Events

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Current Job Searches

Assistant or Associate Professor in Social and/or Cognitive Psychology. The Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences (CLPS) at Brown University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant or tenured Associate Professor in Social or Cognitive Psychology beginning July 1, 2023. We invite applications from researchers who address core questions regarding social and/or cognitive processes across research areas, including individuals who study, for instance, affect, memory, development, intergroup relations, individual differences, judgment and decision making. We particularly encourage experimental approaches that can integrate with other methodologies, including, but not limited to, data science, machine learning, cognitive neuroscience methods, naturalistic methods, or those that prioritize traditionally understudied cultures or populations. In addition to building an externally funded nationally recognized research program, a successful candidate will provide effective instruction and advising to a diverse group of graduate and undergraduate students, and be willing to interact with colleagues from a wide range of disciplines and academic backgrounds. The department anticipates making up to two hires.

Assistant or Associate Professor in Developmental Psychology and/or Behavioral Neuroscience. The Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences (CLPS) at Brown University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant or tenured Associate Professor position beginning July 1, 2023. The department plans to hire several new faculty members over the next few years. This search will consider candidates in any area of Behavioral Neuroscience (including Comparative Psychology) and/or Developmental Psychology. We encourage applications from candidates who study the mechanisms of social, cognitive, perceptual, and/or affective processes using empirical, cross-species, and/or computational approaches. In addition to building an externally funded, nationally recognized research program, a successful candidate will provide effective instruction and advising to a diverse group of graduate and undergraduate students, as well as be willing to interact with colleagues from a wide range of disciplines and academic backgrounds. The CLPS department is committed to building a culturally diverse faculty; we strongly encourage applications from individuals historically underrepresented in the academy. The department anticipates making up to two hires in this search. 

Upcoming Events

  • Nov
    30
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    LingLangLunch Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Ruth Kramer - Associate Professor - Georgetown University

    Title: A critical investigation of phonological gender assignment across languages

    Abstract: According to classic typological research, grammatical gender can be assigned to nouns in several different ways. Gender can be assigned semantically (depending on social gender identity, animacy, etc.), morphologically (depending on the presence of a specific affix), or phonologically (e.g., depending on the final segment of the noun). In this talk, I take a critical look at the last member of this list: phonological gender assignment. I present the results of a crosslinguistic survey of phonological gender assignment as well as case studies of multiple languages that allegedly use phonological gender assignment including Hausa (Chadic), Gujarati (Indo-Aryan), Apurinã (Maipurean), and Guébie (Kru), among others. I argue that the crosslinguistic trends and the case studies point towards phonology *not* being involved in grammatical gender assignment and, more importantly, that a phonological gender assignment analysis is less explanatory than alternative approaches. In Distributed Morphology, phonological gender assignment is predicted to be difficult at best because gender is assigned during the syntactic derivation and the syntax lacks phonological information. This result therefore provide support for Distributed Morphology, and against theories where gender is assigned in the lexicon with access to phonological information. I close the talk with plans for future work to investigate additional languages with (alleged) phonological gender assignment.

    Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    2
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Cognition Seminar Series

    Michael S. Goodman ’74 Memorial Seminar Series.

    Speaker: Mariam Aly - Assistant Professor - Columbia University

    Title: How hippocampal memory shapes, and is shaped by, attention
     

    Abstract: Attention modulates what we see and remember. Memory affects what we attend to and perceive. Despite this connection in behavior, little is known about the mechanisms that link attention and memory in the brain. One key structure that may be at the interface between attention and memory is the hippocampus. Here, I’ll explore the hypothesis that the relational representations of the hippocampus allow it to critically contribute to bidirectional interactions between attention and memory. First, I’ll show — in a series of human fMRI studies — that attention creates state-dependent patterns of activity in the hippocampus, and that these representations predict both online attentional behavior and memory formation. Then, I’ll provide neuropsychological evidence that hippocampal damage impairs performance on attention tasks that tax relational representations, particularly spatial relational representations. I will then provide pharmacological evidence that hippocampal contributions to attention and perception may be mediated by cholinergic modulation — a switch that can toggle the hippocampus between internally and externally oriented states. Finally, I’ll demonstrate that hippocampal memories enable preparation for upcoming attentional states and may help resolve competition between similar memories to guide attention. Together, this line of work highlights the tight links between attention and memory — links that are established, at least in part, by the hippocampus.

    Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    5
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    CLPS PhD Defense: Alexander Fengler

    Metcalf Research Building

    Speaker: Alexander Fengler , Brown University

    Title: Likelihood Approximations for Bayesian Analysis of Sequential Sampling Models

    Advisor: Professor Michael Frank

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not a part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours in advance.

    Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences
  • Dec
    9
    3:00pm - 5:00pm

    CLPS PhD Defense: Lakshmi Narasimhan Govindarajan

    Metcalf Research Building

    Speaker: Lakshmi Narasimhan Govindarajan, Brown University

    Title: Attractor Dynamics in Large Scale Recurrent Neural Networks

    Advisor: Professor Thomas Serre

    ~ zoom link information to the meeting sent to clps all ~

    If you are not part of the CLPS Department and would like to attend, please contact the department’s graduate student coordinator at least 24 hours in advance.

    Carney Institute for Brain Science, Neuroscience, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences