Upcoming Events

"Transcendent Futures" Virtual Art Exhibit

Thursday, October 22, 2020 12:00 am to Thursday, June 30, 2022 12:00 pm

October 2020 - June 2021

"Taking stock of where we’ve been. Moving beyond where we are." With the daunting challenges of the year 2020, including a global pandemic, renewed struggles for racial justice, and ongoing environmental and climate concerns, CSREA’s new art exhibit features 20+ artists whose artwork explores hope, connection, and community, as we collectively strive to build a world that works for everybody.

View the complete exhibit online.

Race & Anti-Black Racism

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America & Office of the Provost
, Zoom

Please join us for a panel discussion, Race & Anti-Black Racism in America on Wednesday, April 21, 2021, at 12 p.m. The discussion will feature:Read More

Critical Conversations: Anti-Asian Racism and Violence in America

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

This conversation explores the complexity of factors impacting Asian American communities, including the historical and recent contexts for anti-Asian racism and violence.

Presenters

CRC Symposium: Racial Reckonings & the Future of the Humanities

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 to Thursday, April 29, 2021
Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

The term “reckoning” denotes acts of calculation, estimation and debts paid. It can carry a sense of future settlements. It also refers to “ideas, opinions and judgments” as in the phrase, “I reckon.” To what extent, and how, might we imagine a racial reckoning via new work in arts and humanities?

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Race and the Transformation of Disciplines, A Faculty Roundtable (Panel 1 of 3)

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

This panel is part of the two-day CRC Symposium, Racial Reckonings & the Future of the Humanities, April 28-29, 2021. The term “reckoning” denotes acts of calculation, estimation and debts paid. It can carry aRead More

CRC Directors’ Roundtable on Institutionalizing Critical Race Studies (Panel 2 of 3)

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

This panel is part of the two-day CRC Symposium, Racial Reckonings & the Future of the Humanities, April 28-29, 2021. The term “reckoning” denotes acts of calculation, estimation and debts paid. It can carry aRead More

Closing Plenary: CSRPC Annual Public Lecture presents Reginald Dwyane Betts, in conversation with Eve L. Ewing (Panel 3 of 3)

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

The Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) at the University of Chicago presents a performance by Reginald Dwyane Betts, Felon: ARead More

The Future of Policing in America: A Third Rail Conversation with Connie Rice

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

This Third Rail dialogue tackles the complex, urgent and difficult subject of racism and policing. Connie Rice is a distinguished lawyer, activist, and co-founder of the Advancement Project. She is widely recognized for her leadership of diverse coalitions and her non-traditional approaches to litigating major cases involving police misconduct, employment discrimination, and fair

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Anti-Racist Feminist Organizing in a Transnational World: Chandra Talpade Mohanty

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) and the journal Gender, Work & Organization

This three-part speaker series will focus on various ways anti-racist feminist methods of organizing are taking shape in an increasingly connected, transnational world. Prof. Tami Navarro (March 25, 2021),Read More

Moya Bailey, “Misogynoir Transformed: Black Women’s Digital Resistance”

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)
About the Book

When Moya Bailey first coined the term “misogynoir,” she defined it as the ways anti-Black and misogynistic representation shape broader ideas about Black women, particularly in visual culture and digital spaces. She had no idea that the term would go viral, touching aRead More

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