engineering at the University of Illinois, Chicago. She received an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and an NSF Graduate Research Opportunities Worldwide fellowship for research at the University of Bordeaux. She engages with the Society of Women Engineering, the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineering, and the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science. She has served on panels at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students, the Voices of Success Panel Discussion, the UIC College of Engineering Advisory Board Panel for Woman Programs. She has won the UIC Chancellor Student Service and Leadership award and the Eugertha Bates Memorial award.

    Host: Professor Robert Hurt

    More Information 
  • Dec
    3
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program Seminar Bench to Bedside Series:
    “Stress and drug recurrence in patients with Opioid Use Disorder”

    Carolina Haass-Koffler, Pharm.D.

    Associate Professor
    Center for Alcohol & Addiction Studies
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
    Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences
    Carney Institute for Brain Science

    Carline Fleig, MSN, ANP-C

    Research Nurse Practitioner
    Center for Alcohol & Addiction Studies

    Zoe Brown, B.A.

    Research Assistant
    Center for Alcohol & Addiction Studies
    Host: Dr. Eric Morrow

    Organized by Brown University’s Center for Translational Neuroscience

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • Dec
    2
    Virtual and In Person
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Sean O’Bryan, Postdoc - CLPS - Brown University

    Title: Decoding the role of learned selective attention in categorization and predictive inference

    Abstract:
    Different classes of objects are associated with distinct representational topographies in ventral occipitotemporal cortex. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) and independent fMRI localizer data, researchers can leverage this object selectivity to test how the neural representations of stimuli change as a function of task (e.g., instructions to “attend house” or “attend face” among simultaneously presented objects). One promising, but relatively understudied application of MVPA is to index the representations people use to guide the generalization of learning, particularly in contexts where generalization strategies can vary substantially across subjects. In a series of category learning experiments, we used this approach to reveal how learned selective attention to task-relevant objects emerges over time, and show that representational indices of attention can account for individual differences in task performance and generalization across several cognitive phenomena: Stopping decisions, base rate neglect, and retrospective revaluation. Collectively, these results underscore the utility of MVPA approaches for testing theoretical and model-based predictions about the role of attention in learning and subsequent learning-based inference.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/7144702637?pwd=VTFXL0ZXc2Z6Z1p5c3dZZ2pFQmRSdz09

    (Meeting ID: 714 470 2637, Passcode: 266033)

    Add to calendar: Google Calendar

    Computational models of language have largely been restricted to text-only data. A fundamental criticism of such a constraint is that it inhibits their language understanding ability, since they have never had access to the underlying processes and phenomena that are being referred to by words. This lack of grounding—that is, the ability to tie a word for which they have learned representations for, to its actual use in the world, means that they cannot be used for tasks that require such grounded reasoning. In this thesis, we explore methods that take in natural language, and learn to ground it to components of decision processes in reinforcement learning tasks. Our models either ground natural language to intermediate symbolic language representations that integrate with world states, or directly ground language to components of the world. Further, we explore how we might transfer grounded knowledge to pretrained text-only models while keeping the previously learned textual knowledge and parameters intact. Our primary contributions develop models that 1) convert natural language instructions to symbolic task representations, 2) use multilingual instructions to guide reinforcement learning agents and 3) allow different parts of natural language to update different parts of a reinforcement learning system. We end by discussing the steps forward which outline the goal of connecting models of language to models of the world.
    Host: Professor Ellie Pavlick
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  • Oren Shriki, Ph.D.

    Department of Cognitive and Brain Sciences
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
    Abstract

    The critical brain hypothesis proposes that our brain is poised close to the border between two qualitatively different dynamical states. Whereas sub-critical dynamics are characterized by premature termination of activity propagation, super-critical dynamics are associated with runaway excitation. The talk will review evidence from recent years regarding this hypothesis and introduce the concept of neuronal avalanches, spatiotemporal cascades of activity whose sizes obey a power-law distribution. They are observed in a wide range of experiments from small-scale cortical networks to large-scale human EEG and MEG and are considered as evidence for critical brain dynamics. The avalanche analysis provides novel measures which reflect the underlying neural gain and are sensitive to changes in the balance of excitatory and inhibitory processes. Consequently, deviations from critical dynamics could serve as neuromarkers for disorders associated with altered balance. The utility of such neuromarkers will be demonstrated in several contexts, including epilepsy, prolonged wakefulness, schizophrenia, and disorders of consciousness.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Lisa Uebelacker, PhD
    Professor, Research Scholar Track
    Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Department of Family Medicine
    Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Assistant Director, Psychosocial Research Program, Butler Hospital
    Wednesday, December 1, 2021◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
    Course Link: https://cme-learning.brown.edu/DPHB-21-22
    Join Zoom Meeting: https://brown.zoom.us/j/93265817787
    Meeting ID: 932 6581 7787

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Behavioral Decision Science final project presentations, various student speakers. 

    More Information Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Dr. Amelia Tseng, American University and Smithsonian

    Title: “They talk just like an African American kid, and if you hear their Spanish, it’s worse”: Raciomultilingual ideologies in Latinx language and migration

    Abstract: Migration and global cities raise new questions for language, identity, and diversity, as well-established discourses of race, class, and social status vie with new semiotic meanings that emerge transnationally and in the local context. Washington, D.C. is a unique site of Latinx migration and sociolinguistic contact. Latinx of all backgrounds, with a Salvadoran majority that is unique in the United States, mingle in a diverse city which is historically both African American and racially segregated, and which is undergoing radical gentrification-related change. I argue that a raciomultilingual perspective is essential to understanding the language beliefs and behavior of U.S. Latinxs and other racialized immigrant groups within this complexity. This approach emphasizes that multilingual repertoires must be studied holistically since raciolinguistic ideologies are not constrained by abstract language boundaries and speakers do not experience their languages in isolation. Taking the example of D.C. Latinx language, I examine multiscalar language ideologies that circulate from the local to transnational and relate to particularities of identity construction as well as commonalities of broader systems of colonialist thought. I conclude with a reflection on directions in linguistics and related fields in relationship to foundational questions of language as part of society and social change.

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    30

    Please join us for a lecture from our Joint Seminar Series on Clinical Trials in Aging: 

    A Modified and Extended Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP-ME) for Delirium Prevention during COVID-19: Development and Feasibility Testing.

    Dr. Fong and Baker will present findings from the recently completed HELP-ME pilot study supported by ISAC. Thispro ject is focused on the development of remote/distancedHospital Elder Life Program (HELP) protocols. The development process, feasibility pilot, and preliminaryquantitative and qualitative results will be discussed. Dr. Sharon K Inouye, Director of Aging Brain Center at the Marcus Institute and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, will serve as discussant for the session.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116
    Contact Elyse or Carol for passcode

    More Information 
  • Join the Carney Institute for a conversation about early diagnosis and risk factors in Alzheimer’s disease, featuring:

    • Yu-Wen Alvin Huang, M.D., GLF Translational Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry
    • Hwamee Oh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute, and Christopher Moore, associate director of the Carney Institute.

    Please register below to receive the Zoom link.

    Videos of previous Carney Conversations More InformationRegistration for this event is now closed. ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    30
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:30am EST

    COBRE CBC Walk-in Office hours

    The Computational Biology Core is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

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    Meeting ID: 952 5017 1953
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  • Nov
    30

    Please join us for our Fall 2021 Implementation Science Seminar series, featuring speakers at Brown University, Providence VA and University of California San Diego, for presentations on sustainability, implementation strategies, hybrid trial designs, implementation blueprints and policy implementation. The sessions will run on Tuesdays from 10-11 am between November 2 and December 7, 2021.

    Tuesday, November 30

    Hannah Frank, PhD: “Educational Implementation Strategies: Best Practices for Training and Consultation”
    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    29
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Christy Byrd Associate Professor North Carolina State University
    Title: Developing Critical Consciousness in Diversity Courses
    Abstract: In this talk I will describe a framework for understanding the awareness, knowledge, and skills developed in college diversity courses that integrates key concepts from the critical consciousness and cultural competence literatures. I will then talk about our ongoing work that uses a rubric approach rather than self-report to measure students’ trajectories of learning in diversity courses.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    23
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Carney Faculty Chalk Talk

    Join Carney’s Center for the Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits for a faculty chalk talk featuring Gilad Barnea, center director and the Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science.

    Please note, this event is open to faculty members only.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116
    Contact Elyse or Carol for passcode

    More Information 
  • Please join us for our Fall 2021 Implementation Science Seminar series, featuring speakers at Brown University, Providence VA and University of California San Diego, for presentations on sustainability, implementation strategies, hybrid trial designs, implementation blueprints and policy implementation. The sessions will run on Tuesdays from 10-11 am between November 2 and December 7, 2021.

    Tuesday, November 23

    Kelli Scott, PhD & Natalie Rodriguez-Quintana, PhD: “Development and Use of Implementation Blueprints”
    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    19
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Janice Chen Associate Professor - Johns Hopkins University
    Title: Brain Dynamics Underlying Memory for Continuous Natural Events
    Abstract:The world confronts our senses with a continuous stream of rapidly changing information. Yet, we experience life as a series of episodes or events, and in memory these pieces seem to become even further organized. How do we recall and give structure to this complex information? Recent studies have begun to examine these questions using naturalistic stimuli and behavior: subjects view audiovisual movies and then freely recount aloud their memories of the events. Within the default network, we find brain activity patterns that are unique to individual events, and which reappear during verbal recollection; robust generalization of these event-specific patterns across people; systematic transformation of the activity patterns between encoding and recall; and memory effects driven by the network structure of links between events in a narrative. Both the behavioral and neural phenomena replicate across multiple movies with a wide variety of semantic content. These observations construct a picture of how the default network contributes to our ability to comprehend and recall real-world events that unfold continuously across time.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    19
    Virtual
    1:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Dose response analysis of inter-alpha inhibitor protein treatment after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats”

    Liam M. Koehn, Ph.D.
    Postdoctoral Research Associate
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
    Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island

    More Information 
  • Zoom link for those choosing to join virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/96730142900

    Add to calendar

    Abstract: I will present a theory for reasoning about the decisions made by AI systems, particularly classifiers such as decision trees, random forests, Bayesian networks and some limited types of neural networks. The theory is based on compiling the input-output behavior of classifiers into discrete functions which are then reasoned about using symbolic methods. At the heart of the theory is the notion of “complete reason” behind a decision which is extracted from a classifier/instance pair and can be used to answer many queries about the decision, including ones pertaining to explainability, robustness and bias. I will present recent results on quantified Boolean logic which provide the semantics of this theory, and discuss developments on tractable Boolean circuits and knowledge compilation which provide the computational arm for employing the theory in practice.

    Adnan Darwiche is a professor and former chairman of the computer science department at UCLA. He directs the Automated Reasoning Group, which focuses on symbolic reasoning, probabilistic reasoning and their applications to machine learning. Professor Darwiche is Fellow of AAAI and ACM and recipient of the Lockheed Martin Excellence in Teaching Award. He is a former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research (JAIR) and author of “Modeling and Reasoning with Bayesian Networks,” by Cambridge University Press.

    Host: Michael Littman

    More Information 
  • CAAS Rounds presents: Diversity of Alcohol Use and Associated Consequences among U.S. Hispanics with Dr. Raul Caetano

    More Information 
  • Nov
    19
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  Coding of Abstract Rules by Distinct Neurons in Primate Visual Cortex

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Note: You may also attend this event via Zoom (Meeting ID: 978 5998 6393 | Passcode: 451768). This workshop requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account.

    Carney Methods Meetups are informal gatherings focused on methods for brain science, moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience. Carlos Vargas-Irwin, assistant professor (research) of neuroscience, and Tommy Hosman, research engineer at BrainGate, will join Ritt in an open discussion of current debates over the validity and interpretation of some leading methods (UMAP, t-SNE) of data dimensionality reduction. While application of dimensionality reduction to neuroscience data is important and ubiquitous, the methods are challenging to understand, with few analytic guarantees on the results. Some recent papers raise questions about whether these methods are doing what practitioners think they are doing.

    Videos and notes from previous meetups are available on the Carney Institute website.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Nov
    18
    Virtual and In Person
    1:00pm - 2:00pm EST

    Biology of Aging Seminar: Josh Dubnau

  • Nov
    18
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Dr. Minjung Kim, Meta Reality Labs (formerly Facebook)

    Title: What can we see on a high dynamic range display?

    Abstract:
    Spatial vision refers to the ability to see variations of image intensity across space, and contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) characterizes spatial vision across different image parameters, such as spatial frequency, colors, and adaptation luminance.

    Using a custom-built high dynamic range (HDR) display, we characterized CSFs from mesopic (0.01 cd/m2) to high photopic (10000 cd/m2), and for different color modulations. This work expanded the knowledge of the visual system to a large range of image parameters. and we discovered that achromatic contrast sensitivity function behaves differently from chromatic contrast at adaptation luminance above 1000 cd/m2.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Zoom link is https://brown.zoom.us/j/93660854174

    Add to calendar: Google Calendar

    Well-chosen data visualizations can lead to powerful and intuitive processing by a viewer, both for visual analytics and data storytelling. When badly chosen, that visualization leaves important patterns opaque, misunderstood, or misrepresented. So how can we design an effective visualization? I will share several empirical studies investigating how visualization design could influence viewer perception and interpretation of data, referencing methods and insights from psychology and computer sciences. These results provide concrete guidelines for how both human designers and automatic chart recommendation systems can make visualizations that help viewers extract the “right” takeaway.
     
    Cindy Xiong is an Assistant Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She received her PhD in Psychology and her MS in Statistics from Northwestern University in 2021. She was a visiting scholar at Utrecht University in the Netherlands in 2018, and received her bachelor’s degrees in Applied Mathematics and Psychology from UCLA in 2016. Professor Xiong’s research at the intersection of human perception, cognition, and data visualization has received awards at premier venues in psychology and data visualization, including Psychonomics and IEEE VIS. She is also one of the founding leaders of VISxVISION (visxvision.com), a partnership dedicated to increasing collaboration between visualization researchers and perceptual + cognitive psychologists.
     
     
    Host: Professor David H. Laidlaw and Fumeng Yang
    More Information 
  • Nov
    17
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Tyler Knowlton, Postdoctoral Fellow - University of Pennsylvania

    Title: The psycho-logic of each and every

    Abstract:How do meanings make contact with the rest of cognition? And how can we leverage that connection to better understand the representations that serve as meanings in a psychological semantics? This talk will consider the universal quantifierseach and every as a case study. A sentence like every circle is green is often thought to express a relation between two independent sets: ‘the circles are a subset of the green things.’ But I will argue that speakers represent these sorts of sentences differently, in non-relational terms: ‘the circles are such that they are green.’ This not only receives support from experiments probing participants’ strategies for verifying sentences, but offers a satisfying explanation of the semantic universal “conservativity”. I’ll then suggest a further “psycho-logical” distinction between every’s non-relational second-order meaning, which implicates a group, and a non-relational first-order meaning for each, which implicates only individuals: ‘any individual that’s a circle is green.’ These proposed representations interface with distinct cognitive systems – object-files and ensembles – leading to predictable behavioral signatures. Moreover, the proposed difference between each and every suggests a path forward for studying how these quantifiers are acquired.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116
    Contact Elyse or Carol for passcode

    More Information 
  • Nov
    16
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:00am EST

    Implementation Science Seminar: Sara Becker, PhD

    Please join us for our Fall 2021 Implementation Science Seminar series, featuring speakers at Brown University, Providence VA and University of California San Diego, for presentations on sustainability, implementation strategies, hybrid trial designs, implementation blueprints and policy implementation. The sessions will run on Tuesdays from 10-11 am between November 2 and December 7, 2021.

    Tuesday, November 16

    Sara Becker, PhD: “Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Trial Designs”
    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    15
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Cristina Atance, University of Ottawa

    Title: Future thinking in young children: Exploring more “spontaneous” forms of future thought

    Abstract: The last few decades have seen a marked increase in research on humans’ (and non-human animals’) capacity to think about the future – often termed “episodic future thinking,” “prospection,” or “mental time travel.” In this talk, I briefly outline how this capacity has typically been measured in young children and highlight what I perceive as some key limitations of this approach. I then describe new research directions in my lab that may better capture children’s future thought including, most notably, the ability to spontaneously generate intentions (and actions) in the service of upcoming events and goals.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    12
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EST

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Johanna Vollhardt Associate Professor - Clark University
    Title: How do People Make Sense of Collective Violence and Oppression against their Group? Conceptualizing Collective Victim Beliefs
    Abstract: Social psychological research on how people make sense of collective violence and oppression against their group has tended to focus on negative processes and outcomes. For example, researchers have assumed that people compete with other groups over who has suffered most, that remembering the ingroup’s suffering increases negative intergroup attitudes and deteriorates psychological well-being, and that collective victimization results in a general sense of powerlessness. In this talk, I argue that this picture of how people make sense of collective violence and oppression against their group (“collective victim beliefs”) is incomplete and skewed, and that the narrow focus in the social psychological literature on collective victim beliefs can be explained by its unexamined assumptions, methodological limitations, and the lack of attention to context and power relations. Drawing on findings from studies conducted in different parts of the world (e.g., Cyprus, Hungary, India, Korea, Northern Ireland, Poland) and among various racial and ethnic minority groups in the U.S. (e.g., Armenian Americans, Black Americans, Jewish Americans, Kurdish diaspora), using various qualitative and quantitative methods (e.g., surveys, focus groups, Q-methodology), I show that how people make sense of their group’s victimization and oppression is much more nuanced than what the social psychological literature on this topic suggests. I present a theoretical conceptualization of the broad range of collective victim beliefs that may help us better understand why and when people choose different strategies for coping, resistance, and social change.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Nov
    12
    Virtual
    1:30pm EST

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    “Neurovascular dysfunction and repair in Alzheimer’s disease”

    Anika Hartz, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
    Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences
    University of Kentucky

    More Information ALZ, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • Renata Batista-Brito, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor of Neuroscience
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

     

    Abstract

    Brain function changes dramatically with changes in the behavioral state of an animal, such as sleeping and waking, with a profound impact on cortical processing. At the brain level, behavioral states are associated with distinct patterns of cortical activity (or cortical states), that are well captured by oscillatory activity measured with electroencephalography (EEG) or local field potential (LFP). Recent work shows that cortical states have a strong impact on how sensory information is processed by the cortex and influences perception. However, relatively little is known about the circuits underlying distinct states of cortical activity. Sensory processing depends on the adaptive function of brain areas comprising many types of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, whose interactions are critical for the generation of patterns of cortical activity. Here, we will focus on the specific role of a transcriptionally unique inhibitory neuron (IN) subtype that co-expresses somatostatin (SST) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), namely the SST/nNOS INs, on cortical state and sensory processing. Contrary to most neocortical GABAergic INs, which typically project locally and regulate local network activity, SST/nNOS INs have long projections that project across cortical areas, making them well positioned to regulate cortical states. Our core hypothesis, based on our preliminary data, is that SST/nNOS INs play an important role in regulating patterns of synchronous cortical activity such as low-frequency oscillations. Low-frequency oscillations, a hallmark of a variety of psychiatric disorders, are associated with compromised neuronal function and impaired sensory processing. SST/nNOS cells have been found to be mislocalized in patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that our work might have implication in disease.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Research
  • CAAS Rounds presents: Alcohol and Cannabis Use and Co-use in Daily Life: Measurement and Analytic Considerations

    More Information 
  • Nov
    12
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EST

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Nov
    11
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EST

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Dr. Elisa Filevich, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

    Title: How (much) do we know about the way we move our bodies?: Motor metacognition and its relationship to other metacognitive domains

    Abstract: Virtually any goal-directed movement can be achieved through a manifold combination of muscular activity, following the principle of motor abundance. That is, any goal-oriented movement needs only satisfy the constraints that ensure that the goal is reached, but can, and does, vary over repetitions. Additionally, corrective movements can happen in the absence of awareness. It seems therefore plausible that the low-level details of motor control are opaque to conscious access.

    To test this hypothesis, we borrow operationalizations from research on (visual) metacognition: We measure motor metacognitive performance as the relationship between subjective confidence judgements and accuracy in discrimination decisions about a movement one just made.

    In my talk, I will present the results of a series of experiments where we asked how, and to what extent, we can monitor the details of our movements. I will also discuss relationships between metacognitive monitoring of performance in a motor task and in other cognitive domains, to challenge the notion of domain generality, which suggests that the same neural mechanisms might be responsible for monitoring performance across many different tasks.

    Together, I will aim to discuss general principles of metacognitive tasks and how we think of the relationships between metacognitive domains.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  •  

    Featuring
    SURESH VENKATASUBRAMANIAN

    Computer Science and Data Science, Brown University

     

    Introduction by
    RICHARD M. LOCKE

    Provost, Brown University

     

    MACHINE READABLE: THE POWER AND LIMITS OF ALGORITHMS THAT ARE SHAPING SOCIETY

    Algorithms have infiltrated our society, imposing their own frame of reference on how we conduct ourselves, how we interact with others, and how we are judged. They’ve turbocharged inequality and biases. They’ve accelerated the balkanization of the landscape of ideas, making it easier and easier to live within suffocatingly homogeneous ideological and cultural bubbles.

    More Information 
  • Nov
    10

    Rapid-acting Treatments for Pediatric Depression and Suicidality: Where are We Now?
    Jennifer B. Dwyer, M.D., Ph.D.
    Co-Director Yale Pediatric Depression Program
    Assistant Professor, Child Study Center and Dept. of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging
    Yale University
    Wednesday, November 10, 2021◊ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

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  • Speaker Series on The Linguistic Expression of Racial and Ethnic Identity

    Speaker: Professor Sharese King, University of Chicago

    Title: “Operationalizing Intersectionality: A variationist’s approach to complicating identity categories in sociolinguistics”

    Abstract: The term intersectionality was coined by legal scholar, Kimberle Crenshaw, to account for the discrimination Black women faced at the intersection of both race and gender (Crenshaw 1989). Since, scholars across disciplines, including linguistics, have drawn on the theory to account for the complexity of identity, recognizing that dimensions of identity co-occur and co-constitute one another, with one informing the other (Levon 2015). In this talk, I discuss why exploring intersectionality in sociolinguistics is vital for advancing both theory and social justice efforts (King 2020). Drawing on previous work from Rochester, NY and Bakersfield, California, I propose ways to operationalize this social theory into variationist analyses.

    Sponsored by: C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund, the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Program in Judaic Studies, the Department of Africana Studies and with additional support from the Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

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  • Nov
    9
    Virtual and In Person
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EST

    Biology of Aging PAARF

  • Please join us for a special seminar given by Dr. Xinyu Zhao, the Jenni and Kyle Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison! 

    Dr. Zhao will discuss the targeting of stem cells in neurodevelopment disorders. Her research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural stem cells and neurodevelopment with the goal of applying this knowledge in the treatment of neurological disorders and injuries. 

    Hosted by Eric Morrow, MD PhD, and Justin Fallon, PhD. 

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CTN, Research
  • Zoom link for those choosing to join virtually: https://brown.zoom.us/j/99968764917
    Add to calendar: Google Calendar

    Abstract: Robots today are typically confined to interact with rigid, opaque objects with known object models. However, the objects in our daily lives are often non-rigid, can be transparent or reflective, and are diverse in shape and appearance. One reason for the limitations of current methods is that computer vision and robot planning are often considered separate fields. I argue that, to enhance the capabilities of robots, we should design state representations that consider both the perception and planning algorithms needed for the robotics task. I will show how we can develop novel perception and planning algorithms to assist with the tasks of manipulating cloth, manipulating novel objects, and grasping transparent and reflective objects. By thinking about the downstream task while jointly developing perception and planning algorithms, we can significantly improve our progress on difficult robots tasks.

    Bio: David Held is an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University in the Robotics Institute and is the director of the RPAD lab: Robots Perceiving And Doing. His research focuses on perceptual robot learning, i.e. developing new methods at the intersection of robot perception and planning for robots to learn to interact with novel, perceptually challenging, and deformable objects. David has applied these ideas to robot manipulation and autonomous driving. Prior to coming to CMU, David was a post-doctoral researcher at U.C. Berkeley, and he completed his Ph.D. in Computer Science at Stanford University. David also has a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering at MIT. David is a recipient of the Google Faculty Research Award in 2017 and the NSF CAREER Award in 2021.

    Host: Stefanie Tellex

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  • Nov
    5
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

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  • Nov
    4
    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  The role of glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in neurometabolism and molecular mechanisms of GPT2 Deficiency

    Advisor:  Dr. Eric Morrow

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  • Nov
    3
    11:00am - 12:30pm EDT

    November Academic Grand Rounds

    Implementation Science: Driving Health Policy Change in Learning Health Systems

    Amy Kilbourne, Ph.D., MPH

    Associate Chair for Research

    Professor of Learning Health Sciences

    Director, Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI)

    U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Faculty, U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation (IHPI)

    Wednesday, November 3, 2021◊ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://brown.zoom.us/j/98895345116

    Meeting ID: 988 9534 5116
    Contact Elyse or Carol for passcode

    More Information 
  • Nov
    2
    Virtual
    10:00am - 11:00am EDT

    Implementation Science Seminar: Rani Elwy, PhD

    Please join us for our Fall 2021 Implementation Science Seminar series, featuring speakers at Brown University, Providence VA and University of California San Diego, for presentations on sustainability, implementation strategies, hybrid trial designs, implementation blueprints and policy implementation. The sessions will run on Tuesdays from 10-11 am between November 2 and December 7, 2021.

    Tuesday, November 2

    Rani Elwy, PhD: “How to Plan for and Assess Sustainability of Evidence-Based Practices”
    Register Now More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Training, Professional Development
  • Nov
    1

    This workshop will cover basic performance optimization techniques using parallel computing techniques in MATLAB, including: parallel for-loops (parfor), single program multiple data (spmd), and distributed arrays. We assume that participants have a relatively advanced knowlege of the MATLAB programming language and have written at least one scientific computing application.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

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  • Nov
    1
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speakers: Professor Megan Saylor & Laura Janakiefski - graduate student
    Vanderbilt University
    Title: Designing a lexicon: Preschoolers evaluate and elicit information about word meanings
    Abstract: Preschoolers are prodigious word learners. Many proposals for what underlies their success describe the ease with which they use various sources of information about word meaning including regularities in the input, constraints, and social pragmatic cues. What each of these proposals has in common is a model of the child as a relatively passive participant in the word learning exchange who capitalizes on whatever bits of information happen to be available. Many methods that investigate children’s word learning rely on this model: experimenters offer children information and then test their response to it without allowing for children’s contributions to shape or tune the information they receive. One possibility is that the nature of the proposals and model of the child in these proposals have obscured children’s active participation in the word learning process. Recent research from my lab has revealed that preschoolers are active consumers of information about new word meanings: preschoolers evaluate verbal definitions for their informativeness, ask questions about new words, and tailor their questions to maximize information gain. This work lays the foundation for investigations of the impact of children’s questions on label acquisition and provides a glimpse of children’s active construction of their lexicon.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • CLPS - Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Colloquium Series

    Speaker: Dr. Jessi Grieser

    Title: What We Talk About When We Talk About Gentrification

    Abstract:  In this talk, I’ll discuss the Big-D discourses of gentrification and the ways they serve as a form of abstract liberalism to obscure the racialized nature of change. Drawing on ten years of sociolinguistic interview data from the neighborhood of Anacostia, in Washington, D.C., I’ll demonstrate how the ways Anacostians talk about their space counters those Big-D discourses at the discourse level, at the narrative level, and at the morphosyntactic level in ways which serve to re-racialize the process of gentrification and strip the agency of outsiders to determine what constitutes “good change.” I then back out to look at the bigger questions of the ways gentrification is considered an a-racialized process and how the residents’ talk brings race to the forefront, rejecting the colorblind racism assumptions inherent in the abstract liberalism appeal.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    29
    Virtual and In Person
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Social Cognitive Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: David Melnikoff - Postdoctoral Fellow - Northeastern University
    Title: How Goals Change Minds
    Abstract: Pablo Picasso once said, “Our goals can only be reached through a vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success.” This sentiment captures an intuition all of us share: Goal pursuit is hard work and demands careful, controlled deliberation. But is this intuition true? I will share research revealing how goals defy conventional wisdom by unintentionally, uncontrollably, and effortlessly promoting their own attainment. Specifically, I will show how goals automatically reconfigure three domains of human cognition: moral judgment, belief formation, and subjective experience.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    29
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Oct
    28
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Professor Li Li, NYU Shanghai (CLPS Alum)

    Title: Comparing the perception of 2D motion patterns versus optic flow

    Abstract: A long-standing question in the field of human perception and action is whether people rely on 3D information in optic flow to perceive the direction of self-movement (i.e., heading) or simply rely on 2D features such as focus of expansion (FoE) in the flow field to achieve this task. A related standing question is whether the brain areas that respond to optic flow respond to 2D global motion patterns in general or show unique responses specific to optic flow. To address these questions, we varied the motion coherence level in contraction and expansion random-dot motion patterns and found that the pattern detection threshold was significantly higher for expansion than contraction 2D motion patterns, but this trend was reversed for optic flow stimuli. The center discrimination threshold was also significantly higher for expansion than contraction 2D motion patterns, but this trend disappeared for optic flow stimuli. We then conducted a human brain-imaging study and found that although all the reported cortical areas that respond to optic flow responded to both contraction and expansion motion patterns, only area MST showed a higher decoding accuracy for contraction than expansion 2D motion patterns and a reversed trend for optic flow stimuli, consistent with the behavioral data. These findings provide direct evidence to support the claim that the brain has areas dedicated to process optic flow and the perception of heading involves more than locating FoE in the flow field. The findings also raise the question whether area MST could be an expertise area along the dorsal visual pathway that becomes more sensitive to detect expansion optic flow due to frequent forward self-movement in daily life.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    27
    Virtual
    4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT

    Machine Learning Series: Joe Hogan, ScD

    Join Advance-CTR and the Data Science Initiative at Brown for this 5-part series exploring machine learning, its methodology, and application in biomedicine and health. The purpose of this series is to serve as an introduction to machine learning for researchers, clinician scientists, and others who may be interested in using these methods in their research.

    Wednesday, October 27 

    Joe Hogan, ScD: “The Role of Machine Learning in Predictive and Causal Inference”

    Many machine learning methods can be formulated as complex but flexible statistical models. A common and important use of the models is to generate accurate predictions from a large set of covariates. When prediction is the goal, machine learning methods can learn prediction rules that involve interactions, nonlinearities, and other characteristics of the prediction function that would be difficult to know in advance.

    In this talk I demonstrate the utility of machine learning for generating causal inferences. For large-scale observational data, causal inference typically requires the correct specification of one or more component models for the purpose of confounder adjustment. This applies to propensity score methods, inverse probability weighting, regression adjustment, and standardization. The component models are not usually of direct interest, but in cases where there are many potential confounders they can be difficult to specify in advance.

    I will first describe the key differences between predictive and causal inference. Then, using a couple of examples from HIV and infectious disease research, I will illustrate how machine learning algorithms that can be formulated as ‘proper’ statistical models play a key role in the process of generating causal inferences.

    About the Speaker

    Professor Hogan’s research concerns the development and application of statistical methods for large-scale observational missing data. He is interested in causal inference, missing data, and quantifying uncertainty associated with untestable assumptions. Nearly all of his work is motivated by applications in HIV/AIDS and infectious disease. For the past several years he has co-led an NIH-funded international training program designed to build research capacity in biostatistics at Moi University in Kenya.

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  • Oct
    25
    Virtual
    3:00pm - 4:00pm EDT

    Workshop - MATLAB: Improving Performance

    This workshop will cover basic performance optimization techniques using MATLAB, including: code profiling, pre-allocation, sequential memory access, vectorization, and efficient matrix-vector storage and operations. We will assume that participants have a basic understanding of the MATLAB programming language.

    This will be a virtual workshop. Registered participants will receive an email with instructions for connecting via Zoom the day of the workshop.

    Register More Information Research
  • Oct
    25
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Developmental Brown Bag

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Viridiana L. Benitez, Assistant Professor, Arizona State University

    Title: Bilingual word learning under uncertainty

    Abstract: A challenge for young word learners is figuring out the referents of words from learning moments that are ambiguous. Furthermore, a large proportion of young word learners grow up in bilingual contexts, having to learn the words in each of their languages that refer to the same thing. How do learners acquire two words for the same thing when faced with ambiguous word learning events? In this talk, I will describe three experiments that examine adults’ and children’s object-name learning from ambiguous input simulating a bilingual environment. The first study shows that under ambiguity, adults can learn two names for an object, but they do so less accurately than learning a single name for an object. The second study shows that children are also capable of learning two names for an object under ambiguity, but this ability becomes more robust with age. In the third study, we demonstrate that a cue differentiating two names for an object (lexical tone) boosts learning, but only in adults familiar with that cue (Chinese-English bilinguals). Together, these findings show that age and language experience affect bilingual word learning under uncertainty. I will end the talk by considering what factors may affect bilingual word learning in the real-world learning contexts of the developing child.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    22
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Leor Zmigrod - Research Fellow - University of Cambridge
    Title: A neurocognitive model of ideological thinking
    Abstract: Since the birth of modern civilization, humans have been creating stories that capture their theories about how the world works and how they should act within this complex world. These narratives both describe and prescribe human action, and exist in a kaleidoscope of forms – from religious doctrines to authoritarian nationalism to political manifestos. Why and how do these explosive ideologies seduce and captivate the human brain? The talk will synthesize an emerging research program on the cognitive underpinnings of ideological thinking, which examines how perceptual traits shape individuals’ ideological dogmatism, extremism, and beliefs. Importantly, this line of inquiry differs from traditional approaches in political psychology because it applies theories and empirical techniques from cognitive psychology and neuroscience in order to address the fundamental questions: What makes some brains more dogmatic than others? What perceptual and cognitive traits lead to ideological tendencies? And how do these individualized psychological processes percolate into the realm of collective doctrines and social relations? In its entirety, this research program aims to illustrate that we can build a cognitive science of the ideological mind, and that this can reveal why minds become dogmatic, hostile, and extreme - as well as, hopefully, how minds can become open-minded, tolerant, and receptive to evidence.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Oct
    22
    Virtual
    1:30pm - 2:30pm EDT

    Pediatric Research Colloquium

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 567 679 7348
    Passcode: Pediatrics

    “The Blood-Brain Barrier in Epilepsy:

    From Dysfunction to Repair”

    Björn Bauer, Ph.D.
    Professor of Pharmacy

    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    College of Pharmacy
    University of Kentucky

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    22
    Virtual
    10:00am - 12:00pm EDT

    CCV Office Hours

    This is a drop-in session where CCV staff members will be available to answer questions about Brown’s research computing resources (Oscar, Stronghold, Globus) and help with any high-performance computing (HPC) issues you might have.

    More Information Research
  • Oct
    21
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

    Carney Methods Meetup: Research Data Systems

    Join Virtual EventInstructions: Meeting ID: 978 5998 6393
    Passcode: 451768

    Carney Methods Meetups are informal gatherings focused on methods for brain science, moderated by Jason Ritt, Carney’s scientific director of quantitative neuroscience. Mete Tunca, associate director of research systems and services in Brown’s Center for Computation and Visualization, will join Ritt in an open discussion about data storage and management challenges produced by increasingly large experimental data sets, such as produced by fluorescence imaging, multichannel electrode recordings, fMRI, bioinformatics, and behavioral videos.

    Experimentalists need to choose wisely between options ranging from local hard drive stacks, university servers (e.g. Isilon or Stronghold), and/or commercial cloud providers, but often with limited guidance for the diverse sources and uses of data across brain science.

    Please direct questions to Jason Ritt.

    Notes from previous Meetups are available online.

    Please note, this workshop requires you to be logged into Zoom through your Brown account.

    More Information Biology, Medicine, Public Health, CCBS, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research
  • Oct
    21
    Virtual
    12:00pm - 1:30pm EDT

    Perception & Action Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Dr. Karla Evans, Associate Professor, York University

    Title: On Nature of Visual Non-Selective Processing and How It Can Help Advance Early Cancer Detection

    Abstract: Visual awareness of everyday complex environments involves both non-selective processing for extraction of global image properties and summary statistics of the scene and selective processing to individuate, identify and localize objects. Together they give us a rich perceptual experience. Evidence suggests that these two types of processing involve different visual attentional mechanisms and do not work on the same time scale, but we still have limited understanding of non-selective processing and whether or how it interacts with selective processing.

    My presentation will aim to reveal the nature of non-selective processing from examining human perceptual behavior both for everyday scenes and medical images. Further it will examine the relationship between the types of processes that afford us visual awareness. I will conclude with evidence to argue for the unique utility of rapid non-selective processing for early cancer detection.

    More Information Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Join Virtual EventInstructions: Please contact [email protected] for passcode

    Title:  Brain dynamics related to short-term memory and learning

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  • Join Advance-CTR and the Data Science Initiative at Brown for this 5-part series exploring machine learning, its methodology, and application in biomedicine and health. The purpose of this series is to serve as an introduction to machine learning for researchers, clinician scientists, and others who may be interested in using these methods in their research.

    Wednesday, October 20, 2021

    Ruotao Zhang, MScRole of Calibration in Uncertainty-based Referral for Deep Learning”

    The uncertainty in predictions from deep neural network analysis of medical imaging is challenging to assess but potentially important to include in subsequent decision making. Using data from diabetic retinopathy detection, we present an empirical evaluation of model performance and the impact of uncertainty-based referral, an approach that prioritizes referral of observations based on the magnitude of a measure of uncertainty. We consider several configurations of network architecture, method for uncertainty estimation, and training data size. We identify a strong relationship between the effectiveness of uncertainty-based referral and having a well-calibrated model. This is especially relevant as complex deep neural networks tend to have high calibration errors. Finally, we provide evidence that post-calibration of the neural network can improve uncertainty-based referral.

    Dilum Aluthge, MD, PhD student: “Supervised Machine Learning Workflows for Electronic Health Records”

    Supervised machine learning can be used to develop clinical decision support systems for use in electronic health records (EHRs). The first portion of the talk will provide an overview of the supervised machine learning workflow. The second portion will present an example application ofclassification using EHR data, specifically the problem list and medication list from a patient’s chart.

    Optional Readings: 

    1. Rajkomar A, Dean J, Kohane I. Machine Learning in Medicine. N Engl J Med. 2019 Apr 4;380(14):1347-1358. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra1814259. PMID: 30943338.

    2. Sinha I, Aluthge DP, Chen ES, Sarkar IN, Ahn SH. Machine Learning Offers Exciting Potential for Predicting Postprocedural Outcomes: A Framework for Developing Random Forest Models in IR. J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2020 Jun;31(6):1018-1024.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2019.11.030. Epub 2020 May 4. PMID: 32376173.

    About the Speakers

    Ruotao Zhang is a PhD student in the Department of Biostatisticsunder the supervision of Dr Steingrimsson and Dr Gatsonis. Before coming to the US, he worked as a data scientist at China Resources Holdings. Ruotao graduated from University of Oxford with a MSc in Applied Statistics, and before that he obtained a BSc in Mathematics from Imperial College London. His research interests focus on statistical machine learning methods with application to biomedical data. 

    Dilum Aluthge is an MD/PhD student at the Brown Center for Biomedical Informatics, Center for Computational Molecular Biology and the Warren Alpert Medical School. His advisors are Dr. Neil Sarkar and Dr. Liz Chen. His research focuses on the theoretical concepts of learning health systems as well as the practical considerations of their implementation. Specific areas of interest include machine learning, clinical decision support, health information exchange, standards and interoperability, and physiologic reserve. Dilum earned his Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics at Brown. He is the co-creator of the PredictMD machine learning framework, which is implemented in the Julia programming language. He is also the founder of the JuliaHealth open source organization.

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  • Oct
    20

    What are the challenges to consider in drug discovery focused on GPCRs?

    Join the Carney Institute for Brain Science for an interactive conversation with Brian Kobilka, M.D., Helene Irwin Fagan Chair of Cardiology and professor of molecular and cellular physiology at Stanford University, about how we can apply lessons learned from his research into the structure and mechanism of activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to strategies for drug design. 

    This conversation will be moderated by Diane Lipscombe, Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director of the Carney Institute.