Lectures, Discussions + Conferences

Moon-Kie Jung, "The U.S. Empire-State and the Strange Career of Dred Scott"

This talk proposes to reconceptualize the United States as an empire-state, drawing evidence from constitutional law of the long nineteenth century. Descriptively more apt, the approach provides a firmer basis for understanding the United States as a racial state and a framework for analyzing the different but linked histories of racial subjection, including those of Asians/Asian Americans, Blacks, Latina/os, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders.

How Structural Racism Works: Industrialized Punishment

Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium

Please join us on Thursday, October 13, at 6:00 pm in the Granoff Center's Martinos Auditorium for the next How Structural Racism Works lecture, "Industrialized Punishment," presented by Ruth Wilson Gilmore, director, Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and professor of geography in earth and environmental sciences, City University of New York.

What I Am Thinking About Now: Rosann Tung, "Partnering with a School District to Address Systemic Opportunity Gaps"

CSREA Conference Room, Lippitt House, Room 101, 96 Waterman Street

Please join us on Tuesday, October 11, 12-1pm for a "What I Am Thinking About Now" presentation from Rosann Tung, Director of Research and Policy, Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. Her talk is titled, "Partnering with a School District to Address Systemic Opportunity Gaps."

How Structural Racism Works: The Double Bind of Racial and Economic Inequality in Education

Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium

Please join us on Monday, September 26, at 5:00 pm for How Structural Racism Works, The Double Bind of Racial and Economic Inequality in Education, a lecture by Prudence L. Carter, dean of UC-Berkeley Graduate School of Education. The lecture will focus on how education inequality works intersectionally to generate other significant inequalities.

Devin Allen, "Rising/Uprising in Baltimore: A Beautiful Ghetto" [VIDEO]

IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium), 85 Waterman Street

In the weeks following the death of Freddie Gray, Devin Allen’s photographs gave voice to his city’s pain during one of its darkest hours. His images of Baltimore document the struggle and humanity of protest, as well as the beauty found in community and everyday life. Born and raised in West Baltimore, Devin will reflect on his personal trials and tribulations, life before and after the 2015 uprising, and the issues that plague his city and many other ghettos across America.

Devin Allen, "Rising/Uprising in Baltimore: A Beautiful Ghetto" [VIDEO]

IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium), 85 Waterman Street, Providence, RI 02912

September 2016 - May 2017

In the weeks following the death of Freddie Gray, Devin Allen's photographs gave voice to Baltimore's pain during one of its darkest hours. His images of the city document the struggle and humanity of protest, as well as the beauty found in community and everyday life.

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