Past Events

What I Am Thinking About Now: Kevin Quashie, “Relation, in Search of an Ethic of Black Relation”

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Kevin Quashie, Professor of English at Brown University, titled “Relation, in Search of an Ethic of Black Relation”

Professor Quashie has been interested in thinking about aliveness–not death, even as death is properly and vitally centered in scholarly and everyday discourse–but black aliveness. And at the heart ofRead More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Austin Jackson, “Compositing Democracy: Teaching Critical Literacy in the New Racial Domain”

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Austin Jackson, Assistant Director of The Writing Center and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Creative Nonfiction Writing Program at Brown University, titled “Compositing Democracy: Teaching Critical Literacy in the New Racial Domain”.

RSVP: csrea@Read More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Sasha-Mae Eccleston, “Odd-See’s Speech and the Fault Lines of Black Classicisms”

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Sasha-Mae Eccleston, Assistant Professor of Classics at Brown University.

Odd-See’s Speech and the Fault Lines of Black Classicisms
This talk draws on Suzan-Lori Parks’ exploration of caninity in Suzan-Lori Parks’Read More

Book Launch: Monica Muñoz Martinez, “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas”

Featuring the author

Monica Muñoz Martinez, Stanley J. Bernstein Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

With commentary from

Karl Jacoby, Allan Nevins Professor of American History, Columbia University
Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, RaceRead More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Keisha-Khan Perry, “Black Women, Violence and the Fight for the City in the Americas”

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Keisha-Khan Perry, Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University.

Black Women, Violence and the Fight for the City in the Americas
This presentation draws from her ongoing transnational feministRead More

Seeing Beyond the Veil: Race-ing Key Concepts in Political Theory (Day 2 of 2)

, Crystal Room

Download a complete conference program with agenda and speaker information.

How does work on race push us to reformulate or abandon established concepts in political theory? Participants in this conference draw on the archive of black political thought to make powerfulRead More

HUGs + STEM Lunchtime Conversation: Arlie Petters, Duke University

Please join us for a HUGs + STEM Lunchtime Conversation with Arlie Petters, the Dean of Academic Affairs for Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at Duke University. He is also the Benjamin Powell Professor of Mathematics and a Professor of Physics and Economics.

On Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 12:00 pm - 1:Read More

Seeing Beyond the Veil: Race-ing Key Concepts in Political Theory (Day 1 of 2)

Presented by the Department of Political Science, the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, and the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women.
, Room 305

Download a complete conference program with agenda and speaker information.

How does work on race push us to reformulate or abandon established concepts in political theory? Participants in this conference draw on the archive of black politicalRead More

Karen Inouye on Researching and Writing Between the Disciplines

Professor Inouye will discuss the challenges involved in researching and writing an interdisciplinary monograph, as well as the demands of transforming a dissertation into a book.

Speaker

Karen M. Inouye is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of American Studies at Indiana University,Read More

Karen Inouye, “The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration”

, Room 106

The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration reexamines the history of imprisonment of U.S. and Canadian citizens of Japanese descent during World War II. Karen M. Inouye explores how historical events can linger in individual and collective memory and then crystallize in powerful moments of political engagement. Drawing on interviews and untapped

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