Courses for Spring 2019

CLAS

  • Ancient Science, Medicine and Magic

    What are the origins of scientific thought? How does it differ from other systems of knowledge, such as magic or myth? In this course, we will examine the cultural and intellectual history of science, medicine and magic in the Ancient World. We will delve into such topics as cosmology, zoology, geography, astrology, Hippocratic medicine, and scientific methodology. Discover how Thales predicted an eclipse, why Aristotle was afraid of seals, and how the Stoics justified their belief in divination. All students welcome.
    CLAS 0530 S01
    Primary Instructor
    van Veldhuizen
  • The World of Byzantium

    Caught between the East and West, the culture of Byzantium inherited the ancient worlds of Greece, Rome, and Jerusalem, nurturing many a modern ideology, conflict, and identity. Byzantium is explored through its history, texts, and art. We examine the foundation and history of Constantinople, Iconoclasm, the Crusades, medieval Christianity and Islam, Byzantine court life, concepts of gender, self, and sexuality.
    CLAS 0660 S01
    Primary Instructor
    MacDougall
  • From Antiquity to the Humanities (via Humanism) and the History of Ideas

    This course looks at the origins of several subjects in the Humanities in order to explain, question, and sometimes challenge the ways in which those subjects are studied or understood today. Consideration of sources for the Humanities today – in the educational practices of classical antiquity, in the 'humanism' of the Renaissance and in the 17th-20th centuries– will throw new light on ideas and categories which are central to western education. Topics include grammar/language, persuasive argument, scholarship; theory/practice of history, literature, poetry, fiction, fantasy, and the novel; relationship between words and images, and connections between studying the Humanities and being human.
    CLAS 0780 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
  • The Bhagavad Gītā

    This course will study and discuss the teachings of the Bhagavad Gītā in the context of its literary, theological, and philosophical origins in ancient India. We will read the text itself (in English, not Sanskrit), parts of the epic Mahābhārata in which the Gītā is situated, and collateral texts, such as Upanisads, Indian myths, Buddhist sermons, or even modern novels, that may shed light on why and how this text has exercised such far-reaching influence across the ages, inside India and beyond.
    CLAS 0855 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Greek Mythology

    Goddesses, heroes, monsters: it’s time for some Greek Myth. We will cover the stories of creation, Pandora, the Trojan Cycle, the legends of Thebes (Oedipus and co.), the Golden Fleece, Greco-Roman gods, Hercules and other heroes, and many, many more myths. But we will also think about the telling of these myths. What do the tellers need from these stories? How do they change them to fit their contexts? And is it possible to separate the “myth” from any particular telling of it? No prerequisites required; all texts in translation.
    CLAS 0900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • The American Presidents and the Western Tradition

    We are accustomed to engaging the American presidency as a public office best approached through the prism of government or political science, but this course studies the ways in which the presidents in thought and action are part of a larger continuum of humanistic expression in the western tradition. It is organized around five categories: memory, language, consolation, farewell, and self-reflection. Our work involves reading and viewing/listening to various materials, including videos and original documents. The words we study, both by and about presidents, will be compared to various masterworks of Greco-Roman antiquity and the western Middle Ages.
    CLAS 1120U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
  • Literature of Empires

    This course compares and contrasts the literatures of the ancient empires of East and West Asia (including the Mediterranean), with an emphasis on Chinese and Greco-Roman cultures. We will explore the literary discourses that grew up in support of and in opposition to imperialism and colonization; specific topics may include how empires use mythology, how tensions between centers and peripheries create imperial identities, how an empire assimilates a multiethnic past, the constitution of archives, and what “classic” means to different audiences. All readings will be in English.
    CLAS 1120Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
  • Late Plato

    This course investigates Plato’s response to difficulties posed in his Parmenides about the theory of Forms. To flesh out the theory we will look back at the Phaedo and Republic, and to understand his revisions we will read a series of dialogues responding to the Parmenides: Theaetetus (on knowledge), Sophist (on truth and falsehood), and Statesman (on method and politics). These dialogues present themselves as philosophical exercises to train the audience in philosophy and promise a final member to complete the series, but the Philosopher is missing. A question: can we find Plato’s philosopher in the series we have?
    CLAS 1121A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
  • Roman History II: The Roman Empire and Its Impact

    The social and political history of the Roman Empire (14-565 CE). Focuses on expansion, administration, and Romanization of the empire; crisis of the 3rd century; militarization of society and monarchy; the struggle between paganism and Christianity; the end of the Empire in the West. Special attention given to the role of women, slaves, law, and historiography. Ancient sources in translation.
    CLAS 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
  • Ancient Novel

    Sex, pirates, powerful goddesses, and mistaken identities: these are just some of the aspects of the so-called Ancient Novel and its parodies. In this course we will investigate how a few fictional texts from the 1st-3rd centuries A.D. construct their characters' gender and sexuality, and therefore reflect concerns about wisdom, power, and difference within the Roman Empire.
    CLAS 1750T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Eccleston
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    CLAS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    CLAS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    CLAS 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Classics Concentrators

    The following courses may be of interest to students who are interested in Classics. Classics concentrators should talk to their concentration advisor to see which of these courses may be taken for concentration credit. Please see the sponsoring department for the time and location of each course.

    Comparative Literature
    COLT 0710Q The Odyssey in Literature and Film
    CLAS XLIST 0

GREK

  • Introduction to Ancient Greek

    Intensive, one-semester introduction to Greek. No previous knowledge of Greek is required. This is a double credit course.
    GREK 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ell
  • Essentials of the Greek Language

    Second half of a two-semester approach to ancient Greek with special emphasis on developing facility in rapid reading of Greek literature. Selections from Attic Greek authors. No previous knowledge of Greek is required.
    GREK 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kapach
  • Introduction to Greek Literature

    Prerequisite: GREK 0300 (or the equivalent). Review of grammar of the Attic dialect through rapid reading of texts by Lysias, Plato, or Xenophon. Emphasis on syntax and style.
    GREK 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Karper
  • Plato, Phaedrus

    We will read in Greek Plato's dialogue Phaedrus on love and rhetoric. We will attempt to understand the dialogue as a unified whole, discussing such questions as the link between love and the art of persuasion, Plato's denigration of writing, and the relationship between rhetoric and philosophy.
    GREK 1110B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
  • Sophocles

    This course offers a thorough introduction to Sophocles and Greek tragedy through a careful study of two plays, Antigone and Philoctetes, as well as a rapid survey of Sophocles' other works. Close attention will be paid to issues of language, poetry, and performance. In addition, through a representative selection of recent scholarship we will explore themes including Sophocles' engagement with culture and politics in fifth-century Athens as well as the reception of his plays in modern and contemporary theater.
    GREK 1110P S01
    Primary Instructor
    MacDougall
  • Polybius

    How does an Empire start? Polybius provides answers in his Histories and explains the rise of Rome to a position of world-power. This course focuses on Book I which describes Polybius' purpose for his history and the foundation of Rome's operations beyond Italy. This advanced Greek language and literature course enhances participants' knowledge and understanding of Greek, develops an appreciation of important themes and current research into Polybius and his work, and improves the student's capacity to translate and comment on ancient Greek text. Assessment is by a combination of translation, commentary, essay assignments, and examinations.
    GREK 1111B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • Greek Prose Composition

    Survey of Greek grammar and an opportunity to reflect on problems of translation. Main goals: to improve the students' command of prose syntax (both in reading and writing), and to develop a keen sensitivity towards issues of translation. A variety of texts written in Attic prose are read and analyzed in class. Students are expected to write two to three compositions a week in good Attic prose. Advanced knowledge of ancient Greek is a prerequisite for this course.
    GREK 1150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    GREK 1910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    GREK 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Greek Choral Lyric: Pindar and Bacchylides

    Choral lyric played an essential role in the religious, cultural, and festive life of the Greeks in the fifth century B.C. Both Pindar and Bacchylides were acclaimed as masters of this art, and their compositions were performed in all parts of the Greek world. With proper preparation, we can enjoy in their original language their elevated poetry and appreciate the information it harbors concerning myth, local traditions, economics and power relations of class and gender. We will also consider such topics as the circumstances of their performance, literary sources and allusions, and the poets' own social position.
    GREK 2020E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
  • Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    GREK 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    GREK 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    MacDougall
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    GREK 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

LATN

  • Introduction to Latin

    This course offers a rapid introduction to the Latin language and grammar. As a one-semester introduction to material often covered in two semesters, this course carries two credit hours instead on one. The workload for this course is correspondingly heavy; students may expect an average of ten hours of homework—including memorization, practice, and preparation of vocabulary and grammar—per week. There are no prerequisites for this course.
    LATN 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Essentials of the Latin Language

    Second course in an intensive two-semester approach to Latin. Special emphasis on developing facility in the rapid reading of Latin literature. No previous knowledge of Latin is required prior to taking this two course sequence.
  • Introduction to Latin Literature

    Introduction to Latin literature through intensive reading of major authors in prose and poetry with careful attention to grammar and style. Prerequisite: LATN 0100, 0200 or 0110 (or equivalent).
    LATN 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sappenfield
  • Literature at the Court of Charlemagne

    We will read widely in the Latin literature of the eighth and ninth centuries, paying attention to genre, meter, patronage, and the shifting uses put to poetry in the decades in which Charlemagne ruled.
    LATN 1110H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
  • Lucan's Civil War

    We will read selected books of Lucan's Civil War (Bellum Civile) in Latin and the poem in its entirety in English. Alongside the primary goal of refining our facility with Latin language, we will also become increasingly familiar with and sensitive to Lucan's style, his poem's place within the development of Greco-Roman epic, and the socio-political context(s) of his poem's creation (e.g. Nero and the Pisonian conspiracy). Themes to be discussed may include, but are not limited to, the grotestque, epic's both complimentary and critical relationship to empire, ambition and Roman gender constructs, and the dynamics between art and politics.
    LATN 1110P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Eccleston
  • Survey of Roman Literature II: Empire

    This course will survey the major authors of Latin literature in chronological order from Virgil.
    LATN 1820 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
  • Ammianus Marcellinus

    In brilliant if idiosyncratic language, Ammianus Marcellinus, last of the major Latin historians, records the exciting and fateful events of his own times, the fourth century A.D., including therein his personal and dramatic involvement in events. We will chiefly read his famous account of the deeds of the emperor Julian ("the Apostate"). The course is intended for advanced students.
    LATN 1930B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ivanisevic
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    LATN 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    LATN 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Latin in America

    Exploration of some of the rich and extensive ‘neo-Latin’ writing from colonial Spanish America, with particular emphasis on poetry and literary prose from sixteenth-century Mexico, much of which has never been studied or translated. Latin satires, epigrams, bucolic poems, literary epistles and dialogues will be examined in relation to their classical models and influences – and in the context of the multicultural environment in which they were produced. As well as opening a new world of Latin, this course will familiarize you with the format of some early modern books and manuscripts, and offer a unique perspective on traditional classical literature
    LATN 2080F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
  • Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    LATN 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    LATN 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    LATN 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

MGRK

  • Introduction to Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0100. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. The course continues on an integrative skills approach and aims to develop language skills, within a framework of specific topics and functions. The course objectives are to enable students to perform a range of tasks, master a minimum core vocabulary and acquire knowledge and understanding of various forms of Greek culture.
    MGRK 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Intermediate Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0300. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. It aims to enhance language skills within a variety of registers and themes; enable the students to master, use and understand effectively essential linguistic structures; examine a variety of expressive forms within an authentic cultural context.
    MGRK 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Advanced Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0500. Students who have not taken the previous sequence may take a placement test, after consultation with the instructor. The course aims to promote range, accuracy and fluency and enable students to develop ease and spontaneity with the language. Authentic materials drawn from a range of sources inform the content of the course and include films, literature, media, testimonies, music and internet based sources. The development of transcultural competence will be an essential component of the course.
    MGRK 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience

    In the past few years, we have all experienced, most of us through the media, what has been called a migration crisis. And yet, migration as a phenomenon did not appear in 2015; it is as old as humanity, and displacement and contemporary forced migration have also a long history. In this course, we will examine the historical, material and experiential dimensions of contemporary displacement and migration. Many of the examples will be from Greece but also other parts of Mediterranean and beyond, including from the Mexico-US border. Engaged Scholarship Course.
    MGRK 1210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamilakis
  • Special Topics in Modern Greek

    No description available.
    MGRK 1910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research

SANS

  • Elementary Sanskrit II

    This course continues the survey of grammar and the reading exercises of SANS 100. The second half of this course reads selected passages of the Bhagavad Gītā and the beginning of the classic story of Nala and Damayantī from the Mahābhārata. Prerequisite: SANS 0100.
    SANS 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Classical Sanskrit Story Literature

    Introduces students to the more challenging Sanskrit of classical story literature and continues to extend the knowledge of Sanskrit grammar introduced in first year Sanskrit and developed in SANS 0300, as well as present basic Indian cultural themes. Prerequisite: SANS 0300.
    SANS 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Independent Study - Special Topics

    SANS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor's permission required.
    SANS 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Sanskrit Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SANS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Sanskrit Reading and Research

    Section numbers will vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    SANS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research