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Meltwater from Greenland’s ice sheet is a leading contributor to global sea level rise, and a Brown University study shows that an underappreciated factor — the position of the snowline on the ice sheet — plays a key role in setting the pace of melting.
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In a finding that has implications for how scientists calculate natural greenhouse gas emissions, a new study finds that water levels in small lakes across northern Canada and Alaska vary during the summer much more than was assumed.
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Chris Horvat, a postdoctoral scholar whose regular research on polar ice floes is temporarily derailed by the government shutdown, is using a strange ice disk (and internet sensation) as a research analog for sea ice.
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Lynch, a climate scientist who is active in environmental policy research, will discuss the implications of the rapidly advancing Anthropocene and the intersection of environmental policy and human rights.
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For the ecology and evolutionary biology concentrator, a summer spent in a Massachusetts forest offered the chance to explore forest ecology and a future career in research.
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Perovskite solar cells are a promising new low-cost photovoltaic technology, but most contain toxic lead; a team led by Brown researchers has introduced solar cells with a new titanium-perovskite material that gets the lead out.
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Working in Brown University’s Center for Computation and Visualization, application scientist Benjamin Knorlein, here with visiting scientist Tom Sgouros, helps turn research data into virtual reality.
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Brown marine biologist Jon Witman and students have spent much of 2016 in the Galápagos Islands, continuing years of chronicling the complex and dramatic ecological changes wrought by the increasingly volatile El Niño – La Niña cycle.
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At the Brown Environmental Leadership Lab, high school students learn the skills they need to create change on environmental issues facing their local communities and the planet as a whole.
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If the world turns to intensive farming in the tropics to meet food demand, it will require vast amounts of phosphorus fertilizer produced from Earth’s finite, irreplaceable phosphate rock deposits, a new analysis shows.
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Two environmental science concentrators in the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society have won an international prize for their idea to make Kenyan fish farming more sustainable.
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Studies of how climate change might affect agriculture generally look only at crop yields — the amount of product harvested from a given unit of land. But climate change may also influence how much land people choose to farm and the number of crops they plant each growing season. A new study takes all of these variables into account, and suggests researchers may be underestimating the total effect of climate change on the world’s food supply.
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