Virtual Event

Mireya Loza, “Defiant Braceros: How Migrant Workers Fought for Racial, Sexual, and Political Freedom”

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

About the Book

In Defiant Braceros, Mireya Loza sheds new light on the private lives of migrant men who participated in the Bracero Program (1942–1964), a binational agreement between the United States and Mexico that allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican workers to enter this country on temporary workRead More

Maile Arvin, “Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai`i and Oceania”

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

About the Book

From their earliest encounters with Indigenous Pacific Islanders, white Europeans and Americans asserted an identification with the racial origins of Polynesians, declaring them to be racially almost white and speculating that they were of Mediterranean or AryanRead More

Tara Fickle, “The Race Card: From Gaming Technologies to Model Minorities”

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

About the Book

As Pokémon Go reshaped our neighborhood geographies and the human flows of our cities, mapping the virtual onto lived realities, so too has gaming and game theory played a role in our contemporary understanding of race and racial formation in the United States. FromRead More

Richard Jean So, “Redlining Culture: A Data History of Racial Inequality and Postwar Fiction”

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

About the Book

The canon of postwar American fiction has changed over the past few decades to include far more writers of color. It would appear that we are making progress—recovering marginalized voices and including those who were for far too long ignored. However, is thisRead More

Writing Workshop on Anti-Racist Feminist Organizing

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America and the journal, Gender, Work, & Organization

Date of workshop: Thursday, May 20, 2021, 4 pm - 7 pm ET
Deadline for paper submissions: Monday, May 10, 2021

This workshop will offer feedback on working papers and extended abstracts on writing that focuses on anti-racist feminist organizing and welcomes submissions from all disciplines. Doctoral students and emerging scholars are encouragedRead More

Moya Bailey, “Misogynoir Transformed: Black Women’s Digital Resistance”

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

About the Book

When Moya Bailey first coined the term “misogynoir,” she defined it as the ways anti-Black and misogynistic representation shape broader ideas about Black women, particularly in visual culture and digital spaces. She had no idea that the term would go viral, touchingRead More

Anti-Racist Feminist Organizing in a Transnational World: Chandra Talpade Mohanty

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) and the journal Gender, Work & Organization

This three-part speaker series will focus on various ways anti-racist feminist methods of organizing are taking shape in an increasingly connected, transnational world. Prof. Tami Navarro (March 25, 2021),Read More

Closing Plenary: CSRPC Annual Public Lecture presents Reginald Dwyane Betts, in conversation with Eve L. Ewing (Panel 3 of 3)

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

The Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) at the University of Chicago presents a performance by Reginald Dwyane Betts, Felon: ARead More

CRC Directors’ Roundtable on Institutionalizing Critical Race Studies (Panel 2 of 3)

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

This panel is part of the two-day CRC Symposium, Racial Reckonings & the Future of the Humanities, April 28-29, 2021. The term “reckoning” denotes acts of calculation, estimation and debts paid. It can carry aRead More

CRC Symposium: Racial Reckonings & the Future of the Humanities

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA)

The term “reckoning” denotes acts of calculation, estimation and debts paid. It can carry a sense of future settlements. It also refers to “ideas, opinions and judgments” as in the phrase, “I reckon.” To what extent, and how, might we imagine a racial reckoning via new work in arts and humanities?

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