Lectures, Discussions + Conferences

A. Naomi Paik, “Bans, Walls, Raids, Sanctuary: Understanding U.S. Immigration for the Twenty-First Century”

Just days after taking the White House, Donald Trump signed three executive orders targeting noncitizens—authorizing the Muslim Ban, the border wall, and ICE raids. The new administration’s approach towards noncitizens was defined by bans, walls, and raids. Bans, Walls, Raids, Sanctuary shows that these features have a long history and have long harmed all of us and ourRead More

Akua Naru, “The Keeper Project”

, Room 106

In this presentation, Akua Naru will discuss her work on The Keeper Project, a multi-media archive that chronicles the role of Black women in the creation and evolution of hip-hop music and culture.

Akua Naru is a Hip Hop artist, producer, activist, and scholar. She is currently a Race and Media Fellow as well as Artist-in-Residence at the Center for the Study of Race andRead More

Ainsley LeSure, “Theorizing Political Resistance to Racism: From Occasioning Sight to Constituting Power”

, Room 103

This talk traces the focus on unconscious cognition (in the form of implicit bias, racial ideology, and volition) as an explanation for the tenacity of racism in the post-Civil Rights era to early critiques of the practice-centered account of institutional racism. With this focus, political resistance to racism has been figured as a twin project of getting people to see that their perceptionRead More

Kimberlé Crenshaw: 50 Years Since 1968 Keynote Lecture

Department of Africana Studies/Rites and Reason Theatre, Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, The Petey Greene Program
, 101

1968: Unearthing the Linked Narratives of Critical Race Theory, Intersectionality, and Their Discontents

This talk by distinguished legal scholar and policy leader, Kimberlé Crenshaw will begin with what should be a puzzling convergence. How is it that after five years of a grassroots uprising against anti-Black police violence, and after eight years of a BlackRead More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, “Policing as the Public Theater of Racial Degradation”

, Room 103

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Brown University and an affiliated faculty with the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, IL.  

“Policing and the Public Theater of Racial Degradation”
Terry v. Ohio,Read More

Book Launch: Micah E. Salkind, “Do You Remember House?: Chicago’s Queer of Color Undergrounds”

CSREA and the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Featuring the author: Dr. Micah Salkind, Special Projects Manager for The City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Humanities in the Department of American Studies at Brown University

With commentary from:

Opening Plenary for “R-E-S-P-E-C-T-A-B-I-L-I-T-Y: Black Women’s Studies since ‘Righteous Discontent’” Conference

CSREA and the Workshop for WOC Feminisms at Brown.
, Room 120

Download a complete agenda.

Righteous Discontent: The Women’s Movement in the Black Baptist Church, 1880–1920 by Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham impacted a wide range of disciplines and areas, among them, gender and sexualityRead More

2019 Commencement Forum | The Promises and Perils of Diversity: A Conversation between Jennifer Richeson ‘94 and Tricia Rose

, Room 130

2019 Commencement Forum

The Promises and Perils of Diversity: A conversation between Jennifer Richeson ’94 and Tricia Rose

It is widely presumed that more diversity naturally expands racial understanding and equality. Jennifer Richeson’s award-winning research reveals a moreRead More

2019 Commencement Forum | Black Noise @ 25: A Conversation between Scott Poulson-Bryant ’08 and Tricia Rose

, Room 130

2019 Commencement Forum

Professor Tricia Rose’s (Ph.D. ’93) 1994 award-winning book, Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America, which was based on her Brown University dissertation, is still considered a foundational text for the study of hip hop, one that has defined what is now an entireRead More

Hip Hop Lecture Series: Austin Martin ’17

, Carmichael Auditorium, Room 130

Professor Tricia Rose’s 1994 award-winning book, Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America, is considered foundational text for the study of hip hop, one that has defined what is now an entire field of study. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Black Noise, Professor Rose and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at BrownRead More

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