Video Available

Black Alumni Reunion Event: “Telling Us Who We Are: The Importance of Black Arts, Media, and Culture Today”

This conversation among alumni artists, journalists, and producers considers the important and changing role of media, art, and storytelling in shaping community and racial and ethnic imaginations in contemporary society.

Moderator: Tricia Rose AM’87 PhD’93, P’14, Chancellor’s Professor of Africana Studies, Associate Dean of the Faculty for Special Initiatives,Read More

A Conversation with Chris Hayes ’01

, Martinos Auditorium, 154 Angell St, Providence, RI 02906

"An essential and groundbreaking text in the effort to understand how American criminal justice went so badly awry." —Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of Between the World and Me

In A Colony in a NationNew York Times best-selling author and Emmy Award-winning news anchor Chris Hayes ’01 upends the national conversation on policing and democracy.Read More

Commencement Forum: Tricia Rose '93 PhD, "How Structural Racism Works"

IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium), 85 Waterman Street, Providence, RI 02912

This presentation shares ideas from Tricia Rose's on-going research project, which aims to make accessible to the public what structural racism is and how it works in society. The project examines the connections between policies and practices in housing, education and other key spheres of society to reveal the intersectional and compounding effects of systemic discrimination as a significant force in American society today. 

Elsa Stamatopoulou, "Indigenous Peoples' Cultural Heritage as a Human Right: Today's Emergency"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman St, Providence RI 02912

What does it mean to see Indigenous Peoples’ Cultural Heritage as a Human Right and why does it matter? How can we correct the invisibility imposed by a settler colonial system of “the doctrine of discovery” and of “empty lands”? How can we create a true pluricultural democracy, where the identity, culture, traditional knowledge and history of Native Americans and all Indigenous Peoples, and others will be respected and protected, instead of being destroyed by state and non-state actors? In this country, the Bears Ears and Chaco struggles today are linked to Standing Rock, to Wounded Knee and to many previous struggles since the time of colonization that have inspired the Indigenous Movement in this country and around the world. The preservation of Indigenous Peoples’ Cultural heritage is a human rights matter for all.
 

"Sacred Sites, Federal Indian Law, and the Future"

IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street

The political and social dynamics of American Indian sacred sites and basic human rights protections within the contemporary U.S. are constantly evolving. This panel, including various legal scholars, community leaders, and activists, will explore issues of human rights, self-determination, sovereignty, and potential International legal remedies in order to better understand the contemporary realities of misunderstanding, lack of social justice, U.S. constructed hierarchies of economic and political inequality, and overall legacies of colonialism.

Expert Roundtable: Innovative Leaders in Health Equity Science

School of Public Health, Room 375, 121 S. Main Street, Providence, RI 02903

Building Health Equity in an Unequal World- A collaborative lecture series presented by the School of Public Health and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America. "Expert Roundtable: Innovative Leaders in Health Equity Science" will feature speakers discussing their established lines of research.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Yến Lê Espiritu, "Feminist Refugee Epistemology: Reading Displacement in Vietnamese and Syrian Refugee Art"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

Joining the fields of transnational feminist studies with critical refugee studies, this talk introduces the concept feminist refugee epistemology (FRE) to re-conceptualize war-based displacement as not only about social disorder and interruption but also about social reproduction and innovation. FRE does more than critique Western media representation of refugees; it underlines the refugees' rich and complicated lives, the ways in which they enact their hopes, beliefs, and politics, even when they live militarized lives.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Sofian Merabet, "Strange Hospitality: Gay Syrian Refugees in Lebanon"

IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

This paper engages with the Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon and, specifically, considers how queer-identified Syrians navigate an often-hostile environment in and around the Lebanese capital Beirut. Drawing on hospitality as a philosophical concept and on the sociological notion of the stranger, this paper focuses on discourses and aspirations these refugees express, in terms of language and bodily practices, in the face of what many experience as “hardened borders” within the social fabric of the host country. 

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