Events

HUGs + STEM Lunchtime Conversation: D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D.

Thursday, February 22, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI

Please join us for a HUGs + STEM Lunchtime Conversation with D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., Professor of Digital Media and Artificial Intelligence, Comparative Media Studies Program and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This informal discussion presents an opportunity to learn more about Dr. Harrell's research and experiences, and talk about challenges faced by historically underrepresented groups (HUGs) in STEM fields.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Leisy J. Abrego, “Liberation, Not Integration: Immigrant Activists Making Claims and Making Home in Los Angeles”

Thursday, February 22, 2018 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Smith-Buonanno, Room 106, 95 Cushing Street, Providence, RI 02912

Undocumented Latino immigrants envision their futures here. Current policies, however, restrict their ability to thrive. Without legalization, they are hindered in their use of the very mechanisms that ensured economic mobility for other immigrants throughout U.S. history: jobs, education, and social services. To this end, one sector of the undocumented immigrant population—the 1.5 generation (often called DREAMers)—has witnessed the benefits of collective mobilization.

Research Seminar with Leisy J. Abrego, “Legal Violence and the Study of Marginalized Communities: Research Challenges and Responsibilities”

Friday, February 23, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI

We invite faculty and students to join us for a research seminar with Leisy J. Abrego, Associate Professor in Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, titled "Legal Violence and the Study of Marginalized Communities: Research Challenges and Responsibilities." Kindly RSVP to csrea@brown.edu.

What I Am Thinking About Now: Emma Amador, "Organizing for Social Services: Labor Migration, Welfare Rights, and Women’s Activism in the Puerto Rican Diaspora after 1948"

Wednesday, February 28, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI

Please join us on Wednesday, February 28, at 12pm-1pm for a "What I Am Thinking About Now" presentation by Emma Amador, Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow at CSREA, entitled "Organizing for Social Services: Labor Migration, Welfare Rights, and Women’s Activism in the Puerto Rican Diaspora after 1948."

Jennifer Nash, "Love Letter from a Critic, or Notes on the Intersectionality Wars"

Thursday, March 01, 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Pembroke Hall, Room 305

Jennifer Nash is an Associate Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University's Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences. Her research centers on black feminist theories; black sexual politics; race, gender, and law; race, gender, and visual culture; and women's/gender/sexuality studies' institutional histories and politics.

Building Health Equity In an Unequal World Series: Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, pediatrician and public health advocate whose research exposed the Flint Water Crisis

Thursday, March 01, 2018 6:00pm - 7:30pm
IBES Room 130 (Carmichael Auditorium), 85 Waterman Street, Providence RI

"The Flint Water Crisis: A Journey for Justice"

Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, MPH, will give the presentation, "The Flint Water Crisis: A Journey for Justice" at Brown University on Thursday, March 1, 2018. This talk is part of Building Health Equity in an Unequal World, a collaborative lecture series presented by the Brown University School of Public Health and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America. 

Politics in the Humanities (PITH) lecture by Cornel West, Harvard University

Tuesday, March 06, 2018 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Salomon Center for Teaching, Deciccio Auditorium

Presented as part of PITH (Politics in the Humanities) and co-sponsored by the Office of the President, the Office of the Provost, and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.

Free and open to the public. Tickets are required. Doors will open at 5:00 pm. A standby line will be available. Please be advised that reserved tickets will be released to the standby line at 5:20 pm. At this time your seat will no longer be guaranteed. Please arrive between 5:00 pm and 5:20 pm to be guaranteed your seat.

Treva Lindsey, "Colored No More Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, D.C."

Thursday, March 08, 2018 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Smith-Buonanno 106

Home to established African American institutions and communities, Washington, D.C., offered women in the New Negro movement a unique setting for the fight against racial and gender oppression. In her 2017 book, "Colored No More," Treva Lindsey traces how African American women of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century made significant strides toward making the nation's capital a more equal and dynamic urban center.

Free and open to the public. Light reception and book signing to follow.

Research Seminar with Treva B. Lindsey, The Ohio State University

Friday, March 09, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA), Lippitt House

Please join us for a research seminar with Treva Lindsey, associate professor of women's, gender, and sexuality studies at The Ohio State University.

What I Am Thinking About Now: Michael Kennedy

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI

Please join us on Tuesday, March 13, at 12pm-1pm for a "What I Am Thinking About Now" presentation by Michael D. Kennedy, Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs, Brown University. Professor Kennedy has specialized in a historical sociology of Eastern European social movements, national identifications and systemic change, and more recently in the knowledge cultural sociology of social and global transformations.

RSVP: csrea@brown.edu

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Sofian Merabet, "Strange Hospitality: Gay Syrian Refugees in Lebanon"

Wednesday, March 14, 2018 5:00pm - 6:30pm
IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street

This paper engages with the Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon and, specifically, considers how queer-identified Syrians navigate an often-hostile environment in and around the Lebanese capital Beirut. Drawing on hospitality as a philosophical concept and on the sociological notion of the stranger, this paper focuses on discourses and aspirations these refugees express, in terms of language and bodily practices, in the face of what many experience as “hardened borders” within the social fabric of the host country.

Research Seminar with Sofian Merabet, The University of Texas at Austin

Thursday, March 15, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA), Lippitt House

We invite faculty and students to join us for a small-group seminar with Sofian Merabet, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin, to discuss his work in greater detail and learn about his research process. Kindly RSVP to csrea@brown.edu. 

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Yến Lê Espiritu, "Feminist Refugee Epistemology: Reading Displacement in Vietnamese and Syrian Refugee Art"

Monday, March 19, 2018 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center

Joining the fields of transnational feminist studies with critical refugee studies, this talk introduces the concept feminist refugee epistemology (FRE) to re-conceptualize war-based displacement as not only about social disorder and interruption but also about social reproduction and innovation. FRE does more than critique Western media representation of refugees; it underlines the refugees’ rich and complicated lives, the ways in which they enact their hopes, beliefs, and politics, even when they live militarized lives.

Research Seminar with Yến Lê Espiritu, "Critical Refugee Studies: The Critical and the Creative"

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 10:00am - 11:30am
Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA), Lippitt House

The hyper-focus on refugee suffering, desperation, and neediness in media and social science scholarship have represented refugees as passive recipients of western generosity and increasingly as the targets of racial profiling, surveillance, and detention. This seminar invites participants to chart new approaches to refugee studies that integrate theoretical rigor and policy concerns with refugees' rich and complicated lived worlds--approaches that fuse the critical and the creative.

What I Am Thinking About Now: Juliet Hooker, "Black Grief/White Grievance: Loss and Contemporary US Racial Politics"

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI

Please join us on Wednesday, March 21, at 12pm-1pm for a "What I Am Thinking About Now" presentation by Juliet Hooker, Professor of Political Science at Brown University, titled "Black Grief/White Grievance: Loss and Contemporary US Racial Politics."