Developmental Brown Bag Speaker Series

The Developmental Brown Bag (DBB) is a speaker series dedicated to investigating developmental origins, trajectories and mechanisms. Speakers consider development from a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective.

The DBB takes place on Mondays from 12pm-1:30pm in Metcalf Research Building, Room 305 (Dome room).

Talks are open to all members of the Brown community.

2022-2023 Speakers

Sept 12: Mariel Goddu, Harvard University: Play: A computational perspective

Sept 19: Idea Blitz

Oct 3: Dave Sobel, Brown University: Perspectives on children's prosocial behavior 

Oct 17: Roman Feiman, Brown University: Not as hard as it looks? Disentangling cognitive and input factors in the acquisition of negation

Oct 24: Kimberly Cuevas, University of Connecticut: Neural and Behavioral Building Blocks of Early Social and Cognitive Processes 

Nov 7: Dan Swingley, University of Pennsylvania: Rethinking the developmental pathway of early infant language learning 

Nov 14: Kathleen Corriveau, Boston University: Variability in caregiver-child interaction impacts young children's STEM learning and persistence

Nov 21: Mahalia Prater Fahey, Brown University: When is my effort worthwhile? How does learned efficacy influence the allocation of cognitive control during development.

2021-2022 Speakers

Feb. 7 : Laurel Gabard-Durnam, Northeastern University: Sensitive periods in human neurodevelopment 

Feb. 28:  Julia Leonard, Yale University: Social influences on children’s persistence

Mar. 7: Carrie Palmquist, Amherst College: Judging a book by its cover: Origins and implications of face-based inference-making

Mar. 14: Elizabeth BonawitzHarvard University: How Social Information Shapes Inferences in Early Childhood

Mar. 21: Florenica Anggoro, College of the Holy Cross: Designing Cognitive Supports for Children's Science Learning

Apr. 4: Shari Liu, MIT: Neural and developmental origins of social intelligence​

Apr. 11: Julia Marshall, Boston College: The Early Pursuit of Third-Party Punishment

Apr. 25: Katherine Tillman, University of Texas at Austin: Children’s concepts of the past and future