Past Events

  • Join our current Health Equity Scholar students and staff to learn more about the Health Equity Scholars Program! 

    Open to graduates of HBCUs, The Health Equity Scholars program provides MPH students with the opportunity to address health disparities through research and practice, while also gaining critical skills for leadership.

    Students selected into the Health Equity Scholars Program benefit from:

    Financial support: Up to a full tuition scholarship (based on demonstrated need), coverage of fees, and stipend support for unpaid or low-paid internships.

    Hands-on public health training: All MPH students, including the Health Equity Scholars, are required to complete 145 hours of an applied public health experience, working with a local, national, or international organization of the Scholar’s choosing.

    Leadership training: Bi-weekly interactive sessions led by Brown faculty and other experts will address communication, negotiation, critical thinking, crisis management, and other essential 21st century leadership skills.

    One-to-one coaching: HES students will work with a coach to help them define their leadership goals and create a personalized plan for leadership development.

    Brown University School of Public Health, SPH Diversity
  • 1.2 million women are under correctional supervision in the United States, yet the narrative of mass incarceration often ignores the gendered aspects of punishment.

    This panel centers on the voices and experiences of incarcerated women and their work to build communities free of mass incarceration. As society pushes for an end to mass incarceration, what do we want a future society to remember about the abolitionist efforts of today?

    This event launches the Mass Incarceration Lab Archive at the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, and is a Humanities Lab project led by Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, Associate Professor of Sociology at Brown University. The Humanities Lab Initiative is generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.


    Speaker Biographies

    Cherie Cruz is a first-generation college graduate who transcended her own personal and family history of three generations of incarceration and involvement with the criminal legal system to now hold two degrees from Brown University, A.B. Cum Laude. Cherie uses her experience of being directly impacted by the War on Drugs in empowering and lifting up the voices of people who have also been directly impacted. This includes advocating for the Right to Vote, parent’s right to volunteer in school, parental rights, Fair Chance Licensing, decriminalization of substances, and more. Cherie was named ACLU of RI Lay Leader of the Decade in 2019, and is a JLUSA Leading with Conviction 2020 Alum. Cherie, along with fellow Rhode Islanders, co-founded the Formerly Incarcerated Union of RI, a membership-driven non-profit organization, founded and led by people who have been directly impacted by the criminal legal system. While continuing to advocate to reduce the barriers to successful reentry, FIU continues to build collective leadership to ultimately reach the goal of reducing the prison population until one day we can shut them down.

    Aminah Elster is a campaign and policy coordinator with the California Coalition for Women Prisoners, where she leads its work on reproductive oppression in women’s prisons. Aminah’s motivation to achieve racial and gender justice is rooted in her direct experiences navigating intersecting identities. She is committed to fighting the impacts of decades of systemic oppression and liberating criminalized survivors. Aminah is a researcher and University of California Berkeley alum. In addition to organizing with the Berkeley Underground Scholars, she is also an organizer with Survived & Punished CA, and co-founder of Unapologetically HERS (Healing Experiences Through Research Solutions).

    Daniela Medina earned her MSW with a concentration in Strengthening Organizations and Communities from the University of California, Berkeley in 2021 and her B.A. in Social Welfare from the University of California, Berkeley in 2019. She is from Oakland, CA, and has worked closely with Berkeley Underground Scholars for several years supporting formerly incarcerated students like herself. She is an award-winning expert on higher education for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people, an experienced program manager, and a thought leader. Daniela previously worked at Community & Youth Outreach, providing direct service support to those reentering the community after incarceration. She is a certified life coach, a previous Young Professionals of Color Fellow with the National Institute for Criminal Justice Reform, and was an inaugural Perez Research Fellow at Bright Research Group. Daniela is also the co-founder and host of the Berkeley Underground Scholars podcast, On The Tier.


    Facilitator Biographies

    Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Brown University and an affiliated scholar with the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, IL. She is an affiliated fellow with Brown University’s Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice (CSSJ) and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA). She is the author of Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court (2016) and The Waiting Room (2018). She is the generator and faculty lead for the Mass Incarceration Lab @ CSREA, generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

    Esteem Brumfield was born to civil rights activists in the Bay Area. Esteem cultivated a deep sense of social responsibility, passion for human rights, and a love for the Bay Area. His interests center on law, health, and alternatives to incarceration. Particularly, his work examines the relationship between incarceration, mental health, and public health outcomes. He is currently pursuing a Masters of Public Health at Brown University and plans to enter law school to study constitutional law. As a Fulbright Fellow to South Africa, he researched the relationship between learning disability accommodations and rehabilitation within the Western Cape’s prison system. Prior to pursuing his masters, Esteem served as a Public Health Commissioner for Alameda County and reviewed the health effects of incarceration within the county. He holds a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity
  • Interested in applying to graduate school?  Join the Brown University School of Public Health at the 2021 MKN McNair Virtual Graduate School Fair.  Learn how our innovative, student-centered academic training and a diverse and collaborative culture prepares graduate students to become leaders in their fields!

    Brown University School of Public Health, Information Session, SPH Diversity
  • Jul
    20
    3:00pm - 4:30pm

    NIH Virtual Graduate Fair

    You’re invited to the Virtual NIH Graduate and Professional School Fair!

    The fair will provide an opportunity for you to prepare for the next step in your career by exploring educational programs leading to the PhD, MD, DDS, MD/PhD, and other graduate and professional degrees.

    This year the fair will welcome all interested college students, postbacs, and other interested young scientists.

    The fair will also feature individual online sessions to give you the opportunity to learn more about the participating institutions and programs.

    Register here to join Brown University School of Public Health’s individual session hosted on Tuesday, July 20th, from 3pm-4:30pm EDT.

    Looking forward to seeing you there!

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Brown University School of Public Health, Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Research, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity
  • Screening of the documentary through the night followed by a discussion. 

    Zoom link: https://brown.zoom.us/j/97246883716

    SPH Diversity
  • Black women face a multitude of disparities from conception to postpartum. These disparities are not due to biological differences but they are attributed to the systemic bias and inequalities that continue to plague the United States. This event will highlight the wonderful work being done by medical student Ade Osinubi of Alpert Medical School at Brown University that calls attention to these inequities through her film Black Motherhood through the lens. We will share our time viewing two short stories that are part of the documentary Black Motherhood through the Lens.

    In recognition of Black Maternal Health Week, Black Motherhood through the Lens features four Black women’s experiences navigating the reproductive and maternal healthcare system from conception to postpartum. The women in this series have experienced miscarriage, lack of access to infertility care, fears about childbirth, and postpartum depression. For this event you will hear the experiences of two women, Shannon and Ijeoma who despite these challenges, boldly pursued their dreams of Black motherhood.

    After viewing the short films there will be a panel discussion led by Ade Osinubi, the film director and producer. Ade will be joined by two of the women featured in the full length documentary, Shaylene and Shannon. There will be time for audience Q&A following the panel discussion.

    We hope that you will join us for an evening of learning, engaging, and rallying around Black Maternal Health.

    SPH Diversity
  • Apr
    8
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    The Barnes Lecture | Paul Farmer, MD, PhD

    Virtual - Zoom link will be sent on the morning of 4/8

    Please join the webinar by clicking on the link below -

    https://brown.zoom.us/j/97072942456

    Please Join Dr. Ashish K. Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, for a special conversation with Paul Farmer, MD, PhD, Kolokotrones University Professor and the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

    Medical anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer has dedicated his life to improving health care for the world’s poorest people. He is Co-founder and Chief Strategist of Partners In Health (PIH), an international non-profit organization that since 1987 has provided direct health care services and undertaken research and advocacy activities on behalf of those who are sick and living in poverty. Dr. Farmer and his colleagues in the U.S. and abroad have pioneered novel community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resource-poor settings.

    Dr. Farmer holds an M.D. and Ph.D. from Harvard University, where he is the Kolokotrones University Professor and the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School; he is also Chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston.

    Dr. Farmer has written extensively on health, human rights, and the consequences of social inequality. He is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association, the Outstanding International Physician (Nathan Davis) Award from the American Medical Association, a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and, with his PIH colleagues, the Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His most recent book is Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History.

     An interactive audience Q&A will follow.

    Registration for this webinar is limited and on a first come first serve basis.

    About the lectureship

    The lecture is supported by The Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Barnes, Jr. Lectureship in Public Health, endowed through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. James S. Zisson ’74, in memory of Norma and Miles Zisson ’38. Dr. Barnes was a beloved member of the faculty who had strong interests in humanism and medicine, and who developed several innovations in teaching at Brown, including the use of authors and actors to read and perform pieces on health-relevant themes. Mrs. Barnes was a social worker who shared her husband’s love of students and teaching.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Brown University School of Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement, Research, Service, Engagement, Volunteering, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • In celebration of National Public Health Week, the Office of Diversity & Inclusion at the School of Public Health is honored to host an alumni panel highlighting the transformative work of four amazing MPH alumni focused on advancing racial equity in public health.

    We will be joined by: 

    Monique J. Brown, PhD, MPH ’09
    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina
    Shane Lloyd, MPH ’11
    Inclusion and Engagement Leader, Worldwide Consumer at Amazon
    Catherine Nwachukwu, MPH ’17
    Manager for Strategy and Research at the Center for Health Information and Analysis
    Abdullah Shihipar, MPH ’20
    Research Associate at Brown University 

    At various stages in their career, our alumni will discuss their professional work in advancing racial equity in public health and how their time at the School of Public Health at Brown prepared them to engage in this complex yet important work. 

    The panel will be moderated and there will be time for Q&A at the end. We hope you will join us!  

    Careers, Recruiting, Internships, SPH Diversity
  • Join us for an afternoon of virtual tea/coffee to discuss how we can come together to better highlight/examine racial disparities in COVID-19 as it relates to Native American health.

    The suggested reading “State Crime, Native Americans and COVID-19” by Laura Finley can be found at this link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/10.13169/statecrime.10.1.0045.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3A7cd1bdd7366d9829017254b7939f69f5

    We realize it is a longer article PLEASE NOTE that we are only suggesting that you read the sections on Structural Disadvantage and AI/NA Peoples, COVID-19, AI/NA Peoples and State Crime.

    Zoom Information: https://brown.zoom.us/j/98101731112?pwd=THNJaURWYzQ1d1lyMU9ia2VGQmJkQT09  

    SPH Diversity
  • Mar
    12
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    Womxn SPH Chat

    Zoom

    In honor of Women’s History Month, we are excited to create a virtual space for all the Womxn Faculty and Staff in our community. We are looking forward to coming together to talk and build community. This might include just catching up, or should people choose, sharing successes, challenges, and strategies for what has worked and what we have learned as Womxn working in the higher educational space over this past year.

    This event will take place on Friday, March 12th from 11am-12pm.

    We will use the World Cafe method to engage in conversation, this will allow us to have small intimate conversations prompted by questions posed by the facilitator. After some time in our small groups we will come together to “harvest” our ideas and strategies as a way to learn from and engage with each other on this journey.

    Please register here! We hope that you will join us in this space.

    SPH Diversity
  • Mar
    2
    3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Student Bystander Training

    We invite you to gather virtually for an Active Bystander training that will introduce and explore bystander interventions as it relates to anti-Blackness, micro and macro-aggressions, and other race related incidents.
    We will offer strategies to effectively intervene as active bystanders, discuss how to engage in courageous conversations, and allow time to explore practice scenarios.
    If you are interested in attending this session please RSVP!
    SPH Diversity
  • Please consider joining the School of Public Health community to virtually gather and watch the Victor Schoenbach Keynote speaker Dr. Sharrelle Barber at the 42nd Minority Health Conference. The L.E.A.D leadership student group will facilitate a discussion following the keynote. 

    Please RSVP through this calendar invite, more details to follow. 

    SPH Diversity
  • We have organized the event around the theme of Black women in health leadership with a focus on advocacy, social justice, public health, and medicine. Through this event we hope to uplift and empower the voices of Black women leaders devoted to health equity, advocacy, and public health; as well as engage in a discussion about the various issues that impact the health of the Black community. We hope to offer ideas on strategies to close the gaps that are present within the Black community.

    This moderated event will take place virtually in collaboration with the School of Public Health and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. 

    Careers, Recruiting, Internships, Featured on Brown.edu, SPH Diversity
  • This is a virtual event.

    Please join us via Zoom by clicking https://brown.zoom.us/j/97876769813

    Please Join Dr. Ashish K. Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, for a special conversation with Helene D. Gayle, MD, president and CEO of The Chicago Community Trust.

    Dr. Gayle has been president and CEO of The Chicago Community Trust, one of the nation’s oldest and largest community foundations, since October 2017. Under her leadership, the Trust has adopted a new strategic focus on closing the racial and ethnic wealth gap in the Chicago region.

    For almost a decade, she was president and CEO of CARE, a leading international humanitarian organization. An expert on global development, humanitarian and health issues, Dr. Gayle spent 20 years with the Centers for Disease Control, working primarily on HIV/AIDS. She worked at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, directing programs on HIV/AIDS and other global health issues. She also launched the McKinsey Social Initiative (now McKinsey.org), a nonprofit that builds partnerships for social impact.

    Dr. Gayle was born and raised in Buffalo, NY. She earned a B.A. in psychology at Barnard College, an M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania and an M.P.H. at Johns Hopkins University. She has received 18 honorary degrees and holds faculty appointments at the University of Washington and Emory University.  She serves on public company and nonprofit boards, including The Coca-Cola Company, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Brookings Institution, Center for Strategic and International Studies, New America, ONE Campaign, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and Economic Club of Chicago. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council on Foreign Relations, American Public Health Association, National Academy of Medicine, National Medical Association, and American Academy of Pediatrics. She has authored numerous articles on global and domestic public health issues, poverty alleviation, gender equality, and social justice.

    An interactive audience Q&A will follow.

    This is a virtual event. A Zoom link will be sent to all registrants on the morning of February 11, 2021.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Faith, Spirituality, Worship, Featured on Brown.edu, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, SPH Diversity, Student Clubs, Organizations & Activities
  • Dec
    18
    Join the School of Public Health Staff Advisory Council to connect virtually with much missed colleagues over lunch, coffee, or tea, and gaming!**
    **We’re going to play the game “Heads Up” which is a free app. If you would like a turn to be in the “hot seat” (the guesser) then you would need to download the game. Downloading the game is not required to participate. The rules and directions will be explained during the zoom meet.
    SPH Diversity
  • Nov
    24
  • As part of our commitment to creating an environment that supports wellness at the School of Public Health, the public health community of color—all students, staff, and faculty of color—are invited to a self-care mindfulness session led by Dr. Shufang Sun.
    Dr. Sun’s research focuses on understanding minority stress and mental health among marginalized populations, including LGBTQ individuals, as well as minority health promotion through innovative, evidence-based methods including mindfulness-based interventions.
    We know that many in our community have been experiencing increased stress due to the burdens of the coronavirus, the election, and racism, to name a few. We hope that you will be able join this self-care event on, please encourage others to join as well.
    SPH Diversity
  • The Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), recipient of the 2019 AIMBE Excellence in STEM Education Award, is one of the largest communities of underrepresented minorities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Students attend this conference to present their research, enhance professional development skills, explore graduate schools, and network. Research faculty and program directors play an essential role in mentoring students and learning strategies for facilitating student success.

    Register for ABRCMS

    Brown University School of Public Health will be hosting four free information sessions/group chats during ABRCMS.  Register today!

    Monday Chat, November 9, 5:45PM-7PM

    https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAsf-uurDIsHNb0B4I3JqI5hx7cwBq-IDYo

    Tuesday Chat, November 10, 5:45PM-7PM

    https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAsf-uurDIsHNb0B4I3JqI5hx7cwBq-IDYo

    Wednesday Chat, November 11, 5:45-7PM

    https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAsf-uurDIsHNb0B4I3JqI5hx7cwBq-IDYo

    Thursday Chat, November 12, 5:45PM-7PM

    https://brown.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAsf-uurDIsHNb0B4I3JqI5hx7cwBq-IDYo

    Brown University School of Public Health, SPH Diversity
  • The PSTC Fall 2020 Colloquia Series will host Tyson Brown, Associate Professor of Sociology, Duke University. His talk is titled “Structural Racism and Health Stratification in the U.S.: Connecting Theory to Measurement ” and will discuss his research on the underexplored relationship between macro-level structural racism and population health in the United States..

    SPH Diversity
  • Oct
    7
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Race & Public Health in America

    Online

    Race & Public Health in America

    Please join us for a panel discussion, Race & Public Health in America on Wednesday, October 7, 2020, at 12 p.m. The discussion will feature:

    • Lundy Braun, Professor of Medical Science, Professor of Africana Studies
    • Akilah Dulin, Associate Professor of Behavioral and Social Sciences
    • Ashish Jha, Dean of the School of Public Health

    The event will be moderated by Ronald Aubert, Visiting Professor of the Practice of Race and Ethnicity, CSREA and School of Public Health.

    Registration is now open.

    For more information and to register for Race & Public Health in America, please visit, https://www.brown.edu/about/administration/provost/race-america.

    This panel discussion series has been curated by Brown’s Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America in partnership with the Office of the Provost.

     

    To request accommodations or assistance for this event, please contact the University Event & Conference Services Office at [email protected] or 401-863-3100.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity, sph
  • “The Problem with the Phrase “Women and Minorities”: Intersectionality, An Indispensable Critical Theoretical Framework for Behavioral and Social Health Science Research”

    Friday, September 25, 2020
     12:00 PM – 12:55 PM
    Zoom ID: 927 3899 8271

    Historically rooted in Black feminist activism, intersectionality is a critical theoretical framework that posits that power and social inequity are differently structured, and vary based on people’s multiple and intersecting demographic positions (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender, gender and sexual minority status, socioeconomic status). Intersectionality has made impressive inroads within the behavioral and social health sciences (BSHS) in recent years. It enhances BSHS research by challenging “single-axis” assumptions such as that connoted by the phrase “women and minorities,” and centering the experiences and needs of people marginalized by intersectional discrimination. This presentation will: (1) provide an overview of intersectionality, its history, and core tenets; (2) describe how intersectionality challenges conventional assumptions about groups of people and social issues; (3) highlight applications of intersectionality to NIH-funded health research with U.S. Black men; and (4) discuss why critical perspectives such as intersectionality are indispensable for BSGS researchers committed to social justice work.

     

    Lisa Bowleg, Ph.D. is Professor of Applied Social Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at The George Washington University (GW), Director of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Core of the DC-Center for AIDS Research, and the Founding Director of the Intersectionality Training Institute at GW. She is a leading scholar of the application of intersectionality to social and behavioral science research, as well as research focused on HIV prevention and sexuality in Black communities.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity
  • The School of Public Health’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion invites all School students, staff, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty to a webinar led by Shontay Delalue, Vice President of Institutional Equity and Diversity and Interim Senior Associate Dean in the Division of Biology and Medicine, and Lawrence Angelo, Institutional Equity Officer in Brown University’s Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity, to provide an overview of the University’s Bias Incident Reporting System.

    In this training, we will review what constitutes a bias incident, the rationale for situating the bias reporting system at the University level, the work of the Bias Review Team, and how data is fed back to the community annually to guide refinements in programming to address climate.

    Following Shontay Delalue and Lawrence Angelo’s presentation, attendees are invited to engage in conversation via Q&A.

    If you are able to attend, please complete the registration form and submit your questions in advance. The Zoom webinar link will be emailed to registrants in advance of the meeting.

    We will be recording this presentation as a resource for those who are unable to attend.

    SPH Diversity
  • The School of Public Health’s Office of Diversity & Inclusion and Office of Academic Affairs invites School faculty engaged in teaching, graduate program directors, director of undergraduate studies, curriculum committee members, and chairs/vice chairs to this training workshop to support faculty to further enhance and transform their teaching of public health to more rigorously address race, racism, and racial bias. This workshop will be led by Associate Dean Caroline Kuo, with content vetted by Dr. Benjamin Reese. Dr. Reese is President of BENREESE, LLC., a global diversity, equity, and inclusion consulting firm. He is the former Vice President of the Office for Institutional Equity at Duke University and Duke University Health System, Duke University’s Chief Diversity Officer, and is a licensed clinical psychologist. He is also adjunct professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Community Medicine and Family Health, and Psychology and Neuroscience.

    The workshop will cover the following content:

    • How to set norms and create a common foundation for engaging in learning around these topics effectively in the classroom.
    • Strategies for facilitating interactions between faculty and students and between students to support a space for effective learning.
    • Discussing how to re-work competencies and content with attention to race, racism, and racial bias in public health.

    The last portion of the workshop will divide faculty by department, where faculty can engage in peer-to-peer sharing on strategies that have worked well for them, and/or to discuss challenges. If you are able to attend, please complete this registration form. A Zoom webinar link will be emailed to you in advance of the meeting.

    Following this workshop, starting September 21st, faculty will have an opportunity to work through specific course content in detailed 1-on-1 or small group coaching sessions with Dr. Reese to troubleshoot any challenges they encounter as they implement new changes in their course, or to have specific questions answered as they begin to re-work their course. There is no structure to these informal sessions - faculty should use these sessions with Dr. Reese in whatever way is most useful to you. If you already know you want a 1-on-1 or small group session (15 slots available on a first come first serve basis, please sign up using this form).

    SPH Diversity, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • “Diversifying the Biomedical Workforce:
    Critical, Urgent, and Long Overdue”
    Patricia Molina, MD, PhD
    Richard Ashman, PhD Professor and Head, Department of Physiology Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center of Excellence
    Louisiana State University Health
    Patricia Molina, MD, PhD
    Patricia Molina, MD, PhD, is a distinguished mentor and scientist. Her work focuses on the impact of alcohol and drug abuse on the cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune consequences of acute traumatic injury and hemorrhagic shock. She also investigates the interaction of chronic alcohol and cannabinoid use on the behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV/AIDS. Her work is currently funded by NIAAA, NIDA, and CDMRP. Dr. Molina is Chair of the National Hispanic Science Network on Drug Abuse, President of the Research Society on Alcoholism, and Past President of the American Physiological Society.
    Research, SPH Diversity
  • Our biennial symposium, split across sessions over three weeks, on teaching public health will explore best practices in inclusive pedagogy. Speakers will address educational policies, course design, content, and other approaches that optimize learning for all students.

    4:30 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
    INTRODUCTIONS AND OPENING REMARKS

    Sandro Galea (@sandrogalea), Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    Lisa Sullivan, Associate Dean for Education, Boston University School of Public Health


    4:35 p.m. – 5:05 p.m.
    KEYNOTE ADDRESS
    Stakes is High: Embedding a Sense of Urgency in Public Health Education

    Raul Fernandez, Associate Dean for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development


    5:05 p.m. – 5:35 p.m.
    STUDENT REMARKS
    Students will share their experiences in the classroom and explore what has worked from a student perspective.

    Moderator: Sophie Godley, Clinical Assistant Professor, Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health


    5:35 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
    MODERATED DISCUSSION AND Q&A
    SPH Diversity, TeachPublicHealth
  • Jun
    17
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    DiversiTeas

    On behalf of oSTEM (Out in STEM), GSOCnSTEM (Graduate Students of Color in STEM), and SACNAS (Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science), I would like to invite you to our virtual DiversiTeas: Don’t Blame Us for Health Disparities on June 17th from 4 - 5:30pm. The discussion topic will be marginalization and disenfranchisement in medicine and research and the featured speakers will be Prof. Laura López-Sanders, PhD in the Population Studies and Training Center in the Department of Sociology, Prof. Diana Grigsby-Toussaint, PhD of the Center for Health Promotion and Health Equity in the School of Public Health, and Prof. Jeffery Proulx, PhD of the Mindfulness Center in the School of Public Health.

    For those new to the series, DiversiTeas is a networking and social series around topics of diversity in STEM fields for graduate students, post-docs, faculty, staff, and administrators.

    If you plan on attending, please fill out this RSVP form: https://forms.gle/V6B15GENY9Qm1bUW8.

    We look forward to seeing you at DiversiTeas!

    SPH Diversity
  • You are invited to an online Community Conversation on the effects of anti-Black racism and police violence on public health. We are coming together as a community to address steps that we can take to improve the climate in our public health community.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, SPH Diversity
  • You are invited to an online Community Conversation on the effects of anti-Black racism and police violence on public health. We are coming together as a community to address steps that we can take to improve the climate in our public health community.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Research, SPH Diversity
  • Our biennial symposium, split across sessions over three weeks, on teaching public health will explore best practices in inclusive pedagogy. Speakers will address educational policies, course design, content, and other approaches that optimize learning for all students.

    4:30 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
    INTRODUCTIONS AND OPENING REMARKS

    Sandro Galea (@sandrogalea), Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    Lisa Sullivan, Associate Dean for Education, Boston University School of Public Health


    4:35 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
    PANEL PRESENTATIONS
    This panel will examine how we can move towards inclusive teaching.

    Viji Sathy, Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Special Projects Assistant to the Dean of Undergraduate Education, University of North Carolina

    Sinead Younge, Chair, Department of Psychology, Morehouse College

    India Ornelas, Associate Professor of Health Services, University of Washington

    Rosalind Gregory-Bass, Chair and Associate Professor, Environmental and Health Sciences Program and Director, Health Careers Program, Spelman College

    Moderator: Candice Belanoff, Clinical Associate Professor, Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health

    SPH Diversity, TeachPublicHealth
  • This kick-off webinar of APHA’s Advancing Racial Equity series will examine racism and its historic and present-day impact on health and well-being. Presenters will:

    • identify the multiple levels on which racism operates;
    • describe the physiological impacts of racism and discrimination on health; and
    • explore the principles for and barriers to achieving health equity.

    REGISTER NOW

    Introduction

    • APHA President-Elect José Ramón Fernández-Peña, MD, MPA, Director of Health Professions Advising, Northwestern University

    Presenters

    • APHA Past President Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD, 2019-2020 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
    • Amani Allen, PhD, MPH, Executive Associate Dean, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

    Moderator

    • Tia Taylor Williams, Director, APHA Center for Public Health Policy and Center for School Health and Education

    We encourage you to view webinars from the 2015 series The Impact of Racism on the Health and Well-Being of the Nation in advance of the 2020 webinar series.

    SPH Diversity
  • Our biennial symposium, split across sessions over three weeks, on teaching public health will explore best practices in inclusive pedagogy. Speakers will address educational policies, course design, content, and other approaches that optimize learning for all students.

    4:30 p.m. – 4:35 p.m.
    INTRODUCTIONS AND OPENING REMARKS

    Sandro Galea (@sandrogalea), Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    Lisa Sullivan, Associate Dean for Education, Boston University School of Public Health


    4:35 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
    PANEL PRESENTATIONS
    This panel will explore what we should be doing to promote inclusivity in education.

    Linda Alexander, Senior Associate Dean for Academic, Student and Faculty Affairs, West Virginia University; Chair of ASPPH Diversity and Inclusion Section

    Erin Driver-Linn, Dean for Education, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health

    Janice Bowie, Director DrPH Program, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

    Raygine DiAquoi, Assistant Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Assistant Dean, Office of Diversity, Culture and Inclusion, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

    Moderator: Yvette Cozier, Assistant Dean of Diversity and Inclusion, Boston University School of Public Health

    SPH Diversity, TeachPublicHealth
  • Register in advance for this webinar: https://www.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_Pl52MF_PSliWhuZCK78B_Q

    Please join us for a webinar focused on sharing promising public health practices to reduce COVID-19 related disparities. During this webinar, presenters will discuss the actions their cities have taken to mitigate the disproportionate impact on racial and ethnic minorities. Additionally, speakers will take these ideas a step further and examine how they can be integrated into longer-term strategies for lasting impact that strengthens future responses and advances health equity. Please feel free to share this announcement with others who might be interested.

    Moderator:

    Dr. Leandris Liburd

    Director of the Office of Minority Health and Health Equity/ Chief Health Equity Officer of the CDC COVID-19 Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Speakers:

    Mr. T. Benicio Gonzales

    Director of the Center for Health Equity, Louisville Department of Public Health & Wellness

    Dr. Nafissa Cisse Egbuonye

    Director of the Black Hawk County Health Department, Iowa

    Dr. Jarvis Chen

    Research Scientist, Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    Dr. Thomas LaViest

    Dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University

    Attendees are welcome to submit questions in advance to [email protected] (Subject Line: Webinar: COVID-19 Response: Promising Practices in Health Equity).

    SPH Diversity
  • Please join Provost Richard M. Locke for Faculty in Focus: The Webinar, “Health Disparities and COVID-19,” on Thursday, April 30, 2020, at 4 p.m.

    The event will feature Brown University faculty members Visiting Professor of the Practice, CSREA, and The School of Public Health Ronald E. Aubert, Assistant Professor of Sociology Laura López-Sanders, and Professor of Health Services, Policy and Practice and Professor of Medicine Amal N. Trivedi.

    COVID-19 is having a disproportionate impact on members of marginalized communities, with disparities in infection rates and health outcomes emerging by race, ethnicity and immigration status. This multidisciplinary faculty panel will explore and discuss the underlying factors driving these disparities and ideas for addressing the issues. Provost Locke will moderate the conversation.

    For more information about this series, please visit: https://www.brown.edu/about/administration/provost/initiatives-resources/faculty-focus-webinar

    If you have a question about this event or would like to submit a question for the Q&A portion, please contact the University Event & Conference Services Office at [email protected]

    Please note:
    -A link to the webinar will be made available closer to the event.
    -Attendees will have the option to submit questions to the moderator during the event.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, SPH Diversity
  • So many transitions have occurred in the past several weeks, and we are aware that the upcoming period of finals, graduation, and summer will bring many more transitions. As such, we write to invite you to an informal virtual coffee/tea check-in on April 30th at 1PM.
    Deans Marcus and Clark will also be joining us as they are eager to hear from you. We encourage you to surface any topic you like. You may have chosen to raise some of these topics during the student town hall with Dean Marcus on April 7th; however, it’s okay to resurface any topic if it is important to you. We also hope this smaller group check-in will allow you to bring up additional topics that are important to you.
    Please register for the virtual tea/coffee here
    By now, you are likely aware of a number of resources that have been developed or enhanced in response to COVID-19. I wish to highlight just a few here:
    • If you are experiencing financial hardship, new resources are available via the Ufunds portal. These requests are being given the fullest consideration and will be met so long as available resources permit.
    • This can be a time that requires additional attention towards mental health. The School is holding weekly virtual mindfulness sessions. CAPS remains open for all students including virtual sessions.
    • All of our Deans remain available to you. We maintain virtual office hours. Deans for the Graduate School and Deans for the College also maintain virtual office hours.
    • For those involved in TA work, the Sheridan Center offers a number of supportive resources for engaging virtual learning.
    We look forward to seeing you.
    SPH Diversity
  • Join us for an afternoon of virtual tea/coffee to discuss how we can come together to better highlight/examine racial disparities in COVID as well as the differential impact on intersecting populations such as minorities in health service sectors and minorities who are disproportionately imprisoned. 
    Articles to be discussed:
    SPH Diversity
  • Feb
    28
    2:00pm - 4:00pm

    Minority Health Conference Webcast Viewing

    121 South Main Street

    This year’s theme is Truth to Power: Exercising Political Voice to Achieve Health Equity. Truth to Power recognizes a critical need for a more just and truthful world to improve our society. Historically, the courageous voices of people with less access to power have fueled movement-making and actions to disrupt resistive power structures. This year’s conference will focus on the tools and approaches we need to uplift marginalized voices, embolden effective leadership, and create policy that is community-driven and grounded in equity.

    The Keynote speaker is LaTosha Brown is an award-winning organizer, philanthropic consultant, political strategist and jazz singer with over twenty years of experience working in the non-profit and philanthropy sectors on a wide variety of issues related to political empowerment, social justice, economic development, leadership development, wealth creation and civil rights. She is the co-founder of Black Voters Matter Fund, a power building southern-based civic engagement organization that played an instrumental role in the 2017 Alabama U.S. Senate race.

    SPH Diversity
  • Feb
    26
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Gender Inclusive Training for TAs/TEs

    121 South Main Street
    This zoom conference session will explore effective teaching practices for creating gender-inclusive discussions and activities. Our goal is to support all students in understanding the relevance of gender to course content, as well as to create a welcoming environment for trans and nonbinary students. Participants are welcome to bring specific questions or scenarios to discuss, or to email the facilitator ahead of time if you want to make sure to address something specifically ([email protected]).
    SPH Diversity
  • Feb
    25
    5:30pm - 8:00pm

    Viewing: PUSHOUT: The criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

    Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center

    The viewing of the documentary PUSHOUT: The criminalization of Black Girls in Schools in order to consider the crucial issues of race, education, social and judicial disparities disproportionately affecting black girls, followed by a panel discussion.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Education, Teaching, Instruction, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, SPH Diversity, Teaching & Learning
  • Feb
    24
    12:15pm - 1:15pm

    Postponed: Womxn in Faculty Discussion: World Cafe

    121 South Main Street

    To kick off women’s history month, please join us for a lunchtime discussion regarding various topics that predominately impact womxn faculty members. This discussion will be interactive and consists of a brief introduction followed by the opportunity to discuss and strategize over different questions like gender dynamics in the workplace, work-life balance, and transitioning between ranks throughout your career. This opportunity will allow you to discuss with other faculty members and facilitators. 

    Please RSVP so that we may order enough food. 

    If you would like to learn more about the world cafe model please visit the website. 

    SPH Diversity
  • Feb
    13
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Student of Color Lunch

    121 South Main Street

    Please join us for the Public Health Graduate Student of Color Lunch Series! This is an opportunity for new and returning graduate students to come together to build community within the School. Food, fellowship, and networking!

     This lunch we will discuss the change in diversity criteria for NIH and what this means for applying for supplements and F31 funding. 

    SPH Diversity
  • Feb
    12
    1:00pm - 2:00pm

    Student Active Bystander Training

    121 South Main Street

    Training Goals: 

    • I ntroduces concept of active bystander intervention
    • Discuss why this is vital as a student in higher education
    • Develop strategies to effectively intervene as active bystanders to challenge bias, harassment, discrimination, and engage in courageous conversations
    • Practice scenarios
    SPH Diversity
  • Jan
    15
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    Virtual Public Health Grad Fair

    Online

    Thinking of applying to a graduate school in public health?  Join us for the first TIPH virtual fair of 2020!  This is a great opportunity to get your questions answered while conversing with multiple school representatives.  All without having to travel or take time from work!  Brown University School of Public Health’s chat room will be open from 10am-12pm EST, and there will be a live student panel at 11am.  We’re looking forward to seeing you there!

     

    REGISTER HERE

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Graduate School, Postgraduate Education, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity
  • Dec
    2
    12:30pm - 1:30pm

    School of Public Health Staff Mix & Mingle

    121 South Main Street

    The staff advisory committee at the school of public health invites you to come and enjoy food and fellowship with other staff members within the school. Enjoy hot cocoa and refreshments, stop by or stay the hour. We can’t wait to see you! 

    Please RSVP so we can ensure there are enough refreshments. 

    SPH Diversity
  • Nov
    19
    1:00pm - 2:00pm

    Student of Color Lunch

    121 South Main Street

    Professor Medeva Ghee will lead an informal discussion that will focus on the question: how do you get people of color to succeed in the faculty pipeline?

    Be prepared to learn about what works well for building a well-rounded experience as a graduate student and come with questions! 

    Please RSVP so that we can make sure there is enough food for everyone!

    SPH Diversity
  • Nov
    18
    6:30pm

    A Screening of: The Farewell

    Smith-Buonanno Hall

    SPH Immigration Working Group, A24 and Global Brown Center Present: The Farewell, Screening Cross-Cultural Ethics of Health 

    For more information please, click here

    SPH Diversity
  • Nov
    7
    3:30pm - 5:00pm

    Sex and Migration Panel

    121 South Main Street
    A panel discussion on the intersections of autonomous sex work, sex trafficking, migration, and gender.

    Pᴀɴᴇʟɪsᴛs
    Rɪᴄʜᴀʀᴅ Hᴏʟᴄᴏᴍʙ is a human rights advocate, street outreach worker and HIV prevention counselor in Providence, Rhode Island. He is best known for his groundbreaking work in HIV prevention and as the founder of Project Weber, a program for male sex-workers in Rhode Island. He has nearly 20 years of street-outreach experience in United States, Canada, and Europe.

    Bᴇʟʟᴀ Rᴏʙɪɴsᴏɴ is a sex worker’s rights activist who has worked in the sex industry over thirty years. She founded the Rhode Island Chapter of Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics (COYOTE RI) in 2009 and has served as the executive director since. As the director of COYOTE RI, Bella looks to build and strengthen support networks for sex workers in Rhode Island and she works in close collaboration with activists nationwide.
    SPH Diversity
  • Nov
    4
    12:30pm

    SAC Cultural Potluck

    South Street Landing

    Start off the holiday season by joining SAC for our second annual Cultural Potluck! Staff members are invited to bring and share their favorite food. It could be a dish that is reflective of your cultural heritage, something you grew up eating that reminds you of home and family, or just something you love to eat now. Beverages will be provided. Cooking a dish is not required to join, all staff are welcome, just bring your appetites! If you do plan to bring a dish, please complete this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeBJ9sxfpUy51dtcw3RPIVqRcnh0OA9Gdz-mJGvJNDj83iGvg/viewform

    Identity, Culture, Inclusion, SPH Diversity
  • Oct
    29
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Gender Inclusive Training for Faculty

    121 South Main Street

    Based on the positive feedback received last year we will be bringing back the outstanding and experienced consultant Think Again. The interactive session will include topics such as “transing” the curriculum and syllabi, opportunities and exercises to practice building gender inclusion in the classroom, and explore challenges faced in this work. 

    Please RSVP so that we may order enough food. 

    SPH Diversity
  • Oct
    29
    10:30am - 11:30am

    Gender Inclusive Training for Students

    121 South Main Street

    This training will be supported by an outstanding consultant Think Again with experience in gender inclusion in higher education. The interactive session will include topics such as the use of gender pronouns in interactions with others in the School, current issues in trans communities, as well as additional topics as informed by community dialogue and interactive practice to support behavior change.

    Please RSVP so that we may order enough snacks. 

    SPH Diversity
  • Transgender Health:  Lessons from the Field and Future Directions

    Friday, October 25, 2019
     12:00pm – 12:55pm
    121 South Main St, Room 245

    Jay A. Irwin is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He is also an Associate Director of the Midlands Sexual Health Research Collaborative, an interdisciplinary research group focused on sexuality, sexual health, and gender-based inquiries. He is also a member of PTRN: Professional Transgender Resource Network of Nebraska, an interdisciplinary group dedicated to increasing knowledge of trans identities and needs among professional fields such as healthcare, legal and policy, and education. His research focuses on LGBT health experiences, trans identities, and topics of queer and trans inclusion in medicine and higher education.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Research, Social Sciences, SPH Diversity, Training, Professional Development
  • Oct
    17
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    LEAD Reading Group: Impact of Immigration Policies on Health

    121 South Main Street
    Delve into the Immigration and Justice AJPH issue with lunch and the LEAD reading group! A discussion on health impact of policies will be led by the Brown SPH Immigration Working Group.
     
     
    All are invited, including students, staff, post-docs and faculty! Lunch from Kabob and Curry will be available.
    SPH Diversity
  • In this webinar, panelists will discuss the inequalities and health disparities brought about by the institution of slavery in the United States, with a focus on mass incarceration as an important social determinant of health.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Assess how historical federal government policies, beginning with chattel slavery, have produced inequality in the United States.
    • Describe the connection between the 13th amendment and current practices and policies around mass incarceration.
    • Describe how health is impacted by social factors such as discrimination, specifically focusing on incarceration in the US.

     

    SPH Diversity
  • Oct
    3
    12:30pm - 1:30pm

    Student of Color Luncheon

    121 South Main Street

    Professor’s Amal Trivedi and David Williams will lead an informal discussion that will focus on “managing” up and getting the most of supervision relationships. Be prepared to learn about what works well for building a good mentoring relationship that you can take forward. 

    Please RSVP so that we can make sure there is enough food for everyone!

    SPH Diversity
  • Oct
    1
    11:00am - 12:00pm

    Student-focused Active Bystander Training

    121 South Main Street

    The Office of Diversity & Inclusion at the School of Public Health would like to invite you to a Student-focused Active Bystander Training. This training introduces concepts and skills to effectively intervene as active bystanders to challenge bias, harassment, discrimination, and engage in courageous conversations. University resources for response to harassment and discrimination will also be discussed.

    Snacks and Refreshments will be served!

    SPH Diversity