Past Events

Ferguson Teach-In

Salomon 101

Events surrounding the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri have re-ignited conversations about racism, inequality, and increasingly militaristic policing practices in black and brown communities across the US. This Teach-In strives to create a space for campus dialogue; provide social and historical context for these events and consider the impact of emerging and ongoing portrayals and responses.  

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Brenda Marie Osbey, "New Orleans Traditional Religion: Mourning, Redemption, Restoration"

CSREA Conference Room, Hillel 303, 80 Brown Street

What I Am Thinking About Now: Professor Brenda Marie Osbey (Africana Studies)

In this presentation, Professor Osbey explores the ways in which New Orleans Traditional Religion provides and promotes healing, and whether it is possible or desirable to apply traditional healing to contemporary experience in the City. 

Commencement Forum with Tracee Ellis Ross '94: Creative Opportunities for Women of Color in Entertainment

Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium

In this conversation, actress, performance artist, and motivational speaker Tracee Ellis Ross '94 shared stories about her years on the hit TV series "Girlfriends" and discussed race, her body, her career, and how she responds to images and expectations of women of color in entertainment.

Tracee Ellis Ross '94, actress, performance artist, and motivational speaker; professor Tricia Rose '93, director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) at Brown University

Using Joy as Your Career Guide: Student Workshop with Tracee Ellis Ross '94

How can you allow your artistic spirit to empower you to reach your potential, to remain flexible and open, and contribute the most to the world? This graduation weekend workshop, led by Brown alum, award winning actress and performance artist Tracee Ellis Ross '94 will enable students to tap into their creative energies. Participants will engage in fun and powerful exercises that explore some of Ross’ best practices for harnessing the elusive well of creativity.

Race in the Global Asias: A Symposium

Petteruti Lounge, Robert Center, 75 Waterman Street

What does it mean to talk about race across different disciplines in Asian and Asian American Studies configured as the Asias? This symposium brings together four prominent scholars to speculate on the intersection of their work in the transcolonial border zones of the Asias to lay the foundation for future conversations in history, ethnic studies, performance studies, and social movements. 

Bottom-Up Place Making: Graffiti-Murals and Latino/a Urbanism

BERT 130 (Carmichael Auditorium), 85 Waterman Street

Celebrated graffiti writers will discuss the practice of painting unsanctioned graffiti-murals as well as related issues such as creative place-making, occupying public space, identity, and the role illicit, creative, and contestative aesthetics play in the process of neighborhood change.

Conversation will be followed by a live art painting and reception.

Moderated by: Stefano Bloch, Cogut Center for the Humanities and Urban Studies Program, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow 

Alexandra Vazquez, "Listening in Detail: A Remix"

Pembroke 305, 172 Meeting Street

This talk is an invitation to think together about what musical details, and all their unassimilatable qualities, make possible for scholarly projects. The presentation will revisit some of the details involved in Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music, and will also surface some of the book's submerged studies that made the final copy. Alongside these details, and the critical modes they make possible, the presentation will offer a set of working, non-prohibitive credos about writing and method.

American Promise: Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Smith-Buonanno 106, 95 Cushing Street

American Promise explores the complex interplay between race, class, gender in educational opportunity. Over the course of 13 years, this 80-minute abridged documentary chronicles the experiences of two middle-class African-American parents in Brooklyn, N.Y., and their sons who are enrolled in Dalton, a prestigious private school. Detailing the boys' divergent paths from kindergarten through high school graduation, this provocative, intimate documentary presents complicated truths about America's struggle to come of age on issues of race, class and opportunity.

George Lipsitz, "Decorating the Way to Other Worlds: Why Race and Space Matter Now"

Pembroke Hall, Room 305, 172 Meeting Street, Providence RI 02912

In CSREA's inaugural Third Rail Series Lecture, George Lipsitz described how in the wake of imposed austerity and state organized abandonment of communities of color, urban activists and artists are building capacity for popular democracy through site specific interventions organized around art-based community making.

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