Courses for Spring 2022

CLAS

  • Revolutionary Classics (or, the classical origins of your Brown education)

    When Brown University was founded in 1764 the curriculum was based on classical texts. In early America, the classics of Greek and Roman antiquity – read in the original Greek and Latin – were the foundation of a gentleman’s education. This course will explore early ideas and structures of higher learning in America from the springboard of those classical texts. We will read a sizable portion of Brown’s earliest curriculum (in English translation), but just as importantly we will seek to set that curriculum in the context of early American intellectual history, from roughly the Colonial to the Antebellum Period.
    CLAS 0310R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
  • The World of Byzantium

    In this course we shall explore the world of Byzantium from the founding of New Rome to Ottoman times. Caught between the East and West, the culture of Byzantium inherited the ancient worlds of Greece, Rome, and Jerusalem, nurturing many a modern ideology, conflict, and identity. We explore Byzantium through its history, texts, and art. Surveys of representative periods in Byzantine history will accompany topical investigation of themes including: the foundation and history of Constantinople itself, Iconoclasm, the Crusades, medieval Christianity and Islam, Byzantine court life, concepts of gender, self, and sexuality, book culture and revivals of learning, the development of Byzantine architecture, the Palaiologan "Renaissance," and the continued influence of and attitudes towards the Byzantine inheritance in both Western and Eastern Europe after 1453.
    CLAS 0660 S01
    Primary Instructor
    MacDougall
  • The Bhagavad Gītā

    This course will study and discuss the teachings of the Bhagavad Gītā in the context of its literary, theological, and philosophical origins in ancient India. We will read the text itself (in English, not Sanskrit), parts of the epic Mahābhārata in which the Gītā is situated, and collateral texts, such as Upanisads, Indian myths, Buddhist sermons, or even modern novels, that may shed light on why and how this text has exercised such far-reaching influence across the ages, inside India and beyond.
    CLAS 0855 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Greek Mythology

    “What of these things goes now without disaster?” -Aeschylus, Agamemnon
    This course is an introduction to Ancient Greek mythological traditions. Topics include: the Olympian gods; ‘culture heroes’ (e.g. Heracles), Homer and the Trojan Cycle of myths; mythical traditions about the families of Oedipus and Agamemnon; etc. We will conclude with an investigation of ancient mythical scholarship and skeptical views of myth in antiquity. Throughout we will be considering myth’s relationship with literature, visual culture, and religion. The class focuses on the ancient material (texts, images, monuments, rituals and traditions, etc.), with some secondary readings in mythological and cultural theory.
    CLAS 0900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • Ghost, Apparitions and the Supernatural in Greece and Rome

    Have you heard of haunted houses? Have you seen a ghost? Do dead people visit us? Do witches really exist? What is the Supernatural? If you have ever wondered about these things, you are in good company, since the ancient Greeks and Romans did too. In this course, we will examine various ancient sources that speak of or illustrate such phenomena, and consider how they experienced them, reacted to them, or attempted to explain them away. We will also compare them to modern accounts, highlighting similarities and differences. All readings in English; open to all undergraduates.
    CLAS 0930 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
  • The Classical World in Film (MGRK 1010)

  • The American Presidents and the Western Tradition

    We are accustomed to engaging the American presidency as a public office best approached through the prism of government or political science, but this course studies the ways in which the presidents in thought and action are part of a larger continuum of humanistic expression in the western tradition. It is organized around five categories: memory, language, consolation, farewell, and self-reflection. Our work involves reading and viewing/listening to various materials, including videos and original documents. The words we study, both by and about presidents, will be compared to various masterworks of Greco-Roman antiquity and the western Middle Ages.
    CLAS 1120U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
  • Aristotle

    A close study of Aristotle's major works: his method, natural philosophy, psychology, metaphysics, with main emphasis on his ethics. Readings from original sources (in translation) and some contemporary secondary material. The class will combine lectures and discussion and is a writing course.
    CLAS 1120W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
  • The Fall of Empires and Rise of Kings: Greek History 478 to 323 BC

    The Greek world was transformed in less than 200 years. The rise and fall of Empires (Athens and Persia) and metamorphosis of Macedon into a supreme power under Philip II and Alexander the Great provide the headlines. The course covers an iconic period of history, and explores life-changing events that affected the people of the eastern Mediterranean and the topics that allow us to understand aspects of life and culture of the peoples of the eastern Mediterranean. and through these transformations, offers insights into the common pressures that communities confronted. No prior knowledge of ancient history is required.
    CLAS 1220 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
  • The Persian Empire and Achaemenid Culture

    CLAS1230 explores the Persian Empire (6th to 4th centuries BCE), its beginnings, development, historiography. We will incorporate Achaemenid culture, and its reception, in a broad spatial and temporal context. The course approaches the ancient world from the perspective of 'the Other'. Taking a Perso-centric view, the course incorporates the multi-disciplinary fields associated with Achaemenid studies since the 1980s. Primary source documents, maps, and readings, will be assembled to provide students with visual, material, and written evidence from the regions of the Persian Empire. Central to this course will be our own engagement with difference/different cultures, and their presentation(s). The majority of the materials will be delivered via the Canvas site. No prior knowledge of antiquity is assumed.
    CLAS 1230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • Death in the West

    This course explores the history of western attitudes toward death from their origins in the ancient Near East and classical antiquity through the medieval and early modern periods to the modern era. The aim is to trace the evolution of western deathways against the backdrop of an anthropologically and sociologically informed understanding of this universal human experience. Among the issues to be considered are the needs of both individuals and society in proper treatment of the dead; in what ways funerary customs reflect broader cultural and historical developments; and what the implications are of recent and contemporary trends in western funerary practices.
    CLAS 1420 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
  • "The Battle of the Books": The Quarrel between the Ancients and the Moderns

    This class examines a key period in the reception of ancient Greek and Roman literature and culture: the intellectual debates of European scholars and thinkers, in the late 17th and early 18th centuries, over whether the “modern” learning of an “enlightened” age was superior to, or instead dependent on and inferior to, the knowledge of the great “ancient” Greco-Roman poets, historians, philosophers, artists, and scientists. Sir Isaac Newton famously sided with the “ancients” when he stated, “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.” We will read arguments by primary participants in the debate (including Perrault, Boileau, Temple, and Bentley), plus Swift’s satirical masterpiece, “The Battle of the Books.” We will also read and compare for ourselves selections from some of the chief ancient and modern “combatants.” All readings are in English.
    CLAS 1930H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Topics in Roman Republican History

    This seminar will examine some of the major controversies in Roman Republican history, with possible excurses to the archaic and triumviral periods. The focus will be on political and cultural history, and on questions of method and theory. Topics will be partially dictated by student interest. Assessment include student presentations and leading discussions, writing an abstract for a term paper, and a term paper.
    CLAS 2080H S01
    Advanced undergraduates may enroll with permission from the instructor.
    Primary Instructor
    Russell
  • Medeas in America

    A witch. A daughter. A pawn. A mother. A heroine. A wife. An exile. Medeas in America draws on contemporary American texts that engage myths about Medea in order to analyze the spatial, racialized, gendered, sexualized and psychological aspects of contemporary society.. Texts will include but are not limited to news stories and court cases about infanticide, novels (e.g. Morrison's Beloved), and dramas (e.g. Moraga's The Hungry Woman). Students will also be introduced to a variety of approaches (e.g. critical legal studies, feminist materialisms, theories of race and ethnicity, psychoanalysis, performance studies).
    CLAS 2110E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Eccleston
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    CLAS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    CLAS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    CLAS 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep

GREK

  • Intensive Introduction to Ancient Greek

    Intensive, one-semester introduction to Greek. No previous knowledge of Greek is required. This is a double credit course.
    GREK 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fischer
  • Essentials of the Greek Language

    Second half of a two-semester approach to ancient Greek with special emphasis on developing facility in rapid reading of Greek literature. Selections from Attic Greek authors. No previous knowledge of Greek is required.
    GREK 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ziegler
  • Introduction to Greek Literature

    Prerequisite: GREK 0300 (or the equivalent). Review of grammar of the Attic dialect through rapid reading of texts by Lysias, Plato, or Xenophon. Emphasis on syntax and style.
    GREK 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carley
  • The Odyssey

    It is hard to imagine a more joyful way to acquire excellent control of Homeric Greek than by reading, in its entirety (if possible), Homer's wonderful and captivating work, the Odyssey. Though it can be a little time-consuming initially, students quickly become familiar with the syntax and the vocabulary, and find great pleasure in immersing themselves in this thrilling masterpiece.
    GREK 1110H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
  • Selections from Greek Authors: Thucydides

    Thucydides Book 5: It begins with a corrupt line that seems to tell us that Athens’ truce (4.117-19) with the Spartans would continue; it ends with the diplomatic failure of the Melians’ conference with the Athenians. In between and inter alia, there are the deaths of Brasidas and Kleon, the story of Thucydides’ exile from Athens, and three verbatim or ‘raw’ (?) treaties: the peace of Nikias, the alliance of Athens and Sparta, and the ‘Quadruple Alliance’ (a treaty between Athenians, Argives, Mantineians, and Eleians—to which we shall compare IG I3 83). We shall translate the book with nitty-gritty philological attention; and we shall also be concerned with the overall narrative structure and the way the diplomatic documents fit into the text. Why did Thucydides insert verbatim or ‘raw’ treaties into his history? And are they in fact the real thing?
    GREK 1110I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
  • Greek Literature Survey after 450 BCE

    Surveys Greek literature after 450 BCE. Authors studied include Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Herodotus, Thucydides, as well as the literature of the fourth century and beyond. Emphasis on literary interpretation and the intellectual currents of the times. Extensive readings in the original.
    GREK 1820 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    GREK 1910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    GREK 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Identity, Repatriation, and Justice: International Relations Among Greek Cities 700 BCE - 90 BCE

    We study diplomatic documents, mainly in epigraphical sources, from all parts of the Greek world especially from the 5th to 2nd centuries BCE Alliances, international arbitrations, and decisions of foreign judges will be major concerns; we shall be particularly interested in agreements that are composed after wars or major disputes among citizens (staseis) are ended, especially in arrangements that are made to foster harmony between citizens who have remained in a polis with fellow citizens who have returned from exile; and also in arrangements to solve disputes over land ownership and to promote economic growth. Our texts are not only diplomatic instruments (treaties, arbitrations, etc.) but also letters of monarchs and dynasts and honorary decrees. As a final project, students are to prepare a dossier of texts relating to one particular polity, documenting its relations with another city or cities, or to divisions within its own population.
    GREK 2110G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
  • Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    GREK 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    GREK 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    MacDougall
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    GREK 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep

LATN

  • Intensive Introduction to Latin

    This course offers a rapid introduction to the Latin language and grammar. As a one-semester introduction to material often covered in two semesters, this course carries two credit hours instead on one. The workload for this course is correspondingly heavy; students may expect an average of ten hours of homework—including memorization, practice, and preparation of vocabulary and grammar—per week. There are no prerequisites for this course.
    LATN 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vitas
  • Essentials of the Latin Language

    Second course in an intensive two-semester approach to Latin. Special emphasis on developing facility in the rapid reading of Latin literature. No previous knowledge of Latin is required prior to taking this two course sequence.
    LATN 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ell
  • Introduction to Latin Literature

    Introduction to Latin literature through intensive reading of major authors in prose and poetry with careful attention to grammar and style. Prerequisite: LATN 0100, 0200 or 0110 (or equivalent).
    LATN 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Butler
  • Seneca

    Philosopher, statesman, teacher, husband, and friend, Seneca (the Younger) was respected in his life and revered for his spectacularly Stoic death. This course will introduce students to aspects of Senecan thought, style, and influence while refining general facility with Latin.
    LATN 1060K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Eccleston
  • Catilines: Cicero and Sallust

    Close readings of selections from Cicero's Catilinarians and Sallust's Bellum Catilinae. We will explore how two contemporary authors responded to the same historical event: the Catilinarian conspiracy. We will consider not only the differences of genre (political speech v. historical monograph), but also the ways in which each author's involvement affected the content of his presentation. Additionally, we will examine Sallust's and Cicero's distinctive positions on Latin diction and stylistics. Prerequisite: Knowledge of elementary Latin grammar and intermediate Latin reading skills.
    LATN 1110R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Russell
  • Alcuin

    Alcuin lived a life of wide variety and accomplishment, not least as an important member of Charlemagne's inner circle and, like many at court, he wrote widely and in multiple genres. From his enormous output this course will focus on the large collections of poetry and letters. We will attend in both gatherings to theme, tone, style, and allusivity and, where appropriate, we will ponder alternate readings in a collection that has not been edited since the late nineteenth century.
    LATN 1120D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
  • Latin Prose Composition

    Review of the basic tenets of Latin syntax, composition, and style. English to Latin translation exercises will shore up composition skills, as we study the stylistic traits of seven Roman authors: Cato, Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Livy, Seneca, and Tacitus. The course will proceed chronologically according to author. Class time will be spent on translation exercises and review, as well as the identification of the stylistic and syntactic characteristics of the seven authors under study.
    LATN 1150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    LATN 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    MacDougall
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Vitas
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Vitas
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    LATN 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    LATN 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    LATN 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Laird
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    LATN 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep

MGRK

  • Introduction to Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0100. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. The course continues on an integrative skills approach and aims to develop language skills, within a framework of specific topics and functions. The course objectives are to enable students to perform a range of tasks, master a minimum core vocabulary and acquire knowledge and understanding of various forms of Greek culture.
    MGRK 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Intermediate Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0300. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. It aims to enhance language skills within a variety of registers and themes; enable the students to master, use and understand effectively essential linguistic structures; examine a variety of expressive forms within an authentic cultural context.
    MGRK 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Advanced Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0500. Students who have not taken the previous sequence may take a placement test, after consultation with the instructor. The course aims to promote range, accuracy and fluency and enable students to develop ease and spontaneity with the language. Authentic materials drawn from a range of sources inform the content of the course and include films, literature, media, testimonies, music and internet based sources. The development of transcultural competence will be an essential component of the course.
    MGRK 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • The Classical World in Film

    Why do film directors, Hollywood moguls, and TV executives hark back to antiquity? This course introduces spectacular, epic representations of classical literature, myth, and history alongside more understated, tongue-in-cheek—occasionally hyperbolic—adaptations of that world in the present. Explores how narrative, cinematic technique, audience reception, and political context produce desired effects and elicit incisive commentary on modernity, race, ethnicity, gender. Analysis centered around a cluster of classical texts, heroic and mythic figures, and truly “historical” events. No prior knowledge of classical literature required. Films range from silent movies, Hollywood epics, European auteurism, anti-colonial Third Cinema, gladiatorial kitsch, and sci-fi franchise.
    MGRK 1010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Calotychos
  • A Migration Crisis? Displacement, Materiality, and Experience

    In the past few years, we have all experienced, most of us through the media, what has been called a migration crisis. And yet, migration as a phenomenon did not appear in 2015; it is as old as humanity, and displacement and contemporary forced migration have also a long history. In this course, we will examine the historical, material and experiential dimensions of contemporary displacement and migration. Many of the examples will be from Greece but also other parts of Mediterranean and beyond, including from the Mexico-US border. Engaged Scholarship Course.
    MGRK 1210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamilakis
  • In Other Words: Translating Greece

    This is an advanced undergraduate seminar that will offer students the opportunity to build on their linguistic, cultural and critical literacies, by translating from Greek into English. Over the course of the semester we will be thinking critically about texts, their ideological, historical and social coordinates and their embedded discourses of Greekness, community, diglossia, identity and gender, among others. In addition to translating from Greek into English, we will read and discuss essays on translation, in order to consider in an informed way the issues (untranslatability?) and types of decision making associated with the practice of translation.
    MGRK 1800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Special Topics in Modern Greek

    No description available.
    MGRK 1910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research

SANS

  • Elementary Sanskrit II

    This course continues the survey of grammar and the reading exercises of SANS 100. The second half of this course reads selected passages of the Bhagavad Gītā and the beginning of the classic story of Nala and Damayantī from the Mahābhārata. Prerequisite: SANS 0100.
    SANS 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Sanskrit Song and Music

    The Sanskrit language is a medium of rich traditions of song and musicological literature that inform Carnatic, Hindustani, and other classical music traditions to this day. This course will introduce students who already have a foundation in the Sanskrit language to the distinctive language of technical musicological literature and notation, as well as to the lyrical poetry set to music in these traditions. There is no requirement for students taking this course to have any background in musicology or performance, though students who do have a background in music are welcome to incorporate performance into the final project for the course.
    SANS 1500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Independent Study - Special Topics

    SANS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor's permission required.
    SANS 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Sanskrit Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SANS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Sanskrit Reading and Research

    Section numbers will vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    SANS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research