U.S. Latino Studies Fund

Cristina García and Dariel Suarez in Conversation

, Room 117

Celebrated Cuban-American writers Cristina García and Dariel Suarez will sit down with Ralph Rodriguez, Professor of American Studies and English at Brown University, for a discussion of Latinidad, place, memory, and writing. Audience participation is invited. 

About the authors

Cristina GarcíaRead More

Writers Dialogue with Cristina García and Dariel Suarez

, Room 103

This intimate, seminar-style discussion with authors Cristina García and Dariel Suarez will present an opportunity for students to learn more about the writers’ inspirations, influences, and methods. Lunch will be provided. 

RSVP to [email protected]

Co-sponsored by the Department of American Studies, theRead More

Writing For A Broken World: An Evening with Cristina García and Dariel Suarez

, Room 305

Contemporary novelists Cristina García and Dariel Suarez use fiction to capture what life after the Cuban Revolution has meant for both Cubans on the island and Cuban-Americans. With great pathos, humor, and anguish, their unforgettable characters show us what’s at stake for individuals in the love and loss of nation, the love and loss of each other, and the painRead More

Book Launch: Monica Muñoz Martinez, “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas”

Featuring the author

Monica Muñoz Martinez, Stanley J. Bernstein Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

With commentary from

Karl Jacoby, Allan Nevins Professor of American History, Columbia University
Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race andRead More

Book Launch: Leticia Alvarado, "Abject Performances: Aesthetic Strategies in Latino Cultural Production"

Nicholson House, 71 George St, Providence RI 02912

"Abject Performances" draws out the irreverent, disruptive aesthetic strategies used by Latino artists and cultural producers who shun standards of respectability. Alvarado centers negative affect to capture experiences that lie at the edge of the mainstream Latino-centered social justice struggles to illuminate modes of community formation and social critique defined by a refusal of identitarian coherence that nonetheless coalesce into affiliation and possibility.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Leisy J. Abrego, “Liberation, Not Integration: Immigrant Activists Making Claims and Making Home in Los Angeles”

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106, 95 Cushing Street, Providence, RI 02912

Undocumented Latino immigrants envision their futures here. Current policies, however, restrict their ability to thrive. Without legalization, they are hindered in their use of the very mechanisms that ensured economic mobility for other immigrants throughout U.S. history: jobs, education, and social services. To this end, one sector of the undocumented immigrant population—the 1.5 generation (often called DREAMers)—has witnessed the benefits of collective mobilization.

Symposium: The U.S. Immigration Regime and the Politics of Belonging [VIDEO]

IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium)

On April 7, 2017, CSREA will be presenting a symposium entitled, The U.S. Immigration Regime and the Politics of Belonging. How have immigration laws developed over the past century and how do these policies continue to affect the country today? For example, what are the legacies of IRCA and IRRIRA and how are these policies being amended and applied today?

Martín Espada, "Vivas to Those Who Have Failed: A Poetry Reading" [VIDEO]

CSREA, Lippitt House, 96 Waterman Street, Room 103

Please join us for a reading, discussion, and book signing with Martín Espada, celebrated poet and Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He will be reading from his latest collection of poems, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed.

Against Respectability Politics: Conversations on Latina suciedad

Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium

Organized around feminist and queer approaches to performance and unconventional archives, this event brings interdisciplinary scholars Deb Vargas(UC Riverside), Dixa Ramírez (Yale) and renown performance artist Nao Bustamante together to discuss Latina suciedad (dirtyness) and abjection as the basis for politicized aesthetics.

Moderated by Leticia Alvarado, Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, Brown University.

A CSREA Faculty Grant Event.

Pages